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Miami

"Providing News/Information and Connecting Florida’s Black Affluencers and Influencers"

BREAKING BARRIERS New Black Deans

MEET SOUTH FLORIDA’S ‘TOP BLACK EDUCATOR’ HONOREES OF 2018

University of Miami's

FLORIDA MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY WELCOMES NEW

Add Diversity to Leadership Team

INTERIM PRESIDENT

Dr. Laura Kohn-Wood Dr. Ryan Holmes

Dr. Henri Ford


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EDITOR'S NOTE

Miami

4. SOUTH FLORIDA’S TOP BLACK EDUCATORS OF 2018 6. POLITICS By Chris Norwood SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT By Gary Hartfield 8. SPECIAL TO LEGACY Hospice Needs Educators to Help Communities Understand Its Special Services By Shirley Thimothee-Paul 10. COVER STORY Shaping the Future of the University of Miami 3 Black Deans Lead the Way By Russell Motley Osamudia James Appointed Acting Dean of UM’s Law School By Russell Motley 14. EXECUTIVE SUITE Son of Former Chief Justice Campaigns for Florida Attorney General By Zach Rinkins MILLENNIAL By Jasmen Rogers-Shaw 16. PINNACLE A Dream Becomes Reality for FMU’s New Interim President Dr. Jaffus Hardrick Plans to Move the Miami Gardens HBCU Forward By Angeline Taylor 18. ABOUT TOWN • 100 Black Men of America, Inc. 32nd Annual Conference • Welcome reception for FMU Interim President Dr. Jaffus Hardrick • 5000 Role Models of Excellence Signing Day • ColorComm Miami launches Miami chapter 19. LEGACY BRIEFS SPECIAL TO LEGACY Preparing South Florida’s Businesses and Homes for the 2018 Storm Season By Richard Gibbs

Russell Motley and Yvensky Gedna

As a professor by day, this issue of Legacy South Florida holds special meaning for me. Teaching journalism at Florida Memorial University for the last seven years, I’ve learned firsthand what it takes to be an effective educator: logging long hours outside of class time, doubling as a life coach, coughing up personal funds for school supplies, grading students’ writing assignments during the wee hours of the morning, connecting graduating seniors with potential

employers – all while maintaining a healthy dose of patience. The sacrifices most educators make are endless. But they can yield high rewards, particularly when students realize their potential and make good on their career aspirations. It’s a process that must start long before students reach college, though. Enter the 5000 Role Models of Excellence Project, founded by Congresswoman Frederica Wilson. Recently, I participated in the organization’s unique tradition for young Black males graduating high school in South Florida. Similar to National Signing Day for athletes committing to a collegiate sports program, mentees in the 5000 Role Models hold their own signing day to tell the world to which institution of higher learning they'll be matriculating. The images are powerful. See page 18). Handsome Black teens,

sporting red custom-made Sean John ties, committed to changing their life’s trajectory for the better. Take Yvensky Gedna, 17, a graduate of Miami’s Turner Technical Arts High School. I had the privilege of standing with Gedna on signing day as he committed to Heidelberg University in Ohio, where he’ll play football and study business administration. He credits the 5000 Role Models for saving his life. “I wouldn’t be on the same path as I am now,” said Gedna. “I’d be where everyone expects a Black man to be at this age – in the streets.” Gedna is the first in his family to attend college. And paving the way for his younger brother and sister, he said hopes he’s not the last. Educators and villagers teaming up to transform boys into men.

Russell Motley

Editor-in-Chief, Legacy Miami rm@miamediagrp.com

Subscribe to and view the digital version of Legacy Magazine Facebook: Facebook.com/TheMIAMagazine Twitter and Instagram: @TheMIAMagazine #BeInformed #BeInfluential #BlackHistoryMonth Dexter A. Bridgeman CEO & Founder Zachary Rinkins Editor-at-Large Shannel Escoffery Associate Editor

Russell Motley Editor-in-Chief Yanela G. McLeod Copy Editor Md Shahidullah Art Director

Member of the Black Owned Media Alliance (BOMA)

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS "The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and na�onal antagonisms when it accords to every person, regardless of race, color or creed, full human and legal rights. Ha�ng no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all hurt as long as anyone is held back."


