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Miami

Commissioner Jean Monestime

Commissioner Oliver Gilbert, III

Commissioner Danielle Cohen Higgins

Commissioner Kionne McGhee

Commissioner Keon Hardemon

2021 BLACK HISTORY MONTH ISSUE COVID-19 REPORT COVER STORY

:6 : 14

Legacy’s Coronavirus expert Dr. William Alexis was recently vaccinated. Find out if he experienced any symptoms or side effects following his first shot.

POLITICS

For the first time, Miami-Dade County has five Black commissioners at the table. These history-making public servants are speaking out about what this means for their constituents and their legacy.

BLACK HISTORY :

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The deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol unfolded right before our eyes on live TV. How did all this happen? Political analyst Christopher Norwood weighs in on how this counterrevolution is important to Black history. For almost a year, the pandemic, coupled with major repairs, have temporarily shuttered the Lyric Theater in Historic Overtown. Now the cultural and entertainment landmark is planning a big return.


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Throughout Black History Month and beyond, we celebrate Black Joy. Its beauty. Its brilliance. Its variety. Its tenacity. Its resilience. Its ability to thrive despite everything.

The power of Black Joy truly knows no bounds... it’s a Joy Supreme. Celebrate a Joy Supreme with us at aarp.org/blackcommunity


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EDITOR’S NOTE 4 MIAMI-DADE MAYOR’S REPORT By Daniella Levine Cava

MIAMI-DADE SCHOOL BOARD REPORT By Dr. Steve Gallon III

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ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH By Dr. Dorothy Fields

COVID-19 REPORT By Dr. William Alexis

8 GREATER MIAMI CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU By Connie Kinnard

POLITICS By Chris Norwood

10 CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT By Mary V. Davids

SOCIAL MEDIA By Dr. Tracy Timberlake

12 MILLENNIAL

By David Cannady

13 TECHNOLOGY

By Kevin V. Michael

14 COVER STORY

As an 8th grader, I recall taking a history course that was anything but diverse. On Fridays, my teacher, a middle-aged white man, routinely threaded the 16 mm projector with a large reel of film, then pressed play. What he required us to regularly digest was baffling, in my opinion. For the entire class period, we’d watch black-and-white images of Adolf Hitler, the reviled leader of the Nazi Party. In this film series, dating back to the 1930s, he was praised by his German constituents — their right arms stretched out long and high with a straightened hand to salute him. From what I gathered, Hitler was rebuilding the German military. The films showed impressive formations of his uniformed

army — all armed and ready for battle. To be clear, yes, we were learning history in history class. However, looking back, I’m was confused about the historical context of which these images were taught, week after week. It was almost as if my classmates and I were being brainwashed. The Hitler we studied was depicted in a positive light. Again, context is important, especially for young impressionable students. Now imagine if my teacher had paid that much attention and time to Black history? What if he had loaded the film projector with black-and-white images of fearless civil rights advocates from the 1960s being hosed down on the street or viciously attacked by police dogs? What if he had bothered to show brave African-American college students staging a sit-in at an all-white lunch counter? And what if my teacher had spent weeks explaining the transatlantic slave trade dating back to the 16th century? This missed opportunity is the very reason why “Negro History Week” — now known as Black History Month — was established. It offered an opportunity for the teachings of Black history to be introduced in public schools and beyond. This is why this issue of Legacy magazine is so special. On the heels of a historic presidential inauguration,

African Americans are celebrating historical political firsts right here in South Florida. In Miami-Dade, there are now five Black county commissioners, the most ever. In Broward, voters elected a string of officials who are the first Blacks in their position including sheriff, state attorney, and public defender. And in Palm Beach County, the first Black city administrator was appointed by the mayor in West Palm Beach. This trend of recently-installed Black leaders doesn’t end there. The newly-hired executive editors of The Miami Herald and The Palm Beach Post are both the first Black Americans to hold their respective positions. As we celebrate past milestones of prominent African Americans who broke glass ceilings and knocked down doors, this issue highlights some of the influential local men and women who are making history right now. And remember, they’re not just making Black history. They’re making American history.

Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com n

 Breaking Barriers in South

Florida: For the First Time, MiamiDade County Welcomes 5 Black Commissioners Who Are Making History and Shaping the Future

By Yolande Clark-Jackson

MEDIA GROUP LLC

20  Florida Memorial University

Embraces Long History of Advocacy; Establishes Social Justice Research Institute

LIFESTYLE

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION By Stanley Zamor  iami-Dade Economic Advocacy M Trust: Three Gears of Progress Towards Black Empowerment

By Traci Pollack

25  Lyric Theater’s Historic

Interior Restored; Ready for Post-Pandemic Visitors

By Dr. Dorothy Jenkins Fields

26 LEGACY BRIEFS

LU X U RY

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine and view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine • Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine

By Dr. Tameka Hobbs

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#BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief Yanela G. McLeod Managing Editor Jordan Polite Director of Operations Sabrina Moss-Solomon Graphic Designer

Aaliyah Sherie Bryant Social Media Specialist Joe Wesley Cover Photographer Alyssa Mark Intern

Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

“The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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MIAMI-DADE MAYOR’S REPORT

Miami-Dade County Working to Advance Equality, Opportunity

BY DANIELLA LEVINE CAVA

This year, Black History Month doesn’t just present an opportunity to celebrate the history and extraordinary achievements of Black Miami-Dade – it’s a time to reflect on the systemic inequities laid bare over the last 12 months, and recommit to uprooting them from our community. If there is one thing we have learned from the events of 2020 – including the disproportionate pain and hardship felt by Black families throughout this

pandemic and economic crisis – it’s clear that our approach to racial inequality has fallen short of our aspirations and is in need of reimagination. As mayor, I am proud to have a platform to work to change this reality. And I am committed to making the institutions and government of MiamiDade County a force for advancing equality and opportunity for all. Since taking office less than two months ago, I have worked to create new mechanisms within the Mayor’s office to bring together government, nonprofit, and private sector partners to dismantle systemic inequities and barriers to opportunity. One of my first acts as mayor was to announce the creation of the Office of Equity and Inclusion, which will advance equity in budgeting and contracting; build awareness and participation through community engagement; and expand trust in local government by prioritizing equity throughout Miami-Dade County decision-making. Directly engaging with the

