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Appreciating Albariùo p16 Aural Art p22 Linklater's 'Boyhood’ p24

Bob Dylan Revisited

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News Editor Tom Gogola, ext. 106

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2014 Metrosa Inc.

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LITERARY LICENSE Like Bob Dylan, Jack London is said to have ‘borrowed’ material for some of his books, p17.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Long Live Drakes Bay Oyster Co. Wilderness or aquaculture? Both. BY TOM GOGOLA

H

ave you heard the latest chapter in the fight to keep Drakes Bay Oyster Company open? Supporters of the Point Reyes National Seashore oyster-farm operation recently took up the cause and filed yet another lawsuit this month to keep the oyster farm operational.

Owner Kevin Lunny is—or was—under a court order to shutter his operation by July 31, after a “final” appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court failed to gain the justices’ attention. Now Lunny has at least another month to farm and sell his oysters, as a federal court sorts out the latest lawsuit, which hinges on the constitutionality of the Department of the Interior’s original shutdown order. (Note: At this point, reportorial objectivity is about to go out the window.) OK, you guys win: Long live Drakes Bay oysters! God, it feels good to say that. The lead plaintiff in the case is Tomales Bay Oyster Co., a competitor to the north. Tomales’ presence signals that this may be a critical moment for the North Bay aquaculture economy as a whole, and that voracious demand for the bivalve won’t ease just because Drakes Bay Oyster Co. is pushed out of business. What then for oyster lovers? Who’s going to be the first to suggest that the state import BP-fouled bivalves from the Gulf of Mexico to replace what would be lost at Drakes Bay Oyster Co.? Wilderness-focused activists say Lunny should be held to the terms of his lease, which expired in 2012 and set off the legal battle. Those activists say the farm should revert to its natural state, and that proLunny forces should lay off the appeals to the feds and the palate. Anyone who has studied the issue should have some ambivalence: Do you want sustainable aquaculture or a vast tract of pristine wilderness? And do we really have to pick one? I visited the facility a few months ago and was left surprised that the operation, for all the outsized controversy surrounding it, is actually quite small. The oysters, on the other hand, are huge and luscious. It’s over for this reporter: Drakes Bay forever! To the ramparts with the shucking knife! Tom Gogola is the news editor for the ‘Bohemian.’ Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

XOXO

Thank you for your article on the band X (“Mark the Spot,” July 23), which, as far as I am concerned, was the last great band (that is until the White Stripes). My first wife and I must have seen them at least 50 times, maybe more. They signed my wife’s boogie board on our way back from the beach at a record signing. (I think it was at the old Tower Records in Westwood.) Best show I saw had Dave Alvin, who replaced Billy Zoom, and Tony Gilkyson, both on guitar, giving the band a much fuller sound. They tore it up. Man, those were the days. P.S. If John Doe and Exene had had a kid, it would have been Jack White.

DAVID DALE Sonoma

Water Watchers More oversight is needed on winery water use (“Of Water and Wine,” July 23)! Around Healdsburg, we’re seeing overhead sprinklers in vineyards running 24/7, for days at a time. Not all growers are conserving! Check out this trailer for Russian River, All Rivers. It will delve into the facts of the wine industry’s water use in the North Bay area.

DAISY Via online

I don’t know where Daisy is seeing sprinklers on in vineyards 24/7. It does not happen! If she is really seeing this she should notify someone. I think that you better take a look around and see which of your neighbors are irrigating their yards and watering lawns that are only for looks. The farmers are continuously using the newest technology to monitor their water use and to conserve. Keep in mind that this is an agricultural community.

Yes, wine grapes are the main crop, and the wine industry is directly related to a minimum of 55,000 employees in Sonoma County. I think that you should also note that the Russian River is a managed water system. If there were no reservoirs, the river would be dry right now and the people who would be most affected are the ones who get their water from the municipalities that use the most water to irrigate landscape.

PAT Via online

Not a Fair Fight My daughter is 22 months old. I want her to grow up in a world where we won’t see the type of atrocities going on right now in Gaza. The civilians in Gaza have no protection from the Israeli military bombing. Where can these men, women and children go when there is no safe place? U.N. shelters in schools as well as hospitals are being hit. It’s not a fair fight when a powerful military is bombing people living under occupation, surrounded by a wall with checkpoints preventing any exit. The term disproportionate seems insufficient. It’s time for the world to intervene, we need more than a daylong truce, because all lives matter, regardless of borders, walls or sides. We are all responsible. I grew up with a Palestinian stepfather, and am fortunate enough to have discovered the culture and to know how warm, well-educated and beautiful the Palestinian people are. I’ve also been aware of the decades of injustice they have been dealt living under occupation. I am not anti-Israeli, only against the Israeli policies which impoverish and deny basic human rights. The Irish were considered terrorists for fighting against British rule, so were the Basque for fighting for their identity and rights. Nelson Mandela spent years in prison for his fight against apartheid. We now celebrate these struggles, these cultures for their contribution to the world. Why


THIS MODERN WORLD

can’t we open our eyes and hearts and do the same for the Palestinians?

