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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2018


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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2018

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2018

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Hospice Doesn’t Stop for the Holidays It’s our team’s gift to you. After hours, on weekends and during the holidays, VITAS® Healthcare is always available for your patients and their families. Verify hospice eligibility and refer patients 24/7/365 by phone, online or via our mobile app.

4. Introducing Legacy Miami’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals 6. COVER STORY Chen Medical Center A ‘Lifesaver’ for Underserved Seniors By Josie Gulliksen

8. MIAMI-DADE BEACON COUNCIL By Michael Finney SPECIAL TO LEGACY An Unexpected Encounter Inspires 20- Year Hospice Career By Marcia Rami 10. PINNACLE By Josie Gulliksen MENTAL HEALTH Physician Delvena Thomas Prescribes Holistic Solutions for Mental Wellness By Zach Rinkins

Will Obamacare be on life support soon? A federal judge in Texas has ruled that the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which requires Americans to at least have some sort of health insurance, is unconstitutional. For now, it’s business

Imperial Point. “You pop right back into the hospital. Why? Because you can’t control your blood pressure. You can’t control your diabetes. And now, with diabetes, you’re possibly looking at the loss of a limb… or worse.” Watkins, one of Legacy’s 2018 Top Black Healthcare Professionals, is hopeful the judge’s ruling will not stand. It will likely be appeared up to the U.S. Supreme Court. In the meantime, Legacy magazine celebrates the highly-skilled, compassionate Black men and women in South Florida who keep us healthy, both mentally and physically. Russell Motley Legacy Editor-in-Chief rm@miamediagrp.com

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS ChenMed: chenmed.com FP&L fpl.com Jessie Trice Community Health Center jtchc.org Miami-Dade Technical Colleges careerinayear.com

800.93.VITAS • VITAS.com

as usual for the ACA. The judge has yet to issue an injunction to stop state and federal officials from enforcing what is now the law of the land. However, this ruling puts health coverage at risk for tens of millions of Americans, including those with chronic and preexisting conditions. What’s more, the ruling would make it more difficult for hospitals and health systems to provide access to high-quality care. The billion-dollar question is: If not Obamacare, then what? South Florida healthcare executives I talked to say they’re disappointed by the ruling, not only for the industry but for their patients. “Once you come into the hospital, even if I give you the best care, the best treatment, if you can’t take the prescription that I provide you because you don’t have insurance, what happens then? That cycle,” said Jonathan Watkins, 39, CEO of Broward Health

University of Miami welcome.miami.edu VITAS Healthcare vitas.com

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine And view additional articles at http://bitly.com/legacymagazines Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine #BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder Shannel Escoffery Director of Operations Karla Cohen Designer

Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief Yanela G. McLeod Copy Editor Joe Wesley Cover Photo

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS “The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accords to every one regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back.”


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2018

Introducing South Florida’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals for 2018

Adam K. Berry, M.D. CEO & Medical Director; Attending Physician Vital Care Medical Center, Inc. ; Royal Palm Beach Medical Group

Dr. Maina Gatonye Regional Chief Medical Officer Chen Senior Medical Center

Sandra McLean Vice President/ Chief Nursing Officer Baptist Health South Florida

Jerisa Berry, M.D. Medical Doctor Royal Palm Beach Medical Group, Vital Care Medical Center, Secure Your Fertility

Marie Denise

Gervaise, M.D. Assistant Dean for Admissions and Diversity University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Karl Michel Medical Doctor Genesis Foot and Ankle Institute, Inc.

Sonia Smith, M.D. Medical Doctor Total Health Medical Centers

Khari Bridges, MD, MBA, FAAD Medical Doctor Miami Dermatology and Cosmetics

Colette Brown-Graham, M.D. Medical Doctor Complete Healthcare for Women

Dr. David Channer Primary Care Physician Chen Senior Medical Center

Roy Hawkins SVP & Chief Executive Officer Jackson Health System Jackson North Medical Center

Austin Ifedirah President/CEO Eon Health

Elizabeth Nasser

Dr. Gianni Neil Medical Director of Centers Chen Senior Medical Center

Olayemi Osiyemi, M.D. Founder, CEO, and President Triple O Medical Services and Triple O Research Institute, PA

Marcus St. John, M.D. Medical Doctor Baptist Health South Florida

Andrea Stephenson-Royster Executive Director Health Council of Southeast Florida

Stephen Symes, M.D., FACP Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Assistant Vice President, Joint Venture Surgery Centers Baptist Health South Florida

Olunwa Ikpeazu Community Care Plan (Medical Director) Etniciti Inc (Co-founder and CEO)

Laurel Dalton Executive Director T. Leroy Jefferson Medical Society

Marke Dickinson Chief Marketing Officer Chen Senior Medical Center

Sammy King Chief Financial Officer Jessie Trice Community Health System

Nicholas Lawrence Director, Clinical Operations Catherine Lowe, M.D., P.A.

