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Contents

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COVER STORY

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STAGE/ART/EVENTS 32 BEATSCAPE 34 CLUB GRID 36 FILM 40 EPICURE 42 FOODIE FILE 43 ASTROLOGY 47

JUNE 19-25, 2013

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Messages M essag ges es & Send letters to Santa Cru Cruz uz W Weekly, eekly, e letters@santacruz. letters@santacruz.com .com or to Attn: Letters, 877 Ce edar St., Santa Cruz, 95060. Cedar Include city and phone number n or email address. Submissions may be edi ited for length, clarity or edited

JUNE 19-25, 2013

factual inaccuracies kno own to us. known EDITORIAL EDITO ORIAL EDITOR EDIT OR STEVE PALOPOLI PAL A OPOLI STEVE spalopoli@santacruzweekly.com spalopoli@santacruzw weekly.com

STAFF S TAFF WRITERS W GEORGIA A PERRY PERRY gperry@santacruzweekly.com gperry@santacruzw weekly.com

JACOB J ACOB B PIERCE jpierce@santacruzweekly.com jpier rcce@santacruzw weekly.com

RICHARD VON VON BUSACK BUSACK richard@santacruzweekly.com richar rd@santacruzw d weekly.com

CONTRIBUTING C ONTRIBUTING G EDITOR EDITOR CHRIS TINA WATERS WAT TERS CHRISTINA PHO TOGRAPHER PHOTOGRAPHER CHIP SCHEUER S C ONTRIBUTORS CONTRIBUTORS ROB BREZ B SNY Y, BREZSNY, PAUL M. M DAVIS, DAV VIS, PAUL GANT T, MICHAEL S. GANT, JOE E GARZA, GILBERT T, ANDREW GILBERT, MARIA GRUS SAUSKAS, GRUSAUSKAS, JOR RY JOHN, JORY CA AT JO OHNSON, CAT JOHNSON, KELL LY LUKER, LUKER, KELLY SCOTT MA CCL LELLAND, SCOTT MACCLELLAND, A VERY MONSEN, V M AVERY P AUL W AGNER PAUL WAGNER

A ART & PRODUCTION PRODUC CTION DESIGN DIRECTOR DIRECTOR KARA A BROWN BROWN KARA PROD DUCTION PRODUCTION OPER RATIONS OPERATIONS COORD DINATOR COORDINATOR MERC CY PEREZ MERCY DE ESIGNER GRAPHIC DESIGNER TA ABI ZARRINNAAL ZARR RINNAAL TABI ED DITORIAL EDITORIAL PROD DUCTION PRODUCTION SEAN GEORGE AD DESIGNER DE ESIGNER VA ANEY YCKE C DIANNA VANEYCKE

DISPLAY DIS SPLAY ADVERTISING ADVERTI ISING SENIOR ACCOUNT ACCOUNT EX XECUTIVE EXECUTIVE ILANA RA UCH--PACKER RAUCH-PACKER ilana@santa acruz.com ilana@santacruz.com A CCOUNT EXECUTIVE EXE ECUTIVE ACCOUNT DENI SE TOTO TOTO DENISE denise@santacruzw weekly.com denise@santacruzweekly.com OFFICE MANAGER MA ANAGER LIL LY S TOICHEFF O LILY STOICHEFF lily@santacruzw weekly.com lily@santacruzweekly.com

PUBLISHER PUBLI ISHER JEANNE HOWARD H WARD HO

PRESIDE PRESIDENT ENT & EXECUTIVE EXECU UTIVE EDITOR ED DITOR DAN D AN PU PULCRANO LCRANO

In Defen Defense nse of Feral Cats F erall Ca e Cats t Re: R ee:“W “Wild WildT Things” hings” (Cover, (C Covveerr, June June 12): Why Wh hy do do you yo ou pi rganiza ati t on ag ga ainstan other? T his pitton oneeor organization against another? This ar ticlle sshould hould h ave been b abou ut the the Project Projecct article have about Purr p ro ogramonl y.T .T hey d oar rem e arrkable program only. They do a remarkable an d gratifying gratif t fyying jjob. ob. T hey h ave d one eeverything ver e ytthing and They have done possib le to to safeguard saffeegu uar ard the the feral feeral ca at po pulati t on possible cat population inourcoun ntty ffor orm o any yyears an earswi e with thth eirvvvarious ar arious in our county many their p rograms. I h ave personally perrsonallly fed feed converted con nver e teed fferal eeral programs. have ca atsf t for fo orov veer 20 yyears eearssaft erth ey w eerreed umped b cats over after they were dumped byy th eirirr esponsible pet p o w wnersth at jus umped their irresponsible owners that justtd dumped th eir pet ca atts w hen th hey m ovved. e T here h ave their cats when they moved. There have beenv eerry ffew ewbir w birds rdsk killedinm ackyya arrdas been vvery killed in m myy b backyard as If feeedallca attsth atcom t come mein ntoiit.t.Ial soh avef e ffour o our I feed all cats that into I also have bir dfeeeders in m bac a kyya arrd d, an d on birdfeeders myy backyard, and onee on m myy fr on nt por ch.Wh enth heffferal eerra alca attsar ound, front porch. When the cats areear around, th rds d on ot com me as fr requ e uen entl tly. I h ave thee bir birds do not come frequently. have rrescued eescued ttwo wo bir ds th at ffell ell ou ut o ests, w h hich birds that out off n nests, which didn otrrresult eesullttinth bir d’sd emise.Bir dfffeathers eea atthers did not in theeb bird’s demise. Bird sshow how m e th e rresults esults o e on es th at did n ot gget et me the off th the ones that not

a way an d th ey cer tainlly w eere n ot en ndangered away and they certainly were not endangered sspecies. speci es.M ayb beat ottalo a off 3-5 bir rds in n 20+ yyears. eears. Maybe a total birds Wh erred ed oesClif Clif fffBixl fBi ler gget eetthi his figu fig uresfr ffrom, om, Where does Cliff Bixler figures tthee ttop th op o ead? I w ould lik o o kn now if h off his h head? would likee tto know hee ccould coul d eeven veen h andle a fferal er era al ca at.t P eople d ump handle cat. People dump p ca pet atts, n otffferal er era alca ats.M t Many an ny o eseeffferal er e alca ats t cats, not cats. offth these cats k eep th at po pulati t onun dercon nttrrol, w hich h keep theerrrat population under control, which w ouldbeou o utto nttrolwi thou uttth Pr ojecct would be out offcon control without theeP Project P p Purr rogram w hether a at h arrb borr, ffarms, arms, a program whether att a boa boat harbor, m alls, ed uca attional ffacilities acilities an a d oth her llocal ocal malls, educational and other a ar reasw e w heremi cean drrrats atts can be a p roblem. areas where mice and problem. M elanieSo belisn ot givin g an accu urate Melanie Sobel is not giving accurate a accoun nt o at in ntak ke an d fferal eeral ca at account off both ca cat intake and cat eeuthanization eu utthaniza ati t on n umbers w hen sshe he sa ssays ays th numbers when thee n umbersa attth ntaCr uzCoun ntty shelter shelterar re numbers at theeSan Santa Cruz County are u p. H er figur esar reecom pletely in acccurate— up. Her figures are completely inaccurate— jjusttllook jus ookonlin o or yyourself. ourse o lf.Itcov . It covers veerss a 3-y yeear onlineefffor 3-year p per iod fr ro om 2010, 2011 an d 2012. If yyou o ou period from and a ar re ggoing oing tto op rojecct a figur ak ke su urre iitt is are project figuree m make sure a accur ate, an d again againn oto ffth f theettop op o ourh o ead. accurate, and not off off yyour head. W houlda pprecia ateeeeverything ver e ytthing Pr P ojecct Weeesshould appreciate Project P h Purr as d one tto o tr d con nttrrol th at has done tryy an and control thee ca cat p po pulattion wi th ov veer m ore th an 20 yyears eears population with over more than

eexperience. xperrience. P eople th at d ump ca atts ar ot People that dump cats aree n not d umping fferal eerralca ats; t th ey ar umping dumping cats; they aree jus justtd dumping th eir i pett ca attssth th attth ey n olllonger ongerwis ih their cats that they no wish tto ottake akecar reeo of..T hey definitely definitely ar ot care of. They areen not rresponsible esponsible pet owners. ow wners.Ih avead e adopted opted I have thr ee pet ca atts (on ly six m on ntths three cats (onee onl only months o ld) ov veer th ast 20 yyears eears th at w eere jus old) over thee llast that were justt d umped in our o n eig gh hborrhood. dumped neighborhood. T hese o wn wners sshould hould be rresponsible eesponsible in These owners h avving th eirr pet ca attsn eu uterred.La e Laws awsh ave having their cats neutered. have beenm aderrregarding egga arrd ding mandatory mandatory d og been made dog n eu uterring— —w why n otca ats? t neutering—why not cats? SHIRLEY COLEMAN Aptos

Nestt Worth Worth o Havvingg re Having read ad a d your your o ar article, rtticle, “W “Wild Wild Things,” Things,” by b y Geor Georgia gia Perry, Perry, we we were weerre appalled appalled to to llearn earnh how ow wm m many an ny bir birds rdsar areekill killed edb byy cats ca attseeevery veery yyear. e r.W ear .W Weeh e have aveen noticed oticedour our neighbors’ n eighbors’cca cats attsfffeast eeastonb on baby aby bir birds rds rregularly. egularrly. Jus Just stinth in thee p past asttttwo wow ow weeks, eeeks, w wee had h adtttwo ad wo on n nests essts ttsonourp on our p property. roperrty ty. Both Bothn nests nests had h ad bir birds rds th that hat di died ed a att th thee p paws aws o off our neighbors’ n eighbors’ pet p ca cats. atts. W Wee llove ovve bo both oth ca cats atts an and d bir birds rds an and dh have ave a solution. so luti t on. W Weeen noticed oticed dth that at sp spring ring is w when henm most ost birds bir rds migr migrate ratet e tto o oourn our neighborhood eig gh hborrhood tto obuil build dn nests. ests.T t The he eggs eggsh hatch. atch.Dur During ing this per period, riod, th tthee b baby aby bir birds ds ar aree m most ost vvulnerable. ulnerra able. W Wee sugg suggest est th that at d during urring each each spring, sp ring, ca cat at o owners w ers k wn keep eep th their eir ca cats ats t in indoors. doors. This T hisso his so solution luttion nwilln n will n not otso ot so solve lveeth th theeeen en entire nttire problem, p roblem, bu but uttwillh will help elp sp spare areth theeliv lives veso e off newly n ewly h hatched atchedbir birds rdsw w who hoar areen not ot jus justtth thee old, o ld, si sick ckan and d dumb dd umbon ones esM Ms. s.Ac Achterberg hterrb berg thinkssar think areeth the heon ones esca cats atts p prey rey u upon. pon. As ffor o or fferal eerral al ca cats, atts, som something ething sshould hould be done d one tto op prevent reven ent peo people ple d dumping umping ca cats atts n no o llonger onger w wanted an anted e as pets. LIL PHILLIPS Aptos

Correction C Corre ection i Due to a copy y editor’s error, errro or, Stacey Daines’ posi position ition was misidentified in last week’s cover c story “Wild Things.” She is Shelter Op Operations perra ations Supervisor ffor o orthe the City of San Jo Jose ose Animal Car Care re & Services. Santa Cruz W SantaCruzW Weekly eeekly rregrets eegrreetstheerr the error. ror. o


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JUNE 19-25, 2013


Currents Chip Scheuer

JUNE 19-25, 2013

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PELLET GUNNING In the face of an EPA ban, D-Con maker Reckitt-Benckiser is the last company fighting to keep its anti-coagulant rat poison on store shelves.

Blood Lines

Shelf Life

Anti-coagulant rat poisons, a dangerous threat to wildlife, were supposed to be banned two years ago. Why are they still on local shelves? BY JACOB PIERCE

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tella McMillin remembers the day a dead coyote from Santa Cruz came into her lab for testing. When the examination started, McMillin, a scientist for California Fish and Wildlife, realized the cause of the animal’s death was probably rat poison. “It was very bloody inside,” she says. When an animal has died from anti-coagulant rat poisons, like DCon, their cavities and organs are often filled with blood—so much that sometimes all of it has drained out

of their heart. They’ve often suffered bruises under the skin. These special rat poisons, by stopping their blood from clotting, cause internal bleeding in an animal. “They almost look like a bloody sponge,” McMillin says. This particular coyote in 2006 tested positive for four different anticoagulant rodenticides. Tests on two dead mountain lions in 2011 yielded similar results—one tested positive for four anti-coagulants, and the other for two. The Environmental Protection

are endangered, have all tested positive for anticoagulants, according to California Fish and Wildlife. So have San Joaquin kit foxes—also endangered—plus bobcats and fishers. WildCare, headquartered in Marin County, began testing for rodenticides in 2006. So far, 69 percent have tested positive for anticoagulants, though it’s sometimes hard to get a clear sample, because some animals that come in for testing sometimes have shown signs of poisoning. These animals in most cases aren’t eating the poison directly. Brodifacoum is what environmentalists call a “secondgeneration” poison. If a rat or mouse eats some and gets sick, it might wander into an open field and become an easy target for wildlife. A predator that eats it will also ingest the poison. Animals are not the only casualties of brodifacoum. Every year, according to American poison control centers, between 12,000 and 15,000 children eat the stuff, which often comes in small colorful pellets.

Agency has been trying to ban these dangerous chemicals, like brodifacoum, since 2008, when the agency gave companies three years to come up with safer alternatives. The deadline came, and the EPA declared it would ban the chemicals, an announcement Santa Cruz Weekly reported in 2011. Three companies then waged legal fights to keep their items on store shelves. Now only Reckitt-Benckiser, the company that makes D-Con, is still fighting. Bald eagles, golden eagles, turkey vultures and the spotted owls, which

Many Santa Cruz environmentalists and naturalists are familiar with anticoagulants and are worried about their dangers. But if any opposition has mobilized, it hasn’t been very vocal. “It’s probably an issue we haven’t really addressed a much as we could have,” says Matthew Strusis-Timmer of the Santa Cruz Bird Club. “There’s so many issues that birds face. We have seen declining numbers of various species over the years in our county.” The San Francisco Board of Supervisors passed an ordinance in November 2011 urging businesses to take anti-coagulant poisons off shelves. Humboldt County, where rat poisons are very popular on marijuana farms, passed its own ordinance last spring urging

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Currents | RAT POISON businesses not to sell rat poisons of any kind. The ordinances don’t have any teeth, though, because it’s up to state and federal regulators to control the poisons. WildCare has been getting the word out in the North Bay Area about avoiding Reckitt-Benckiser items. But full-blown boycotts are tricky with a $32 billion company that encompasses French’s, Clearasil, Woolite, Lysol and Durex—or as Kacmarcik puts it, “everything from mustard to condoms.”