community, and measuring progress and performance are critical to the long-term success of these efforts. My administration is partnering with institutions of higher education to do just this: We are working with the Office of Innovation and Economic Development at FIU to expand the reach of our Office of Equity and Inclusion, and we have partnered with experts from the Harvard Kennedy School to develop performance metrics to track progress and hold us accountable. Another top priority for me was building a cabinet that looks like the community we are blessed to serve. I was proud to appoint four incredibly talented Black public servants to serve in senior roles in my administration: Chief Public Safety Officer J.D. Patterson; Chief Community Service Officer Morris Copeland; Director of Juvenile Services Cathy Burgos; and Rahel Weldeyesus, senior adviser for Innovation and Performance. These accomplished public servants bring years of leadership and their own lived experience to help ensure

that Miami-Dade County government is playing a leading role in uprooting disparities and building a more equitable, inclusive community. There is much work ahead of us. Improving trust and accountability between law enforcement and communities of color; making reforms to our procurement system; crafting an economic development plan that leaves no community behind; and providing new pathways for at-risk youth are top priorities. I believe the early steps we have taken at Miami-Dade County will help create the framework and investments needed to make significant progress on these challenges. Alongside my talented team and hundreds of committed advocates, experts, and leaders from across MiamiDade, we are already making strides to tackle entrenched disparities head-on and create measurable progress for all our communities.

Daniella Levine Cava is mayor of Miami-Dade County. n

MIAMI-DADE SCHOOL BOARD REPORT

It Would Have Been Worse Had Capitol Rioters Looked Like Me

BY DR. STEVE GALLON

The treatment of the predominantly white violent insurrectionists that invaded the Capitol, broke windows, fought law enforcement, carried weapons, and wreaked havoc was a stark contrast to the treatment of Black, Latino peaceful protesters last summer during a march in Washington, D.C. The former, after leading an act

of sedition and physically brutalizing officers and decimating offices and several areas of the Capitol walked out with little to no resistance from law enforcement and very few arrests. The latter were met with helicopters, tear gas, violence, and arrests. Had they engaged in behavior remotely close to what was on display by the group of white invaders who were attempting what many equated to a coup, they would have been beaten, battered, arrested, and shot dead. The summer of 2020 proved this to be the case as the community, state, and nation were rocked by racial division, discord, disharmony, and distrust. As a Black man, I have often experienced and witnessed the sting of marginalization, dehumanization, trauma, and disenfranchisement that has long vexed and been a part of the brutal history of this nation-— dating back more than 400 years. This time, it was the brutal, public, and inexplicable death of George Floyd,

a Black man whose life was taken by a white police officer, that launched an explosion of protests throughout the state, nation, and world. Mr. Floyd’s slow, painful death occurred as the officer maintained his knee lodged into his neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds, and as a crowd of onlookers watched, pleaded and recorded the callous denial of his citizenship. Mr. Floyd’s eventual death was over $20, a sad symbol of the perceived value of a Black life. The teaching of lessons about conspicuous racial disparities and inequities, double standards and systemic racism, is not only prudent, but necessary. As a nation supposedly committed to diversity, equity, equality, and inclusion, the shouldering of ensuring the fair treatment of Blacks and persons from under underserved communities, represents an even heightened sense of social responsibility. What the nation and world witnessed on January 6, 2021 at the

Capitol in Washington, D.C. once again put on worldwide display the inequities, injustices, and inequalities maintained by white privilege and inherent, structural systems of racism, denial, and deprivation. We must have the courage to call it as we see it — including racism and racists —no matter where it is or who they are. Only then, can we truly begin to address it. Hard truths and important lessons in life are not only found in the answers we receive, but often in the questions we ask. What if the people who committed those horrific acts on the Capitol looked like me? The answer vexes, pains, and troubles me. Dr. Steve Gallon III is a lifelong educator and the vice-chairman of Miami-Dade County Public Schools, the nation’s fourth largest. He has served as a teacher, principal, district administrator, and superintendent of schools before being elected in 2016. n


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UM ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH

Memory Loss is not a Normal Part of Aging

BY DOROTHY JENKINS FIELDS

Where are my keys? Don’t panic. This common question can be answered quickly if you planned ahead by attaching a key finder, location app or other gadget to your keychain. Or as my grandmother would say, “retrace your tracks,” meaning, think about the last place you left the keys. Forgetting happens. Misplacing keys, forgetting to

lock the door, sometimes making bad decisions or forgetting which word to use next happens to all of us. According to the National Institute for Aging, losing things from time to time is normal. However, misplacing things often and being unable to find them, having trouble holding a conversation, having problems taking care of monthly bills, losing track of the date or time of year, or getting lost in familiar places may signal time to seek professional advice. If you, a family member or friend is presently experiencing one or more of these symptoms the time to seek help is now. Determining whether memory and other cognitive problems are normal and what may be causing them is an important first step. You may also wish to talk with a health adviser about opportunities to participate in research on cognitive health and aging. Help is just a phone call away at the John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of

Miami Miller School of Medicine. Immediate help is available to those who are 65 years old and older, undiagnosed, experiencing noticeable memory loss or already diagnosed with Alzheimer Disease. HIHG team member Faina Lacroix, MPH, senior research associate, is the community liaison. Lacroix, a clinical research coordinator, manages outreach efforts, participant ascertainment and participation in the Research in African American Alzheimer Diseases Initiative. She earned a master’s in public health with a concentration in epidemiology from the University of North Florida and a bachelor’s degree in biology from Florida Atlantic University. Involved in clinical research since 2017, Lacroix has worked on initiatives varying from childhood psychiatry opioid prevention, maternal and child health, and now Alzheimer’s Disease. Born and raised in Haiti she is passionate about raising awareness

with regards to health disparities, particularly in the Haitian community in addition to her work at the HIHG. Evaluations are conducted by phone and video conference in English, French and Haitian Creole. You can schedule an appointment for a memory evaluation by calling (305) 243-1981 or email questions to: AD-HIHG@ miami.edu. Schedule your memory evaluation today! Dorothy Jenkins Fields, Ph.D. is a consultant to the John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. A certified archivist and public historian, Fields helps organize virtual and in-person family and class reunions; and provides resources for downsizing, relocating and aging in place. Visit WHY WE CAN’T WAIT | SSR (societysocialsandreunions.com) for more information. n

