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Miami

Shannan Ighodaro Renee Webley Leyanis Diaz

Taylor McCain

Christina Lucas

Introducing Miami’s Most Influential and Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry for 2020 POLITICS

PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

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Newly-elected Miami-Dade Mayor Daniella Levine Cava makes her debut as a Legacy Miami columnist. While she’s excited about being elected the county’s first woman mayor, she explains why she’s now laser-focused on solving several key problems. Legacy Miami honoree Renee A. Webley is a unicorn. In her industry, less than one percent of architects are African-American women. Find out how she’s blazing trails while designing the landscape of South Florida.

EDUCATION

PINNACLE :

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School shut downs due to COVID-19 adversely affected Black students, particularly in lowincome communities, in many ways. MiamiDade School Board Vice Chairman Dr. Steve Gallon III examines the magnitude of the technological and learning disparities.

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It has been five years in the making. Now after months of delays due to the pandemic, Red Rooster Overtown has finally made its muchanticipated grand opening.


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EDITOR’S NOTE 4 INTRODUCING MIAMI’S MOST

INFLUENTIAL AND PROMINENT BLACK WOMEN IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY FOR 2020

6 MIAMI-DADE MAYOR’S REPORT By Daniella Levine Cava

MIAMI-DADE SCHOOL BOARD REPORT By Dr. Steve Gallon III

8 PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

Architectural Firm Owner Makes Her Own Big Dreams Come True

By Michelle Solomon

10 UM ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH By Dr. Dorothy Fields

12 COVER STORY

Legacy’s ‘Most Influential and Prominent Black Women’ Honorees Blaze Trails in Uncharted Territory

By Russell Motley

13 CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT By Mary V. Davids

14 SOCIAL MEDIA

By Tracy Timberlake

16 MILLENNIAL

By David Cannady

 FINANCE REPORT By Kevin Cadette

residential architect to a young executive running a multi-million dollar snack food company. You’ll meet honorees like Miami Gardens City Council member Shannan Ighodaro who has reinvented herself just shy of her 50th birthday. You’ll meet Christina Lucas who works in a field that employs less than one percent of Black women in America. And the list of remarkable women honored in this issue goes on and on. For them, this honor comes at a historic time as they prepare to witness a political force – one that his issue of Legacy Miami looks exactly like them – become magazine is powerful. All of the the next vice president of the women featured are incredible United States. local leaders that you should watch as “I really believe [Kamala Harris] we enter 2021. will be a beacon for many of us, They now have the distinction especially me being an Africanof being known as Legacy Miami’s American woman in politics in the Most Influential and Prominent Black city of Miami Gardens, the largest Women in Business and Industry for African-American city in South 2020. What does this mean? It means Florida,” Ighodaro told me during the they’re breaking glass ceilings, setting photo shoot for the magazine cover. new political agendas, and blazing Rap Snacks executive Taylor uncharted entrepreneurial trails. McCain, who also appears on the Their professional titles run cover, told me Black women are now the gamut, from a commercial and setting their sights even higher.

T

“Every year is the year of Black women. Every day is the day of Black women. Black women are breaking through tremendously,” said McCain. “I mean, we just elected our first Black vice president of the United States of America. I think Black women have always played a pivotal role in business, whether it’s in entertainment or real estate or whatever.” Another woman breaking glass ceilings is Miami-Dade Mayor Daniella Levine Cava, the first woman to be elected to that office. I am proud to announce that Mayor Cava will join Legacy Miami’s esteemed roster of columnists starting with this issue. She’ll keep you informed about what issues she’s tackling whether it’s the environment or COVID-19. I encourage you to take advantage of this connection and reach out to her at her county office. Let her know what issues you’d like to see addressed in your community.

Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com n

18 PINNACLE

Red Rooster Overtown Celebrates Much-Anticipated Grand Opening

By Yolande Clark-Jackson

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20-21 LEGACY BRIEFS 22 MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

LIFESTYLE

By Stanley Zamor

LU X U RY

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine and view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine • Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine

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#BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief Yanela G. McLeod Managing Editor Jordan Polite Director of Operations Sabrina Moss-Solomon Graphic Designer

Aaliyah Sherie Bryant Social Media Specialist Joe Wesley Cover Photographer Rory Lee Cover make-up artist

Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

“The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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Introducing Miami’s Most Influential and Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry for 2020

TAWANA AKINS, ED.S. Dean of Students Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Assistant Principal Miami-Dade County Public Schools

AUDREY BROOKS

Board Certified Christian Counselor Brooks Counseling Services LLC

JARDINA CAMPBELL, MSHRM

ANGELIQUE HIBBERT

KARINE-BEVERLY HOLLY

HON. SHANNON IGHODARO

CHRISTINA LUCAS

Real Estate Professional The Keyes Company

LORI F. BAILEY

Regional Sales and Education Executive L’Oreal Travel Retail Americas

PATRICIA C. A. SASSER

Head of the Upper School Ransom Everglades School

LORY WALLACE

Councilperson City of Miami Gardens

Practice Manager of Obstetrics & Gynecology Pulse Beauty Cosmetics

Human Resources Manager Swatch Group U.S.