The Environmental Protection Agency has been trying to ban these dangerous chemicals, like brodifacoum, since 2008. If a national ban does go into effect and survives possible lawsuits from Reckitt-Benckiser, the poisons would leave stores like drugstores and Safeways, but licensed pesticide professionals could still apply them. Shoppers could still buy first generation poisons, which don’t typically kill predators.

Post-Poison Kelle Kacmarcik has a few tips for alternative ways of getting rid of rats and mice. The main one: eliminate any attractants, namely food, water and shelter. In a woodpile or patch of English Ivy, for example, a rat can tiptoe around in the dark undetected from predators. And while listening to Kacmarcik, Wildlife Solutions Manager for WildCare, an ivy bush starts to sound downright cozy. “They just love it, man. It’s so perfect

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for them,” she says. “It takes over a fence, and they can climb up that like it’s nothing. It’s a rat ladder.” Solutions like these are part of what environmentalists calls integrated pest management or IPMs—ways to eliminate pests without harming the environment. Kacmarcik helps households tackle prevention first and mechanical rat traps as a last resort. Kacmarcik worries that when people are killing foxes, hawks and owls, they only worsen rodent problems and further our dependence on poisons. The two most common victims are grey foxes and Great Horned Owls. “Everyone loves those animals, especially raptors—people find them fascinating,” Kacmarcik says. “They’re both super beneficial. They consume large numbers of rodents. But obviously when you poison a rodent, whoever eats that rodent becomes poisoned themselves.”

Endgame? Two years after announcing their intention to ban anti-coagulant rat poisons, the EPA filed a Final Notice of Intent to Cancel in January, hoping to protect kids, pets and wildlife. Reckitt Benckiser, which is headquartered in Europe, hasn’t had any comment for this story—nor for any story since Humboldt’s North Coast Journal made fun of a representative for spinning poison bans as a just way to spread disease. Maggie Sergio, a volunteer for Raptors Are The Solution, says the threats poisons pose to wildlife and children outweigh threats of disease. Sergio, who used to hold Kacmarcik’s job at WildCare, has been working for years to get dangerous poisons off store shelves. It’s forced her to learn a lot about environmental policy. “It’s been an education,” Sergio says, “and it’s been a frustrating education about how our system works and doesn’t work. But before 2008 we didn’t have the EPA on conference calls with multiple environmentalists. Now you have Raptors Are The Solution, Defenders of Wildlife, the American birding community, Earthjustice, Center for Biological Diversity and the Humane Society. Everybody was at the party. They’re all telling the EPA to do something about it. A lot more people know about it now. That gives me hope.” 0


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Briefs Petal Power

On any given day, downtown Santa Cruz bustles with buskers, magicians and even “energy readers” who will tell your fortune for spare change. The retail establishments include multiple New Age shops, the Serpent’s Kiss witchcraft supply shop and, until recently, the Happy High Herb Shop—an establishment selling legal high-inducing herbs such as salvia leaf. When the Happy High Herb Shop’s property at 227 Cathcart St. became available recently, Birch (born Michael Correll), the owner of Soquel Avenue witchcraft supply store Sacred Grove, decided to apply in hopes of gaining more foot traffic into his store with a downtown location. But according to Birch, the landlord of the Cathcart property, Robert Mariolo, came to visit the Sacred Grove shop and decided not to give them a chance to apply for the downtown property. “He looked around the shop for a few seconds and said, ‘This is a little too far out for me, you have strange merchandise. Let’s end this here,’” says Birch. Believing the shop is being discriminated against on religious grounds, Birch is now contacting lawyers to pursue a suit against Mariolo, who did not respond to our requests for comment. Birch says he contacted the ACLU, who weren’t sure how to help him. The issue has stumped city officials, as well. “They’re a retail shop. It’s not a church. I have no idea whether to say whether their suit would have merit,” says the city’s Economic Development Coordinator Peter Koht. While he shops for attorneys and explores options, Birch says he is refraining from using magical means to exact revenge. “We’re trying to keep it above board. We don’t go out and hex people,” says Birch. “Calling on justice is always allowed, and we’re not ruling that out. But right now we’re calling on justice through the regular, legal means.”

Could flower designers be the new chefs, with signature ingredients, power arranging and celebrity status? Can the farm-to-table concept be extended from food and wine to flowers? Those were just a couple of the questions that came to mind when writer Debra Prinzing, author of Slow Flowers and The 50-Mile Bouquet, spoke last week at a dinner at Watsonville’s Kitayama Brothers Farm.

‘We’re trying to keep it above board. We don’t go out and hex people.’ —Birch Amid a profusion of colorful Gerbera daisies, Prinzing encouraged the audience to choose local, seasonal and sustainable flowers, and to value high quality over low-priced imports with their hidden costs. Her message, as fresh as a spring bud with a perennial blooming season, was that the flower business is ready to go farm-to-table. The Kitayama family has been growing flowers for 65 years in our backyard, maneuvering end runs around the foreign competition to stay in the game. When founders and eventual top carnation growers Tom and Ray Kitayama could no longer compete with low-priced South American carnations, they switched over and became top rose growers. Eventually, low-priced Mexican roses whittled the Kitayama rose operation to its current level: a single bush, just for memory’s sake. Gerbera daisies are the current big thing—pink and orange are hot — and the Kitayamas think the time has come to appeal to the conscious consumer. Inviting Prinzing to speak dovetails with their mission to promote the idea that Americangrown is not only economically smart, but also sustainable. 0

JUNE 19-25, 2013

Witch Hunt


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Full Throttle Scotts Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Zero Motorcycles are reaching world-class speedsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;without gas BY JACOB PIERCE

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who seem to want to buy the says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just super fun. It can be t first weirdest looking car possible in ridden on- or off-road, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s glance, order to show off their reduced lighter and super quick.â&#x20AC;? Chris carbon footprint. Motorcycle Heimbuck aficionados have different doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look priorities. Bikers want a coolZero headquarters is tucked like an adrenaline junkie. looking vehicle that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going behind a Scarborough Lumber to get them made fun of when With short, combed hair, a store in Scotts Valley, with its theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re soaring up Highway 9. collared shirt, pale brown eyes back to Highway 17. First founded â&#x20AC;&#x153;Motorcycles tend to be a bit and a calm voice, the Palo Alto in 2006 as Electricross, the more on the conservative side native seems more like a high motorcycle company has a way of in terms of looking different,â&#x20AC;? staying on the cutting edge. school chemistry teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Simmons says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For the most Zero made big strides in battery the fun one everyone wants part, people want to buy a bike life in 2011, when it switched to have. that looks cool, not to stand out

Built for Speed

from tiny cylinder cellsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which as an electric, but to stand out as But beneath that cool, relaxed left pockets of unused space in a motorcycle.â&#x20AC;? exterior is a guy who likes to ride between cellsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to larger pouches, Zero also launched a new motorcycles that reach speeds of which fit together tighter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We smartphone application in almost 100 miles per hour. were able to get more range out of the spring. The bikes have a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because when you go it or more power because we could Bluetooth-enabled device that and ride, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re out having fit more cells in there,â&#x20AC;? says Brian transmits info about speed and fun, you get all that adrenaline out Simmons, an engineer for Zero. miles traveled to a userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s iPhone of your system for a little while,â&#x20AC;? That means a longer battery life. or Android device. The app keeps Heimbuck says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Until it all builds â&#x20AC;&#x153;And we also upped the voltage of track of how efficiently someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up again.â&#x20AC;? our system, which translates to riding, how much money a driver Heimbuck, vice president of more speed and more efficiency.â&#x20AC;? is saving by not filling up with Zero Motorcycles, is standing in Zeroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 breakthroughs were gas and how long itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s showroom, next to in speed. For the 2013 models, take to charge up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s everything the all-black, fully suspended FX the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s innovations were FULLY you want to know and more,â&#x20AC;? Stealth Fighter, which is plugged in acceleration and in design. CHARGED Heimbuck says. into the wall. Like all of Zero bikes, Chris The new Zero S bike, which is Heimbuck, it runs purely on electricity. designed for street riding, has it vice president This one happens to have all: a battery life of up to 137 miles, of Zero the fastest acceleration, and top speeds of 95 miles per hour An electric bike isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so different Motorcycles, on looks like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out of the new and acceleration comparable to a from a gas bike in terms of how the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Batman trilogy. The Zero FX goes high-end sports car. it works. The bikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s battery is Dual Sport (DS) from zero to 60 in under four The stylized new bikes come basically the fuel tank, its energy model. All Zero secondsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as fast as a high-end with a sleeker design, too. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the source. And instead of a carburetor motorcycles are sports car. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We fondly refer to it opposite of the mentality found or fuel injection, it has a motor 100 percent electric. as our hooligan motorcycle,â&#x20AC;? he among those Toyota Prius owners controller, which tells the

Running Silent

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motor how much power to give the bikeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;without ever having to change gears. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No shifting. No transmission,â&#x20AC;? Simmons says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the advantages of the electric motor.â&#x20AC;? While gas bikes lurch forward and slow as bikers switch gears, Zero bikes instead pull on riders more steadily as the motorist climbs toward their top speed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It feels very odd at first. But once you get used to it, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all you want,â&#x20AC;? Simmons says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much more natural.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s direct-drive,â&#x20AC;? says Heimbuck. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For people who enjoy ridingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; enthusiastsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it really reduces complexity when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re riding, so you can focus on becoming an even better or competitive rider. In addition to that, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhilarating. You have no sound. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to shift. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost like a magic carpet ride.â&#x20AC;? The bikes are quiet, too, practically silent. Last month, Simmons took his friend out for a ride to the beach and was able to have a conversation with her until wind noise became an issue at about 35 miles per hour. People sometimes ask Heimbuck

if a quieter bike reduces safety when drivers canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hear the motorcycle revving in their blind spots. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a bikerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility to pay attention to traffic, Heimbuck says, but he believes less noise can actually help. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you have a quieter motorcycle, you can hear more about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on around you and be more aware,â&#x20AC;? Heimbuck says. The bikes range from $8,000 to $16,000 in price. Heimbuck says thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a steal when you factor in money saved on energy. Additionally, the City of Santa Cruz has charging stations around town, where people can plug in and charge up for free. Simmons, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been with the company a year and a half, gets to check out the bikes and put test miles on them. He hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t touched his gas bike in months and wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have it any other way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really miss the noise,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun knowing youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not using any gas, and that you can go home and charge and charge at work and never have to stop at a gas station. It feels great.â&#x20AC;? 0

Pedal to the Mettle

14


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13 TH E G R EEN IS S U E

Pedal To the Mettle

Santa Cruz bike mechanics prove just about anything can be cycle-powered BY GEORGIA PERRY

L

ongtime Bike Church mechanics Steve Schnaar and Paul Hempstead have spent years putting together bikes at the Pacific Avenue DIY repair shop. But on Schnaarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent trip to Central America, he witnessed the power of bicycles to sustain village lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;everything from washing clothes to grinding corn. The two got inspired to switch gears, and start taking bikes apart.

In the last year, Hempstead and Schnaar have solicited the help of their bike-savvy friends and created four unique machines, all powered entirely by human pedaling. Using cast-off parts donated to the Bike Church, these machines are about as green as they come. Behold!

BLENDER BENDING Modeled directly on the machines Schnaar saw in Central America, this lilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; number is attached via an axle from a bicycle the men filed into a square, making it a perfect fit for most standard blenders. The motion of the wheel makes the axle spin, and the blender blend.

CHANGE THE WHIRL Using the same bike frame as the blender, this spin-art machine was created by Tom Kennedy, the director of the Santa-Cruz-based alternative transportation program Green Ways to School. It is foam-core board encased in an old mountain bike tire, and Schnaar says it is â&#x20AC;&#x153;always a crowd pleaser.â&#x20AC;? The machine makes frequent appearances at kid-friendly Earth Day events, and was once even used to decorate an ice cream pie with chocolate frosting. Pictured is Amelia Conlen, director of People Power of Santa Cruz County.


15 CRUSH GROOVE Built for the Santa Cruz Fruit Tree Project, an organization spearheaded by Schnaar to harvest surpluses of urban fruit, this apple crusher uses an old bike wheel filled with concrete as a flywheel to keep the machineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s momentum going without putting too much strain on the human pedaling it. Bike chain connects the flywheel to the crusher, which the pair made by drilling screws into a metal utensil-holder they got from a restaurant supply store. After loads of apples are crushed, they are transferred to a cider presser made of reclaimed wood from old college dormitory furniture.    8 C < 3   '  #     !         

WHEELBARROW OF FORTUNE After stripping the parts of an old wheelbarrow salvaged from the dump, Hempstead added durable bike tires to it, then welded parts from cruiser bike frames to attach it to the bike trailer that pulls it. Notable hauls have included a full tub of apples, as well as a heavy load of sand, reports Hempstead.

Home on the Strange

17


JUNE 19-25, 2013

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Put Pu u Y ut Your our o Career e in Your Your o r Hands H Massage Mas a ssage Practitioner - 25 250 50 Hours Summer quarter er begins be egins July 1

Massage Therapist is - 550 Hours 6SRUWV,‡$URPDWKHUDS\:RUNVKRSV 6SRUWV,‡$URPDWKHUDS\: :RUNVKRSV Table Table Shiatsu & Seated Shiatsu Shiatsu classes (offered only once o a year)

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D & evening classes | Paym Day Payment ment plans See ourr website for full list of advanced advanced classes. TwinLakesCollege.org

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15

TH E G RE EN IS S U E 1VW^AQVScS`

Secure your business in 5 minutes! MEDECCO can help to achieve prerequisites and accumulate points in the following categories and credit aeas of LEED.

Features include: Digital Masterkeying Audit Trails Add or remove keys easily Easy Installation

Home on the Strange

Security Solutions for Life Access control systems | Camera systems | Home security solutions

The Tiny House movement is the Wild, Wild West of the housing market BY GEORGIA PERRY

T

he West, being the domain of cowboys, does not always take kindly to tiny houses, the little elf-sized cottages that in recent years have become the calling card of ludicrously sustainable living. While the Tiny House movement, as it is called, rejects the standard American home (which NPR reported has more than doubled in size since the 1950s), the wee homesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cuteness factor has always overwhelmed any badassery they may represent.