COVID-19 REPORT

Vaccinations Against COVID-19 Underway Across United States

BY DR. WILLIAM ALEXIS

December 2020 saw the United States Food and Drug Administration grant emergency-use authorization for two vaccines developed to prevent COVID-19, the deadly disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 (Coronavirus) pandemic. While approval for emergency use was relatively rapid, it was by no means rushed. The development of these vaccines was the

result of unprecedented efficient and cooperative work between government and scientists that built upon decades of scientific research and innovation. Nearly 80,000 participants were studied in the Phase 3 trials of both vaccines prior to Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna receiving emergency use authorizations that would result in vaccines finally becoming available to the public. The group responsible for development of these vaccines was racially diverse and comprised some of the world’s most respected scientists including one of the lead scientists at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Kizzmekia Corbett, an AfricanAmerican woman. The study participants were also a racially diverse group that was up to 10 percent African-American in order to as closely as possible have the studies reflect the percent of the U.S. population that is African-American. At one point, enrollment in the Moderna trial was slowed in order to ensure adequate

representation of African Americans so it could be proved that the vaccine also protected them. The two vaccines, which work by preventing the Coronavirus from entering the body’s cells where they cause severe disease, were found to be safe and nearly 95 percent effective across all groups in preventing COVID-19. Further, the vaccines were nearly 100 percent effective in preventing severe disease. The Coronavirus pandemic is responsible for more than 15 million infections and 300,000 deaths in the United States and the AfricanAmerican community has suffered disproportionately from this health crisis. Despite this, research shows that only 42 to 55 percent of African Americans would be likely to receive the vaccine, primarily due to mistrust. Epidemiologists estimate that in order to achieve the herd immunity necessary to end the pandemic, 75 to 80 percent of the population must become immune to the virus. The safest and

most effective route to immunity is vaccination. African Americans must use their platforms to lead by example. For this reason, when I received my first dose of the vaccine, I posted pictures on social media and shared my experience with patients, friends and family. Except for soreness at the arm injection site that lasted one day, I had no other symptoms. The tallest hurdle the medical community must clear in order to ensure high vaccination rates among African Americans is restoring trust. “Trust, especially when it has been stripped from people, has to be rebuilt in a brickby-brick fashion.” Dr. Corbett said. Dr. Anthony Fauci commented, “So, the first thing you might want to say to my African-American brothers and sisters is that the vaccine that you’re going to be taking was developed by an African-American woman, and that is just a fact.” Dr. William Alexis is chief of Internal Medicine and Cardiology at Memorial Hospital West. n


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305w558w8000

“You’re on your way to Success with Learning at M-DCPS.”

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GREATER MIAMI CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

Celebrating Black History and Culture Helps Bridge Gaps in Equity

BY CONNIE KINNARD

In a time when access to information is just a command to Alexa or a swipe away, we must not take for granted the need to elevate and empower while we celebrate history and culture. February is Black History Month and it’s a time as a nation when we bring awareness of the contributions of Black people locally, nationally and internationally

to the world. We showcase some of the best and brightest, as we also discuss some of the struggles that we as People of Color have faced. Now more than ever we must continue to spotlight the Black culture and let the world know that the contributions are many and exceed what traditionally has been taught (or not have been taught). As we celebrate Black History in February, we can’t let it be the only month we tell the stories of trial and triumph of our ancestors. We should be deliberate, showing via programs and marketing the historical significance of Black History as well as the effect that it has on the present-day culture on a year-round basis. Many times, we tell historical stories of our ancestors, but the application of the effect may get lost. I am so honored to be a new columnist for MIA Legacy on behalf of the GMCVB; we are committed

to continuing to investigate and incorporate the historical greatness of the Black Culture of Miami into our tourism package. During this month the GMCVB will market both locally and nationally many of the Black History Month programs that will take place throughout the county. We will also host virtual conversations regarding small business and/or cultural attraction revitalization efforts post COVID-19. Some may ask, “ What do these efforts have to do with helping to bridge gaps in tourism equity and economics or Black History?” Many times, our community is not at the table or not invited to the table of discussion and acclimation. Through the efforts of the GMCVB’s Leadership and Multicultural Department, we have a specific focus on capacity building and connecting directly with the community to bring more people to the

proverbial table and just as importantly help them to build their own table. Our intent at the GMCVB is to let action be the way we celebrate, honor and support Black businesses. We encourage everyone to let your actions be your voice and be committed to supporting and elevating Black History and Black Culture especially in Miami. I would like to thank Dexter Bridgman, Russell Motley and the Legacy Miami team for their work in media to champion the promotion of Black Culture in South Florida. I am looking forward to sharing more thoughts on key topics to include Multicultural Tourism as well as matters involving Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.

Connie W. Kinnard is vice president of Multicultural Tourism & Development for the Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau n

POLITICS

Siege of U.S. Capitol Equals Black History

BY CHRIS NORWOOD

White Supremacists and Holocaust denying neo-Nazis took over the U.S. Capitol on behalf of a sitting U.S. President, their avowed standard bearer. The terror that these people invoked led to the deaths of at least five people, including two law enforcement officers (at the time of this writing). Perhaps hundreds of arrests, after the fact, as well. For the last four years, we have

had an open revolt against the history of civil rights and racial equality. “Make America Great Again” was a declaration and call to action that radicalized communities of white America against their own government. Far-right groups, from states far and wide, including the violent Proud Boys, were the pillars of the crowds that formed in D.C. to support Donald Trump as he demanded they protest Congress’ counting of Electoral College votes confirming the Biden-Harris victory. Then these radicals, including leaders of QAnon, headed to the Capitol. (Police were photographed stopping a man identified as a leading promoter of the QAnon conspiracy theory from storming the Senate floor). How did all of this happen? Well for one, We legitimized their political philosophy by accepting it as a Republican Party call to action, which it wasn’t. Although Republicans benefited from it. The MAGA phenomenon was a

counterrevolution to the advancement of civil rights that ultimately resulted in the election of America’s first Black President. White supremacists despised the evolution of America electing its first non-white president. ​ “Make America Great Again” was a reaction and marketing brand that propelled people to support a candidate that would sell them anything to get elected, including HATE. The stain that was the last four years was based on xenophobia and racial intolerance. Yet, across America, good people and public intellectuals still deny the permeating existence of structural racial disparities in the American economy, health and education. When good people are silent, they create the opportunity for the worst atrocities in world history. Those folk that invaded the U.S. Capitol gave the world a public example of white privilege. Contrast the display of law enforcement with what we saw over the course of the summer’s George

Floyd protests. These MAGA folk with swastikas, confederate flags and tactical gear essentially walked in the U.S. Congress during the Electoral College and looted the place with no resistance. On October 16, 1995, more than a million Black men gathered in Washington, D.C. to declare their right to justice, to atone for their failures and to accept responsibility to lead their communities. Men traveled from all walks of life to attend, including a law professor from Chicago, Barack Obama. But not one of them stormed the Capitol, raided and looted its chambers, or sat in the Speaker’s chair. Not a single incident occurred, despite the historic injustices that have occurred within those walls against their humanity in the past. Black History is not only the progress that African-Americans produce, it is also the counterrevolution it inspires in the HATERS of this nation. n


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This shouldn’t be how we say hello...or goodbye.