RENÉE A. WEBLEY

President Envista Forensics

Architect, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP Principal Architect RAW Design & Consulting

LEYANIS DIAZ

Business Consultant, Small Business Avocate, Speaker and Founder, MAJOR

TAYLOR D. McCAIN

Chief Operating Officer Rap Snacks

JUDY-ANN WELLINGTON MSN, APRN, FNP-C Black Nurse Practitioners of Palm Beach County


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MIAMI-DADE MAYOR’S REPORT

Time to Boldly Imagine a More Equal Miami-Dade

BY DANIELLA LEVINE CAVA

This has truly been a history-making year for women in our community. I am extremely proud and humbled to have been elected the first woman mayor of Miami-Dade County, but that was just one of many glass ceilings we shattered together. With the first woman president of Miami Dade College, the first woman (and woman of color) general manager in the history of Major League Baseball leading our Miami Marlins, and now

the first Black woman executive editor of the Miami Herald – women have stepped up to lead Miami-Dade forward across all fields. It’s important to reflect and celebrate these gains, and I’m especially proud to be a part of this issue celebrating the many Black women leaders across our community who have overcome obstacles to excel in their industries. As women who lead, we know how to celebrate while wasting no time in rolling up our sleeves and getting to work – because the challenges we face are urgent. First and foremost, we need to protect our community’s lives and livelihoods during the COVID-19 pandemic. Since taking office, I have been laser-focused on keeping residents safe and keeping our economy moving forward by stopping the spread of the virus. Working with leaders from government, business, and healthcare, we launched a new county-wide “We Can, We Will” campaign to amplify

positive messages about how, together, we can keep cases down over the holiday season. Looking ahead to the future, we also need to map out plans to build back a local economy that is stronger, more resilient, and more equitable. That’s why one of my first acts as mayor was to appoint a new senior advisor for Innovation and Performance, whose portfolio will include MiamiDade’s first Office of Equity and Inclusion. My administration will engage directly with the community to make our government more accountable and transparent, while bringing an innovation mindset to entrenched, historic problems like economic disparities for Black and Hispanic families. We can and we will lay the foundation for a stronger and more diverse economy by doubling down on investments in small businesses, especially women-and minority-owned firms. We can lead by example from

within county government by making hiring and contracting more diverse. And we can accelerate infrastructure projects that will help us tackle our biggest challenges – like expanding transit, replacing our aging water system, and guarding against the impacts of sea level rise – while also creating good-paying jobs. We can use the momentum of this year in leadership gains for women to catapult forward our vision of a more equal future. I remain more optimistic than ever that we can remove barriers for new generations of entrepreneurs and businesses, and create a county where all families have an equal opportunity to thrive. To all the women blazing trails in your workplaces, fields, and families, I celebrate you. I’m proud to work alongside you to create a future for Miami-Dade where all girls and young women can imagine a limitless future.

Daniella Levine Cava is mayor of Miami-Dade County. n

MIAMI-DADE SCHOOL BOARD REPORT

COVID 19 Pandemic Will Widen Achievement Gap

BY STEVE GALLON

Despite our collective commitment to the education of students, school districts throughout the nation continue to grapple with the negative impact the COVID-19 pandemic will have on student learning and achievement. History has proven that when things are bad throughout general populations, they are felt far worse in communities of

color and poverty. Thus, it is anticipated that the achievement gap will be widened as a result of COVID-19. More than 100,000 U.S. schools were forced to close due to the spreading virus, leaving 55 million students without traditional classrooms, and parents and teachers working, in some cases scrambling, to find the best ways to teach children and ensure their continuity of learning. Shutdowns also exposed the conspicuous, commonly known chasms and technological disparities between the “haves and have-nots.” In 2019, more than 25 percent of U.S. homes lacked Internet access, according to the Pew Research Center, who, in an April survey reported that more than six times as many lower-income parents said their kids would have to use public Wi-Fi to complete their schoolwork because there wasn’t a reliable Internet connection at home. Disparity and deprivation are more pronounced in communities of color, poverty, and families whose home language

is not English. These issues, coupled with an exacerbated “summer slide” regression in student learning, have given rise to even greater concerns for the education and academic progression of students throughout the nation. Evidence shows that shutdowns are likely to exacerbate existing achievement gaps as the U.S. education system was not built to sustain extended closures. More troubling is the social educational context the persistent achievement disparities reveal across income levels and between white students and students of Black and Hispanic heritage. Over time, school shutdowns are likely to lead to more of them dropping out. The impact school closures will have on students rests with how much support, assistance, and guidance can be provided to them and their parents. Lower-income students are less likely to have access to high-quality remote learning or to a conducive learning environment, such as a quiet space with minimal distractions, devices they do not need to share, high-speed Internet, and

parental academic supervision. Data reveals that only 60 percent of low-income students regularly log into online instruction; yet, 90 percent of high-income students do. Engagement rates also lagged behind in schools serving predominantly Black and Hispanic students. We must develop, implement, monitor, and evaluate ways to address the myriad of issues that too frequently vex students and families that were already sitting on the margins of our educational systems, and drowning in waters of educational inequities and failures. We must enable them to rise, swim, and ride a wave toward learning and lifelong success during and after these educationally challenging times. Dr. Steve Gallon III is a lifelong educator and the vice-chairman of Miami-Dade County Public Schools, the nation’s fourth largest. He has served as a teacher, principal, district administrator, and superintendent of schools before being elected in 2016. n