Nikia Phillips, APRN, FNP-C, CNM CEO/Owner NP Family Practice & Midwifery Care

Jidlyne Remy-Cherelus

Freud Telemaque, M.D. Medical Doctor Larking Hospital

APRN-FNP BC Jessie Trice Community Health System

Hansel Tookes III Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Henri Ford, M.D. Dean University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Catherine Lowe, M.D. Medical Doctor Catherine Lowe, M.D., P.A.

Chad Ritch, M.D. Assistant Professor of Department of Urology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Jonathan Watkins

Chief Executive Officer Broward Health Imperial Point

Tamu Fourie Assistant Vice President and Associate General Counsel Baptist Health South Florida

Darline Francoise APRN Jessie Trice Community Health System

William McCormick, Jr. CEO Americlaims Billing, Inc.

Tracey McKelton, MSN, ARNP, FNP-BC Family Nurse Practitioner Primary Medical Care of Florida, Inc.

Marguerite Rowell

Jeane Russell Nathan CEO Carib Medical & Wellness Center, Inc

Marguerite Rowell Assistant Vice President of Nursing Miami Cancer Institute

Arlenna Williams Assistant Vice President Baptist Hospital/Baptist Health South Florida

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2018

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2018

COVER STORY

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2018

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

Chen Medical Center A ‘Lifesaver’ for Underserved Seniors

Dr. Maina Gatonye steps inside ChenMed’s medication room where prescriptions can be filled for senior patients immediately following their doctor’s appointment.

The Chen Senior Medical Center’s mission is to honor seniors with affordable VIP healthcare that delivers better health, with a goal of also improving their overall health and wellness at no cost to them. The medical center has been providing these services since 1985 and continues to expand its reach. “We’re proud to be conduits providing VIP healthcare to the least among us,” said Marke Dickinson, the center’s Chief Marketing officer. “For us, it’s truly a calling that we have, and we’re blessed to be able to deliver to seniors in seven states soon to be eight and 13 markets across the U.S.” Aside from providing the traditional medical services of labs, x-rays, echocardiograms and ultrasounds, Dr. Maina Gatonye, Regional Chief Medical Officer of the center, said the center also offers several health and wellness classes. Classes include acupuncture, nutrition and cooking classes with chefs performing healthy cooking demonstrations for seniors, heart health classes, and on-site exercise classes accompanied by the Silver Sneakers program. To help maintain and improve balance, the center also offers Tai Chi. Gatonye joined the company in 2005 as one of its first primary care physicians on staff. He oversees the centers in Broward County, Jacksonville and will also oversee the West Palm Beach market with three centers opening in 2019.

Wanting to go above and beyond, Gatonye said the Chen Senior Medical Center offers additional services that assist senior patients with housing and other needs. The center was not as comprehensive when it started in 1985 as a small family solo practice. During the first 15 years, the medical center in Miami Gardens had a small group of doctors. However, founder Dr. Jenling James Chen quickly realized that within the underserved area in which he was working, there were seniors with very poor access to primary care. He immediately saw this as opportunity to assist underserved neighborhoods. In the mid-1990s, when the Medicare Advantage Program was being developed, the Chen Senior Medical Center signed up for the program so it would cover the 20 percent that the Medicare plan did not. “These were very sick patients in their mid-70s, so we became very adept at providing medical care to them and managing their on-average five preexisting conditions, Gatonye said. Something else unique to the center’s system is its small patient panels of about 450, where most centers include more than 2,000. Operating this way allows physicians to see patients every month. Frequent visits help stabilize patients. The center has also eliminated the traditional use of paper records by building technology to maintain electronic