Until now. Meet Jason Dietz, owner of Felton-based Molecule Tiny Homes. A tiny homebuilder for three

Mon-Fri 8-6 Sat 9:30-3:30 712 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz 831-423-5415 C-28 LIC#767441

years, Dietz possesses no kind of building license, just a certificate for classic car restoration and â&#x20AC;&#x153;a lot of experience creating things and engineering things.â&#x20AC;? Indeed, he was once featured at the Bay Area Maker Faire with his 5-foot-tall neon UFO lamps, each filled with 10 gallons of bubbling water and a cow figurine, being â&#x20AC;&#x153;abductedâ&#x20AC;? into a UFO perched at the top. With six tiny homes under his belt, including one for the CEO of software giant Intuit, Dietz follows no housing code or government determined safety standards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just kind of do things off the cuff, as it were,â&#x20AC;? he says.

30

   8 C < 3   '  #     !         

Logic offers most of the functionality of more sophisticated access control systems and Logic installs without any wiring, door or frame modifications, or additional hardware.

LITTLE GREEN HOUSES FOR YOU AND ME Jason Dietz at work on an eco-friendly â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;tiny houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for Feltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Molecule Tiny Homes.

17


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17

T H E GRE EN ISSUE

   8 C < 3   '  #     !

18

WIPE YOUR FOOTPRINT Staff of Life store manager Russel Kreitman believes the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s carbon reduction program can be a valuable contribution to the local sustainability effort.

Market Value Staff of Life offers carbon reduction program BY AARON CARNES

M

ost people have heard by now of the concept of reducing humansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;carbon footprint.â&#x20AC;? For years, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been talked about most often in relation to big companies, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an increasing focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions at smaller and even individual levels. Now, local grocery icon Staff of Life, which already operates in a fully green building, is blazing a whole new trail toward environmental sustainability with their CUTURCO2 program, an all-volunteer carbon reduction program that allows their customers to participate in a small-scale version of the carbon credit system. When the customers purchase groceries, they have an option to offset the gas they burned driving to the grocery store. The rate is 25 cents per mile. So if, for example, someone lives five miles away, they would tell the cashier that they would like to buy 10 milesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; worth of carbon credits, which would be $2.50. It is then added to their bill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only a small impact, but letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s say this was being done in each

town in California, that would make a major impact,â&#x20AC;? says James Honroth, floor manager at Staff of Life. The money from CUTURCO2 is given directly to local organization Ecology Action, to be used in its Boltage program. Ecology Actionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to reduce the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s carbon footprint by educating businesses, schools and government agencies on ways they can better go green. The Boltage program, where all the Staff of Life carbon reduction money goes, focuses on educating children. They go to schools and teach kids about the importance of walking and riding their bikes instead of getting rides from their parents. They even set up a system at their school that electronically tracks how often kids ride their bike to school and awards them prizes for doing so. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The owners at Staff of Life are interested in creating ways to keep the community sustainable,â&#x20AC;? says store manager Russel Kreitman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It [Boltage] was something we could see in our community, and it works.â&#x20AC;? This concept of purchasing

30


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JUNE 19-25, 2013


JUNE 19-25, 2013

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19th Annual

Roxie June 6-20 Balboa June 7-9 Aquarius June 9-11 New Parkway June 14-16 Rio June 21-23

WOODIES on on the the

WHARF Saturday June 22ND

Presented by the City of Santa Cruz and the Santa Cruz Woodies, …plus these great sponsors:

Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf 10 am to 4 pm FREE Bike Valet Parking


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Laura Dodd Surf City Civil Engineering and Landscape Design

Scotts Valley Water District svwd.org San Lorenzo Water District slwd.com Sheryl McEwan Vision Gardens LLC

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Soquel Creek Water District soquelcreekwater.org Santa Cruz City Water District cityofsantacruz.com Santa Cruz Weekly; santacruz.com KUSP 88.9; KUSP.org Loves Gardens; lovesgardens.com Allterra Solar; allterrasolar.com

7KH*DUGHQ)DLUHLVD IUHHDGPLVVLRQHGXFDWLRQDO HYHQWIRFXVLQJRQEHQHĂ&#x;WVRI RUJDQLFJDUGHQLQJDQG VXVWDLQDEOHKHDOWK\OLYLQJ ,QFOXGHGZLOOEHDXQLTXH DVVHPEODJHRIJDUGHQJRRGV DQGPDWHULDOVSODQWVDQG VHUYLFHVSOXVPDQ\ NQRZOHGJHDEOHVSHDNHUV LQWHUDFWLYHSUHVHQWDWLRQV IRRGDQGEHYHUDJHOLYHPXVLF DQGDFWLYLWLHVIRUHYHU\RQH %URQ]H6SRQVRUV Vision Recycling; visionrecycling.com Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gone Crackers marysgonecrackers.com KAZU 90.3; kazu.org High Mowing Organic Seeds highmowingseeds.com Good Times; gtweekley.com Sand Channel Drainage; dryturf.com

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FAIRE SCHEDULE JUNE 19-25, 2013

Opening Ceremony

9:30 Ceremonial Opening and Blessing of the Faire with California State Assemblymember Mark Stone, City Council members, and other distinguished speakers Location: Main Tent



086,& 9:00-11:00 .... The Spice Island Steele Drummer 11:00-1:00 .... Kuzanga Marimba 1:00-2:00 ...... Mystic Troubadours 2:00-3:00 ...... Sound Healing in Recreation Building 2:30-4:30 ...... Trio AmanhĂŁ ~ Brazilian Music 4:45-7:00 ...... The Steve Graves Band

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Faire Highlights

11am ......... Thomas Whitman: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Non-Toxic Vertebrate Pest Control 12pm ......... Patrick Adams & Emmet Brady: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nourishing Our Community: Bees, Insects, Community Groups, and Meet-upsâ&#x20AC;?

30 5LFK0HUULOO , keynote speaker Kitchen Gardens for Personal Health and the Health of the Environment

/RFDWLRQ0DLQ7HQW 30  +HDOWK3DQHO Craig Lane, Dr. JuanAcosta-Urquidi, Dr. Karen Lynch, Michael McEvoy

1pm .........Rich Merrill Keynote Speaker: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kitchen Gardens for Personal Health and the Health of the Environmentâ&#x20AC;?

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2pm .......... Beth Young: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Naturescaping for Health, Wealth Beauty and Peaceâ&#x20AC;? 3pm .......... Health Panel: Craig Lane, Dr. Juan Acosta-Urquidi, Dr. Karen Lynch, Michael McEvoy

%((5*$5'(163($.(56 10am ........ Beer Making Demo Sponsored by Seven Bridges Cooperative, Mike Smith and Craig Lane 11:30-1:00 . â&#x20AC;&#x153;Krauting Partyâ&#x20AC;? with Toby Wingo: Bring your cabbages and jars

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2:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3:00 ... Craig Lane: Get your libido ďŹ zzing with herbal sodas

Sponsored by Seven Bridges Cooperative, Mike Smith and Craig Lane

3:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:00 .... Kelly Dearie: Fermentation as an Art and Medicine

/ RFDWLRQ%HHU*DUGHQ .UDXWLQJ3DUW\ with Toby Wingo. Bring cabbage and any other vegetables and/or spices, cutting boards, knives, large jars, large mixing bowls, take home sauerkraut you make.

4:00............. Completion of the beer-making process

5(&5($7,21%8,/',1* Anytime Healthy RestStop for body, mind, and spirit; so you can keep on gardening. Tea House, Chair massage Reiki, Heart rate variability

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Ă&#x2DC;7KH)XWXUHRI:DWHUĂ&#x2122; display includes the following: 1. Native and drought tolerant plant garden 2. Greywater systems (2 types) 3. Rainwater cistern and rain barrels 4. Toilet and washing machine being supplied with rain water from cisterns 5. Native grass lawn 6. Docents from Central Coast Greywater Alliance, California Native Plant Society, Ecological Landscaping Association, Delta Blue Grass, Central Coast Wild, landscape architect, and others available to answer questions 7. Ocean and river friendly booklets encouraging water conservation 8. Rain barrel give away 9. 100 Greywater Challenge sign ups 10. Ecological Landscaping Association California booth with two large picture posters with examples of water conservation

)22'9(1'256 Mission Hill Creamery missionhillcreamery.com

Creative Cultures: Fermented beverages: Beet Kvass, Pollen Up, Green Dream detox plus specials for The Garden Faire!

Zameen Mediterranean Food zameencuisine.com

Inner Light Ministries: Food and Beverages emphasizing organic, vegan, and healthy food

Taylaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen/ Health Force healthforce.com

FAIRE MAP at Skypark

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Monterey Bay Master Gardeners Native Revival Nursery nativerevival.com Penny Mclaughlin Physical Therapist, uses PRRT (Primal ReďŹ&#x201A;ex Relief Techniqueâ&#x201E;˘) PďŹ sterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Perennials: Perennials, succulents, plant arrangements, and Japanese maples Santa Cruz Bats santacruzbats.com Soil Solutions soil-solutions.com Super-Starts.com Vegetable, herb, and ďŹ&#x201A;ower seedlings Sustainable Water Coalition of Santa Cruz County sustainablewatersantacruz.org Terrra Nova Ecological Landscaping terranovalandscaping.com Robinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Keep: Garden ornament, ďŹ&#x201A;ower pots, furniture and more Santa Cruz Community Food Forest facebook.com/santacruzfoodforest Scotts Valley 4-H Club scottsvalley4h.org Solar Technologies solartechnologies.com Stewart Construction Services Terra Sole Nurseries terrasolenurseries.com The Grateful Garden Regenerative Beekeeping; gratefulgarden.net The Stump King stumpking.com The Truth Uncovered Vision Recycling: Compost, mulch, wood chips, soil amendment Weston A. Price Foundation westonaprice.org

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Accent Landscape & Masonry Brent Campanolo Allterra Solar Offering Free Solar Assessments allterrasolar.com Beth Young Garden Design bygardendesign.com Bushman Rainwater Harvesting bushmanusa.com Blue Moon Bees bluemoonbees.com Central Home Supply centralhomesupply.com Cherie Bobbe Landscape Design cbldesign.com City of Scotts Valley Public Works Stormwater Crescent Hill Nursery crescenthillnursery.com Ecological Landscaping Association California ecolandscaping.org Farm Fresh To You farmfreshtou.com Farm Fuel Inc farmfuelinc.com Gophers Limited gopherslimited.com Healing Spirit Plants healingspiritplants.com Houses For Bats housesforbats.com Imagination by Francesca: Face Painting. abcimagine.net Insect News Network insectnewsnetwork.com Knox Garden Box knoxgardenbox.com Loveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gardens lovesgardens.com Monterey Bay Iris Society montereybayiris.org

Habitat Gardens habitat-gardens.com, Hidden Gardens, Loveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gardens, lovesgardens.com, Mountain Feed and Farm Supply mountainfeed.com, Dr. Bronnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Magic Soaps drbronner.com, Scarborough Gardens scarboroughgardens. com, Scotts Valley Sprinkler svsprinklerandpipe.com, Sheryl McEwan Vision Gardens LLC, The Garden Company, Whole Foods Market facebook.com/wfmsantacruz plus many more!

JUNE 19-25, 2013

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EXHIBITORS

For more information about the exhibitors, visit our website: the gardenfaire.org


JUNE 19-25, 2013

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JUNE 19-25, 2013


JUNE 19-25, 2013

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Summer er er titioon Vacation

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located in a LEED-certiďŹ ed building printed at a LEED-certiďŹ ed facility printed on 100% recycled paper with soy-based ink delivery to all Westside locations by PedEx bicycle distribution closely monitored to minimize waste ofďŹ ce supplies purchased from locally-owned businesses

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   8 C < 3   '  #     !

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17 T H E GR E E N ISSUE

H O M E O N THE STRA N G E

So how does he pull it off? Well, to start with, tiny homes are a completely unregulated industry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I mean, of course you want to build things to a certain standard just for safety purposes,â&#x20AC;? says Dietz, furrowing his brow, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but as far as permitting and regulating and things like that go, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really just nothing.â&#x20AC;? In Santa Cruz, our notoriously strict building code (which requires, among other things, that a single family home with two bedrooms have three parking spaces) turns some people off to the idea of owning their own home, says Dietz. Tiny homes provide a way around that. A tiny house can be placed on any lot, even one too small to be zoned for housing, because its size puts them into a gray area when it comes to pinpointing what exactly the structure is. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not really an RV,â&#x20AC;? says Dietz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not really a mobile home. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a park model.â&#x20AC;? It is basically a Wild West out there for tiny houses. And the benefits go beyond using fewer resources and taking up less space. Tiny home owners pay no property taxâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just a

laughable $38 a year to register their home with the DMV as a load on a trailer. And like the tiny baby Phoenix rising from the ashes of the subprime mortgage crisis, tiny homes have stellar resale value. Builders, meanwhile, are reveling in the opportunity to create whatever kinds of structures pop into their imaginations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can get away with a lot,â&#x20AC;? says Dietz, whose edgiest creation to date is a staircase that doubles as a dresser, each step pulling out into a full drawer. While he takes great pains to make sure his homes are safe, describing things like â&#x20AC;&#x153;insulated wireâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;hurricane straps,â&#x20AC;? Dietz knows not all builders are as responsible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some people are doing things that are pretty shoddy, dangerous looking,â&#x20AC;? he says. Because of this, Dietz knows the wild rumpus cannot last forever. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I mean, eventually somewhere down the road somebody will have an accident or something, and the authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gonna come and say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Nope you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do that at all.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Or, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;It has to be built to these guidelines.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

1 8 MARKET VALUE

credit program. But they operate on a similar concept. When a person or business buys credits for the carbon theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve used, those credits arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wiping out those carbon emissions, but rather they are used to reduce carbon emissions elsewhere. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It takes out future emissions, cuts down on future use of carbon,â&#x20AC;? Kreitman explains. The effects of Boltage fall in line with this definition in that they not only reduce carbon usage by encouraging kids to ride their bikes more (and their parents to drive less), but it sets them up to be more environmentally aware as adults. At this point, because the CUTURCO2 program is so new, it might seem to some like an odd way for customers to think about how they can reduce their carbon usage in their daily lives. But the Staff of Life folks donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind being ahead of the curve. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who knows?â&#x20AC;? Kreitman says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In five to 10 years, carbon offsetting your purchases could be the new norm.â&#x20AC;? 0

carbon credits and offsetting carbon usage has been enacted on much larger scales. Part of what makes Staff of Lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program so appealing is that because of how small it is, there is no large committee or bureaucracy to tie the money up, and the customers know exactly where their money is going, and what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being used for. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any time you are doing a largescale program like the carbon tax program that they keep talking about in Congress, you have to get together any number of people to agree on something, and in that case it can be held up in legislation. It can be all these variables involved there, because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dealing with a large area,â&#x20AC;? Honoroth says. The concept of carbon credits is confusing to some people, which is in part why Staff of Life calls it a carbon reduction program instead of carbon


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PHOTO: Jeff Shanes

JUNE 19-25, 2013

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fashion fa CUR CURRENT STYLES WOMEN'S & MEN'S WOM

811 81 1 PACIFIC PA ACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-458-0555 buy / sell / tr trade ade / consign www.crossroadstrading.com


32 List your local event in the calendar! Email it to calendar@santacruzweekly.com, fax it to 831.457.5828, or drop it by our office. Events need to be received a week prior to publication and placement cannot be guaranteed.