It’s our reality right now. But it won’t be if we do what it takes to beat COVID-19. Vaccines are coming, but until enough of us are vaccinated, we all still need to wear our masks, stay at least six feet from others, and avoid indoor social gatherings. The more we slow the spread, the faster we’ll return to normal hellos … and fewer goodbyes. Learn more about vaccines and slowing the spread at cdc.gov/coronavirus Brought to you by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

Filling Employment Gaps on Resume Makes You More Competitive After Pandemic

BY MARY V. DAVIDS

There has been a total of 22 million jobs lost as a result of the pandemic. The pandemic has hit the workforce hard, but its impact on women has been four times the number of men. According to the U.S. Employment figures, in December 2020, the economy lost a net of 140,000 jobs, 100 percent of which were held by women. Many women have had to

leave the workforce to take care of their children, which has eliminated any progress made to reduce the gender wage gap, which has been especially hard for black women. While the job loss recovery is said to take at least four years, many employers will forgive gaps on your resume due to the pandemic. Here are three ways to fill the gaps on your resume, help decrease the wage gap, and set yourself apart from other candidates looking to re-enter the workforce this year. Volunteer/Contract Work – Employers are looking for continuous skill building and productive behavior when considering job seekers for employment opportunities. Continuous activity such as volunteerism is a great way to show you remained actively working within your community or within your industry. Doing work voluntarily shows your commitment to add value regardless of the paycheck and it sets you apart from other

jobseekers having no continuous work to display on their resumes. You can also reach out to past employers for project-based opportunities as a way to stay active during unemployment. Get a certification or take a course – Many educational institutions have offered free courses during the pandemic and many have opened access to courses virtually to students that were exclusively held on-campus. I encourage you to take advantage of these opportunities to enhance your knowledge and add more value to your career profile. An additional certification can add between $10k-$14k to your salary for those within the tech industry, and anywhere from 20 percent to 45 percent for administrative and healthcare professionals. Learn another language – Studies show professionals who are bilingual or multilingual tend to earn higher wages, earning between 5 percent-25 percent more than non-multi

or bilingual professionals. Bilingualism is greatly valued by many organizations because it helps to increase revenue by bridging cultural gaps that may be present between businesses and their customers. Virtual opportunities are creating increased market reach for many organizations to consider global expansion. Employing professionals with capabilities to reach global customers will be essential to the sustainability for many organizations. Learning another language will be a great investment in your career development and it will also increase your marketability far beyond the pandemic recovery. Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For more career tips and advice visit www.slaytheworkplace.com or follow @MVDavids on Instagram and Twitter. n

SOCIAL MEDIA

New ‘Clubhouse’ App Makes Industry Networking More Accessible

BY DR. TRACY TIMBERLAKE

Let’s talk about Clubhouse, a new app (available only for iOS at the time of this writing) that is the hottest ticket in town! In a mid-pandemic world, where people are desperate for connection, Clubhouse arrived right on time. It’s touted as a drop-in audio app, where anyone with a profile can listen in to

conversations. A second aspect that makes Clubhouse unique is its exclusivity. Everyone can’t just hop on to the app. You need to be invited. And invites are rare because Clubhouse only allots a certain amount of invites per user. Imagine five or six of your favorite powerhouse players in the fields of music, marketing, medicine, politics, real estate, you name it... they are there, and they got together for dinner. They sit down, they start eating, and they start discussing various topics that make sense for their industry. They are dropping nuggets, tips and tricks left and right and YOU get to listen in on this conversation! Not only that, but you can raise your hand, be brought up to the “stage” and join in (if room moderators allow). This is Clubhouse.

Why it works so well is because it imitates real life. For most of 2020, we have all been a little deprived of regular life interactions. All networking events have been canceled. We can’t go to parties, we can barely even go to restaurants! But now we have Clubhouse. It’s solving many of the problems we’re experiencing. Here is how to use it to your advantage: 1. Use it to network with likeminded individuals in your industry. Virtual networking is what we have. Clubhouse is organic in that way. 2. Use it to learn and you can learn almost anything! There are rooms for everything under the sun and moderators are steadily delivering valuable content 24/7. 3. Use it to promote. If you have a

business, Clubhouse may be a great space for you to make your business known in front of new people.

Recognize the opportunity and seize it. New social media is bound to pop up and early signals indicate whether it will take off. In 2019/2020 it was Tiktok. Today it’s Clubhouse. And the good thing is Clubhouse is still new and significantly underrated because the majority of the public either doesn’t know about it or hasn’t gotten access to it yet. So, this is your time to be one of the early adopters. And when you do get on, follow me @tracytimberlake for more tips and tricks like this! Dr. Tracy Timberlake is an awardwinning business coach. n


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MILLENNIAL

Millennials Must Keep America Moving Forward

BY DAVID CANNADY

I often wonder what makes America a great nation. Is it how our country was founded; is it our constitution and the ever evolving rights that we are afforded; or is it the uniqueness of the American Dream? I don’t believe these things make our nation great, rather, these ideals only last if each generation builds on the promises and progress of the previous generation. ​ However, as Millennials, since the insurrection on our United States Capitol on January 6, 2021, I’m not sure if we are living up to our generational mandate. ​ After the death of George Floyd on May 25, 2020, American Millennials lit the match that sparked a worldwide protest against the injustices in the criminal justice system, which is this generation’s fight for civil rights. By using the traditional tactics of the marginalized and oppressed, protesters in the summer of 2020 engaged in largely nonviolent protest. ​ At times property was damaged, businesses were harmed, and looters took advantage of opportunities to enrich themselves. However, efforts were always made to tamper emotions and focus on substantive change. ​ Some may say the minimal violence overshadowed the peaceful part of the protest, but even Dr. King had to fight these inaccurate characterizations in his time. However, during the insurrection, protests were never peaceful and the participants wanted only one thing,

to stop democracy by any means necessary. ​ Rather than following the example of historical nonviolent protests, these domestic terrorists swarmed the Capitol leaving only death and destruction in their path. It’s clear their actions were incited by President Trump’s attempt to prevent the lawful transfer of power to incoming President Biden. ​But these insidious acts were not led by a forgone generation wanting to see the good old days. Instead, it was led by Millennials who’d rather incite violence then pick up the mantle of progress and move our nation forward. ​ Most notably, some of the more egregious actors were Millennials from Florida like Adam Johnson, Matthew Council, Michael Curzio, Douglas Sweet, Henry “Enrique” Tarrio Jr., John Anderson, Eric Munchel, and Nicholes Lentz, all of who were arrested for their participation in the insurrection. This is important to know because it shows that our younger generation is still influenced by the outdated morays of the Jim Crow south. ​ This likens back to a time where doctors, lawyers, and respected business owners put on a white hood and separated themselves from the larger society so as to hold onto the ways of the past. The past four years have shown us that progress can be halted at any time by anyone be it voting rights, civil rights, economic freedom, or political progress. ​ Now more than ever, we need to hold true to the promises of this nation. As Millennials, if we don’t continue to move towards the bending arc of justice we may twist our nation into something unrecognizable for future generations.