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THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, STAFF, FACULTY AND STUDENTS

Welcome Dr. Jaffus HardSick

Interim President

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Introducing South Florida's Top Black Educators of 2018

Judith Case Literacy Coach Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Michael Christie, Ph.D. Senior Lecturer Florida International University Department of Biomedical Engineering

Jessie M Colin, PhD, RN, FRE, FAAN

Belinda Daise School Counseling Director Broward County Public Schools

Derrick Gilbert

Dr. Ryan Holmes Asst. VP of Student Afffairs/Dean of Students Univeristy of Miami

Courtney Kambobe Program Director Crockett Foundation

Jamal King Elementary School Counselor Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Chandra Mickles

Derek Negron Principal Carol City Middle School

John Pace III Assistant/Region Superintendent of Central Region Office Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Stephanie Pierre Educator Dade Public Schools

Latoya Porter Teacher Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Alexia Rolle, Ed.D. Department Chair of Student Services Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Donald Roomes Instructor and Assistant Chair, Management & International Business Florida International University

Jana Rutherford Assistant Professor of Marketing Barry University

Cisely Scott Principal Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Porschia Shelton Middle School Educator School District of Palm Beach County

Darwyn Allen Sr. Social Science Teacher School District of Palm Beach County

Elodie Billionniere Associate Professor Miami Dade College InterAmerican Campus

Olveen Carrasquillo MD, MPH Professor of Medicine & Public Health, Chief Division of General Internal Medicine University of Miami

Tammy Freeman English Teacher/BCPS Teacher of the Year Monarch High School

Michelle Garcia, Ed.D. Dean of Academic Affairs Johnson & Wales University, North Miami Campus

Marie Denise Gervais Assistant Dean for Admissions and Diversity University of Miami/ Miller School of Medicine

Brian Knowles

Tisa McGhee Associate Professor Barry University

Winfred Porter Jr. Assistant Principal/ BCPS Assistant Principal of the Year Marjory Stoneman Douglas H.S.

Neisha Richie Reading & Writing Interventionist Ray of Hope Academy-Florida LLC

Manager - Office of African, African American, Latino, and Gender Studies The School District of Palm Beach County

Dionne Stephens Associate Professor of Psychology Florida International University

Doctor/Associate Professor/Optometrist Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry

Stephen Symes, M.D. Associate Dean Diversity and Inclusion/ Associate Professor University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

School District Educator and Director of the Bold Leadership Excelsum Palm Beach County School District/ Bold Leadership Excelsum (BLX)

Thomas Walker, Ph.D Associate Dean, Business Administration Broward College

Steve White Educational Consultant Hattie's Child

Professor and Director of Nursing PhD Program Barry University, College of Nursing and Sciences

Van Williams Dean Palm Beach State College

Corvette Yacoob Interim Director NP and DNP Specialization Programs Barry University


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POLITICS By Christopher Norwood

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 2018

Black Voters Must Support Black Excellence in Politics

Black excellence is a phrase that expresses the importance of AfricanAmerican achievement in all forms. We recognize this excellence in the arts but not so much in politics. We readily support Black art and collect it whether visual, musical, or theatrical. But when it comes to Black politics, we don't patronize candidates who support and exemplify Black thought or the human rights of black families. We often choose party over family. We often misled by people who look like us. You don't have to be Black to support and embrace African-American values in public policy. Pro-Black isn't an ethnicity. It’s a philosophy. White men can jump and Michael McDonald has soul. I recently attended the National Black

Family Conference (at Hampton University) where author and educator Dr. James Peterson delivered a powerful discussion about “The Influence of Culture-Based Practices on Improving Educational Outcomes for AfricanAmericans.” Dr. Peterson brilliantly critiqued the blockbuster universally praised film “Black Panther,” produced and directed by Black men and which stars a who’s who of Black acting talents. It illustrates what Dr. Peterson calls Black people’s greatest resource, our ‘Vibranium’ – Black film, Black music, Black art – Black culture. This film has the potential to inspire not just the African-American community, but also the broader black community including African, Caribbean, and Afro-Latin American immigrants, and even the African diaspora.” The $1 billion success of the “Black Panther” film shows that culturally relevant Black art can be commercially successful and produce historic shifts in

pop culture. It shows that the Black community's support of the arts can drive others to the theaters, which in turn creates enormous economic potential. Sociologist Patricia Banks makes this point as well. Banks argues that: "While many observers believe that the value of art is determined by its intrinsic properties...rare and unusual talent is not enough to vault an artist from obscurity to the spotlight. For art to be recognized as worthy it must have champions such as collectors who nudge it forward to be granted entrance into the canon." Our “Vibranium” is our culture and we should utilize it in political spaces as well. Too often we think of patronage as coming from exclusive singular philanthropic individuals. We don’t think enough about communities of patrons; groups of folks who support candidates that matter to them. In a community of patrons with monetary resources, word-of-mouth promotion and critical discourses are all the more powerful.

Today, an extraordinary young man is running for governor of Florida as a Democrat. Currently the mayor of Tallahassee, Andrew Gillum he has served 15 years in municipal government service in our state's capital. His resume of elected office is literally twice as long as the four other Democratic candidates combined experience. And he just so happens to be African American. When 30 percent of the Florida Democratic Party is African American, our support should be lifting him above the fray so the masses can see him. As a community we can support our own. Our challenge is to continuously define and redefine what is beautiful in our body politic. The solution is readily available. We just need to imagine a world that doesn't yet exist so we can then work for what is to come. Christopher Norwood, J.D. is the spokesman for the Democratic Black Caucus of Florida and principal of The Norwood Consulting Group.

SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT By Gary T. Hartfield

SBD Supports Education to Drive Business Growth

Nelson Mandela once said, “Education is the great engine of development.” At Small Business Development, we recognize the importance of continuous learning and routinely seek opportunities to help our certified firms acquire knowledge and grow their businesses. Our Small Business Week 2018 events were a recent example of our efforts to do just that. Commissioner José “Pepe” Diaz and I had a spirited discussion about the contributions of our local businesses to the economy, which gave me the opportunity to educate some attendees about the advantages of becoming certified in Miami-Dade County’s Small Business Enterprise Certification Programs. During the rest of the week, we devoted day sessions to targeted training

and development workshops for participants in the construction, architecture and engineering, goods, and services programs. Those in attendance were able to learn from expert panelists representing various counties, departments, and agencies about best practices for success in their industries. Feedback has been decidedly positive and is just one indication that SBD is on the right track to supporting continuing education for our firms. Our theme for the week was: “Seek to Learn. Build to Grow. Develop to Sustain.” Though Small Business Week is now over, we are dedicated to helping our firms continue that stride for the rest of this year and beyond. SBD has several events planned for the near future to educate firms about processes and projects specific to Miami-Dade County. Among these are workshops aligned to contracts for services that are crucial to our community’s recovery after natural disasters.

Last year, the county’s Emergency Debris Removal pre-qualification pool was utilized to ensure that small businesses were employed in the critical task of clearing streets and alleyways in the wake of Hurricane Irma. As Miami- Dade County implements an even more aggressive and preemptive response plan during this hurricane season, SBD will host several workshops focused on those county contracts that are linked to disaster-related services. Besides trainings driven by community need, SBD will facilitate workshops that recognize business owners’ needs as well. Many small businesses are burdened with the administrative demands of entrepreneurship and show a crucial need for back office support. Small business owners find themselves alone or with very few employees juggling mounds of paperwork just to manage the day-to-day, internal processes of a business. SBD wants to bridge that gap with a series of workshops to address standard

business operations such as human resources, project management, and planning and scheduling. This business series will challenge entrepreneurs to reevaluate the state of their businesses, reflect on areas in need of improvement, and develop a course of action for implementing better business practices. Finally, we will continue to offer general business training and development sessions for our certified small businesses. Regardless of what trends exist in an industry, basic standards for successful business practices remain the same. Newbies and even seasoned veterans in need of a refresher can all benefit from general business development workshops. We are confident these sessions will help to educate our certified business community and improve firms’ capacity to successfully compete. Gary Hartfield is division director for Small Business Development, a division of Miami-Dade County’s Internal Services Department. Email: Gary.Hartfield@miamidade.gov Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/MiamiDadeISD


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SPECIAL TO LEGACY

Hospice Needs Educators to Help Communities Understand Its Special Services By Shirley Thimothee-Paul

I have been a registered nurse for 20 years and have worked with VITAS® Healthcare, the nation’s leading hospice care provider, for almost five years. I know from observation that hospice has much to offer patients and families. I’ve seen someone struggle to hold down a job and care for a sick relative, then choose hospice, and suddenly find relief through help from a hospice team: a doctor, nurse, social worker, hospice aide, chaplain, volunteer and more. I see someone’s final months and weeks made more comfortable by hospice services that alleviate their physical pain and go a long way toward easing their mental pain. Hospice takes care of family

pain too. Increased Access to Hospice It would be great if more black patients and families had access to hospice. That is something VITAS and I have been working on. There are so many hospice misconceptions that people in our community are reluctant to use hospice services. This is where being an educator comes in – specifically a VITAS community liaison. VITAS has identified a lot of underserved communities, matching community liaisons to the area’s demographics. Here in South Florida, community liaisons serve Black, Haitian, Hispanic, Afro-Caribbean and veteran communities. These are people with strong ties to another culture where older generations tend to question any new ideas about death and dying. I teach that hospice is about living well to the very end. Hospice addresses

pain – if you are being treated by a specialist and they can’t make you better, what’s the point of having to deal with unbearable pain, too? Some hospice patients rally, because they’re not as exhausted as when they were in pain and dealing with labs and diagnostic tests. Hospice is Free I teach communities that hospice is free for anyone on Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance. As the nation’s leading hospice company, VITAS has the resources to provide complex care to patients with cancer, heart disease, COPD, etc. VITAS has invested in technology. There is an app to help doctors identify hospiceeligible patients right from their phones. We can provide extras such as music therapy, Paw Pal® visits, volunteers as well as Memory Bears and bereavement support for family members. We say we improve the quality of life at the end of life, and we do.

It Takes Education Misinformation about hospice is why I am out in the community, teaching at different Broward venues like assisted living facilities, churches, not-for-profit organizations and hospitals. I also teach end-of-life care at Broward universities and colleges. Sometimes hospice seems too good to be true. That’s why it takes a team of educators to explain it. For more information about hospice services or VITAS Healthcare, call 866.759.6695, or visit VITAS.com. Shirley Thimothee-Paul is a VITAS community liaison serving the South Florida region.