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PROFILES IN LEADERSHIP

Architectural Firm Owner Makes Her Own Big Dreams Come True

BY MICHELLE SOLOMON

of career she could have that could combine the two. Her father, Michael, who owns Webley’s Interiors, was also an influence. “I would go to work with him,” she recalled. “One time, we went to this house that was under construction. I overheard the contractor talking to the architect. Just being there with that house,” she said. The thought of what it was and what it would become thrilled her. She said by the time

Renée A. Webley stands in front of a contemporary home she’s designing. The principal architect and owner of RAW Design + Consulting was on site visiting the project. Midway through completion, a photo of her in front of the 11,000-square-foot structure on 1.3 acres makes it apparent how massive it is. “This project is one of my favorites,” she said about the solid structure that is built using only concrete, steel and glass. “It’s indestructible.” At 36, Webley herself seems indestructible. The view now is different than what she expected it to be after completing her first internship at a firm in 2005. Her Renee A. Webley, president and owner of Raw Design and Consulting firm, designed and engineered this 7,000-square-foot company will be 10 years old in custom home in Southwest Ranches in Broward County. February of 2021. until they saw me,” she “I always thought said. “There have been a I would have my own few times when I could feel business,” she said. it and witness it happening, “What I didn’t know but I don’t let that get in was that I would have the way of me going after started it so early – clients. I don’t even think like when I was 25 or about it.” 26.” If she can design an There were indestructible mega-house a few childhood and transform a once experiences that dilapidated supermarket helped chart the in North Miami into Da course. Born in Cave, a cave-themed bar South Miami, she and lounge, there isn’t remembers a fourthHalfway through construction, Renee A. Webley stands in front much that can stand in grade assignment of the modern custom-built home in Southwest Ranches that her her way. architecture firm designed. when she was in the “There’s something gifted program at about spending so many Vineland Elementary School. “We she was 12 she knew she wanted months and years on had to draw our dream home,” she to be an architect. She earned a Principal architect Renee A. Webley designed the World something, and then reflected. “We were given graph bachelor’s of design in architecture Famous House of Mac ’s location in the Brightline foodcourt at you see it and you’ve paper. We had to use a ruler to draw MiamiCentral Station. and a master’s of architecture from designed it,” she shared. it to scale. Art and math were my the University of Florida. Black women. She said she has “It’s a dream-come-true kind of two favorite subjects. I had so much Webley is a rarity in her experienced what that means on moment. It never gets old.” fun doing that project.” profession – 0.3 percent of licensed many levels. n She wondered then what kind architects in the United States are “They were unaware of who I was


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UM ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH

Recalling B. Smith’s Fashion and Alzheimer’s Disease Legacies

BY DOROTHY JENKINS FIELDS

There was a time when super fashion model B. Smith’s picture appeared on national magazine covers including Ebony and Essence. She made headlines in 1976 as the first black woman on the cover of a major white magazine, Mademoiselle. At the top of her career she owned three restaurants, published a magazine, was a celebrity chef and was known nationally for her lifestyle brand. A model-turned television host, she demonstrated how women of all economic levels can decorate their homes with style. An occasional visitor to South Florida, in 2016 she was in Miami for the presentation of her book at the Miami Book Fair. Before I Forget: Love, Hope, Help and Acceptance In Our Fight Against Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), was co-authored by her husband and business partner, Dan

especially among black people. Once an entrepreneur who created and operated businesses, her health was declining and she was no longer able to function on an executive level. Her bright smile remained. B. Smith, born Barbara Elaine Smith on August 24, 1949, lost her battle to A.D. on February 24, 2020. The gifts she left behind include her lifestyle Appearing at the 2016 Miami Book Fair, entrepreneur B. Smith and her husband Dan Gasby are joined by team members Nora brand and her example Matellus, director of business operations; and Dr. Margaret of dignity in the face of Pericak-Vance, director of the John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics. Photo courtesy of Dr. Dorothy Jenkins Fields. adversity. For more information Gasby, and Vanity Fair editor Michael about Alzheimer’s Disease, join Shanayerson. the African-American Alzheimer’s It described her new life with Disease Initiative at The John P. early-onset of Alzheimer’s Disease Hussman Institute for Human and the decision to publicly confront Genomics. the stigma associated with A.D.,

Virtual evaluations are scheduled at your best time. Complete your evaluation over the phone or Zoom to help keep everyone safe. Contact our research-team for more information, at 877-686-6444; Visit: AD-HHG@ MIAMI.EDU. Dorothy Jenkins Fields, Ph.D., consultant to The University of Miami’s Hussman Institute of Human Genomics project, “Why We Can’t Wait,” project is a public historian, certified archivist and freelance writer. She helps families and class reunions create a legacy of their past through their own personal stories. In partnership with historical, educational and medical institutions, she helps researchers collect data focused on the black experience in Miami, Florida and elsewhere. Visit: WHY WE CAN’T WAIT | SSR (societysocialsandreunions.com) n


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COVER STORY

Legacy’s ‘Most Influential and Prominent Black Women’ Honorees Blaze Trails in Uncharted Territory