David Cannady is a prosecutor with the Broward County State Attorney’s Office and business owner. n

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TECHNOLOGY

Ignoring Terms of Use Can Cost You Control of Social Media Accounts

BY KEVIN V. MICHAEL

In the wake of companies like Twitter and Facebook taking action to remove President Donald Trump from their platforms, there has been significant discussion about whether social media platforms should be arbiters of free speech. While I certainly do not profess to be a constitutional scholar, I think it is commonly understood that rights

are not unrestricted, particularly if the exercise of such rights infringes upon the rights of others. Free speech is no exception and there are numerous ways that the individual right to free speech has been limited by courts throughout our history. The technologist within me does, however, see this debate from an additional angle, that goes beyond the subject du jour. Instead it looks at the implication of using a private company’s software or platform to communicate to an audience, manage company operations, or store your data. Most of us are familiar with Terms of Service or Terms of Use agreements because we agree to them whenever we sign up for online services like online banking, social media platforms, project management software or open an email account. By familiar, I mean most of us scroll to the bottom of the language presented to us onscreen and click ‘’Accept’. Why?

Because most do not have the time or energy to read paragraphs of dense legalese and we also assume that the benefit we expect to derive from signing up outweighs any potential downside or restriction that could be imposed by the owner of the service. Either that, or you do not get to enjoy the benefits of the service. While seemingly benign, the Terms of Service that you agree to is legally binding and governs your relationship with that company and its services. The agreements are often onesided in favor of the service provider, are non-negotiable and are subject to amendment at practically any time. What rights the company reserves to access or use your data, where and how that data is stored, whether it can be shared with third parties, and whether they can restrict your access or use of the platform are all embedded in these agreements. The implication of your consent is that no matter who you

are, you are not in control. There are a handful of reasons why the average person would get booted from an online service, but typically they are all related to an abuse of the platform in some way such as utilizing the service in a manner contrary to its intended purpose or to inflict harm on others. My advice is to be wise, take a moment to review the TOS for the apps that your personal or business brand hinges on and do your best to abide. Failure to do so, could cost you your online freedoms. Kevin V. Michael, is the CEO and co-founder of Invizio, a leading South Florida Managed IT Services Provider that provides outsourced IT management to organizations and companies, helping them operate more efficiently and reduce costs.

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2021

COVER STORY

Breaking Barriers in South Florida

For the first time, Miami-Dade County Welcomes 5 Black Commissioners Who Are Making History and Shaping the Future BY YOLANDE CLARK-JACKSON While the country celebrates the first Black woman to serve as vice president of the United States, Miami celebrates its own firsts. For the first time in history, MiamiDade County elected a woman for mayor and, for the first time, the Miami-Dade County has five Black commissioners. Spanning from Miami Gardens to South Dade, these history makers say they plan to build, learn, and positively impact their respective districts and the county. “We all represent different areas of the county, and we all have different lived experiences, but we are all bringing our abilities, our interests, and our talents to the county commission at the same time,” said Commissioner Oliver Gilbert III. Gilbert is the new commissioner for District 1 and the vice chair of the MiamiDade County Commission. Previously, he spent eight years as the mayor of Miami Gardens and will now work closely with the commission chairman, Commissioner Jose Diaz, and Mayor Daniella Levine Cava for the next two years. He says he is looking forward to working with the new commissioners to build a better MiamiDade for everyone. Gilbert says that the election results were “interesting,” but not surprising. “People didn’t go out and vote for Black candidates, they voted for the best candidates,” Gilbert said. Keon Hardemon leaves the Miami City Commission to serve as the new Miami-Dade commissioner for District 3. “As a newly elected official, I have a greater opportunity to bring about legislation and change that affects our community,” Hardemon said. Hardemon grew up in Liberty City, and knows first-hand the needs of struggling neighborhoods. “Communities that are historically Black or Brown are still some of the most ill-invested communities that exist in Miami-Dade County.” Hardemon says the current county commission has an opportunity to work together to bring about tremendous change.

Standing in the west courtyard of the Stephen P. Clark Government Center in downtown Miami are Miami-Dade County Commissioners Jean Monestime, Oliver Gilbert III, Danielle Cohen Higgins, Kionne McGhee and Keon Hardemon.

Commissioner Danielle Cohen Higgins has already hit the ground running. By the end of January, she had passed three forms of legislation without opposition. Cohen Higgins is the first

have a voice and an opportunity to make change. “First and foremost, I’m going to help our residents get healthy and get back to work,” Cohen Higgins said. Commissioner Kionne McGhee is new to the “We all represent different areas of the commission but not new to county, and we all have different lived politics. Before running for experiences, but we are all bringing our commissioner for District 9, McGhee served in the Florida abilities, our interests, and our talents House of Representatives from to the county commission at the same 2012 to 2020 and served as the minority leader during his last time,” — Commissioner Oliver Gilbert III. two years. He says he is looking forward to the opportunity to Jamaican American to sit on the county work with the other city commissioners commission and the first woman of color “to elevate conversations and discussions in more than 30 years. She says she has a that we believe are relevant to the overall lot of goals for her District 8 constituents, makeup of Miami-Dade County.” who she says, like her own family, are a Rounding out these five history group of “diverse, hard-working people makers is Commissioner Jean Monestime with a similar story.” who has represented District 2 for 10 Cohen Higgins says she is proud to years. Monestime was first elected

in 2010, becoming the first HaitianAmerican commissioner in Miami-Dade County. Monestime brings a wealth of experience to the commission. He has served as City of North Miami councilman and vice-mayor, chairman of the Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners, and delegate to the National Democratic Convention. He was selected as a Florida Electoral College member in 2012, and presided over the Miami-Dade Metropolitan Planning Organization Governing Board. Yet, he remains humble and eager to work with the next generation of Black commissioners. “Ten years ago I learned from the seniors, now I’m learning from my juniors, and hopefully there is a thing or two I can pass along as well,” Monestime said. n


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

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FORGETTING IMPORTANT DATES OR EVENTS DIFFICULTY FOLLOWING A FAMILIAR RECIPE TROUBLE DRIVING TO A FAMILIAR LOCATION ASKING THE SAME QUESTIONS OVER AND OVER DECLINE IN ABILITY TO KEEP TRACK OF MONTHLY BILLS FORGETTING RECENTLY LEARNED INFORMATION MISPLACING OBJECTS

We are looking to evaluate people from the Black community to keep you safe and informed. Evaluations to be conducted by phone and video conference.