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VITAS Invests in Education Hospice isn’t difficult. It’s just different. That’s why we have educators. VITAS educates every step of the way. • We educate patients and their families about hospice, what to expect and how to care for someone you love. • We educate the community about what hospice is, where it happens, who pays for it and when to consider it.

• We educate referral sources—physicians, nurses, social workers, case managers, facility administrators— about pain management, psychosocial support, how to have the hospice conversation, how to identify a hospice-eligible patient. VITAS invests in reference material, in teaching moments, in CEs and CMEs. Our goal is to get you to think about death and dying in different ways.

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COVER STORY

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10, 2018

Shaping the Future of the University of Miami 3 Distinguished Black Deans Are Leading the Way

By Russell Motley

Dr. Ryan Holmes admits he’s often asked this question: How’d he become the associate vice president of student affairs and dean of students at the University of Miami (UM)—all before the age of 40? “I thought I’d be doing more [now at 39] to be honest,” said Holmes, whose initial career path included performing in a couple of moderately successful R&B and hip-hop bands. He’s now singing a very different tune. In an unprecedented move, Holmes is one of three Black full-time deans that UM has hired within the last year. The others include Dr. Henri Ford, dean of UM’s Miller School of Medicine, and Dr. Laura Kohn-Wood, dean of the School of Education and Human Development. “To see three Black deans at a non-historically Black college or university is phenomenal,” said Ford. “I don’t know that any other place can boast such an accomplishment.” On a humid summer afternoon, Holmes, Ford and Kohn-Wood all gathered for the first time to pose for Legacy’s photo shoot, in front of the iconic green and orange “U” sign, standing tall in the heart of the Coral Gables campus. The result was historic. “It’s extremely exciting and humbling to be in the company of the By Russell Motley

degree from Howard University. “We’re at a point where you’re only 50 percent likely to exceed your parents and their socioeconomic status, so we’re going to need all the brains in University of Miami Deans Henri Ford, Laura Kohn-Wood, and Ryan Holmes the School stand in front of the iconic "U" in the heart of the Coral Gables campus. of Education two distinguished gentlemen,” said to think about how we can progress Kohn-Wood, who started her position that traditional route of social mobiliJuly 1, after serving as an associate ty through education.” professor and chair of UM’s Ford comes to Miami after serving Department of Educational and as vice president and chief of surgery Psychological Studies. “I’m very at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles. excited about what it means to The Haitian immigrant, who grew up exemplify and show diversity on in Brooklyn, said it was the campus.” deployment of UM’s medical team to Kohn-Wood said her priority is his homeland, following the deadly supporting cutting-edge education earthquake in 2008, that helped innovation while working convince him to accept the job. Ford collaboratively with faculty, staff and said his primary purpose as dean will students. be to inspire—leading faculty and “Education has historically been students at the Miller school campus the route for social mobility in this to make breakthrough discoveries and country, but we’re at a point where clinical interventions. that’s stalled for a lot of people,” said “The first order of business is to Kohn-Wood, who earned a bachelor’s understand the local culture,

understand the needs of the medical school constituents,” said Ford, who started June 1. “ But at the same time, also make sure we are addressing the needs of the people of South Florida.” As dean of students, Holmes and his team assist students for a myriad of reasons, from guiding Greek life on campus to solving academic challenges to intervening personal setbacks with drug and alcohol abuse. Holmes said he wants to break the stereotype of what a trip to the dean’s office means. “What we’re moving towards here is to try to get students out of the principal’s office feel,” said Holmes from his corner office in the Whitten University Center. “[Instead] it’s a place where they can go for advocacy, a place they can go for support and empowerment.” Holmes has worked in higher education since 2002, most recently serving as assistant vice president for Student Support at University of Texas – El Paso. That’s around the time he decided to trade his mic, singing with the soul group Mental Metropolis, for a career in academia. He hasn’t looked back since. “Our students need to see the diversity at the administrative level, so they can see themselves in those positions, so they can continue to aspire toward their own success,” said Holmes.

Osamudia James Appointed Acting Dean of UM’s Law School

For Osamudia James, joining a prestigious firm after graduating cum laude from Georgetown University’s Law

Center sounded exciting. Yet, it wasn’t quite her calling. So after just two years of working with a group that focused on white-collar crimes, James pursued her first love of teaching and writing, which landed her 10 years ago at the University of Miami’s law school. “I write about identity and law, specifically how race changes the

applications of law, the development of the law or the consequences in legal application,” said James, whose work includes “Opt-Out Education: School Choice as Racial Subordination,” published in the Iowa Law Review. In July, James started her most challenging role at UM. She’ll serve as acting dean of the law school while Dean Patricia White takes a sabbatical

through December. James said she’s ready for the challenge, which includes contributing to the university’s strategic planning process and hiring new faculty. “I’m excited to see increases in Black leadership across campus,” said James, a former Legacy Miami Top Black Educator honoree.