MAYA TAYLOR Petaluma

Good Dogs I was touched by the missive Jack Irving wrote (Open Mic, July 23) about his sweet friend Kern-Dog. Thank you both immensely. I am one of your more conservative fans here in Healdsburg, not normally given to touchy-feely sentiments, but I never, ever miss the Bohemian. Lord did this homage strike an emotional chord, though! I’ve never had a family but I’ve always had dogs, shepherds initially and Aussies for the last 20 years (brothersister pairs). I recall well Cyrus, a blue merle Aussie, who was the world’s most perfect creature. Cyrus waited to die

By Tom Tomorrow

until the night I returned home from a two-week trip, after his four-month bout with cancer. His sister, Hana, died from a broken heart four months later in a darkened basement. Both were barely 10. Running on the ranch now is Ali. Rio died three years ago after being struck by a car four days before Christmas outside the fire station where I volunteered for 20 years. Oh, how Kern-Dog’s loss must have hurt! I salute you Mr. Irving for writing about your pal. They strike a crazy emotional chord for those of us who are used to death and dying, but we will take our animals’ memories, pleasantly, to the grave. Thank you for honoring our pals.

RICK GROFF Healdsburg Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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Rants

7


THE

Paper

DEBR IEFER SRJC Bond on Ballot JoshuOne Barnes

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The Santa Rosa Junior College Board of Trustees voted unanimously on July 22 to place a $410 million capital-improvement bond on the November ballot. Officials aired a laundry list of much-needed improvements at the board meeting, which was attended by school faculty and staff. Among the proposed improvements: a quarter-billion dollars in new construction and renovation; $60 million in modernization of existing buildings; and $74 million for information-technology upgrades. The remaining bond money would be spread between various departments for maintenance, repairs and improvements. The spending-priority list the board presented was not an actual itemization but a guideline of what the board may approve if the bond measure passes. Final approval of any project would still need to come from the board.

UNION YES Local UNITE HERE president Wei-Ling Huber hopes unionization of the Graton Casino will lead

to collaboration with the casino’s Las Vegas–based operator.

The New Deal

Union bargaining table gives Station Casinos chance to show new face BY TOM GOGOLA

T

he vote to unionize workers at the Graton Resort & Casino was certified last week. Now 600 service workers and the UNITE HERE union will negotiate a contract—but with whom? “I can’t discuss that, and I don’t know yet,” says Graton Rancheria tribal leader Greg Sarris, who

spearheaded the casino deal. Sarris worked with UNITE HERE Local 2850 to organize the union election at Graton Casino in June. The vote was held in the casino in a common room rented to UNITE HERE. The casino is owned by the tribe but operated by Las Vegas– based Station Casinos. None of its 18 Vegas-area casinos is a union shop. UNITE HERE, which represents

hospitality and other service workers around the country, lauded the union-friendly efforts of the Graton Rancheria, which allowed the vote to go forward free from “interference from the employer,” according to a statement from the union. “We fully respect and support the tribe’s neutrality agreement with the union,” says Station Casinos spokeswoman Lori Nelson in an email. ) 10

Speakers who addressed the board last Tuesday agreed that money is needed, but also questioned an apparent lack of detail over how the board would actually distribute the funds. A citizen oversight committee would review board decisions and provide yearly reports about its activities. But the oversight committee will lack veto power, and deliberations will take place outside of public scrutiny. —JoshuOne Barnes

Fish Story The Golden Gate Salmon Association threw its support behind the recommendations of a National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) study that highlights the hard-hit Chinook salmon fishery in the Central Valley. “It calls for a lot of good things,” says John McManus, executive director ) 10 The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.