Faina Lacroix, MPH Sr. Research Associate Ph: (305) 243-1981 Email: AD-HIHG@miami.edu Language(s): English, French and Haitian Creole

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Call for nominations AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY M•I•A MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2021

LEGACY MAGAZINE IS ACCEPTING NOMINATIONS FOR THE

Most Powerful and Influential Black Business Leaders for 2021

Please submit your nomination by MARCH 1, 2021 miamediagrp.com/nominations RULES FOR NOMINATION: The person nominated must be of Black/African American descent and reside in Miami-Dade, Broward or Palm Beach Counties. The nominee can only be recognized once in his or her lifetime.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

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Today, together, we write and right tomorrow’s history. How we address country, community, and progress will be history’s record of how we transformed challenges into triumphs. We can accomplish anything together.

Together Forward.

Vice Chairman Oliver G. Gilbert, III Miami-Dade County District 1 District1@miamidade.gov 305.474.3011

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Celebrating

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2021

From Overtown to Lemon City to Coconut Grove,

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Black history has long and strong roots since before Miami’s incorporation in 1896. And now, 125 years later, Miami-Dade County continues to celebrate the contributions and impacts made by our Black residents. To learn about events happening in February during Black History Month in Miami-Dade County, visit miamidade.gov/black-history-month.

February 2021

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2021

Florida Memorial University Embraces Long History of Advocacy; Establishes Social Justice Research Institute BY DR. TAMEKA HOBBS

On July 16, 2020, Florida Memorial University president, Dr. Jaffus Hardrick — in reaction to the months of unrest following the murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd — announced the founding of the FMU Social Justice Institute. Our intention is to create a research institute and solutions-focused think-tank examining racial inequality and injustice in Miami-Dade County and the state of Florida. The goal of the FMU Social Justice Institute is to serve as a resource for creating and facilitating tangible reforms in order to achieve a more just and fair society. The greater vision, however, is to create in South Florida a society bereft of social injustice and racial disparities. As the only Historically Black University in South Florida, and with its 142-year track record of educating servant-leaders, FMU is well-positioned to explicitly advocate for uplifting racial justice for the communities that it has served since its founding in

and women of color, and the violent murder of Heather Heyer in the aftermath of the White supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017 — are proof that our nation’s previous efforts toward addressing this long history of inequality are incomplete. In more recent years, Florida Memorial has Florida Memorial College at its Live Oak campus near the turn of the also had a front row century. Founded in 1879, the Historically Black College, now located in Miami Gardens, has facilitated social mobility and educational seat to the tragedy and equity for generations. ongoing movement 1879 — Live Oak, Jacksonville, St. born by the tragic Augustine, and now Miami Gardens murder of Trayvon Martin. In 2012, our and Opa-locka. Unfortunately, the campus mobilized to support Sybrina scourge of anti-Black racial violence Fulton, who is an alumna of FMU. that threatened FMU’s existence in both After the marches and the trial, we Live Oak and St. Augustine still exist, extended an invitation to the Trayvon manifesting in new and vicious ways. Martin Foundation to establish their The increase in overtly racist speech offices on our campus. Since that time, and actions in the nation over the past we’ve watched the powerful advocacy several years — as evidenced by both and healing work of Tracy Martin, the continued murder of unarmed men

Sybrina, and their family, and the ways that they have embraced and inspired our students. It makes perfect sense, for both historical and contemporary reasons, that FMU would embrace social justice as a core part of its agenda to serve the South Florida community, with hopes to bring real energy and solutions to address the reality of systemic racism and racial injustice. The questions are complicated but the answers are within our reach if we are willing to do the work. FMU is mobilizing the resources of our campus, both capital and human, along with the support of the South Florida community, to address the thorny issues of the day and to produce future change-agents to build a brighter and better society with true opportunity for all. FMU’s Social Justice Institute will be the genesis of that work. Dr. Tameka Hobbs is the associate provost for Academic Affairs at Florida Memorial University. n

MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

Kaizen-Mediation Technique Can Improve Mediation Process

BY STANLEY ZAMOR As the plaintiff’s attorney announced that they executed and emailed back the mediated agreement, he smiled, shook his head and said, “I told my client that we would not be settling the case since the previous denial was considered final, and that he should expect the trial to be set for some time in beginning of 2022.” I said, “Why would you say and think that?” He replied, “Well honestly, I know the adjuster and I have never had

a positive experience with the defense firm. So, it was more of the same games that the insurance side plays, and I am not interested.” I responded, “Hmmm! Well maybe that is why this time mediation worked. Remember in my orientation/opening statement, I stated that unlike court, mediation is better when it is approached as if it is your first time. Doing so allows for a more flexible process, with fresher ideas and expanding what perspectives can be. And my role is to explore options not typically considered. And I commend you for reducing your initial adversarial tone and allowing this to be different. This changed and ‘continually improved’ how the negotiations progressed, which led to a mutually beneficial solution…”.

tone they bring to the mediation process. Mediation is an opportunity to negotiate differently than before. It is an opportunity to explore , create, and learn more. But when participants are not open to “more,” they stall themselves by being resistant to growth – and not open to other possibilities (improvements). The role of a neutral mediator is to create and promote a balanced process encouraging dialogue, exploring possibilities and growth beyond participants norms. Kaizen is a Japanese term that means continuous improvement. I often introduce elements of the Kaizen philosophy into the mediation negotiations. Parties do not notice this and find themselves creating alternative solutions that work!

a cultural transformation because it requires everyone to think about improvement every day, everywhere. At its core, Kaizen Teian actively involves all participants within a culture (business or interpersonal) to improve within the culture and continuously for the benefit of the culture. Stanley Zamor is a Florida Supreme Court Certified Circuit/Family/County Mediator & Primary Trainer and Qualified Arbitrator. Mr. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/ arbitration rosters and mediates with the ATD (Agree2Disagree) Mediation & Arbitration, PA throughout Florida. As an ADR consultant he regularly lectures on a variety of topics from ethics, crosscultural issues, diversity, bullying, and Family/Business relationships.