Marke Dickinson

medical records. The current state of the healthcare industry, with a shift of Medicare to a value-based model, is something the center has been practicing for 25 years. “For a long time, Medicare was quantity based, meaning seeing a large number of patients, but now the focus is on a smaller amount of patients but better outcomes,” Gatonye explained. “We have a lower number of admissions and readmissions and excellent clinical care. Because of this, we get rewarded by CMS, or Center for Medicare and Medicaid, the government center that runs the programs for seniors. The system has shifted from quantity to quality, value-based care.” As a Result of the value-based care, the medical facility has been published in two major studies that highlighted how the center’s methods decreased patient’s emergency room visits by 34 percent and inpatient hospital stays by 28 percent. With high quality care too often beyond the reach of those most in need, such as low income seniors managing several chronic conditions, Dickinson explained the center serves several roles in its patients’ lives. “We see our role as bringing better healthcare, meaning better health outcomes, to these patients and bringing down the cost of healthcare,” Dickinson said. “We do this by being proactive and seeing them frequently for tests and

diagnosis not only in their bodies but also their lives.” According to Dickinson, on average Chen Senior Medical Center patients live five to six years longer than other patients with their health status. The average age of the center’s patients is 72, and 90 percent of their patient population fall into the federal poverty limit. Two-thirds are from a minority population. About 60 percent female. At Chen Senior Medical Center, the role of the sales and marketing team is to reach out and find consumers in typically low-income neighborhoods, which they call “primary care desserts” – places where patients would have to drive or take public transportation to get to their healthcare provider. Outreach into the community through civic and religious organizations is another of the center’s initiatives. “We want to be where seniors are and hopefully convert them into Chen Senior Medical Center patients,” Dickinson said. To expand its reach into Black communities, the center partners with the NAACP and attends health fairs, particularly in communities with Haitian, Caribbean, and Hispanic-American populations. Staff provides both language assistance and medical care for conditions that may be unique to these specific ethnic groups. The Chamber of Commerce typically coordinates community events, so they have broad community participation. “We are passionate about providing a level of what we call “social justice” in our community,” Dickinson reflected. “… For far too long, the citizens that are the least among us get the worst that we have to offer as a society.” With more than 50 centers stretching as far east as Pennsylvania and as far north as Illinois, more and more seniors are benefitting from the center’s quality healthcare.

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AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2018

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24 2018

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY MIA MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS GROUP TO THE MIAMI HERALD

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MIAMI-DADE BEACON COUNCIL

Ventures Pilot Program Connects ‘Structurally Unemployed’ with Career Pathways

By Michael A. Finney As I walk around Downtown and Brickell, I am frequently approached by economically distressed individuals looking for spare change or help to improve their immediate situation. Many are recently homeless and in need of a livingMichael A. Finney wage job to turn their circumstances around. This is a familiar problem repeated over and over throughout Miami-Dade County and in most urban communities throughout the United States. The good news is Miami’s homeless population is not being ignored. The Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust has made significant progress addressing the needs of our homeless population. During 2016, the Trust reported the following accomplishments: 15,988 homeless adults and children

were placed into emergency, transitional or permanent housing 7,092 homeless adults and children were placed into emergency housing 325 homeless adults and children were placed into transitional housing 8,571 formerly homeless adults and children were placed into permanent housing 49,456 contacts were made by Homeless Trust-contracted homeless outreach teams There are many other social impact organizations throughout Miami-Dade County actively engaged in providing necessary resources to individuals not addressed by the Trust. On December 1, The Miami-DadeBeacon Council — in partnership with Career Source South Florida, Allegany Franciscan Ministries, Sun Trust Bank, South Florida Blue Foundation, Bank United, Goodwill Industries, Collective Empowerment Group, Transition, Inc., Lotus House, OIC of South Florida, United Way of Miami Dade, and The Children’s

Trust — joined forces to launch the pilot program for Miami Community Ventures, a collective impact initiative designed to connect structurally unemployed individuals to living wage jobs. MCV delivers long-term economic benefits to our community, providing comprehensive wrap-around support services in areas of: transportation, job training, childcare, success coaching, financial literacy and social services. The target audience of eligible participants includes public assistance recipients, exoffenders, the disabled, and at-risk youth ages 19-29. Communities selected for the MCV pilot are: Liberty City, Overtown, and Goulds. They were selected based on quantitative data (poverty rate, crime rate, unemployment rate and available funding sources). The four-month pilot will secure living-wage jobs for 77 residents. The Beacon Council (and all participating partners) encourage our extensive network of employers to commit full-time living wage jobs to MCV-eligible

Five years into my job as a VITAS call center admissions coordinator, I had an unexpected encounter in a grocery store that convinced me of the Marcia Rami immense value of the hospice profession. It was 2003, and I had stopped for groceries on my way home, still wearing my VITAS® Healthcare badge. A family of strangers rushed over to me, embraced me and literally lifted me off the floor, calling me an angel over and over again. They thanked me profusely for taking such good care of their dying mother, for being there when they needed help the

misconceptions and myths about hospice care, many of which are rooted in cultural beliefs or attitudes about death and dying that do not align with today’s hospice practices. Hospice is not about giving up in the face of a terminal illness. It is not about hastening death. Hospice care focuses on managing symptoms, easing pain and making every day dignified by surrounding patients with physical, emotional and psychosocial support near the end of life. As one of my physician colleagues describes it, hospice “helps people live as well as they can, for as long as they can live well.” Conviction, confidence, compassion Some physicians and healthcare professionals feel unprepared to talk about death and dying, which limits their ability to have open, honest conversations about diagnoses, prognoses and options for compassionate end-of-life care.