Stage DANCE

JUNE 19-25, 2013

Bellydance Showcase Different belly dancers each week on the garden stage. Presented by Helene. www. thecrepeplace.com. Sat, 1:30pm. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz, 831.429.6994.

Mosaic A dance concert about peace, justice, culture and conflict in the Middle East, by Karl Schaffer. Fri, Jun 21, 8pm and Sat, Jun 22, 8pm. $13-$18. Motion Pacific, 408 Front St, Santa Cruz, 831.457.1616.

THEATER Center Stage “Touch”: A high school astronomer discovers true love. Directed by Bill Peters. Fri, Jun 21, 8pm, Sat, Jun 22, 8pm and Sun, Jun 23, 7pm. Center Stage, 1001 Center St, Santa Cruz, 831.425.7529.

CONCERTS Caitlin Jemma Folk music from Arcata. Mon, Jun 24, 4-5pm. Free. Streetlight Records Santa Cruz, 939 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz, 831.421.9200.

San Lorenzo Community Band An old fashioned concert featuring marches, folk music and show tunes. Sun, Jun 23, 5pm. Free. Boulder Creek Library, 13390 W. Park Ave, Boulder Creek, 831.420.5319.

Twilight Concerts Live music by a different group each week. Wed, 6-8pm. Thru Aug 29. Free. Capitola Esplanade Park, Capitola Village, Capitola.

GALLERIES

Eloise Pickard Smith Gallery In Her Place, Visual Narratives: Tapestries by Bonnie Stone. Gallery hours: Tues-Su 11am-4pm. Thru June 22. 831.459.2953. Cowell College, UCSC, Santa Cruz.

Felix Kulpa Gallery 16” x 16”: Mixed media work by Gloria K. Alford. Gallery hours: Thurs-Sun, noon-6pm. Thru June 30. Free. 107 Elm St, Santa Cruz, 408.373.2854.

R. Blitzer Gallery “Catamaran” Artists Only: An exhibition featuring work by 14 “Catamaran Literary Magazine” artists. Gallery hours: Tues-Sat, 11am-5pm. Thru June 29. Free, 831.458.1217. Mission Extension and Natural Bridges, Santa Cruz.

CONTINUING

Santa Cruz County Bank

Chimera Tattoo Studio

Viva Santana. A solo retrospective of the late painter, printmaker and sculptor Manuel Santana. At Santa Cruz County Bank locations in Aptos, Capitola, Santa Cruz, Scotts Valley and Watsonville. Mon–Thu, 9am–5pm & Fri. 9am– 6pm, Thru Aug. 23. Free,

An exhibition of taxidermy and oddities by Emily Bones. Gallery hours MonSat, noon-8pm. Thru July 30. 831.426.8876. 1010 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz.

831.457.5003. 720 Front St, Santa Cruz.

LITERARY EVENTS Author Event: Anthony Marra The author will read from “A Constellation of Vital Phenomena,” a novel set in Chechnya about the power of love during wartime. Thu, Jun 20, 7:30pm. Bookshop Santa Cruz, 1520 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz, 831.423.0900.

Book Discussion Group A discussion of a new book each month, with copies available at the branch circulation desk. Email harbisons@santacruzpl. org for more information. Third Thu of every month, 1pm. Free. Santa Cruz Central Branch Library, 224 Church St, Santa Cruz, 831.427.7700x7616.

Poetry Reading Readings by a select group of award-winning poets. Sun, Jun 23, noon2pm. Free. Alan Chadwick Garden, UCSC, Santa Cruz, 831.459.3240.

Storytime Former Shakespeare Santa Cruz actress Billie Harris and Book Cafe manager Jill Rose perform animated readings of children’s stories. Mon, 11am. Capitola Book Cafe, 1475 41st Ave, Capitola, 831.462.4415.

LECTURES It’s Not About the Bully A six-month workshop series for families, kids and teens about how to mitigate the effects of bullying and create empowerment strategies. Fourth Sun of every month, 2-3:30pm. Thru Jun 24. Free. Santa Cruz Central Branch Library, 224 Church St, Santa Cruz, 831.427.7717.

NOTICES Baby Feeding Circle

SATURDAY 6/22

Garden Faire Whether you have a multi-acre farm, a single cherry tomato plant on your back patio, or just a taste for organic fruits and veggies, the Garden Faire is sure to entice you with a speaker or workshop around the theme of “Growing Together, Nourishing Our Community.” Live music and an organic beer garden will keep this earthy party going all day. Saturday, June 22 from 9am–7pm at Skypark, 361 Kings Village Rd., Scotts Valley. Free admission.

A chance to relax, feed your baby and chat with other new mothers. Open to all mothers and babies. Mon, 10:30-11:30am. free. Luma Yoga & Family Center, 1010 Center St., Santa Cruz, 831.325.2620.

Beat Sanctuary A dance class for exploring authentic movement as connection, exercise, prayer and spiritual practice. Wed, 7:30-9:15pm. $15. A weekly class for exploring exercise and spirituality through dance. Wed, 7:30-9:15pm. $15. Santa Cruz Yoga, 402 Ingalls Street, Santa Cruz, 585.278.0080.

Black Justice Lecture Mandy Carter presents

SATURDAY 6/22

Woodies on the Wharf What’s long, brown and created between 1915 and 1952 (besides the atom bomb)? Classic, wood-bodied surf cars! Come bask in the glory of over 200 woodies as they line the Santa Cruz Wharf and delight dads of all ages at this annual woodypalooza. Saturday, June 22 from 10am–4pm at the Santa Cruz Wharf. Free admission. a talk, “Mobilize: Bayard Rustin and the 50th Anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington.” Tue, Jun 25, 7pm. Free. Resource Center for Nonviolence, 612 Ocean St., Santa Cruz, 831.251.4833.

Clutterers Anonymous A free weekly 12-step meeting for those frustrated with too much clutter and not enough room. Fri, 5:30pm. Free. Sutter Maternity and Surgery Center, 2900 Chanticleer Ave, Santa Cruz, 831.359.3008.

Eating Disorders Resource Center Meeting Groups will be led by Kimberly Kuhn, LCSW and Carolyn Blackman, RN, LCSW. Third Fri of every month, 6-7:30pm. Sutter Maternity and Surgery Center, 2900 Chanticleer Ave, Santa Cruz, 408.559.5593.

Food Film Screening Food Inc: A screening followed by a guided discussion. Tue, Jun 25, 7pm. Free. Santa Cruz Central Branch Library, 224 Church St, Santa Cruz, 831.420.5700.

Computer Class

Freedom Forum

Led by Computer Dave, this beginner-friendly class lets group participants pick the topics themselves. Third Wed of every month, 4-5:30pm. free. Santa Cruz Central Branch Library, 224 Church St, Santa Cruz, 831.427.7717.

Two documentaries examining the loss of freedom in America and abroad: “The End of America” and “It Can’t Happen Here!” Wed, Jun 19, 7pm. Free/Donation. Live Oak Grange, 1900 17th Ave, Santa Cruz, 831.708.8626.

A Course In Miracles Study Group

Hemlock Discussion Group

A weekly meeting on learning how to forgive and live in peace. Drop-ins are welcome. Thu, 7-9pm. The Barn Studio, 104b Park Way South, Santa Cruz, 831.272.2246.

Discuss end-of-life options for serenity and dignity. Meets in Aptos the last Wed afternoon of every month except Dec; call for more info. 831.251.2240.

Dog Hikes Santa Cruz International Dog Owner’s Community hosts a weekly one-hour, easy hike along the beach for dog lovers and their pets. www.newdogsintown. com Mon, 8:45-9:45am. Free. Aptos Beach staircase, 1049 Via Palo Alto, Aptos.

Ice Cream Social Treats to eat and stories about food, for preschool and primary school grade children. www.porterml. org. Wed, Jun 19, 1pm. Free. Porter Memorial Library, 3050 Porter St, Soquel, 831.465.3326.

Insight Santa Cruz Meditation sits, talks and

discussions every day of the week. Learn the formal practice of meditation and engage with a community dedicated to reducing suffering by cultivating compassion. Visit www. insightsantacruz.org for specific times and more information. Ongoing. Insight Santa Cruz, 1010 Fair Avenue, Suite C, Santa Cruz, 831.425.3431.

Mended Hearts Speakers on advancements in cardiology and acute care for heart patients and caregivers. Wed, Jun 19, 11:30am-2pm. Free. Dominican Hospital Rehab Center, 610 Frederick St, Santa Cruz, 831.688.9332.

and 6:30-7:30pm at 335 Spreckles Dr, Ste. A, Aptos. Thursdays 1-2pm at 301 Center St., Santa Cruz. Fridays noon-1pm at 49 Blanca Ln, #303, Watsonville and 12:15-1:15pm at 2500 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz. Saturdays 9-10am at 532 Center St, Santa Cruz and 11am-noon at 75 Nelson St, Watsonville. 831.429.7906.

Postpartum Health Circle A weekly community circle offering support and information about postpartum changes for mothers. Wed, 1:30-2:30pm. $5-$10 donation. Luma Yoga & Family Center, 1010 Center St., Santa Cruz, 831.325.2620.

Miracle Working Spiritual teacher Dominique Free leads a weekly class on cultivating the consciousness to heal, overcome, succeed and create miracles. Thu, 7-8pm. Conscious Lounge, 1651A El Dorado Av @ Capitola Rd, Santa Cruz, 831.359.0423.

Overeaters Anonymous A 12-step support group for those who wish to recover from compulsive eating. Sundays 9-10:15am at 2900 Chanticleer Ave, Santa Cruz. Mondays 12:15-1:15pm at 420 Melrose Ave, Santa Cruz and 7-8pm at 4951 Soquel Drive, Soquel. Tuesdays 12:15-1:15pm at 420 Melrose Ave, Santa Cruz and 7-8pm at 301 Center St, Santa Cruz. Wednesdays 10:30-11:30am at 1335 Seabright Ave, Santa Cruz; noon-1pm at 49 Blanca Ln #303, Watsonville;

Qigong Flow Led by Bonnie Eskie, MFT. Tue, 10-11am. $10-$12. Louden Nelson Community Center, 301 Center St, Santa Cruz, 831.515.4144.

Serenity First— Pagans in Recovery A 12-step meeting with a Pagan flair where guests are free to discuss their nature-based, goddesscentered spiritual paths. Sun, 7pm. The Sacred Grove, 924 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz, 831.423.1949.

Support and Recovery Groups Alzheimer’s: Alzheimer’s Assn., 831.464.9982. Cancer: Katz Cancer Resource Center, 831.351.7770; WomenCARE, 831.457.2273. Candida: 831.471.0737. Chronic Pain: American Chronic Pain Association,


33

JUNE 19-25, 2013

SATURDAY 6/22

5K River Run Spend your morning taking in a scenic run around the Levee with fellow fitness enthusiasts. The best part? Proceeds go towards Grind Out Hunger’s mission to end childhood hunger in Santa Cruz County. A family-friendly health expo will follow the race. Saturday, June 22 from 9am–4pm at the corner of River and Potrero streets, Santa Cruz. Race registration is $35 and includes a t-shirt, goody bag and raffle ticket. 831.423.1385. Grief and Loss: Hospice, 831.430.3000. Lupus: Jeanette Miller, 831.566.0962. Men Overcoming Abusive Behavior: 831.464.3855. SMART Recovery: 831.462.5470. Trans Latina women: Mariposas, 831.425.5422. Trichotillomania: 831.457.1004. 12-Step Programs: 831.454.HELP (4357).

numerous weekly classes, 831.464.8100. Yoga Within at Aptos Station, 831.687.0818; Om Room School of Yoga, 831.429.9355; Pacific Climbing Gym, 831.454.9254; Aptos Yoga Center, 831.688.1019; Twin Lotus Center, 831.239.3900. Hatha Yoga with Debra Whizin, 831.588.8527.

The Speaker s Gym

Zen: SC Zen Center, Wed, 5:45pm, 831.457.0206. Vipassana: Vipassana SC, Wed 6:30-8pm, 831.425.3431. Basic: Land of the Medicine Buddha, Wed, 5:30-6:30pm, 831.462.8383. Zen: Ocean Gate Zendo, first Tue each month 6:30-7pm. All are free.

Instructor Noel Murphy provides leadership coaching and public speaking skills every week. www. thespeakersgym.com. Wed, 7-9:30pm. Discovery Gym, 75 Mt. Hermon Rd., Scotts Valley, 831.238.1234.

Zen, Vipassana, Basic: Intro to Meditation

Wellness Lecture A talk on plant-based dieting by Half-Ironman triathlete Elizabeth Inpyn. Entrance fee doubles as New Leaf gift card. Sun, Jun 23, 11am-1pm. $5. New Leaf Market Westside, 1101 Fair Ave, Santa Cruz, 831.426.1306x0.

Yoga Instruction Pacific Cultural Center: 35+ classes per week, 831.462.8893. SC Yoga: 45 classes per week, 831.227.2156. TriYoga:

AROUND TOWN Comedy Showcase A weekly comedy night featuring Bay Area talent. Lineup changes every week. Wed, 7pm. Cafe iVeTA, 2125 Delaware Ave, Santa Cruz, 831.713.0320. A new comedy showcase hosted by DNA featuring a different Bay Area headliner each week. Tue, 8:30pm. $5. Blue Lagoon, 923 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz, 831.423.7117.

Contra Dance A beginner-friendly dance hosted by the Traditional Dancers of Santa Cruz with music by The Rosin Doctors. www.santacruzdance.org. Fri, Jun 21, 8-11pm. $10 donation. Felton Community Hall, 6191 Hwy 9, Felton.

Film Screening “Dig”: A documentary about the rock and roll rivalry between the Dandy Warhols and the Brian Jonestown Massacre. Thu, Jun 20, 8:30pm. Free. Felix Kulpa Gallery, 107 Elm St, Santa Cruz, 831.421.9200.

Greenwood Arts A gathering of music, drawing, sharing and other creative activities. Tue, Jun 25, 11am-1pm. $10. Location in Nature (directions given upon reservation), n/a, Santa Cruz, 831.662.0186.

Movies @ the Mission East of Eden: Starring the seminal James Dean. Sat, Jun 22, 8-10pm. Free. Mission Adobe, 144 School St, Santa Cruz, 831.425.5849.