BY RUSSELL MOTLEY As one of Miami Gardens’ newly-elected city council members, Shannan Ighodaro is still beaming with excitement. Now recognized as one of Legacy Miami’s Most Influential and Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry for 2020, Ighodaro is over the moon. “It means the world to me, coming from humble beginnings. Born and raised in the Bahamas, this is something that I never imagined,” Ighodaro told Legacy during the photo shoot for the magazine cover. “I believe it creates a lasting legacy for every immigrant woman, for every wife, for every mother, for every entrepreneur to know that if I can do it, they can do it as well.” Ighodaro is one of five honorees selected to appear on the cover. Everyone involved practiced social distancing while photographing at a $32 million Fort Lauderdale waterfront mansion, once owned by the family of the late entrepreneur H. Wayne Huizenga. Afro-Latina Role Model For honoree Leyanis Diaz, a bilingual business consultant, the invitation to grace the cover means serving as a positive role model for young Afro-Latinas like herself. “I know there’s a little girl that’s currently watching me who hopes to one day be like me,” said Diaz, founder of MAJOR, an online one-stop shop consulting firm for minority-owned businesses. “So, I do it for that little girl who might be watching. And I do it to give back to my community, so it’s really an honor.” Few Black Women Architects Architect Renee Webley is a unicorn in her industry. According to Architecture Magazine, less than one percent of architects are Black women. She’s optimistic those numbers will increase as more and more women of color break glass ceilings. “Especially now having a woman of

Honorees Renee Webley, Leyanis Diaz, Christina Lucas, Taylor McCain, and Shannan Ighodaro pose on the steps of the Fort Lauderdale mansion previously owned by the family of the late entrepreneur H. Wayne Huizenga.

color as vice president [of the United States],” said Webley, who designs mostly residential properties. “It opens up so many doors and opens the mindset of Black females all throughout the world, especially in the U.S.” With Vice President-elect Kamala Harris set to be sworn in on Jan. 20, 2021, the honorees say she’ll be a beacon of equal opportunity for all women of color. “It shows that we are here, we are here to stay,” Ighodaro said. “We’re making a difference, not just in our families, not just in our communities, not just in the nation, but in the world.” Paving Pathways for Black Women Engineers Honoree Christine Lucas wants to encourage and recruit more Black women to become engineers. She was recently named president of Envista Forensics, which employs engineers who provide consulting services to insurance companies and law firms. They help determine what may have caused a major disaster and who’s

liable. Although she is not an engineer, Lucas said she’s in a key position to create these type of opportunities for women of color. “It’s not a field that’s run by women, period, and I’m not an engineer by training but now I run a 500-person forensic engineering company that’s represented across nine countries in the world,” Lucas said. “I’m in awe of women who have that professional engineering designation and that experience. I want to bring them into this more and also help recognize that there are opportunities in the leadership roles at highly technical scientific engineering companies that we should look at as well.” Snack Food Executive Makes Mark Honoree Taylor McCain moved to Miami three years ago from North Carolina. In that short time, she has made her mark in the snack food industry as chief operating officer at Rap Snacks, which features rappers like Cardi B and Rick Ross on the packaging. Recently, the Miami-based

company announced its flavored chips are headed to 4,200 Walmart stores. McCain, with the help of her team, has been instrumental in generating the company’s $20 million in annual sales. “What I do every day is I go in there and I work. I try to fill my passion,” McCain said. “So, it is a major honor to be someone who is influential in Miami, being able to be connected to this community of such diverse people.” It’s evident that many of Legacy’s honorees are all blazing trails in industries not previously dominated by women of color. They all pride themselves in giving back in their respective communities, sharing their wealth of knowledge and resources. “I really thank Legacy magazine for creating these opportunities and really highlighting the talent that’s here,” Lucas said. “In general, the Black population in South Florida, in particular Black women, is very small but you’re giving us a great platform to show that we are here and we’re doing great things.” n


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CAREER LEADERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

Coaching Offers New Road to Employee Engagement and Retention

BY MARY V. DAVIDS

2020 has been such an eye-opening year for everyone. There have been a lot of ups and downs this year, which has greatly impacted the way managers and leaders interact and engage employees. This year, the dynamics of work have shifted to adjust to the challenges of the pandemic, which has provided more opportunities for the relationship between

employees and employers to evolve. Here are some useful tips to let go of outdated managerial tactics and embrace coaching to help employees become more engaged and motivated in the workplace. Directing vs. Developing: As a leader, it is critical to know when it is appropriate to direct an employee and when you need to develop an employee. Managing focuses on directing tasks and processes to get a specific outcome for a specific moment in time. Developing an employee requires a more hands-on approach and it also involves knowing the strengths and opportunities of individual contributors. While these two roles may intersect at times, it is important to have clarity about which capacity is necessary at the moment. Short Term vs. Long Term: Coaching involves more of a cohesive relationship — two or more people working together to achieve personal and/or professional growth that extends beyond a project. Because the coaching

relationship can require more time, many managers tend to avoid it. Feeling obligated to commit more time can be burdensome, especially when you just need to get things done. The good news is, not every team member will require coaching long-term. Short-term coaching may be appropriate for employees that need help in one specific area rather than entering into an ongoing careerdevelopment coaching relationship. Don’t assume you need to step in and coach before asking employees what they are looking to improve upon. Instead of coaching them yourself, you may be able to provide them a resource or direct them to someone else who can assist them. Prioritize Feedback: Employees who receive daily feedback from their manager are three times more likely to be engaged than those who receive feedback once a year or less. While coaching greatly increases employee engagement, it is not always a possibility while amid a crisis. Try to make a habit of taking note

of things you see but may not have the time to address at the moment. Prioritize setting aside time to talk to your team members immediately after the work is complete. Consistency in this area will not only improve your relationship with your team but also help you to avoid the same challenges in the next crisis. Knowing when to apply the coaching vs. manager role is one of the greatest techniques a leader can possess. Helping employees develop under your leadership will lead to increased trust, engagement, efficiency, and productivity no matter what business challenges may arise. Mary V. Davids is an executive career and leadership development coach and owner of D&M Consulting Services, LLC. For more career tips and advice, visit www.slaytheworkplace.com or follow @MVDavids on Instagram and Twitter. n


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SOCIAL MEDIA

Step Into Your Personal Power Online Shifting your thoughts in this way allows you to build new neuralpathways that reinforce the new beliefs instead of the old ones. And that is critical to seeing yourself as powerful.