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Legacy of Leadership and Inclusion The University of Miami congratulates the 2018 Top Black Educators in South Florida—including Ryan Holmes, associate vice president for student affairs and dean of students, and Drs. Olveen Carrasquillo, Marie Denise Gervais, and Stephen N. Symes of UM’s Miller School of Medicine—for building a legacy of inclusion in education. The University is also proud to recognize Dr. Henri Ford, dean of the Miller School of Medicine, and Laura Kohn-Wood, dean of the School of Education and Human Development, who are featured with Ryan Holmes in this issue of Legacy magazine, for their exemplary scholarship and leadership.

miami.edu

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MILLENNIAL

Black Students Must Not Be Social Casualties of Increased School Safety Measures

By Jasmen Rogers-Shaw

The history of the education system in this country is a precarious one to say the least. Public education has been used as a tool for segregation, erasure of Native culture, and criminalization. And while the more overt marginalization seems to have been quelled (after all, Black kids can legally sit in the same classrooms with white kids), there are more covert and insidious things going on in our schools. Miami organizations like Power U Center for Social Change are building power within youth who are willing to fight back against a crumbling education system. In their October 2017 report titled “Miami-Dade County Public Schools: The Hidden Truth,” the center used research and testimonies of several

Miami-Dade County students to paint a vivid picture of the true climate of schools. On a national and local level, Black students are disproportionately impacted by exclusionary discipline (arrests, out-of-school suspensions, etc.). In Miami-Dade County, in the 2015-16 school year, there were 324 school-based arrests. Black youth represented 51 percent of Black school-based arrests, while only representing 21.9 percent of the student population. Nationally, Black students make up 15 percent of students enrolled in schools across the country but accounted for 39 percent of those suspended out of school at least once. Black students are also more likely to be referred to law enforcement for disciplinary problems, further solidifying the school-to-prison pipeline. Yet, at the state and local level, lawmakers are failing to take serious steps to thwart these incongruities. During the 2018 legislative session,

Miami Dade College congratulates Elodie Billionniere on being recognized by Legacy Magazine as one of South Florida’s Top Black Educators for 2018.

Elodie Billionniere, M.Ed., Ph.D. Associate Professor

We salute your contributions to higher education and steadfast commitment to serving future generations.

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the Florida Legislature passed a bill that would fund the Guardian Program. Given the clamor about school safety post the Parkland school mass shooting, the Guardian Program will allow school districts to opt in to increasing “security” personnel (i.e. police) on campus and allowing teachers to be armed on campuses. With all that we know about how our Black children are already criminalized, what could possibly go wrong with this program? For our Black students, EVERYTHING. So what do we do? According to the youth at Power U, the Miami-Dade County School Board and school boards across the nation must divest crucial funds away from police being present in schools, and invest that money into more restorative measures that guarantee positive long-term outcomes for students. Restorative measures include: more counselors and more restorative justice initiatives. The school system must also invest in

educators who are the cornerstone of this institution. If we continue on this same path with an education system that leaves Black children behind, significantly crippling their possibilities for higher-level education and advancement, the future of our communities looks grim. For more information about the work of Power U Center for Social Change, visitwww.poweru.org. To hear more policy solutions from the youth of Miami-Dade County, join us at “Here Comes the Boom: An Assembly for Black Women and Girls,” June 22-23 at Miami-Dade College, Wolfson Campus. Visit www.herecomestheboom.org. Jasmen Rogers-Shaw is a community organizer in South Florida focusing on issues of racial and gender justice. Email: jasmen.m.rogers@gmail.com IG: @thebeautyofthesoul Twitter: @beautyofthesoul


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EXECUTIVE SUITE

Son of Former Chief Justice Campaigns for Florida Attorney General By Zach Rinkins From the steps of the Florida Supreme Court in January, Sean Shaw, a Sean Shaw debates on the political scion, floor of the Florida House secondof Representatives. generation attorney, and state legislator recently launched his campaign to become attorney general for the state of Florida. If Shaw has his way, on August 28, he will defeat his fellow primary candidates to become the Democratic nominee for what he describes as, “The best office in the state.” “The people of Florida are your client,” asserts Shaw, a graduate of Princeton University and the University of Florida’s law school. “You wake up every day trying to figure out how to protect them. The greatest thing you can do is serve others.” In 2016, the Jacksonville-bred and