Radical Food Jam Play with your food, including a literal banana piano hooked up to the Internet with a magical,

techy device. Fri, Jun 21, 4-8pm. $5. Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History, 705 Front St, Santa Cruz, 831.429.1964.

Stuffed Animal Sleepover Drop stuffed animal friends off at the library and have a tea party Friday, then return Monday the 24 at 10:30am to find out what fun they had. Fri, Jun 21, 2-4pm. Free. Garfield Park Branch Library, 705 Woodrow Ave, Santa Cruz, 831.427.7717.

Surfing Magician All-ages magic show by Doug Hofkins. Mon, Jun 24, 10:30am. Free. Live Oak Library, 2380 Portola Dr, Santa Cruz, 831.427.7717.

Wetlands Tours Wetlands Alive! Informational tours offered by Watsonville Wetlands Watch. Sat, Jun 22, 10am. Fitz Educational Center, Pajaro Valley High School, Watsonville, 831.345.1226.

Woodies on the Wharf More than 200 classic, pre1952 wood-bodied cars on display. Sat, Jun 22, 10am4pm. Free. Santa Cruz Wharf, Beach Street, Santa Cruz, 831.420.5273.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Anya Kvita & the GetDown Voted best band at Silicon Valley Sound eXperience, with the sublime ‘Runnin.’ Jun 20 at Great American Music Hall.

Father John Misty Prolific musician has played with Fleet Foxes, Damien Jurado, David Bazan and Kid Cudi. Jun 21 at the Fillmore.

The New Trust Record-release show for piercing new album ‘Keep Dreaming.’ With Creative Adult. Jun 21 at Bottom of the Hill.

L. Subramaniam Indian violinist appears with Larry Coryell, Corky Siegel in show of global fusion. Jun 20 at Yoshi’s SF.

A Wilhelm Scream Long-running Massachusetts post-hardcore troubadors play with the Flatliners. June 23 at Thee Parkside. More San Francisco events at www.sfstation.com.


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Beatscape I WONDER WHAT AMY LAVERE IS DOING RIGHT NOW? Patty Griffin ponders while awaiting her Cocoanut Grove show.

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A creative triple threat, Amy LaVere is a songwriter, an actor and an accomplished upright bass player. She played rockabilly queen Wanda Jackson in the 2005 film Walk the Line, but the Louisiana-born LaVere has a musical range that stretches from jazz and gypsy music to country, Southern soul and Americana. Most recently, she collaborated with singer-songwriter Shannon McNally on a home-spun recording called Chasing the Ghost: Rehearsal Sessions. On Thursday, she brings her talents to Felton. Local singersongwriter-bassist Carolyn Sills and her combo open. Don Quixoteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; $12 adv/$15 door; 7:30pm. (Cat Johnson)

Scofield began his musical career in the mid-70s, and has not stopped since. The jazz guitarist has collaborated with a diverse group of musicians, playing with the legendary Miles Davis and the contemporary John Mayer. His music breaks the divide between rock and jazz, fusing elements of funk, blues and R&B. With over 30 albums, he has become an internationally acclaimed jazz performer whose versatility and blurring of genres continue to inspire fans and musicians. The band he now performs with serves up steamy rhythms and improvisational detours that match Scofieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature blend of saucy riffing and sophisticated ideas. Kuumbwa; $25 adv/$28 door; 7pm & 9pm. (Melanie Ware)

Good god, has any pop band this side of Stone Temple Pilots had as tortured a history as the Gin Blossoms? Considering that it started with their best songwriter being fired from the band, and then committing suicideâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just as the hits he wrote propelled them into international stardomâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say no. This doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even begin to take into account the hiatuses, breakups, firings, re-hirings and rehab stints of the other members. Truly, the title of their major-label debut New Miserable Experience turned out to be all-too prophetic. Nor is it any surprise that their best-known songs are about as sad as one can get while still riding candy-coated layers of radio-friendly, mid-tempo â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s guitar. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Found Out About Youâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Follow You Downâ&#x20AC;? were big hits, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never figure out how such a dysfunctional band could produce the staggering heartsick anthem that is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey Jealousy.â&#x20AC;? Boardwalk; free; 6:30pm and 8:30pm. (Steve Palopoli)

Grammy-nominated, all-star musician RonKat Spearman produces, writes, performs, engineers, mixes, sings and writes the lyrics to his incredibly danceable songs. His latest project, Katdelic, is a 10-piece funk and rock band that has combined spacey synthesizer, squelching electric bass lines and hypnotic vocals that make it nearly impossible not to bounce to the groove. He played alongside P-Funk originator George Clinton and the Parliament-Funkadelic collective for 10 years, and the influence is still front and center on his album Dance on the Mothership. Moeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; $10 adv/$12 door; 9pm. (MW)


PATTY GRIFFIN

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FATOUMATA DIAWARA If you are a fan of world music, radiating smiles or charming women, it would be wise to check out Fatoumata Diawara. Born in Mali, this soulful beauty moved to France to pursue an acting and dancing career. After picking up the guitar and playing around with the traditional Mali music Wassalou, she began to blend it with other international influences such as jazz and blues, creating her own contemporary sound. Her sensuous vocals and enormous stage presence make her absolutely fascinating and a pleasure to listen to. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a passionate woman who sings of love, politics and empowerment, expressing her concerns of the femaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role in African society. Don Quixoteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; $20 adv/$25 door; 8pm. (MW)

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JOHN HART As a member of the Bay Area R&B group the Outfit, John Hart cut his musical teeth collaborating with some big names including E-40 and Baby Bash. These days, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s left the nest and is writing, co-producing and singing his own material. His breakout hit single, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who Booty,â&#x20AC;? is an â&#x20AC;&#x153;R & Bay slap trackâ&#x20AC;? complete with all the swag-a-licious lyrics you would expect from a song about booties. Catalyst; $20 adv/$25 door; 9pm. (CJ)

Celebrating Creativity Since 1975

Wednesday, June 19 U 7 pm The brilliant new voice of jazz!

GREGORY PORTER Friday, June 21 U 7 & 9 pm | No Comps

THE JOHN SCOFIELD UBERJAM BAND FEATURING ANDY HESS, AVI BORNICK, TONY MASON 9 PM: 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS

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DAVE ALVIN I think by now we all understand that Dave Alvin can play anything, any way, in any configuration of band. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s played in the Blasters, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s played solo, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been backed by Guilty Men, Guilty Women and genderneutral Guilty Ones. He rips on electric guitar, he shimmers on an acoustic one and he uses both as a backdrop for epic stories about characters who are anything but epic. His quiet, melancholy ballad â&#x20AC;&#x153;Abileneâ&#x20AC;? hits as hard as his most famous anthem, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fourth of July.â&#x20AC;?The Alvin-obsessed (hi Queenie!) will appreciate that this show offers up one of his rarer solo incarnations, the Dave Alvin Acoustic Trio. Kuumbwa; $25; 7pm.

Madeleine Peyroux The Blue Room

Sunday, June 30 Â&#x2021; 7:30 PM @ Rio Theatre Â&#x2021;1R&RPSV Monday, July 1 U 7 & 9 pm | No Comps

BOBBY HUTCHERSON QUARTET Legendary Jazz Vibraphonist! Wed. July 3 U 7 & 9 pm | No Comps

LARRY CARLTON QUARTET

One of the tastiest guitarists around! Monday, July 8 U 7 pm

PETER APFELBAUM & SPARKLER Jazz â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jam Sophistication! Thursday, July 11 U 7 pm

HRISTO VITCHEV QUARTET GOLD CIRCLE 7/12 7/15 7/22 7/24 7/29 8/1

SOLD OUT! Badi Assad Pete Escovedo Orchestra Red Baraat Raul MidĂłn John Pizzarelli Oliver Mtukudzi & The Black Spirits

Unless noted advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org and Logos Books & Records. Dinner served 1-hr before Kuumbwa presented concerts. Premium wines & beer. All ages welcome.

JUST A TYPICAL AFTERNOON AT AMY LAVEREâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOUSE Way less creepy to see her at Don Quixoteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thursday.

320-2 Cedar St [ Santa Cruz 831.427.2227

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Patty Griffin is one of those songwriters who can stop you in your tracks with a lyric. A quietly brilliant artist whose catalog is packed with insightful and touching songs, she has a way of getting to the heart of things. Bringing to life characters with devastatingly human aspects, she sidesteps sentiment to reveal deep, simple truths. Griffinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest offering, American Kid, pays tribute to her father with songs exploring war, waltzing, death, family and the stories we leave when we go. Cocoanut Grove; $35 gen/$50 gold; 8pm. (CJ)

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Benny Benny Green Green Trio Trio

D DAVENPORT AV VENPORT RO ROADHOUSE ADHOUSE

Benny Benny Green Green Trio Trio

8 831.420.0135 31.420.0135

KUUMBWA KUUMBWA JAZZ JAZZ CENTER 831.427.2227 831.427.2227

Gypsy G ypsy Soul

L Locomotive ocomotive Br Breath eath

MOE’S MOE S ALLEY 831.479.1854 831.479.1854

Rasta Ras ta Cruz Reggae Reggae

Eclectic Eclectic by by

Hip-Hop by by

Primal Pr Productions o oductions

D DJ J AD

P Poetry oetry Open O Mic

MOTIV MOTIV 831.4 831.479.5572 79.5572

REBEC REBECCA’S CA’S 831.426.33 831.426.3353 53

Jazzy Sundays Sundays

Open Jazz Jaz zz Jam

Steve Steve Bare Bare Band

THE REEF 831.459.9876 831.45 9.9876

SF Documentary Fest Fest

RIO THEATRE THEA ATRE T 831.423.8209

SEABRIGHT BREWER BREWERY Y 831.426.2739 831.426.2 739

JUNE 19-25, 2013

BL BLUE UE L LOUNGE OUNGE


38

1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-423-1336 Wednesday, June 19Â&#x2039;In the AtriumsAGES 16+

THE SUPERVILLAINS

!DV$RSs$RSPM3HOWPM

Thursday, June 20Â&#x2039;In the AtriumsAGES 21+

GAUDI

K KEEP UP WITH THE LOCAL LOCAL ACTION: ACTION N N:

clubgrid

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT 831 BEER SCENE

plus Indubious also Little

John and Noah Styles !DV$RSsPMPM

Friday, June 21Â&#x2039;In the AtriumsAGES 21+

A.J. CROCE

!DV$RSsPMPM

JUNE 19-25, 2013

Saturday, June 22Â&#x2039;AGES 21+

The English Beat

!DV$RSs$RSOPENPM3HOWPM 3ATURDAY *UNEÂ&#x2039;In the AtriumsAGES 16+

A BAND OF ORCS

plus Hatriot Shall Fall and Cultural Warfare !DV$RSs$RSOPENPM3HOWPM

also A Thousand

3UNDAY *UNEÂ&#x2039;In the AtriumsAGES 16+

JOHN HART

!DV$RSsPMPM

June 28 Earl Zero/ Flex Zagazow Atrium (Ages 16+) June 29 Streetlight Manifesto (Ages 16+) June 29 WhaleďŹ sh Atrium (Ages 21+) *UNEPrince Rama Atrium (Ages 21+) July 2 Face To Face (Ages 16+) *ULYOctopus Nebula Atrium (Ages 16+) July 16 Black Flag (Ages 16+) July 20 Emancipator (Ages 16+) July 25 Guttermouth/ Agent Orange (Ages 16+) July 26 Del The Funky Homosapien (Ages 16+) Aug 2 Xavier Rudd (Ages 16+) !UGAndre Nickatina (Ages 16+) Aug 17 Tainted Love (Ages 21+) Aug 18 Les Claypoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Duo de Twang (Ages 21+) 3EPJimmy Eat World (Ages 16+) 3EPTech N9ne (Ages 16+)

Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating. Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

www.catalystclub.com

WED 6/ 6/19 19 A APTOS / RIO DEL MAR / SOQ SOQUEL QUEL

THU TH HU 6 6/20 /20

BRITANNIA B BRIT TANNIA A ARMS

FRI 6 6/21 /21

SAT 6 6/22 /22

Live Live Music

Karaoke Karaoke

110 11 0 Monterey Monterey Ave., Ave., Capitola Capitola

THE T HE FOG BANK

with Eve Eve

DB Walker Walker Band

B4 Dawn Dawn

211 2 11 Esplanade, Esplanade, Capitola Capitola

MANGIAMOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S M MANGIAMO S PIZZA PIZZA AND WINE BAR

David David Paul Paul Campbell

David David v Paul Paul Campbell

George George Christos Christos

Roberto-Howell Roberto o-Ho Howell

783 7 8 Rio del Mar Blvd, 83 Blvd, Apt Aptos os

MICHAELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S M MICHAEL â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON MAIN

Z Zebra ebra 3

West West Coast Coast Soul So oul

Lara Lara Price Price

2591 25 591 Main S St, t, Soquel

PARADISE P ARADISE BEACH BEACH GRILLE

Ken Ken n Constable Constable

Levitate Levitate

215 21 15 Esplanade, Esplanade, Capit Capitola ola

SANDERLINGS S ANDERLINGS

Sambasa

In Thr Three ee

Breeze Breeze Babes

Stormin Stormin Norman

Joe Ferrara Ferrara

Lenny Lenny

1 Seascape S Resort Resort Dr Dr,, Rio del Mar

SEVERINOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S S EVERINOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAR & GRILL

Don n McCaslin &

7500 7 5 500 Old Dominion Ct, Aptos Aptos

The The Amazing Jazz Geezers Geezers

SHADOWBROOK S HADOWBROOK 1750 17 750 Wharf Rd, Rd, Capit Capitola ola

THE T HE UGLY UGL LY MUG

Jack Williams Williams

4640 4 640 Soquel Dr, Dr, Soquel

ZELDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Z ELDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Asher

Electro Electro Dance Dance Party Party

Hip Shake Shake

Freestone F eestone Peaches Fr Pea aches h

Fatoumata Fatoumata Diawara Di wara Dia

203 20 03 Esplanade, Esplanade, Capitola Capitola

S SCOTTS VALLEY / SAN LORE LORENZO ENZO VALLEY D DON QUIXOTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S QUIXOTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Murder M der Mur d Mystery M stery My

6275 62 275 Hwy Hwy 9 9,, F Felton elton

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Amy A y LaVere Am L Vere LaV

Duane Allman T Tribute ribute

H HENFLINGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TAVERN TAVERN 9450 94 450 Hw Hwy y9 9,, Ben L Lomond omond

W WATSONVILLE / MONTEREY Y / CARMEL C CILANTROâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Hippo Happy Happy Hour

Mariachi Ensemble Ensemble

11934 934 Main Main St, St, W Watsonville atsonville

G GOLDEN STATE STATE T THEATRE THEA AT TRE

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417 4 17 Alvarado Alvarado St, St, Monterey Monterey

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Hwy H wy 1, Moss Moss Landing

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&K KDON DON D DJ JS SolRock olRock

The e Audio Audio Waltz Waltz

Gilmore Gilmore Rizzo Rizzo Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Amore! Amore!