BY DR. TRACY TIMBERLAKE

This issue has highlighted so many powerful women. We celebrate that and love to see women claim their contribution as power players across all industries. I will always advocate and encourage women in this regard. I think branding themselves as powerhouses in the digital space is more important now than ever. We are seeing the need for leaders to step into positions that allow them to fully exercise their leadership online, for the good of all. As a matter of fact, it is my life’s work to help them do so. So, if you are reading this and wondering how you can show up powerfully, how you can be seen as a power player, or how you can begin your journey to a powerful digital reputation, these three steps will help you get started.

Replace Negative Self-Talk with Positive Affirmations: Oftentimes we limit our leadership opportunities with our own limiting beliefs. I have worked with hundreds of women who have struggled to show up online because they don’t think they are photogenic enough, tech savvy enough, or whatever other negative thoughts come up in our head. The first step to showing up as your powerful self is to own it! Own your power and walk in that. Remove any “I’m not good enough thoughts” with “I am powerful because” thoughts instead.

Get Visible: If you want to be a powerhouse online, you need to get online. Find the platforms that work best for you and your industry and start showing up there. Create content that offers up tips, tricks, and strategies to your followers. Motivate and inspire them with your stories. Be authentic and allow them to get to know you in this new way. Focus on creating content that is educational, entertaining, promotional or motivational in nature. Your consistency in this area will allow them to see you as a thought leader in your area of expertise, creating social proof that you are, in fact, a power player! Network with Other Power Players: Jim Rohn famously said we are the average of the five people we spend the most time with. If you keep powerful company, it’s inevitable that you will become powerful yourself. And this is 100 percent possible online. Start connecting through DMs on Instagram and LinkedIn. Try joining some Clubhouse chats where you can share your opinion about different topics and start building up a powerful network of leaders just like yourself. This strategy can go a long way because your reputation then spreads across platforms and even offline! Now is not the time to deprive the world of your power. It’s time to fully lean in, pull up a seat at the table, and show up as your whole self, especially in the digital space. Dr. Tracy Timberlake is an awardwinning business coach.

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MILLENNIAL

Millennials Must Take Control of Their Health and Safety

BY DAVID CANNADY

As every generation gets older they start thinking about life differently. Millennials are no different. However, 2020 has Millennials reaching our tipping point and reassessing what’s most important to us. This year, we have struggled with so many things. Sports and entertainment heroes like NBA Laker legend Kobe Bryant and Black Panther actor Chadwick Boseman tragically passed

away. We witnessed the rise of a political dynasty in President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama, who brought a level of honor, civility, motivation, and moral inspiration to our nation. However, we have reckoned with the opposing political styles of President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump, who some have argued have eroded our hegemonic world standing, decreased our moral superiority, and made us question what it means to be an American. Moreover, as Millennials, we are now in the middle of the second economic recession of our lifetime and we haven’t even reached age 40. My generation has had to grow up and grow up fast and take charge of our nation’s future during the culmination of criminal justice reform, increased unemployment, child rearing and childbearing, and a global pandemic that threatens every citizen, whether rich or poor. I myself, am a new father. My wife

gave birth during the peak months of the COVID-19 global pandemic. So, what is most important to this generation at this moment in time? I argue that it is twofold: health and safety. Let’s talk about health. During the Obama administration, our country’s leaders agreed to do a massive overhaul of our healthcare system. This landmark piece of legislation, former presidents only dreamed of passing through the halls of Congress, was achieved in 2010. Colloquially named Obamacare, President Obama succeeded in using the bully pulpit to move past massive pushback from conservatives and liberals. Even today, our country is arguing whether we should resend the legislation or make it stronger. But no matter what you think about the current legislation, more Americans have healthcare now than ever before. Unfortunately, as of today, more than 210,000 people in the United States have died from COVID-19 and President Trump has been infected by this virus.

As Millennials, we must take the issue of healthcare head on and make it work for all generations. There are certain things that should not be politicized and the health of our citizens is one of them. Currently, Florida is fully reopened. There are no state restrictions other than suggested guidelines surrounding 6-feet social distancing and mask wearing. However, we neither have a widely distributed vaccine nor do we have decreased infection or death rates due to the virus. Every day, more people are dying and more people are getting sick. It is clear that we cannot rely on our leaders in D.C. or in Tallahassee. Therefore, we must rely on our local leadership. That is where Millennials come in.