C O M M U N I T Y

H E A L T H

S Y S T E M ,

I N C

Michael A. Finney is president and CEO of the Miami-Dade Beacon Council.

An Unexpected Encounter Inspired My 20-Year Hospice Career most.I was in tears. So were they. Even though I was not the VITAS employee who provided direct care to their mother, I remember saying to myself, “Wow, this company has such a lasting, profound impact on people. If our families view everyone who works at VITAS as an angel, this is the company I want to work for until retirement.” Now 20 years into my career, I espouse the benefits of hospice care daily as director of market development for the VITAS Dade-Monroe program. When I discuss the benefits of hospice care with physicians, hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, patients and their families, I want them to feel and understand my passion about what a wonderful service hospice is. I want to earn their trust. Let’s talk about a difficult topic One of the biggest challenges in this profession is dispelling the

T R I C E

candidates. Employers receive on-thejob training funds for each job filled, and MCV candidates receive comprehensive wrap-around services.. We anticipate completing the pilot in April 2019. MCV is not limited to three communities. Instead of a pilot program in Goulds, Liberty City and Overtown, we plan to expand MCV across Miami-Dade County to annually target 500 to 1,000 jobs. With innovative thinking, we can develop a model that economically empowers people who may previously have lost hope of ever making a living wage. MCV is about more than finding a job. It’s an opportunity to change a life for the better. For additional information, contact MCVinfo@beaconcouncil.com.

SPECIAL TO LEGACY By Marcia Rami

J E S S I E

I want healthcare partners to realize that hospice offers an immensely valuable service for patients and their families when curative treatments are no longer an option. I know firsthand the benefits of compassionate hospice care, which VITAS provided to my own mother before she died peacefully in 2017. And I reflect frequently on that random grocerystore encounter with an ever-grateful family, an experience that reminds me daily about what hospice care is all about. . Marcia Rami is director of market development for VITAS® Healthcare, the nation’s leading provider of end-oflife care, for Miami-Dade and Monroe counties. She is one of Legacy’s 2018 Most Influential & Prominent Black Women in Business and Industry.

Sammy King, CFO

Jidlyne Cherelus, ARNP

Darline Francois, ARNP

Congratulations to our honorees for being recognized as

Legacy Magazine’s Top Black Healthcare Professionals 2018

@JessieTriceCHS

jtchc.org


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PINNACLE

By Michelle F. Solomon

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2018

For Walgreens Executive Alie Darbouze, Service Is a Prescription for Success

Alie Darbouze As a young girl growing up in Haiti, Walgreens executive Alie Darbouze remembers people visiting her godmother Viola and leaving much better than when

they first arrived. Viola was a nurse. “Anyone that would show up, whether they had money or not, would be cared for,” said Darbouze, adding that it was the pharmacy aspect of what her godmother did, much of it using holistic treatments, that interested her. When Darbouze was 17, she trained to assist with the country’s immunization program. As part of a national vaccination campaign, healthcare workers would visit children in rural areas who didn’t have access to health services. The experiences with her godmother and helping with immunizations deeply impacted her. “I saw what a difference education and medication could make in saving people’s lives,” she said. When she finished high school, Darbouze moved to South Florida, along with her two sisters, and a brother. She

immediately enrolled in Miami-Dade College (MDC), but knew she wanted to move quickly through the program, part of which was learning English since her first language was French. She knew she had to master the basics, but “I was in a hurry to make a difference,” she said. She had one goal in mind – to attend pharmacy school. Darbouze cut the time she spent at MDC in half, and soon was on her way to Tallahassee to Florida A&M University’s College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. An internship at Walgreens would lay the foundation for her career. After obtaining her Doctor of Pharmacy degree, she remained with Walgreens as a pharmacist. Soon after, she became a pharmacy manager at Walgreens in Miami Gardens. “Sometimes the older patients would come in and they would just want

to talk,” said Darbouze. “Spending that time with them, listening to their stories, was just as, if not more, important than dispensing pills.” That dedication to the community is what remains important to Darbouze. Now she’s one of five healthcare supervisors in the south Florida region for Walgreens. She oversees 88 Walgreens pharmacies on the West Coast of the state. Darbouze is also on the board for the family-owned Primary Medical Care Center in Miami and Fort Lauderdale, which provides assistance to Haiti, Jamaica, and the Caribbean. “I’ve been with the company 21 years,” Darbouze said. “It just feels right. When I was younger, my vision was to make a difference growing up, and I feel that Walgreens created the platform for me to realize my passion.”