Tallahassee-raised litigator was elected state representative for District 61. His platform emphasizes the opioid crisis, gun violence, and criminal justice reform. He also received endorsements from the Florida Professional Firefighters, Florida Education Association, and Florida Police Benevolent Association, and former U.S. senator and Florida governor Bob Graham. A general election victory would yield Florida its first Black attorney general. Making history is the Shaw family way.“ When you have someone like Leander Shaw as your father, it just affects how your life goes,” said Shaw referring to his father who was Florida’s first Black Supreme Court chief justice. “I really believe in this idea of public service. I grew up around it.” Sean Shaw is an insurance attorney, a lawmaker, and crisscrosses the state campaigning on the legal philosophy that, “Everyone is equal under the law.” Despite serving an unfinished first term as

an elected official, Shaw interjects, “These are not normal times.” “When I was considering whether or not to do this, I looked at what was going on around this country,” Shaw notes. “Some of the things the president was doing inspired me to do something. It’s the attorneys general around the country who are suing the president about privacy, net neutrality, seeking his tax returns, opposing travel bans, and challenging him on important issues.” Shaw, whose first statewide position was serving as insurance consumer advocate, insists, “The president has to follow the law just like anyone else.” He says if elected he aims to give Floridians a greater voice. “A lot of the bad stuff that emanates from Tallahassee is the result of the Legislature. We have constitutional amendments that the people passed that the Legislature doesn’t enforce. Whether it is public education, medicinal cannabis,

or the environment, there are certain things that the voters tell us to do and we don’t do them,” he disclosed. “The attorney general is the only person who can hold the Legislature accountable under those circumstances.” Shaw says residents deserve higher service standards.“I am someone that is going to be active and aggressive as attorney general in making sure that laws are enforced equally. Whether it’s the smallest fraudster on the state, the largest bad actor in the state doing wrong to the people, and anywhere in between,” Shaw declared. “Whoever is breaking the law is going to hear from Attorney General Shaw. Everyone has to follow the same set of rules.” Shaw says he takes the oath of office “very seriously” and promises to, “remember why I ran, remember what I told the people I would do if elected, and work every day to get it done.” For more information, log on to www.seanshaw.com.

The Barry University community congratulates and is very proud of these outstanding educators on being recognized as a Top Black Educator for 2018. Since 1940 we strive to provide students with a transformational education and experiences that help them become who they are called to be – to empower them to build inclusive communities, to accept responsibility to foster peace and nonviolence, and to engage in meaningful, collaborative and productive partnerships. We are grateful for these educators who, with their peers, facilitate the attainment of students’ goals. | barry.edu

Dr. Jessie Colin

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“Respect and Justice For All is not just a campaign slogan for Lizzet Martinez. It is what she believes in. I am proud to support Lizzet for County Court Judge and I encourage all to vote for her. We know the importance of having impartial judges on the bench. Lizzet Martinez will be fair, respectful and just.” — Rev. Carl Johnson

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PINNACLE

A Dream Becomes Reality for FMU’s New Interim President Dr. Jaffus Hardrick Plans to Move the Miami Gardens HBCU Forward By Angeline J. Taylor Ever since high school, Dr. Jaffus Hardrick said he recalls dreaming about this day. Now, decades later, Florida Memorial University’s (FMU) Board of Trustees has tapped the former Florida International University (FIU) administrator to serve as its interim president. Hardrick considers himself a transformational leader who vows to turn FMU around, following a revolving door of two presidents and three acting presidents within seven years. Hardrick said he wants to bring stability to South Florida’s only HBCU. “Everything I do is about purpose and

passion,” Hardrick said just prior to taking the helm. “For me, HBCUs still play a significant role in our nation. That’s my goal – to make FMU the premier HBCU in our nation.” Hardrick’s first official day at FMU was July 16. The weeks leading up to his start date have been hectic, according to Opal Comfort, FMU’s communication and marketing director. She said Hardrick’s days were spent managing his remaining responsibilities at FIU’s main campus in west Miami-Dade, where he served as vice provost for Student Access and Success and vice president of Human Resources for the past 10 years. Meanwhile, his evenings were spent transitioning into his new position at the Miami Gardens campus. “During his time as vice president, the Division of Human Resources has helped enhance our benefits and culture to the point that FIU has been named second best employer in Florida by Forbes Magazine and one of the Best Colleges to Work for by the Chronicle of Higher Education – repeatedly,” said FIU President Mark Rosenberg. When Rosenberg was asked to describe Hardrick in three words, he said: “determined,

passionate and caring.” He added that during Hardrick’s tenure at FIU, he shaped the organizational culture there by starting a wellness program, FIU’s Leadership Education Advancement Program, and the FIU Retiree Association. Under the auspices of student success, Hardrick created the Golden Scholars Bridge Program, an alternative admissions program for underrepresented students. He also expanded partnerships with the Miami-Dade County School District by connecting the community, schools, students, and parents to address students’ educational and social needs. “Many have admired him for being a visionary leader at FIU,” said Marybeth Gasman, director of the Penn Center for Minority Serving Institutions. “Given his experiences in human resources, student services, and community relations I think he will bring a strong skill set around relationships and service.”