David Cannady is a prosecutor with the Broward County State Attorney’s Office and business owner. Email: info@davidcannady.com; Phone: 954-707-5030.n

FINANCE REPORT

Celebrate Black Women Entrepreneurs by Investing in Their Businesses

BY KEVIN CADETTE

Black women are nearly 14 percent of the female population in the United States, but 42 percent of all new women-owned businesses from 2014 to 2019. For black and Latinx-founded companies, 36 percent have female founders as opposed to 21 percent overall since 2015. But of the $276.7 billion in

funding raised by companies in 2018 and 2019, Black women founders accounted for just $747 million, according to Pitchbook. What is the rationale for Black women not being invested in at the same rate as everyone else? Investors looking to invest in startups are looking far beyond the presented proposal. They are critiquing the DNA of the founder and assessing if they can pull off what they are proposing, if they will be able to lead and pivot as needed to be successful. If Black women are not receiving funding, then that rejection says more about the investors than the founders. So why not black women? We can all conjecture why, but at the end of the day, if we want to celebrate Black women we need to invest in them. If we want Black women to flourish, we have to ensure they have the means to do so.

Investing in Black women founders improves the entire community. We are investing in ourselves. This year, Black founders have garnered more interest from venture capitalists in the midst of the Black Lives Matter movement, even during the COVID-19 pandemic. The VC industry “got a little woke” and Black founders received more reviews. Are we at the cusp of change? Possibly. At least the industry has taken a step in a positive direction. But we need to keep our foot on the gas as we are not going to have any semblance of equality with momentum alone. The journey continues, and we all know how hard it will be. When I review Black Angels Miami’s work in 2020, we have always kept Black women front and center. Black women have been prominent simply because there are

so many amazing Black women doing impressive things in tech. In 2020, our very first talk was from a Black woman fund manager and since then we haven’t looked back. In 2020, we have presented 12 amazing investment opportunities. Of those, seven were led by Black women. We did not have a female agenda. Those entrepreneurs and leaders simply represented the best of us. Half our board is made up of black women — Ok, that was on purpose, but our programming has simply been the best and brightest, and that is what women are. If you are interested in investing in startups, and enjoy being around like-minded individuals that believe in our philosophy, I welcome you to join us. Check us out at blackangels.miami and click on members. You can also follow us on twitter @blackangelsmia. n


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PINNACLE

Red Rooster Overtown Celebrates Much-Anticipated Grand Opening BY YOLANDE CLARK-JACKSON

this area the Harlem of the South,” Fleming said. Red Rooster Overtown had a rough start because of COVID-19. The grand opening was initially scheduled for this summer. The postponement left dozens of employees without work. Yet, the restaurant was able to persevere and host a grand opening on Dec. 3 where they served close to 150 guests, a little less than half the restaurant’s capacity.

You can’t miss The Red Rooster restaurant sprawled across the 900 block of 2nd Ave in historic Overtown. The building is a bold red and black two-story building with the restaurant’s name filled with large, round white bulbs. And, when you walk through the door, you’ll step onto a waxed terrazzo floor with colorful geometric shapes outlining the circular bar that is situated directly at the right of the entrance. Through the cobalt blue awning, you are met with the well-lit 1940’s style dining area. As you enter the outside patio “Why Overtown?” through the double doors, you will see Fleming has developed a 50-year old tamarind tree, swinging communities in New papasan chairs, a variety of plants, and York, New Orleans a small cocktail bar. It’s in this eclectic and San Francisco. So outdoor patio that Legacy Miami sat why Overtown? “It down to meet one of the restaurant’s was an opportunity to owners. Derek Fleming, who Red Rooster Overtown co-owner Derek Fleming stands in the restaurant’s terrace dining hall, adjacent to the main dining hall indoors. was recently named one of Modern Luxury’s Miami’s “Men of Style,” is an L.A.been marginalized. And, the way Fleming said they born New Yorker who has development has approached our were intentional about communities has been an insult. This found himself at the end of hiring people who a five-year journey to see is a chance for us to do something live in the community, culture-driven that is not half fetched his vision for Red Rooster and intends for the Overtown become a reality. but full throttle; something that reflects second floor of the Fleming is a real estate Black excellence.” restaurant to serve as a developer, community Fleming admits his aspirations for community resource. builder, and co-owner of the restaurant go beyond the Overtown “The upstairs during Red Rooster Overtown. He, community. “We want this to be a the day should be with famed chef Marcus tourist destination,” he added. “It’s used for communitySamuelsson, opened Red definitely about us and of us, but it is based organizations Rooster Harlem in 2010. not for Black people. It’s for everyone.” and nonprofits and For the last five years, With chef Tristan Epps in the local groups that need Fleming has been working kitchen preparing what Fleming calls, and don’t have a on this project alongside “food that is eclectic with a southern The brightly-lit sign beams at night outside Red Rooster Overtown, located at 920 space to congregate,” Samuelsson and Michael and Caribbean flavor profile,” they N.W. 2nd Ave., across from the historic Lyric Theater. he shared. Simpkins to bring back to hope to appeal to a broad audience. Besides being The menu covers dishes from chicken life a building that once held do something change-making; an proud of the acquisition of artwork by the iconic Clyde Killens Pool Hall, a and waffles, to bay scallops, and grilled opportunity to do something for a Black artists who show at the Whitney popular late night destination for Black yellowtail snapper, which Fleming said neighborhood that deserves it, for Museum of American Art, he is just performers and celebrities during times is his favorite. a neighborhood that hasn’t had the as proud of the ice cream shop, The of Jim Crow segregation, including Fleming said when customers best of attention and inclusion,” he Creamery, that opened to the public this leave the restaurant, he wants them Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Nat explained. “Instead of someone else summer while the restaurant remained King Cole, Sam and Dave, and to say: “I’ve never been to a place coming into this neighborhood, why closed. Muhammad Ali. like that before. The experience was not Black-owned businesses come in Black communities have “After doing my research, I started amazing. I learned something new. I’m and invest in this neighborhood and been neglected, and they have to see the correlation between Harlem so excited for Overtown.” provide jobs and opportunities?” been underserved, and they’ve and Overtown and why they called n