Kaizen Mediation Often when I mediate, I notice how attorneys and their clients approach negotiations with a less than positive attitude. Even when meditating through an online platform like Zoom, I can sense the tension and the adversarial-

Kaizen Teian: Bottom-Up Improvement Kaizen Teian is one of four methodologies and describes a form of improvement where people participate to improve their own processes. This bottom-up type of Kaizen drives

szamor@effectivemediationconsultants. com; www.effectivemediation consultants.com; www.LinkedIn.com/in/ stanleyzamoradr (954) 261-8600 n


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2021

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY M•I•A MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2021


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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY M•I•A MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2021

Miami-Dade Economic Advocacy Trust: Three Gears of Progress Towards Black Empowerment BY TRACI POLLACK

Since inception, the focus of the Miami-Dade Economic Advocacy Trust has been on addressing socioeconomic disparities through initiatives that support families, youth, and businesses. Different from the traditional definition of economic development, these three gears work together to connect families, businesses, and the individual to resources, funding, and programming that together create whole communities. While economic development is still essential to how the community grows businesses and creates jobs, there are other organizations in this community whose sole responsibility is job creation. Instead, MDEAT’s position is to serve the unmet needs and work

towards improving the economic conditions of the Black community as we define the three gears through homeownership, youth empowerment, and small business development. MDEAT has helped to create more than 7,500 new homeowners through its down payment assistance program that has provided more than $42 million since 1995

More than 7,800 youth have participated in the agency’s Teen Court second chance and leadership development program, which includes legal career exposure, paid summer jobs, psychological services, and other services. Lastly, hundreds of small businesses have benefited from grant funding, marketing support, and technical assistance over the years. The ideal scenario to the three gears working together would be to help connect a Black business to resources that would help them grow, and then support the owner’s homeownership goals with down payment support while also connecting their teen to MDEAT’s internship and career exposure

program. As MDEAT closes out its first decade, our greatest opportunity will be to explore how advocacy and policy recommendations can make home ownership more affordable for Black residents. There is also an opportunity to expose more Black entrepreneurs to new opportunities, which is why we relaunched the Black franchising initiative this year. And as MDEAT continues to invest in our people and in our communities, we recognize the investment that Teen Court is to our youth, and our goal is to expand the program to create more opportunities for our youth. Ultimately, we can do better by fostering greater collaboration among other like-minded organizations. n


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Lyric Theater’s Historic Interior Restored; Ready for Post-Pandemic Visitors BY DOROTHY JENKINS FIELDS

Gleefully, Timothy A. Barber, executive director of the Black Archives History & Research Foundation, Inc., led a masked and socially distant group of supporters into the newly restored Lyric Theater last November for a special preview celebrating the organization’s 43rd anniversary. Formerly a head drum major in Florida A&M University’s Marching 100 Band, Barber exhibited the “drum major instinct” that Dr. Martin Luther King famously coined — to be out front and lead the parade. Barber started at the Black Archives in 2003 as an intern. Nearly 20 years later in March 2020, he spent many hours solving unforeseen threats to the operation at the theater. The lack of activity at the theater due to the pandemic revealed a termite infestation on the stage, requiring emergency repair. The repair project evolved into a complete auditorium restoration, adding opulence and grandeur to the structure, originally built in 1913.

Paris, France with his wife, Henrrietta Sweeting Walker. While there, they toured fashion and opera houses. Upon returning to Miami, Walker built the Lyric to counter the separate and unequal limitations of Jim Crow. A native Miamian, I grew up in Overtown and witnessed the community’s development. I The historic Lyric Theater’s proscenium stage has been restored always wanted to with ornate custom wood. Courtesy: Derek Cole Photography record the stories of With funding from the Southeast the washerwomen, Overtown Park West Community laborers, porters, business people, Redevelopment Agency, Miami-Dade longshoremen, educators, doctors and County, and manpower from laborers clergy who built our communities and from the Overtown community, the helped give Miami its magic. project is finished and is now ready for After completing undergraduate virtual and in-person events. studies at Spelman College, I returned Several years before World War to Miami and was employed by MiamiI and before the spread of the 1918 Dade County Schools as a school worldwide influenza pandemic, Black librarian and reading teacher. While businessman Gedar Walker of Miami’s looking for books about Blacks at the Colored Town (now Overtown), visited main library, I was told, “We only have

a folder with obituaries about Black people. I guess those people have not thought enough of themselves to write their books.” That statement and a search with no results left me unsettled. In 1977, I earned certification in Archives Administration and training in Historic Preservation at Emory University. My paper for completing the graduate course was “The Establishment of The Black Photographic Archives.” As a volunteer, I established the Black Archives and invited a group of mostly retired Black pioneers to serve on the Board of Directors and the Board of Trustees at the Joseph Caleb Center. A decade later, I saved the Lyric Theater and acquired it for the Black Archives. For a listing of events at the Lyric, visit bahlt.org. To support the Black Archives’ Endowment Fund, call 786-708-4610 or email baf@bahlt.org. n

Inclusive. Celebrating heritage. February is Black History Month. It’s a time to recognize and celebrate Black Heritage — the great struggles, achievements, and contributions by African Americans. It’s a time to rededicate ourselves to year-round inclusiveness — to bring all of us closer as a community here in Miami-Dade County, and throughout the United States. At Jackson Health System, we celebrate the heritage of our patients, nurses, doctors, and staff of all backgrounds. Our diversity is a firm foundation for the future and underlines our commitment to deliver compassionate care to all in need.

Call 305-585-4JMG for a Jackson specialist near you.


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2021

LEGACY BRIEFS HIGHLY UNIQUE SOFLO RADIO PROMOTES ABEBE LEWIS AS MUSIC DIRECTOR

Abebe Lewis has partnered with Highly Unique Soflo Radio to serve as music director. In this new position, Lewis has creative control over the music that the station will archive. He is also responsible for connecting with local Abebe Lewis record labels, artists, and producers in South Florida in order to find new music for the station’s listeners. Lewis also owns and operates Abebe Lewis Marketing and Branding, which discovers and promotes talent.