39 Like BUD LIGHT

SUN

6/23 6 /23

MON

6/24 6 /2 24

TUE 6 6/25 /25 APTOS / RI RIO IO DEL MAR / SOQUEL BRITANNIA BRITANNIA ARMS 831.464.2583

Karaoke Karaoke

w with ith Eve Eve

THE FOG BANK 831.462.1881 831.462.1881

MANGIAMO’S MAN NGIAMO’S NGIAMO S PIZ PIZZA ZA AND WINE BAR 831.688.1477 831.688.1477

Jade

MICHAEL’S MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 831.479.9777 831.479.9777

Lara Lar a Price Price

Dining Music

PARADISE PARADISE BEACH BEACH GRILLE 831.4 831.476.4900 76.4900

SANDERLINGS SANDERLINGS 831.662.7120 831.662.7120

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 831.688.8987 831.688.8987

SHADOWBROOK SHADOWBROOK 831.475.1511 831.475.1511

Open Mic c

THE UGL UGLY LY MUG

w/ w/ Mosep Mosephus hus

831.477.1341 831.477.1341

ZELDA’S ZELDA’S

831.475.4900 831.475.4900

SCOTTS VALLEY / SA SAN AN LORENZO VALLEY J Luby Jan L by Lub

DON QUIXOTE’S QUIXOTE’S

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831.603.2294 831.603.2294

Karaoke Karaoke with K Ken en

HENFLING’S T TAVERN AVERN V 831.336.9318 831.336.9318

WATSONVILLE / MONTEREY M / CARMEL Santa Cruz Trio Trio Gilmore Gilmor e Rizzo Rizzo

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KPIG Happy Happy Hour

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F Farmer’s armer’s Mark Market et

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Karaoke Karaoke

CILANTRO’S 8 831.761.2161 31.761.2161

GOLDEN S STATE TATE THEA THEATRE TRE 831.372.3800 831.372.3800

MOSS MOSS LANDING INN 831.6 831.633.3038 33.3038

JUNE 19-25, 2013

Pam P am Hawkins Hawkins


JUNE 19-25, 2013

40

Film

on his bones now, some muscle and maturity, and he looks a bit like Edward Fox. Denisof’s voice is slightly woodwindish in a role where you like to hear a little brass. And yet these two good-looking and chemical leads bring out the true spirit of the fight as well as the screwball comedy of reconciliation.

Two goodlooking and chemical leads bring out the true spirit of the fight as well as the screwball comedy of reconciliation. KITCHEN-COUNTER COMEDY Amy Acker’s Beatrice takes some alone time in ‘Much Ado About Nothing.’

Buffing Up the Bard BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

S IT “nothing,” that matter that Shakespeare uses as the engine of the frequently cruel comedy Much Ado About Nothing? The allegedly lighthearted subject is the dreadful way men and women treat each other, just because they can. The two sexes call each other animals (“A bird of my tongue is better than a beast of yours”) in foolish denial of their own natures. “Sex is a way of reminding an animal pretending not to be an animal that it is an animal,” wrote Kingsley Amis. This 400-year-old

comedy has a contemporary twist: the sure-fire power of slut-shaming. Joss Whedon’s low-budget blackand-white, small-camera version of the play takes place at a Santa Monica mountains house party during a long weekend. There’s more than a little of Whedon’s honest and honorable feminism here, a touch of Neil LaBute to the way the suit-clad victors gang up and prank each other. A lighted swimming pool steams away through the night, while tastefully Sapphic new-vaudeville acrobats

cavort. Riki Lindhome, the tough blonde actress playing the coconspirator Conrade, wears a striped Edie Sedgwick shirt, and the play’s tune “Hey, Nonny Nonny” is crooned late at night to the rhythms of the Velvet Underground’s “Rock & Roll.” Witty Lady Beatrice is played by Amy Acker, sweet, gawky “Fred” from TV’s Angel. Alexis Denisof (Wesley from Angel and Buffy the Vampire Slayer) plays Benedick. He used to play a Roddy McDowallish geek; Denisof has some meat

The 1992 Kenneth Branagh version isn’t made irrelevant by new Ado. You miss the purring drawl Emma Thompson brought to a phrase like “civil as an orange.” But fans of the learned constable Dogberry (Nathan Fillion), who were shorted two decades ago, get served beautifully this time. O rare N. Fillion, the acme of the bluff, fatuous man, plays Dogberry as a fatuous rent-a-cop in a Polyester sports-coat of Soviet cut. The film gives us mature romance and acid youthfulness aligned—well worth sighing over.

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING Opens Fri at the Nick


Film Capsules New

SH O WT I ME S

Fri at Aptos, Del Mar, Scotts Valley and Green Valley) MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (PG-13; 115 min) See review, page 40. (Opens Fri at the Nick) SF DOCFEST The San Francisco documentary festival, now in its 12th year, brings a three-day mini-festival to the Rio Theatre this weekend, Friday through Sunday. Subjects include the famous punk protest band Pussy Riot, Bettie

Movie reviews by Steve Palopoli and Richard von Busack

Page, mountaineering on K2, and a lot more. (Fri through Sun at the Rio) WORLD WAR Z (R; 98 min) Heard anything about the film adaptation of Max Brooks’ zombie-war novel being a budget-busting, reshootheavy, politically compromised nightmare? We haven’t either! But we’re sure that if the story of its disastrous production were, say, all over the Internet and the movie-gossip shows all

the time, star Brad Pitt would be sweating bullets about how his $200 million pet project— in which he plays an ex-U.N. employee who travels the world to find a cure for an apocalyptic zombie pandemic—will be received by the summer blockbuster audience. (Opens Fri at Santa Cruz 9, Scotts Valley and Green Valley)

Reviews

Showtimes are for Wednesday, June 19, through Wednesday, June 26, unless otherwise indicated. Programs and showtimes are subject to change without notice.

APTOS CINEMAS

122 Rancho Del Mar Center, Aptos 831.688.6541 www.thenick.com

Monsters University — (Opens Fri) 2:20; 4:40; 7; 9:10 plus Fri-Sun noon. Now You See Me — Wed-Thu 2; 4:30; 7; 9:20. This Is the End — Wed-Thu 2:30; 5; 7:20; 9:30; Fri-Wed 2:40; 5; 7:20; 9:30 plus Fri-Sun 12:20pm.

CINELUX 41ST AVENUE CINEMA

1475 41st Ave, Capitola 831.479.3504 www.cineluxtheatres.com

World War Z — (Opens Thu 8pm) 11:30; 2; 4:45; 8:45; 10:15. World War Z 3D — (Opens Fri) 11:15; 7:30. (no Wed 7/3 11:15am) Man of Steel — Wed-Thu 11:55; 2:15; 3:15; 5:30; 6:45; 8:45; Fri-Wed 11:55; 3:30; 5:30; 6:45; 10. (no Thu 8:45pm)

Man of Steel 3D — Wed-Thu 2:15pm. The Internship — Wed-Thu 1; 4; 7; 10. Chimpanzee — Wed-Thu 10am. The Smurfs — Wed-Thu 10am..

DEL MAR

1124 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz 831.426.7500 www.thenick.com

Monsters University — (Opens 8pm Thu) 12; 2:20; 4:40; 7; 9:20 plus Fri 9:45am; Fri-Sat 11:30pm. Monsters University 3D — (Opens 8:15pm Thu) 11:15; 1:30; 3:50; 6:15; 8:30 plus Fri-Sat 10:40pm. The Bling Ring —(Opens Fri) 12:50; 3; 5:10; 7:20; 9:30 plus Fri 10:40am; Fri-Sat 11:30am. The East — Wed-Thu 2:15; 4:45; 7:15; 9:50. Frances Ha — Wed-Thu 3:15; 5:20; 7:30; 9:30. MUD — Wed-Thu 4:15; 7; 9:40.

NICKELODEON

Lincoln and Cedar streets, Santa Cruz 831.426.7500 www.thenick.com

Much Ado About Nothing — (Opens Fri) 2:20; 4:50; 7:20; 9:40 plus Sat-Sun noon. Before Midnight — Daily 2; 4:30; 7; 9:20 plus Sat-Sun 11:45am. The East — Fri-Wed 4:40; 9:50. Frances Ha — Fri-Wed 5:20; 9:30 plus Sat-Sun 1:15pm. Kon-Tiki — Fri-Wed 3:15; 7:30. Love Is All You Need — Wed-Thu 1:50; 6:50. MUD — Fri-Wed 1:50; 7:10. Shadow Dancer — Wed-Thu 2:20; 4:50; 7:12; 9:40. Stories We Tell — Wed-Thu 2:10; 4:40; 7:10; 9:30.

RIVERFRONT STADIUM TWIN

155 S River St, Santa Cruz 800.326.3264 x1701 www.regmovies.com

Iron Man 3 — Wed-Thu 3:30pm; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. The Great Gatsby — Wed-Thu 12:15pm; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. This Is the End —Wed-Thu 12; 2:30; 5; 6:30; 7:30; 9; 10; Fri-Wed call for showtimes.

SANTA CRUZ CINEMA 9

1405 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz 800.326.3264 x1700 www.regmovies.com

World War Z — (Opens Thu 8pm) call for showtimes.

After Earth — Wed-Thu 11:40; 2:10; 5:10; 10:40; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. (no Wed 6/19 5:10pm) Epic —Wed 6/19 11:10; 1:45; 4:15; 7:10; 9:50;Thu 11:10; 1:45; 4:15; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. Fast and Furious 6 —Wed-Thu 11:20; 2:40; 7:20; 10:20; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. The Internship — Wed-Thu 12:30; 3:30; 7:30; 10:15; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. Man of Steel —Wed-Thu 11; 2:30; 4:30; 6; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. (no Thu 4:30pm) Man of Steel 3D — Wed-Thu 11:30; 3; 6:30; 9:30; 10; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. Now You See Me — Wed-Thu 12:15; 3:10; 7:10; 9:50; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. The Purge — Wed-Thu 12; 2:20; 5:30; 7:40; 10:30; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. (no Wed 6/19 5:30pm) Star Trek Into Darkness —Wed-Thu 11:50; 2:50; 7; 10:10; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. The Great Gatsby — 11:40; 2:50; 6:50; 10:10; Fri-Wed call for showtimes. Carmen Met Summer— Wed 6/19 7pm. The Thing — Thu 9pm.

CINELUX SCOTTS VALLEY STADIUM CINEMA 226 Mt Hermon Rd, Scotts Valley 831.438.3260 www.cineluxtheatres.com

Monsters University — (Opens Thu 8pm) 11; 11:45; 1:40; 2:30; 4:20; 7; 8:30; 9:40. World War Z — (Opens Thu 8pm) 11:55; 1:45; 2:40; 4:30; 5:30; 7:15; 10. World War Z 3D — (Opens Fri) 11; 8. Before Midnight — Wed-Thu 11; 1:40; 4:20; 7; 9:40. Epic — Wed-Thu 11:55; 2:45; 4:30; 7; 9:30; Fri-Wed 11:20; 2. (no Thu 9:30pm) The Internship — Wed-Thu 4:30pm; Fri-Wed 4:30; 10:15. Man of Steel — Wed-Thu 11:45; 12:30; 1:15; 3:15; 4; 4:45; 6:30; 7:30; 8:15; 9:45; Fri-Wed 11:55; 12:30; 1:15; 3:15; 4; 4:45; 6:30; 7:30; 8:15; 9:45. (no Thu 8:15pm) Now You See Me — Wed-Thu 11; 1:40; 4:20; 7; 9:40. Star Trek Into Darkness — Wed-Thu 12:15; 3:30; 6:45; 9:45; Fri-Wed 7:20pm. (no Thu 6:45pm) This Is the End — Wed-Thu 11:15; 2:30; 5:15; 7:45; 10:15; Fri-Wed 11:30; 2:15; 4:55; 7:45; 10:15. (no Sat 4:55pm) Chimpanzee — Wed 6/19 10am. West Side Story — Thu 7pm; Sat 11am. The Smurfs — Wed 7/3 10am.

GREEN VALLEY CINEMA 8

1125 S Green Valley Rd, Watsonville 831.761.8200 www.greenvalleycinema.com

Monsters University — (Opens Thu 8pm) 10:50; 1:25; 4; 7; 9:30. Monsters University 3D — (Opens Thu 8pm) 10:45; 1:05; 6:30. World War Z — (Opens Fri) 11; 1:45; 2:45; 4:30; 7:30; 8:15; 10:15. World War Z 3D — (Opens Fri) 12; 5:30; 9. After Earth — Wed-Thu 9:30pm. Epic — Wed-Thu 10:55; 1:15; 4; Fri-Wed 11; 1:45. Fast and Furious 6—Wed-Thu 10:50; 1:35; 4:15; 7:20; 10:15; Fri-Wed 10:55; 1:35; 4:15. The Internship — Wed-Thu 12; 2:30; 7:50; 10:15. Man of Steel — Wed-Thu 11; 1; 3; 4; 5; 7; 9; 10; Fri-Wed 12:45; 3:45; 6:45; 9:45. Man of Steel 3D — Wed-Thu 12; 6; Fri-Wed 3:30pm. Now You See Me — Wed-Thu 10:50; 1:35; 4:15; 7. The Purge — Wed-Thu 1:55; 3:50; 5:45; 7:40; 10:15; Fri-Wed 3:30; 5:30; 7:40; 10. This Is the End — Wed-Thu 1:15; 4; 7:15; 9:30; Fri-Wed 11:25; 2:10; 4:50; 7:40; 10:15.