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LEGACY BRIEFS YOLANDA CASH JACKSON CREATES LARGEST ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Becker, a multi-practice commercial law firm, announced that Management Committee Member and Government Relations Shareholder Yolanda Cash Cash Jackson Jackson has created The University of Florida Levin College of Law’s largest endowed scholarship fund. Jackson, who received her J.D. from UF Law in 1990, had long envisioned a program designed to recruit academically talented graduates from Historically Black Colleges and Universities to UF Law. With Jackson’s initial gift, plus other alumni contributions in the Spring of 2020, the HBCU Pathway to Law fund quickly surpassed $100,000 in commitments. In honor of civil rights icon John Lewis in July, Sarasota developer Hugh Culverhouse donated $1,000,000 to the new scholarship fund. The HBCU Pathway to Law fund will help UF Law enroll at least five HBCU graduates annually with full tuition scholarships. These students will be known as John Lewis Scholars and receive enhanced engagement opportunities with the UF Law Black Alumni network. Jackson said she hopes her donation will motivate additional contributions from UF Law alumni, friends of the law school, law firms, bar associations, corporate entities and charitable foundations in honor of John Lewis and the strong traditions of America’s HBCUs.

NATALIE PINER PROMOTED TO VICE PRESIDENT AT MCCLATCHY

Natalie Piner has been promoted

into the role of Vice President, Strategic Business Partner for News for McClatchy People team, which owns media outlets including the Miami Herald. Piner Piner has worked for the McClatchy People team for the last 15 years in a variety of leadership roles, including most recently as the Director of Talent Acquisition. Prior to that she served as the East Regional HR Director. As strategic partner, Piner will collaborate with newsrooms and be a full participant in news leadership, contributing ideas across a range of issues, including training opportunities, diversity and inclusion initiatives and career-path planning for news staff.

MONICA RICHARDSON NAMED MIAMI HERALD EXECUTIVE EDITOR

The Miami Herald’s parent company, McClatchy, has named Monica Richardson as its first Black executive editor in the newspaper’s 117-year history. Richardson The 30-year newspaper veteran was previously the senior managing editor at the Atlanta Journal Constitution. “We are thrilled to welcome Monica to Miami,” Kristin Roberts, McClatchy’s senior vice president of news, said in a statement. “She has a strong record of leadership in local journalism at one of the great metro newsrooms in the country. Now, she brings her commitment to accountability journalism and a track record of successful digital innovation that serves local

audiences.” Richardson officially joins the Herald as the top editor on Jan. 1, 2021.

EVAN SHIELDS ELECTED TREASURER OF MIAMI-DADE DEMOCRATS

Evan Shields was unanimously elected treasurer of Miami-Dade’s Democratic Executive Committee at its December organizational meeting. “I believe Shields we need a trustworthy leader with an organizer’s spirit who can get things done,” Shields stated on his website prior to the election. “As an activist, educator and business leader, I’ve embodied these traits in all that I do and believe I’m up to the task.” Shields has been an elected member of the Democratic Executive Committee since 2019. He’s a member of the Miami-Dade Democratic Black Caucus, and a former Membership Chair of the Downtown Dems. In the 2020 election cycle, he was a founding board director of the Northeast Miami-Dade Democrats. Throughout the pandemic, the group built broad coalitions across the community and recruited a diverse team of more than 150 volunteers that, among other things, staffed early voting sites, and adopted 40 Election Day precincts. Shields earn his MBA in corporate finance and commercial real estate from UNC Chapel Hill.

BLACK WOMAN IN TECH CREATES NEW FUNDRAISING OPPORTUNITIES FOR HBCUS Dominique King is the first to bridge a funding platform for Historically Black Colleges & Universities via a single mobile app. The “I Heart My HBCU” app allows users to donate spare change to

any of the 104 HBCUs in one place. “When creating this app, it was important for me to encourage HBCU alumnae to support all HBCUs,” King King said. “Users can easily adjust how much or how little of their spare change they share to their five favorite HBCUs.” A Howard University grad, King said she is passionate about her efforts to preserve the viability of those institutions. Users can download the I Heart My HBCU app in iOS or Android stores and link their bank account. The app rounds up each credit or debit card purchase to the nearest dollar. The spare change will then be donated to the user’s five favorite HBCUs. As a non-profit organization, 80 cents of every dollar will go towards funding student scholarships, student emergency funds, sports programs, academic Programs, campus upgrades, and endowments, to name a few.