Dr. Delvena Thomas Prescribes Holistic Solutions for Mental Wellness

By Zach Rinkins If you always feel sad, believe mistakes from your past hold you back,

Dr. Delvena Thomas or if you hate activities you used to enjoy, you might have a treatable mental illness. And, it’s more common than most think. “A mental illness is anything that affects the way you think, your mood, and any of your behaviors,” said Delvena Thomas, D.O., an osteopathic psychiatric

physician with medical offices and a spa in Fort Lauderdale and Aventura. “The way you think could also apply to personality pathologies. It could be anxiety or nervousness.” According to the National Institute for Mental Health, nearly one in five U.S. adults (44.7 million) live with a mental illness. Additionally, the National Alliance on Mental Illness revealed nearly 60 percent of adults suffering from mental illnesses did not receive services within the last year. “Mental illness covers a wide variety of disorders that are the result of some maladaptation or abnormality of the brain,” Thomas shared. “Typically, someone knows they have a mental illness because it becomes intrusive. It affects the way they are able to engage and interact with other people. It also affects the way they interact within their environment whether it’s at home, on the job, at school or in their personal life. People see a disruption in their life.” The American Psychiatric Association

describes mental disorders as behavioral or psychological syndromes or patterns. They are diagnosable by a licensed mental health professional after a person experiences several symptoms beyond a two-week period. Mental illness can be provoked by past or current traumas, brain chemistry changes, environmental impacts, or be genetically inherited. “The first sign of mental illness is that you are not able to operate the way you once were,” Thomas added. “Maybe you are not sleeping well, not handling stress well or engaging friends like you used to.” Thomas said using psychiatric medication can help patients balance brain chemistry and better handle their illnesses. Despite increasing national acceptance of mental challenges, NAMI information reveals only 1-in-4 African Americans seek mental health care, compared to 2-in5 whites. “The stigma of mental illnesses is greater in the Black community,” Thomas explained. “For some reason, we feel that we are always Teflon. We feel like we

can’t be sick or mentally weak because we are supposed to be stronger. As Blacks, we hold ourselves to a higher standard when it comes to health care. Ignorance and faith have been influences. I am happy to see more clergy members encouraging their parishioners to see mental health professionals.” Thomas said mental illnesses are treatable and prescribes an action plan for success. “Patients and families must build effective communication and support systems,” she shared. “And, nutrition and physical fitness are very important. Mental illness can be prevented by adopting great health habits.” Thomas encourages people to engage their health insurer, community mental health centers, or psychology.com to find a mental health professional that can help them overcome mental health challenges. Log on to www.drdelvena.help, for more information. Log on to www.drdelvena.help, for more information.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2018

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CONGRATULATIONS TO THE TOP BLACK HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS FOR 2018 including our very own:

HENRI R. FORD, M.D., MHA

MARIE-DENISE GERVAIS, M.D.

CHAD R. RITCH, M.D., MBA

STEPHEN SYMES, M.D.

HANSEL TOOKES, M.D., MPH

Dean and Chief Academic Officer University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Assistant Professor of Family Health and Community Medicine

Assistant Professor of Urology

Associate Professor of Medicine

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Assistant Dean for Admissions and Diversity

Associate Co-Director, UHealth International

Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusion

Medical Director, IDEA Needle Exchange

On behalf of your colleagues and friends at the University of Miami Health System and Miller School of Medicine, congratulations on this well-deserved honor. We thank you for your commitment to the health and wellness of our South Florida community and beyond.

UMiamiHealth.org


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2018

Celebrating Excellence in Healthcare Chen congratulates four of its own healthcare professionals, recognized as South Florida’s Top Black Professionals in Healthcare 2018 by Legacy Magazine. This honor reflects their remarkable contributions and positive impact on healthcare and on Chen’s growth, as they continue to ensure seniors receive the best care and respect they deserve.

Dr. Maina Gatonye Regional Chief Medical Officer

Dr. David Channer Primary Care Physician

Dr. Gianni Neil Medical Director of Centers

Marke Dickinson Chief Marketing Officer

12 convenient locations to serve you across Miami-Dade and Broward Visit www.ChenMedicalCenters.com or call (888) 461-2436

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2018 Healthcare Issue - Legacy Magazine  

2018 Healthcare Issue - Legacy Magazine  

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