EVERYTHING I DO IS ABOUT PURPOSE AND PASSION. FOR ME, HBCUS STILL PLAY A SIGNIFICANT ROLE IN OUR NATION. THAT’S MY GOAL – TO MAKE FMU THE PREMIER HBCU IN OUR NATION. Gasman’s said Hardrick, “understands and supports the mission of FMU,” which is to instill students with the values of leadership, character, and service in order to enhance their lives and the lives of others on the campus, in the community, and throughout the world

through transformational liberal arts education. “Everything in my career prepared me and led me where I am today,” Hardrick said. “Everything [we will do] is about moving forward and keeping our students excited.” Hardrick said he knows he must first take, “incremental steps … to move our university forward.” Those steps will be taken as he works to implement five strategic objectives to ensure an environment of excellence: • Student success (“Every student is expected to excel,” he said.) • Academic quality • Financial solvency (Hardrick wants to build a “sustainable” financial base and plans to diversify the FMU’s portfolio.) • Relationship development • Operational excellence “We want to make sure our students, when they walk across that stage to graduate, are prepared to compete globally,” Hardrick said. Moving forward, Gasman said FMU needs to “access the situation, focus on strengths and get to work immediately. FMU is very important and serves an important population of students,” she added. “FMU has a long history of contributing to the community. The key is making sure that everyone knows about the contributions and support of students – all too often HBCUs keep their success under wraps. In addition, FMU really serves a distinct population in southern Florida.” Hardrick agrees. FMU is one of 105 HBCUs in the country. He said that uniqueness coupled with the institution’s other attributes attracted him to the top spot. “It’s been a hidden gem,” said Hardrick, expressing his passion about the university. “[I want to] elevate the university locally, nationally, and internationally. If we don’t make ourselves relevant, we will wake up one day and become irrelevant and extinct.”


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ABOUT TOWN

The 32nd Annual Conference of the 100 Black Men of America, Inc., Diplomat Beach Resort, Hollywood, FL, June 13-17. 1

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1. Mayor Oliver Gilbert, 100 Black Men National Chairman Tommy Dortch 2. Basil A. Binns II, Wayne Barclay 3. 100 Black Men of South Florida mentees Ruben Williams, Jordan Sealy, Maurice Goosby 4. Florida Memorial University Collegiate 100 Member Paris Roper receives Collegiate Chapter of the Year

Welcome reception for Florida Memorial University Interim President Dr. Jaffus Hardrick, July 16, Smith Conference Center at FMU, Miami Gardens. 5. Miami Gardens Councilman David Williams Jr., FMU Board of Trustees Chairperson JoLinda Herring, Dr. Jaffus Hardrick, Miami Gardens Vice Mayor Erhabor Ighodaro 6. Dr. Jaffus Hardrick with FMU staff members 7. Opa-locka Councilman Matthew Pigatt, FMU Trustee William McCormick Jr., FMU National Alumni Association President Rochelle Cox-Hill 8. Dr. Jaffus Hardrick and his wife Janet Hardrick

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The 5000 Role Models of Excellence Foundation and the Miami Dolphins hosted the annual Academic Signing Ceremony, May 18, Hard Rock Stadium, as 58 Wilson Scholars signed scholarships to the colleges and universities of their choice. 9

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12 9. Paul Wilson Jr.

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10. Congresswoman Frederica Wilson 11. Miami-Dade School Board member Dr. Steve Gallon III, keynote speaker 12. Miami Dolphins players and alumni with Role Model Dr. Marcus Bright (right)

ColorComm, the nation’s premier organization for women of color working in communications, launches the Miami chapter, July 19, Wynwood Yards. 13. ColorComm Leadership Team: Tiffany Pittman, Keysha Rejouis, Ferin Pierre, Jessica Garrett Modkins, Isheka Harrison, Sonia Diaz, and Felicia Lopez-Walker 14. Arri Henry, Juana Jones, LaShannon Petit 15. ColorComm event attendees

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LEGACY BRIEFS Christie Grays' I Am CHIC Covers Wardrobe and Lifestyle South Florida trendsetter Christie Grays recently transitioned from an executive role at Baptist Health and is now focusing her attention on her business I Am CHIC (which stands for Christie Has It Covered). Her clientele includes businesswomen and TV news personalities. Clients can depend on her services to craft the right look and send the right message. Visit IAmCHIC.net for more information. Palm Beach Boys & Girls Club Appoints Glades-Area Advisory Board Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach

County established its first advisory board specifically charged to guide the direction of clubs located in the Glades area. The region includes six elementary school sites and one stand-alone teen center. The eight-member board is led by Chairman Spencer Davis and Vice Chairman Dr. LaTanya L. McNeal. Virgil Hawkins Florida Chapter Appoints Grasford Smith President-Elect Palm Beach-based attorney Grasford W. Smith was recently appointed president-elect of the Virgil Hawkins Florida Chapter of the National Bar Association. Smith, a litigation shareholder at the law firm of Jones Foster