DANIELLE COHEN HIGGINS MAKES HISTORY ON MIAMIDADE COUNTY COMMISSION The Miami-

Dade County Commission appointed Danielle Cohen Higgins as the first AfricanAmerican to represent District 8. The civil rights attorney fills the Higgins seat vacated by Miami-Dade’s new mayor Daniella Levine Cava. Higgins was selected by a 10-1 vote in a special meeting after commissioners decided to make the appointment rather than spend taxpayer dollars to hold a special (CONTINUED ON PAGE 21)


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LEGACY BRIEFS JSD’S MORRIS COPELAND HONORED FOR CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY

Morris Copeland, director of the MiamiDade County Juvenile Services Department, is a 2020 honoree of the David Lawrence Jr. Champion for Copeland Children Award, presented by the Children’s Trust. JSD is the processing facility for all arrested juveniles in Miami-Dade County. In this capacity, Copeland continues to advocate passionately for at-risk children in the community. During his tenure as the director, JSD has documented a 62 percent reduction in juvenile arrests and a 39 percent reduction in arrests of children 12 and under.

LUCIDO GLOBAL KELLER WILLIAMS PARTNERS REALTY

let’s talk REAL ESTATE.

election for district residents. After receiving a scholarship to the University of Florida, Higgins became the first person in her family to attend and graduate from college. In 2006, she earned her Juris Doctorate from Florida State University School of Law and was admitted to the practice of law at age 24. In 2009, she opened her own civil litigation law firm, Cohen Law, with the mission of providing excellent, yet cost efficient, legal services to small businesses and individuals. Cohen has an extensive track record of public service. She recently sat on the board of directors for the South Florida American Heart Association, served as a Young Ambassador to the Miami Children’s Health Foundation, and worked as a mentor and board member with Take Stock in Children. She was also elected to sit on the largest statewide board of trial attorneys, the Florida Justice Association.

According to the Children’s Trust, Copeland is deeply committed to developing and implementing innovative and humane juvenile justice strategies that will have a positive impact in the lives of the atrisk children and families served by the JSD.

He earned a Master’s in English Education at Florida International University. n

DR. BILLY JONES ELECTED PRESIDENT OF BROWARD COLLEGE FACULTY SENATE

Dr. Billy Jones has been elected president of the Faculty Senate at Broward College, where he serves as an English professor. In 2018, Broward College’s South Campus recognized Jones as Professor of Jones the Year. Jones earned a doctorate in Education and Leadership at Barry University.

DID YOU RECENTLY GET A PROMOTION? ARE YOU A NEW HIRE AT A SOUTH FLORIDA COMPANY? DOES YOUR FIRM HAVE A MAJOR ANNOUNCEMENT TO MAKE? Let us know by sharing your good news in Legacy Briefs. Send a press release and your professional headshot to rm@miamediagrp.com.

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MEDIATION/ARBITRATION

Power Series Part 2: Resolution Happens When Both Parties Feel Empowered

BY STANLEY ZAMOR

I conveyed the homeowner/petitioner’s demand for $110,000 and the insurance company’s reply offer was $7,000 of “new money.” Apparently, nine months prior the insurance company paid the homeowner for what repairs they needed and they paid the two mitigation company’s bill for $8,000. But today the homeowner’s attorney is representing that the insurance company underpaid the loss, owes for

destroyed home contents, and owes incurred attorney’s fees/costs to date. Negotiations lasted for two more hours. Eventually, the homeowner reduced their demand to $80,000 and the insurance company made a final offer by stating they will pay the homeowner $35,000 towards all home repairs and damaged contents, but they’ll pay the attorney’s fees/cost separately once the court determines what that amount is at a later “feehearing.” The homeowner smiled and nodded in acceptance saying, “Finally! We can end this and move on.” But then his attorney stopped him and asked for some private time. Twenty minutes later the homeowner’s attorney invited me back into their room and said her client decided to not accept the insurance company’s final offer. As I ended the mediation, I invited both sides to rejoin me in the main conference room. I reminded the parties that they made more progress today than ever before and as they

continue to litigate they should remember that they’ve opened new means of communication and that there is a resolution as long as they remain focused on retaining the power/control of their case before going to trial. Almost three months went by, and as usual, I decided to send a followup email to the attorneys, asking them how things have progressed since the mediation. Only the defense attorney responded, sounding very upbeat and saying they resolved the matter several weeks after with the homeowner and the homeowner’s new attorney helped structure an acceptable agreement as soon as they got on the case.

THE TAKE-AWAYS: 1. The parties should feel empowered “throughout” the mediation process. 2. Party self-determination can only be achieved if the parties know it exist. 3. Mediation is an opportunity to explore creative solutions that should be flexible and should not meet set unknown interests.

4. Know your legal representation and have more than one strategy meeting with that specific advocate prior to mediation. 5. For better negotiated outcomes, and to take advantage of the mediation process, the parties should always feel they are informed and in control throughout the mediation process.

Stanley Zamor is a Florida Supreme Court certified circuit/family/county mediator and primary trainer and qualified arbitrator. Zamor serves on several federal and state mediation/ arbitration rosters and mediates with the Agree2Disagree (ATD) Mediation & Arbitration, PA throughout Florida. He regularly lectures on a variety of topics from ethics, cross-cultural issues, diversity, bullying, and family/ business relationships. szamor@ effectivemediationconsultants.com; www.effectivemediationconsultants. com; www.LinkedIn.com/in/ stanleyzamoradr; (954) 261-8600 n


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Legacy Miami's Most Influential and Prominent Black Women 2020  

Legacy Miami's Most Influential and Prominent Black Women 2020