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The pro-union vote is great news for cooks and custodians at the Rohnert Park casino—a contract likely means greater job stability and expanded health benefits—but it’s also good public relations for Station Casinos. “I don’t know if you’ve done your research,” says Sarris, “but Station is not particularly union-friendly.” Casino owners on Station’s home turf are at a natural advantage because of Nevada’s union-restrictive right-to-work laws. Right-to-work laws, for example, allow non-union workers to avoid paying union dues but still enjoy the benefits of union membership. Culinary workers at Station Casinos in Las Vegas sued the company in 2010 and claimed it had harassed pro-union workers with surveillance and interrogations of employees interested in unionizing, according to court documents. Company officials have long charged that if anyone was being harassed at the 18 non-union casinos owned by Station, it was the workers, who didn’t want to be in a union. “Station Casinos is proemployee, not anti-union,” says Nelson. But a 2012 finding from the National Labor Relations Board (which followed a ruling from administrative law judge Geoffrey Carter) ruled that Station had violated 82 federal labor laws in trying to keep UNITE HERE out of its Vegas casinos. UNITE HERE local president Wei-Ling Huber says the bargaining process will likely turn on worker issues, with negotiations over wages and benefits probably falling to tribal leaders. Station Casinos would bargain with the union over job descriptions and duties, performance standards and other operational issues, she says. That’s news to Station Casinos. The company doesn’t plan to be present at the negotiating table, “as this is an agreement between the union and the tribe,” says Nelson. The union vote came as the Graton Casino emerged as a post-

recession success story for Station Casinos, whose majority-share owners are brothers Lorenzo and Frank Fertitta. Station posted solid earnings in March, according to a statement from the company. The grand opening of Graton Casino in November 2013 was a highlight, the company says, and the company paid off $50 million in long-term debt. In the fourth quarter of 2013, the company received an $8.2 million development fee and $6.5 million in management fees from revenues generated at the new casino. That’s a nifty turnabout from the brothers’ fortunes at the time of the 2007 economic crash, which hit the gaming industry hard. Nevada was among the worst in home foreclosure rates nationwide, as Station closed casinos and struggled with fallout from a 2007 partnership with private-equity giant Colony Capital. In that deal, Colony and the brothers took the company private in a $5.7 billion leveraged buyout. Colony partially financed the buyout via an equity fund it created with revenue from casino properties under its control, including Station. That fund was called Colony VIII, according to the Colony website. But the deal was bad news for casino workers, as the StationColony deal crashed along with the economy, just months after it was signed. Station eventually filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2009. UNITE HERE organizers in Las Vegas claimed that the combination of the recession and the buyout cost more than 2,000 jobs at Station Casinos. The company forcefully disputes the allegation. And despite the company’s insistence that contract negotiations in Rohnert Park will be between the tribe and the union, UNITE HERE’s Huber sees an opportunity to build a bridge with the corporate operators. “We’ll be at the table working on issues together and collaborating on a contract,” says Huber. “Hopefully, we’ll have some insights into how to bridge some of the differences in Las Vegas.”

DEBRIEFER

(8

of the association, “primarily [aimed] at recovering the winter and spring run Chinook.” The former is on a federal list of endangered species; the latter is considered a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act, says McManus The study was prepared in conjunction with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and found that, because of dams, “Chinook salmon and steelhead are blocked from 90 percent of their historical spawning habitat in the valley.” The problem is compounded by “water withdrawals, commercial and recreational fisheries, the introduction of non-native fish, and legacy effects of hatcheries, [which] all contribute to declining populations,” according to a summary of the report. McManus notes that a “recovery plan is not legally enforceable,” but provides a template for restoration of salmon-spawning grounds in and around the Sacramento River. The enforcement backbone to the NMFS plan is contained in a supplemental “biological opinion” from NMFS scientists. That opinion addresses damage done to the Central Valley by all the various dams, water re-routes and other salmon-distressing water-flow management, agriculture projects. “The biological opinion is the hammer,” says McManus. “It says things like, ‘Thou shalt, thou must.’ But the recovery plan is basically, ‘If you want to recover the fishery, do this.’” The NMFS plan, if implemented, could be good news for the fall Chinook run, says McManus. “The fall run Chinook is the target of sport and commercial fishermen off the Marin and Sonoma coast, and even in the bay. To the extent that the recovery plan goals are implemented, one could see a benefit to the fall run, which is what we’re all targeting.” —Tom Gogola


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SHUCK, SLURP AND REPEAT Bodega Bay Oyster Co. has been farming Tomales Bay shellfish for nearly 30 years.

Oysters to Go Bodega Bay Oyster Co. is a new roadside attraction BY STETT HOLBROOK

H

og Island and Tomales Bay oyster companies are the best-known shuck-yourown-oyster outposts. But if you don’t want to make the trip out Highway 1 to West Marin, you’ve now got a closer option in Sonoma County: Petaluma’s Bodega Bay Oyster Company.