NEWS ANCHOR CONSTANCE JONES RETURNS TO SOUTH FLORIDA Starting this month, Constance Jones will co-anchor the morning newscast at NBC-6. Most recently she anchored the evening newscast for ABC-8 News in Richmond, Virginia, where she Constance Jones worked for 2 years. The awardwinning journalist is a familiar face to South Florida; she was previously a news anchor at Local 10.

ATTORNEY JOLINDA HERRING ELECTED AS FIRM’S NEW CEO AND MANAGING SHAREHOLDER

Bryant Miller Olive P.A. (BMO) has announced that JoLinda Herring, Esq., a shareholder in the firm’s Miami office, was elected as BMO’s JoLinda Herring new chief executive officer and managing shareholder. Herring joined BMO as a law clerk in 1994, and upon admission to the Florida Bar in 1996, she began as a practicing attorney with the firm. Most recently, Herring served as co-chair of BMO’s Public Finance Group, as well as chair of the firm’s Board of Directors. In 2020, she was also appointed to the National Association of Bond Lawyers (NABL) Board of Directors. Herring graduated from Florida State University College of Law in Tallahassee, Florida. She received an MBA in finance with honors from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.

JOY OGLESBY HIRED AS BROWARD HEALTH’S MARKETING MANAGER

Joy Oglesby moves to the position of marketing manager for Broward Health Imperial

Point. She formerly served as corporate communications public relations coordinator at Broward Health where she focused on keeping Broward Health in the public eye while maintaining Joy Oglesby a positive image. Now as marketing manager, Oglesby will be in charge of promoting the products Broward Health sells.

DR. MALOU HARRISON PROMOTED TO EXECUTIVE VP AT MDC

Dr. Malou Harrison has been promoted to Executive Vice President and Provost of Miami Dade College. Previously, she served as president of MDC’s North Campus. In that position, Harrison was an advocate for over Malou Harrison 50,000 students. She is known for her dedication and commitment to MDC and the Miami-Dade community.

MARLON A. HILL JOINS MIAMI LAW FIRM

Weiss Serota Helfman Cole & Bierman, P.L. welcomes Marlon A. Hill as Of Counsel to its Miami office. Hill is an experienced and highly skilled government and corporate lawyer Marlon Hill and has been deeply involved in community leadership roles with South Florida’s multicultural communities. Hill represents local governments, businesses and entrepreneurs in business transactions, intellectual property and government matters concentrated in the hospitality, tourism, arts and entertainment and technology sectors. He works with growth-oriented businesses in South Florida and the Caribbean, helping them navigate the structuring, launch, and growth of their ventures and advocating for them before state and local government entities. Hill was born in Kingston, Jamaica, and raised in Miami. He earned his undergraduate and law degrees from Florida State University.

CARRIE MEEK FOUNDATION WELCOMES MATTHEW BEATTY AS VP AND COO

Matthew Beatty has been hired as vice president and

Matthew Beatty

chief operating officer for the Carrie Meek Foundation. In his new position, the Miami native plans to help his community by finding out the origin of systemic issues in Black communities. Beatty previously worked as Senior Director of Communications and Engagement for the Miami Foundation.

HEALTH FOUNDATION OF SOUTH FLORIDA WELCOMES MELIDA AKITI AS NEW BOARD CHAIR

Health Foundation of South Florida has announced that Melida Akiti is now its Board Chair, the first Black Latina to hold this position. Akiti was formerly vice president of Melida Akiti Ambulatory and Community Services at Memorial Healthcare System where she oversaw primary care practices and urgent care centers throughout the South Broward area.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CHAIRWOMAN SHARON JOHNSON ENDS TERM

Sharon K. Johnson has ended her two-year term in office as the Chair of the Miami-Dade County Commission for Women. The primary purpose of the commission is to advocate for women’s rights and needs in the Sharon Johnson community. As chairwoman, Johnson oversaw meetings and operations that corresponded with the commission. She served as the second Black American chairwoman and the first Haitian American chairwoman on the Miami-Dade County Commission for Women. Johnson is also the founder and president of the non-profit organization Pumps, Pearls, and Portfolios, which helps low-income women and their families.

ANN MARIE SORRELL ELECTED FIRST BLACK WOMAN TO PALM BEACH SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT By a landslide, Ann Marie Sorrell was elected the first Black woman to the Palm Beach Soil and Water Conservation District, Seat 2. “There are so many residents who are unfamiliar or unaware of our wetlands, how our water system works, and the economic impact that farming and agriculture has in our county and our state,” said Sorrell. “With that in mind, I will bring a fresh and diverse voice, new leadership, and the ability to communicate the importance of sustainability and conservation matters to all constituents in Palm Beach County.” Sorrell is the founder, president and CEO

of The Mosaic Group, an award-winning advertising, public relations, marketing, and government relations firm. She has served as an adjunct professor at Palm Beach State College for 5 years Ann Marie Sorrell teaching Introduction to Business, Entrepreneurship, and Human Relations. Sorrell also recently founded Cannabiziac for the purpose of creating an inclusive global cannabis ecosystem that provides education and training, business and financial resources, networking opportunities, advocacy, and a community for cannabis companies.

HOLY CROSS HEALTH HIRES STONISH PIERCE AS COO

Holy Cross Health has named Stonish Pierce, FACHE as Chief Operating Officer. Pierce is a boardcertified healthcare executive with diverse Stonish Pierce clinical and leadership experiences in acute and ambulatory operations spanning from not-for-profit, public, private, government, academic/teaching and faith-based hospitals to integrated delivery systems and forprofit physical therapy sectors. Prior to joining Holy Cross Health, Pierce was System Vice President, Specialty Services for Beaumont Health, Michigan’s largest health system based on inpatient admissions and net patient revenue.

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DID YOU RECENTLY GET A PROMOTION? ARE YOU A NEW HIRE AT A SOUTH FLORIDA COMPANY? DOES YOUR FIRM HAVE A MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENT TO MAKE? Let us know by sharing your good news in Legacy Briefs. Send a press release and your professional headshot to rm@miamediagrp.com.


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Florida’s energy future is on the horizon. And we will never stop moving toward it. We simply envision continuing to deliver energy that’s not just the most reliable, or the cleanest, but also the most affordable. That’s America’s best energy value working for you and for Florida.

FPL.com/Value This advertising is paid for by FPL shareholders, not our customers.

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2021

The Florida Lottery proudly supports education by contributing over $37 billion to local

schools and awarding nearly 900,000 Bright Futures Scholarships. So Florida students can do more than just dream of a brighter future, they can create one. Learn more at flalottery.com/education

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Legacy Miami Black History Month 2021  

Legacy Miami Black History Month 2021