AFTER EARTH (PG-13; 100 min.) After Hollywood figured out that no one wants to watch M. Night Shyamalan movies anymore, they had to find something to do with him. So they put him in the director’s chair for a Will Smith sci-fi movie, didn’t let him write the script by himself and agreed that no one would talk about the fact that he was involved. Smart move. Smith, who once again stars with his own kid in this story about a father-son outing to an abandoned and treacherous Earth, doesn’t need the M. Night albatross around his neck in selling this summer blockbuster. BEFORE MIDNIGHT (R; 109 min) Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy bring their characters Jesse and Celine back for the third film in this series from Richard Linklater. It’s two decades since they first met, and all is not well. Can they stick it out? THE EAST (PG-13; 116 min) Brit Marling, Ellen Page and Alexander Skarsgard star in this thriller about a private detective hired to infiltrate an anarchist group who is forced to reconsider her loyalties as she gets deeper in the case. EPIC (PG; 102 min.) Somewhere between Brave and Arthur and the Invisibles is this computer animated story of a girl who finds a culture of tiny people in the forest, shrinks down to their size and joins them in a battle of good against evil. Amanda Seyfried and Clint Ferrell headline the voice cast. FAST AND FURIOUS 6 (PG-13; 130 min) Fasterer! Furiouserer! And Michelle Rodriguez is back from the dead! That’s pretty much the extent of the plot in this fifth franchise sequel. How did they fit it all into 130 minutes? THE INTERNSHIP (PG-13; 125 min.) Sure, you could argue the world doesn’t need another Frat Pack comedy about losers who learn a valuable life lesson by acting stupid—in this case, wasting valuable space in Google’s internship program. But look at it this way: Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn get jobs, Fox gets a summer comedy product, and Google gets millions of dollars in free advertising. Everybody wins! KON-TIKI (PG-13; 118 min.) Finally, the Norwegians take back Thor. Okay, not that Thor, but Thor Heyerdahl, the Norwegian researcher and adventurer who sailed the famous Kon-Tiki expedition of 1947. Nominated for an Oscar and all kinds of other awards, this film dramatizes his attempt

to prove a theory about preColumbian explorers by building and then attempting to sail what is basically a wood raft 4,300 miles across the Pacific. It’s not as easy as it sounds… oh wait, it sounds absolutely impossible. MAN OF STEEL (PG13; 116 min.) Director Zack Snyder was accused by many of botching his Watchmen adaptation, but somehow he still managed to get himself put in charge of reviving the most troubled superhero franchise this side of The Hulk. Can new cape star Henry Cavill lead a rebound from Superman Returns, with this story that vaguely combines the original Superman (origin story) with Superman II? Zod is back, baby! MUD (PG-13; 130 min.) Ellis and Neckbone, two 14year-olds living on a river in Arkansas, go on an adventure and come across some surprises, including a very gritty Matthew McConaughey. NOW YOU SEE ME (PG13; 116 min.) Magicians pulling heists? How come no one ever thought of that before? Not to mention that this movie re-teams Zombieland’s Woody Harrelson and Jesse Eisenberg, who co-star with Morgan Freeman and Mark Ruffalo. STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (PG-13; 132 min.) Considering that J.J. Abrams is now in charge of both the Star Trek and Star Wars franchises, nerds of both tribes can finally come together in the hope that this movie will kick ass. And hey, he didn’t do such a bad job on the first Star Trek reboot, did he? Certainly he got bonus points for using Trek-type reasoning to explain why we suddenly had Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Karl Urban, Zoe Saldana and Simon Pegg as the original Enterprise crew, in a different origin story. Pine as Kirk did a fantastic job of holding off on any kind of a Shatner impression until the end of the first movie after he had something to be so cocky about. STORIES WE TELL (PG-13; 116 min.) Actress Sarah Polley directed this film about her own family secrets, with the cast mixing actors and actual family members. THIS IS THE END (R; 112 min.) For this follow-up to Superbad and Pineapple Express (and Green Hornet?), Evan Goldberg and Seth Rogen got their friends to star as themselves in a comedy about what people who party at James Franco’s house would do in the apocalypse.

JUNE 19-25, 2013

THE BLING RING (R; 98 min) Sofia Coppola’s buzzy new film stars Emma Watson as part of a group of teenagers who rob celebrities. The victims of the real-life crime ring that inspired the film included Paris Hilton and Lindsay Lohan, so they can’t be all bad. (Opens Fri at Del Mar)

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (G; 110 min) When people talk about the greatest Pixar movies, Monsters Inc. never seems to get mentioned. And yet, it is awesome. Why Cars got a sequel before Sulley and Mike is anyone’s guess, but at least it’s here now. Technically, it’s a prequel, with John Goodman and Billy Crystal returning to tell the story of how the pair got into the scare business. (Opens

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JUNE 19-25, 2013

42

Epicure

spot at the top of Cedar Street. It’s true that he played hardball with the South Korean group who wooed his coffeehouse name, “Caffe Bene.” And Botelho got the deal he wanted. “I sold the name to a company who wanted to open lots of Caffe Benes all over California,” Botelho said. “Originally, they wanted just the domain name, but I told them it was all or nothing.” So Botelho got what he admits was “a good deal for me—it made it worth it for me to stay here.” So now the Caffe Bene name is under license—and don’t be surprised it you hear of other places called Caffe Bene popping up in other regions. Only they will never be the same as Botelho’s vintage coffeehouse, which will continue to do its thing exactly like it always has. For sure, it does seem as though people get excited when a new coffee place opens. But it’s also great when the vintage, seasoned places can continue on as caffeinated forts for equally seasoned locals. Molto bene, Ken. That’s the “original” Caffe Bene, at 1101 Cedar Street (425-00441). SEASONAL SENSATIONS:

TRAY CHIC The fine tradition of waiter racing will be part of the Bastille Day celebration in downtown Santa Cruz July 14.

The Great Waiter Race BY CHRISTINA WATERS

N

o, it is not too early to make your Bastille Day plans, which absolutely must include this year’s pulse-pounding culinary reality show—the Soif Waiter’s Race. Make sure you’re at Pacific and Walnut on Sunday, July 14th, 1pm for the spine-tingling action as waiters show off their best moves, all in the interest of fun (and outstanding Facebook photo ops). Don’t forget to stick around for a special three-course Bastille

Day spread @ Soif, $45 per person (non-inclusive). Call 831.423.2020 to reserve your spot. And while I’m on the subject of Santos Majano (chef @ Soif), you will want to savor Majano’s cooking at its finest, enjoyed outdoors at the Route 1 Farms Summer Farm Dinner, pairing Majano’s specialties with wines from Odonata—Sunday, June 30th. Participants get to stroll the farm, take a tour with farmer Jeff Larkey, then sit down to several courses

prepared in the fields, paired with Denis Hoey’s terrific wines. This is a terrific al fresco event—what better way to dine locally, drink locally and enjoy the summer locally. Check the website for your tickets. BENE FOR CAFFE BENE: Talked with Ken Botelho this

week, the guy who has been laying down great espresso drinks for 25 years—and inhabits that cozy, funky, irrepres sibly Santa Cruz

That would be the cherries and fingerling potatoes at current local markets. Ditto the strawberries and blueberries (UCSC Farm & Garden). I swear I had a pale pinkskinned fingerling from Happy Boy Farms last week that was the finest potato I’d ever tasted. Enough to make a grown Bavarian cry. Also this season’s young onions, Meyer lemons and giant sunflowers are worth your attention right now. And I never, ever leave the Saturday Westside Market without at least one slice of fresh-baked tea cake from Companion Bakery. Current to-die-fors are the moist rhubarb and the banana bread loaded with walnuts and dates. These are carbs worth consuming! LIFE’S TOO SHORT NOT TO.... treat yourself to a scoop of salted caramel artisan ice cream made by Mission Hill Creamery. Even better, try some of this utterly enchanting blend of the sweet and the salty, chased by a shot of espresso. Do this at the downtown Santa Cruz Mission Hill Creamery ice cream shop at 1101B Pacific Avenue—noon–10pm, Sun–Th, and noon–11pm Fri & Sat. 0


FO O D IE FIL E Chip Scheur

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THE BOOKA OF ETI Eti Levi-Barkai, along with her husband Atar Barkai, has just opened Booka in Aptos’ Bayview Hotel.

W e e’ve Eliminated Eliminatted All Styrofoam Usage Usag ge We’ve & Disposable Dishware Diishware for In-Store Dining. Diining.

Eti Levi

W e Support Nonprofit No onprofit Environmental Environmenta al Groups We Through Fundraisers Fundr raisers & Sponsorships. Sponsorships s.

Co-owner, Booka Restaurant & Bar BY JACOB PIERCE

O

riginally from Israel, Eti Levi-Barkai and her husband Atar Barkai recently relocated from San Jose to open Booka, a new restaurant on the bottom story of the Aptos Village’s Bayview Hotel. SCW caught up with her at her restaurant, formerly the site of Ristorante Barolo, to talk about unique flavors, fusion food and the spot’s atmosphere.

SCW: Beautiful building. Is it haunted? ETI LEVI-BARKAI: If it was,

they couldn’t stand a chance for the enthusiastic energy we brought to the place. It’s haunted by a group of people who want to give people an excellent dining experience. What do you bring to the table in Santa Cruz? A taste people have

never had before. When we opened, we wanted to give people everything they know, but with a twist. For example, calamari. Everywhere you go, how are you going to get the calamari? It’s usually fried. It’s fried. You’re going to get the red sauce 90 percent of the time. So we do the calamari. And instead of deep-frying it with everything the right way, we do it on the plancha. We do it on hummus with a lemon sauce. It’s different things. Everybody’s had calamari before, but not in that way. We have influence from many cooking traditions. What’s your favorite thing on this small menu? If you’re going

to push me and force me to choose one really, the calamari, and beef carpaccio, and the ceviche. And the Caesar. And the cauliflower…In the entrees, I can say many people who eat the burger, actually use the words “best burger I’ve had in my life.” Normally, I don’t like burgers, but here it’s one of my favorites. Who’s your favorite super hero? Wonder Woman. She was amazing. I

liked when she was flipping and the clothes would change. What would Wonder Woman order? She would order everything on the menu. I would force her to order the calamari, but I would not let her go without the carpaccio. I like to see every table with a focaccia. This is such a great appetizer to start with the other appetizers: tomato, eggplant and labane, which is a Mediterranean common cheese. — Jacob Pierce

Our Take-Out Ta ake-Out C Containers, Boxes & Paper Products Produc cts Are Recyclable. Our Patio Furni iture Furniture is Made From 100% 10 00% Recycled Materials. Mater rials. We W e Recycle Whenever Possible. Poss sible. 710 Front St (Next to Trader r Joe’s)

831-427-4444 8 31-427-4444

woodstockscruz.com

JUNE 19-25, 2013

We’ve W e e’ve Installed d Energy-Efficient Refrigeration, Refriigeration, Lighting, Ovens, Ovens s, Computers & Dishwashers. Dishwa ashers.

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Diner’s Guide Symbols made simple: $ = Under $10 $$ = $11-$15 $$$ = $16-$20 $$$$ = $21 and up Price Ranges based on average cost of dinner entree and salad, excluding alcoholic beverages

JUNE 19-25, 2013

APTOS/SOQUEL $$ Aptos

Ambrosia India Bistro Authentic Indian. Fresh regional flavors & techniques. 207 Searidge Rd, 831.685.0610 Lunch buffet daily 11:30a-2:30p. Dinner daily 5p-close.

$$$ Soquel

Cafe Cruz

$ Soquel

Discretion Brewing

2621 41st Ave, 831.476.3801 2703 41st Ave, 831.316.0662

Heather’s Patisserie

Rosticceria & Bar. Fresh, local, sustainable. Lunch, dinner. Patio dining, happy hour menu. Brewery/gastropub.. Handcrafted beers on tap. Tasty beerinspired tapas by Main Street Garden w/ local ingredients. Bakery and deli. Pastries, breads, baked goods baked daily on site. Breakfast, lunch, wedding cakes.

$ Aptos

7486 Soquel Dr, 831.662.3546

$$ Aptos

Manuel’s Mexican. Northern Mexican inspired fare, made fresh daily. 261 Center Ave, 831.688.4848 Family restaurant since 1965.

$$ Severino’s Grill Aptos 7500 Old Dominion Ct, 831.688.8987 $$ Aptos

Continental California Cuisine.. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner. www.seacliffinn.com

Zameen Mediterranean

Middle Eastern/Mediterranean. Fresh & flavorful. Beer and 7528 Soquel Dr, 831.688.4465 wine. Dine in or take out Tue-Sun 11a-8p.

CAPITOLA $$ Capitola

Britannia Arms 110 Monterey Ave, 831.464.2583

$$$$ Capitola

Shadowbrook

$$$ Capitola

Zelda’s

1750 Wharf Rd, 831.475.1511

British and Classic American.. Daily specials. Happy Hour Monday - Friday. California Continental. World-class service, fine food, wines, with Old-World charm. Open daily.

California cuisine. Weekly specials include prime rib and 203 Esplanade, 831.475.4900 lobster. Patio dining on the beach.

SANTA CRUZ $$$ Aquarius Creative American cuisine. Oceanfront dining. Local Santa Cruz 175 West Cliff Dr, 831.460.5012 produce and sustainable seafood. $ Charlie Hong Kong CA Organic meets Southeast Asian street food. Santa Cruz 1141 Soquel Ave, 831. 426.5664 Consistent winner “Best Cheap Eats”. Open daily 11a-11p. $$ The Crepe Place Crepes and more. Full bar and beautiful outdoor patio. Santa Cruz 1134 Soquel Ave, 831.429.6994 Live music. $$$ Crow’s Nest Seafood and American cuisine. Kids menu and nightly Santa Cruz 2218 East Cliff Dr, 831.476.4560 entertainment. Harbor and Bay views.

Gabriella Cafe $$ Santa Cruz 910 Cedar St., 831.457.1677

Califormia-Italian. Farmers market fresh and organic. Local wine list, romantic setting with charming patio.

Hindquarter Grill Americana. Specializing in ribs, steaks and burgers. $$$ Santa Cruz 303 Soquel Ave, 831.426.7770 Full bar. Hoffman’s Bistro Calif. cuisine & Bakery. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, brunch. $$ Santa Cruz 1102 Pacific Ave, 837.420.0135 Full Bar w/ $3 Bar Bites/$4.50 Well Drinks. $$ Hula’s Island Grill Santa Cruz 221 Cathcart St, 831.426.4852

’60s Vegas meets ’50s Waikiki. Fresh fish, great steaks, vegetarian. Full-service tiki bar.

$ India Joze Santa Cruz 418 Front St, 831.325-3633

Eclectic Pan Asian dishes. Vegetarian, seafood, lamb and chicken with a wok emphasis since 1972.

$$$ Johnny’s Harborside Santa Cruz 493 Lake Ave, 831.479.3430

Seafood/Calif. Fresh seafood made your way on the Harbor. Great views & full bar.

$$$ La Posta Italian. Traditional Italian cuisine made w/ the finest Santa Cruz 538 Seabright Ave, 831.457.2782 local ingredients. Extensive wine list. $$ Laili Santa Cruz 101 Cooper St, 831.423.4545

Silk road flavors. Fresh and flavorful Mediterranean cuisine with an Afghan twist. Patio dining.

$$ Lillian’s Italian Kitchen Santa Cruz 1116 Soquel Ave, 831.425.2288

Italian. Home-style Italian specialties. Cozy, friendly atmosphere. Beer & wine.

$$ Louie’s Cajun Kitchen Santa Cruz 110 Church St., 831.429.2000

N’awlins-style dining. Cajun and southern flavors. Full bar. Bluesy, cool, funky..