Johnston & Stubbs, P.A., was inducted for a one-year term at the Legacy Gala during the Florida Bar Convention in Orlando. VHFCNBA began in the 1950s and has been the catalyst for the establishment of local, affiliate Black bar associations throughout Florida. It is a state affiliate chapter of the National Bar Association and consists of a network of nearly 1,000 attorneys statewide. Miami Urban League unveils final pillar of ‘Development Revolution’ with the Villages The Urban League of Greater Miami recently cut the ribbon on its We Rise

Educational Village, located at 860 N.W. 69th Street in Miami. The $40 million, state-of-the-art, gated community adds 150 affordable housing units into the heart of Liberty City. Amenities include a security gate, private clubhouse, pool, veranda, exercise complex, Wi-Fi, and more. The grand opening ceremony also highlighted a partnership with over 30 organizations charged to transform lives and restore the value of education in Liberty City. Did you recently get a promotion? Are you a new hire at a South Florida firm? Does your company have a major announcement to make? Let us know by sharing your announcement for possible inclusion in Legacy Briefs. Send your press release and a professional photo to rm@miamediagrp.com and include Legacy Briefs in the subject line.

SPECIAL TO LEGACY

Preparing South Florida’s Businesses and Homes for the 2018 Storm Season By Richard Gibbs Tropical weather in Florida is a way of life. The Sunshine State leads the nation in landfalling hurricanes with nearly 120. Properly preparing for hurricane season now can save you and your employees unwanted stress when a storm is imminent. The key is having a plan in place when that time comes. Here are some tips from Florida Power & Light Company (FPL) to help get you going as we head into the heart of storm season. Plan ahead: • Ensure your employees’ contact information is up to date. • Have a plan in place to communicate after the storm passes, e.g. set up a telephone number with a message featuring updates to inform employees of the status of company operations. • Establish a safe area away from exterior glass windows and doors if you plan to shelter at your business. • Identify what you need to secure your

building, important equipment and who will help; outline specific tasks and conduct a training session. • Bookmark FPL.com/outage and save 1-800-4OUTAGE to your cell phone to report and check the status of your restoration. • Download FPL’s Mobile App in the App Store or Google Play, or text the word "App" to MyFPL (69375). Generator safety • Read and follow all the manufacturer’s guidelines when using a generator to avoid dangerous shortcuts and ensure safe operation. • DO NOT directly connect your generator to your business’s breaker or fuse box. Power from a generator connected to a business’s wiring will "back feed" into utility lines – which can severely injure or kill a neighbor or utility crew working to restore power. • DO NOT run generators inside your business or garage. • Keep generators away from all open windows to prevent the fumes from entering your business. • Use a battery-operated carbon monoxide alarm to monitor possible

dangerous gas levels. • Turn off all connected appliances before starting your generator. • Turn connected appliances on one at a time, never exceeding the generator’s rated wattage. • DO NOT touch a generator if you are wet, standing in water or on damp ground. • NEVER refuel a hot generator or one that is running – hot engine parts or exhaust can ignite gasoline. • Have plenty of gas safely stored in gas containers to operate your generator. Before a storm: • Pay attention to instructions from public officials and the media. • Identify outdoor equipment, materials and structures that could become airborne and move them to a safe location. • Park vehicles in safe, protected areas such as a covered garage. • Charge your cell phone and keep it ready by obtaining portable chargers. • Make multiple back-ups of computer files and data and store records off premises. • Run a special voice message informing employees and customers on

the status of company operations. • Close offices with sufficient time to allow employees to secure their own homes, and inform clients that you’re closing early and when you plan to reopen. After a storm: • Make your safety and the safety of your employees a priority. • DO NOT travel, or ask employees to travel, until it is safe to do so. • Watch for downed power lines. Call 911 or FPL at 1-800-4OUTAGE to report fallen, dangerous power lines. Always assume that every power line is energized. • Take inventory to determine and record losses – based off of photos and recordings you took for insurance purposes. Always keep safety top of mind and see more valuable storm tips at FPL.com/storm.

Richard Gibbs, senior communication specialist with Florida Power & Light Company, is a member of FPL’s storm media team.


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“I WALK IT, LIKE I TALK IT.� Andrew walks it.

Thanks to Andrew Gillum, President Obama awarded Tallahassee the “Tech Hireâ€? designation for training workers for high-technology jobs. Because of Andrew’s leadership, Tallahassee KDVWKHORZHVWFULPHUDWHLQĆ“YH\HDUV$QGUHZĹ?V work led to Tallahassee being designated an “All American Cityâ€? for the second time.

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$V*RYHUQRU$QGUHZ*LOOXPZLOOUHEXLOG)ORULGD into a state that works for all of us. He knows HYHU\RQHGHVHUYHVJRRGSD\LQJMREV and access to quality, affordable healthcare. Andrew knows we need to strengthen our public schools, end the culture of high-stakes testing and LQFUHDVHWHDFKHUVDODULHVWRNDQGDERYH

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2018 Education Issue Legacy Miami  

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