Olitas Cantina Fine Mexican cuisine. Stunning Bay views. Full bar. $$$ Santa Cruz 49-B Municipal Wharf, 831.458.9393 $ Pacific Thai Thai. Fresh ingredients, ambrosia bubble teas, shakes. Santa Cruz 1319 Pacific Ave, 831.420.1700 Daily specials. $ Pizza My Heart Pizza. Slices and whole pies. Original & award -winning Santa Cruz 1116 Pacific Ave/2180 41st Ave recipes. Daily specials.


$ Pono Hawaiian Grill Santa Cruz 120 Union St, 831.426.7666

Authentic Hawaiian Cuisine. Large outdoor patio. Feat. “The Reef” tropical bar. and “Aloha Fridays”

Red Restaurant and Bar $$ Santa Cruz 200 Locust St, 831.425.1913

Restaurant and Lounge. Large, small and shared plates. Extensive cocktail, beer, wine lists.

$$$ Ristorante Italiano Santa Cruz 555 Soquel Ave, 831.458.2321

Italian-American. Generous portions, friendly service, beautiful patio. Full bar.

$ Samba Rock Acai Cafe Santa Cruz 291-B Water St, 831.458.2224

Brazilian. Fresh and authentic acai smoothies and bowls. M-F 8a-5p, Sat/Sun 9a-5p.

$ Santa Cruz

Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing California / Brewpub. Handcrafted organic ales and large 402 Ingalls Street, 831.425.4900 outdoor patio.

$$$ Soif Wine bar with menu. Seasonal menu with local ingredients Santa Cruz 105 Walnut Ave, 831.423.2020 paired with fine wines. Wine shop on site.

Seasonal cuisine. Farm-to-table American comfort food. Gluten-free/vegetarian options.

$$$ Stagnaro Bros. Seafood and more. Panoramic ocean views. Fresh seafood, Santa Cruz 21 Municipal Wharf, 831.423.2180 pasta and steaks . Kid friendly.. $$ Woodstock’s Pizza Santa Cruz 710 Front St, 831.427.4444

Pizza. Beers on tap, patio dining, HDTV and free WiFi. Large groups, catering, deliveries.

$$ 515 Kitchen & Cocktails Santa Cruz 515 Cedar St, 831.425.5051

Restaurant & Lounge. Specialty cocktails, small plates & happy hour menu. Dinner nightly.

SCOTTS VALLEY/FELTON $ Heavenly Cafe American. Breakfast and lunch. Famous eggs benedict. Scotts Valley 1210 Mt. Hermon Rd, 831.335.7311 welcome. Large parties welcome.

Maya Mexican Restaurant Mexican. 75+ flavors of tequila. Authentic flavors, fresh $$ Scotts Valley 3115 Scotts Valley Dr, 831.438.7004 ingredients. Kid-friendly. $$ Mollie’s Country Cafe American. Homemade meals in a comfortable, family Scotts Valley 219 Mt Hermon Rd, 831.438.8313 environment. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Outdoor patio. $$ wine.

Redwood Pizzeria Felton

Pizza. Local and organic toppings, lasagna, salads. Beer & 6205 Hwy 9, 831.335.1500 Gluten-free options.

HAPPY HOUR 4 to 7 PM, Monday through Friday $4 Bottles of Domestic Beers $6 Well Drinks $6 House Wine by the glass 25% Off All Appetizers 175 WEST CLIFF DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ

831.460.5012

JDVHOTELS.COM/AQUARIUS

JUNE 19-25, 2013

$$$ Solaire Santa Cruz 611 Ocean St, 831.600.4545

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JUNE 19-25, 2013

AF

Santa Cruz County’s only green publication, Santa Cruz Weekly, is now certified by the City of Santa Cruz’s Monterey Bay Area Green Business Program. Our office is in a LEED-certified building and we print on 100% recycled paper at a LEED-certified facility—just two of many of our green features.

877 Cedar St. Suite 147 Santa Cruz 831.457.9000


Astrology As A sttrrro ology g Free F Fr rree e Will Will

By

Rob Brezsny Breezsny

47

For F or th thee w week eek o off Jun Junee 19

TAURUS S (April 20–May 20):: I expect exxpect you will be called on to move fluidly between opposin ng camps or competing opposing inter ests or diff erent rrealities. ealities. Mayb be you’ll volunteer to interests different Maybe ser ve as an arbiter between the crabby crraabby good guys and serve the righteous bad guys.. P erhaps yo u’ll try to decode Perhaps you’ll one friend’s quirk quirkyy behavior so thatt another friend can understand it. YYou oou might have to int terprret e my hor oscopes interpret horoscopes ffor or people who think astr ology is bu unk. YYou oou may even have astrology bunk. to be a mediator between your ownn heart and head, or explain the motivations of your past passt self to your future future self. self. YYou oou can’t can’t be perf ect, of course. There Therre will be details lost in perfect, tr anslation. But if you’r a a saint and as trick translation. you’ree as patient as trickyy as a cr ow w, you’ll succeed. crow, GEMINI (May 21–June 20):: Pablo Pabllo Casals Casals was one of greatest cello players who ever lived. Among his early the greatest inspirations was the music of Johann Johannn Sebastian Bach. inspirations Casals discovered discovered Bach’s Bach’s six cello su uites when he was 13 Casals suites daay for for the next 13 years. years old and played them every day sim milarr, Gemini? Devoted Have you ever done something similar, pleasurable discipline on a regular regular basis for for yourself to a pleasurable a long time? I invite you to try it. Thee coming months will thrroough a diligent masterry through be an excellent time to seek mastery attention to the details. CANCER (June 21–July 22):: “I know knnow that I am not a category y,” ,” said philosopher Buckmin nster Fuller category,” Buckminster Fuller.r. “I am not a thing—a noun.. I seem to be a ver rb, an evolutionary verb, pr ocess.”” Philosopher Norman O.. Br rown had a similar process.” Brown experience. “The human body is not not a thing or substance, but a continuous cr reation,” e ” he muse ed.. “It is an ener gy creation,” mused. energy system which is never a complete structur sstructure; ree;; never static;; is in perpetual inner self-constructionn and self-destruction.” Now is an excellent time to imaginee yourself in these terms,, CCancerian. ancerian. YYou’re oou’re not a finish hed pr oduct, and never finished product, will be! Celebr ate your fluidity y, your changeableness,, your Celebrate fluidity, instinctual ur ge to rreinvent einvent yourself urge yourself.f. LEO O (July 23–Aug. 22):: Renownedd 20th-century Karl Barth worked on hiss book Church Church theologian Karl for 36 years. It was more morre than 9,000 pages Dogmatics for more than 6 million miillion words. words. And yet long and contained more more to say s and wanted to it was incomplete. He had more k going. i What Wh t’s ’ your biggest bi t undone undone d project, project, j t, Leo? L ? keep What’s concentrate The coming months will be a good time to concentrate Ideallyy, you you will do so with a on bringing it to a climax. Ideally, embracing the challenge of of creating creating an artful flourish, embracing ending with the same liveliness youu had at the beginning prrocess. o . But even if you havee to culminate your of the process. prosaic way, wayy, do it! Your Yoour next big project project work in a plodding,, prosaic revealed within weeks weeks after you’ve y will be revealed tied up the last loose end. VIRGO (Aug. 23–Sept. 22):: Susannah Susannnah Cibber was a popular 18th-century English contr a to whose singing was al contralto expr essive and moving.. On one occa asion, she perf ormed expressive occasion, performed Handel’s Messiah with such ver hat an influential priest ve tthat verve rresponded esponded by making an extr avagant guar raantee.. He told extravagant guarantee. her that as a rresult esult of her glorious singing, s any sins she had committed or would commit wer w orever fforgiven. orgiven. given II’dd weree fforever like to see you perpetr ate an equiva alent amazement, Vir go: perpetrate equivalent Virgo: a good or beautiful or soulful deed that t wins you a flood of enduring slack. The cosmic omen ns suggest that such an omens achievement is quite possible. LIBRA (Sept. 23–Oct.. 22):: Johnnyy Appleseed was a 19th-century ffolk olk her eenowned ffor o planting apple tr or ees heroo rrenowned trees in vast ar eas of rur al America. Durin ng the 70 years this areas rural During ffamous amous Libr ot mar ried. He believed Libraa was alive, he never go got married. that if he rremained emained unwed during his h time on earth, he would be blessed with two spirit-wives spirit-w wives in the after-life. after-life.

Have you ever do one something like that yourself ra? a Is done yourself,f, Libr Libra? ther re you’ve denied yourself in the her theree an adventu adventure heree and now because youu think that ’s the only way you can get that’s some bigger ter adventur re at a later date? If so,, now bigger,r, bett better adventure would be an exce ellent time to adjust your attitude. excellent

SCORPIO O (Oct (Oct.t.. 23–Nov 23–Nov. v. 21): “It is kind of fun to do the alt Disney, Disneyy, a pioneer animator whose impossible,”” said W Walt innovatioons were were remarkable. remarkable. Judging from from your cartoon innovations current astrological astrologiccal omens,, I think you Scorpios have current adoopt his battle cry as your mantra. mantrraa. You’ve Yoou’ve every right to adopt appointmeent with the frontier. frontierr. You’re Yoou’rre primed to got an appointment perform experiments experimeents at the edge of your understanding. perform Great mysteries will w be tempting you to come closer and Great secrets will be be teasing you with juicy clues. As As you lost secrets explore and tinker tinkeer with the unknown, you might also want explore grraaffiti I saw scrawled scrrawled a mirror in a thhe graffiti to meditate on the on a mirror restroom: “Only “ absurd can public restroom: those who attempt the absurd impoossible.” achieve the impossible.” SAGITTARIU SAGITTARIUS US (Nov (Nov.. 22–Dec. 21):: Astronauts Astrroonauts on lunar expeditionss have orbited the moon and seen its entir ace. Bu ut the rrest est of us have never seen mor re entiree surf surface. But more than 59 percent percent of o it. As As the moon rrevolves evolves ar ound the around Earth, it always keeps keeeps one side turned away from from our view. view. Isn ’tt that amazingg and eerie? The second most important Isn’t heavenly body y, w hich is such a constant and intimate body, which ffactor actor in our lives s,, is half-hidden.. I’d like to pr opose that lives, propose ther analoggous phenomenon in your inner world, theree is an analogous Sagittarius:: a partt of you that fforever orever conceals some of its true natur e. But I’I’m ’m pr etty sur ered an nature. pretty suree you will soon be off offered unpr ecedented cchance hance to explor re that mysterious rrealm. ealm. unprecedented explore CAPRICORN N (Dec.. 22–Jan.. 19):: Anglo-Irish novelist Laurence Sterne Sterne married married his wife, wife, Elizabeth, in 1741. 17411. Laurence Tw wenty-five years years later, laterr, he fell fell in love with another Twenty-five c woman, Eliza. In composing love letters to his new infatuation,, he lifted lifted some of the same romantic romantic infatuation, passages he had originally written to Elizabeth when he her. Try Trry hard hard not to do anything remotely remotely was courting her. resembling that, Capricorn. Capricorn. Give your intimate allies your resembling freshest stuff. stuff. Treat Treaat them as the unique creatures creatures they are. are. freshest temptaation to use shticks shticks that worked to create crreate e Resist the temptation p closeness in the past. AQUARIUS S (Jan. ( 20–Feb. 18):: ItIt’s ’s important that yoourself or allow yourself to be punished you not punish yourself for the sins that other o people have committed.. ItIt’s ’s also for n think nasty thoughts about yourself crucial that you not presence of anyone who’s who’s pr one to or put yourself in the presence prone thoughts about you. Self-doubt and selfthinking nasty thoughts thy for for you to entertain about ten criticism may be heal healthy from now, now w, and and at that time you will probably probably benefit days from from receiving reeceiving compassionate coompassionate critique from from others,, too. from for the mome ent,, please put the emphasis on selfBut for moment, protection and self-nurturing. seelf-nurturing. protection PISCES S (Feb (Feb. 19 119–Mar 19–March March 20):: For more more than three three decades, a man inn Assam, Assam, India,, has worked to build a fforest. orest. When Jada av “Molai”” P ayeng started planting and Jadav Payeng tending seeds at the age of 16,, the sandbars bor dering bordering the Br raahmaputra River wer re bar ren. TToday, oodayy, almost entir ely Brahmaputra were barren. entirely thank ey’re cover ed with a 1,360-acr orest thankss to him,, th they’re covered 1,360-acree fforest that harbors deer, deerr, birds, birds, tigers, rhinos, and elephants. A ccording to my analysis a of the astr ological omens,, you According astrological could launch a comparable coomparraable project project in the next 12 months, Pisces—a labor of love that will rrequire equire your persistent cr eativity and provide provide o for a long time. creativity you with sanctuary for

Homework: It’s It’ss a shame so many of us try to mo mo-tivate ourselves ourselvees through through abusive self-criticism. Ar guilty of this sin? How so? What will you Aree you guilty do to change? Write Write Freewillastrology.com. Freewillastrologyy.com. .

Visit RE Visit REALASTROLOGY.COM A L ASTROLOGY.COM ffor or R Rob’s ob’s Expanded E Weekly Weekly Audio Audio Hor oscope es and Daily Text Text Message Message Horoscopes Hor oscope es. The The audio horoscopes horoscopes Horoscopes. ar e also available available by by phone at at are 1.877.873.4888 1.877.873 3.4888 or 1.900.950.7700 1.900.950.7700

JUNE 19-25, 2013

ARIES (Mar (March ch 21–April 19):: Mayb Maybe be you’ve seen that circulating on the Internet:: “M My desire desire to be wellmeme circulating “My informed is at odds with my desire desire to remain remain sane.”” If you informed feel that way now—and I suspect you y might soon if you feel don’t alr eady—you have cosmic pe ermission,, at least for for don’t already—you permission, beeing well-informed. well-informed. a while, to emphasize sanity over being Lose track track of what Kim Jong-un andd Kim Kardashian Kardashian are are Lose ignore the statements of every every jerk on the planet, up to,, ignore AWOL from from thee flood of data that and maybe even go AWOL relentlesslyy pours p toward you. y Instead, Insteead,, pay p y attention to relentlessly toward teell you. Remember and every little thing your body has to tell marrvel v at your nightly dreams. dreams. Go slow. sslow. Lie low. low. Be soft. marvel influences that make you Have fun with unspectacular influences feel at home in the world. feel


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