Unlike its competitors in West Marin, the two-and-a-half-monthold Bodega Bay Oyster Company doesn’t offer picnic space to pop and eat your oysters. This is strictly a takeout operation, but there are plans to open a restaurant and raw bar next year in the adjacent space. For now, make a pit stop for oysters, and go and eat Oysters are kind of like sushi, in that most people eat them in restaurants rather than at

home. Maybe it’s because of the perceived difficulty of opening an oyster or trepidation over freshness, but the common practice is to go out for oysters. The impeccable freshness of Bodega Bay’s oysters, however, mean they are highly portable. I suggest grabbing a dozen or two and continuing to head west on Valley Ford Road, and take them right to the beach. Pack a shucking knife, a towel to hold the oysters while your pry open the

shells, a bottle of Cholula picante sauce, and you’re all set. Cold beer is also highly recommended. The folks at the market will send you off with plenty of ice to keep them cold. Empty shells? Toss them on the sand. I can’t think of better ocean-side dining. Given the store’s roadside location on Valley Ford Road a few miles from the ocean, most customers stop on their way to the beach or on their way home to keep the beach-party vibe going, says Lindsey Strain, whose father, Martin Strain, started raising oysters nearly 30 years ago. The oysters come from the Pt. Reyes Oyster Company’s (do you spot a pattern in naming conventions here?), 90 acres of production in and around Tomales Bay. Until now, the bivalves were only available wholesale or at restaurants like Nick’s Cove. The shop sells three kinds of oysters: Miyagi, Kumamoto and Virginica. The Miyagis and Kumamtos are available in a variety of sizes. I like the smaller ones best. The Kumamotos pack an intense, briny flavor that’s softened by the sweetness of the meat. My favorites, though, are the Virginica, or Atlantic, oysters, tiny little orbs of meat with a racy, clean, buttery flavor. In addition to oysters, the market sells Manila clams, raised in the Walker Creek Estero, and so-called Bodega gallo mussels, a species grown in Tomales Bay that’s different from the California sea mussels typically seen growing on coastal rocks and piers. But it’s the oysters that are real attraction. If you’re like me, you’ll want to grab some more to take back home after your trip to beach. Bodega Bay Oyster Company, 12830 Valley Ford Road, Petaluma. 707.876.3010. Open Thursday–Sunday, 10am–5:30pm.

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Dining

13


Dining

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14

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

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he’s not serving up crispy pork belly or healthy quinoa salads, owner/chef Gray Rollin tours with rock bands like Linkin Park as a personal chef. Lunch and dinner daily. 523 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5787

Scopa Italian. $$. For true Tuscan flavors. Can be crowded, but you get to see what the neighbors ordered. Dinner daily. 109-A Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.5282.

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Northern Italian. $-$$. Delicious innovative fare. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 114 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.782.1130.

Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian. $. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner daily. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491. Hikuni Sushi Bar & Hibachi Japanese. $$$.

Thai House Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

Terrific teppanyaki plus a full sushi bar, tonkatsu, udon and bento. Lunch and dinner daily. 4100 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.539.9188.

Peter Lowell’s California. $-$$. Casual, organic cuisine with a healthy twist. Italian-inspired cafe, deli, wine bar. All food offered as takeout. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7385 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.1077.

Ravenous Cafe & Lounge American. $$$$. Returning to its original small, five-table location next to the Raven Theater, this Healdsburg

$-$$. Small plates with a large vegetarian selection and an Asian fusion-leaning menu. And they’re open until 2am! Dinner daily. 139 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Tonayan Mexican. $ Truly wonderful Sonoran-style classics at rock-bottom prices. The enormous El Jefe combination can’t be beat. Lunch and dinner daily. 500 Raleys Towne Center, Rohnert Park. 707.588.0893.

Wolf House Californian. $$. Stick with the simple, classics dishes, as they always shine. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 13740 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.996.4401.

MARIN CO U N T Y Casa Mañana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch and dinner daily. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331. Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast and lunch daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona St, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St; 901 & 903 Lincoln Ave. 415.451.4765. Mill Valley location: 401 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.380.1986.

Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500. Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy


The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N TY Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gillwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

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SMALL BITES

Laguna Farms Turns 30 After 30 years, Sebastopol’s Laguna Farms has become a household name among foodconscious Sonoma County residents. At the solar-powered farm, cold storage holds some of the 400 or so CSA boxes for weekly pick up, and fresh produce, herbs, local eggs and other farm products are available for purchase. It’s like a farmers market that’s open more than once a week. The produce is sold at regular farmers markets in Sebastopol, Oakmont, Petaluma and Santa Rosa too. Founder Scott Mathieson was a pioneer of the West Coast CSA movement in the ’80s, and he sold the business in 2011 to two longtime employees, Jennifer Branham and Ignacio Romero. They continue the organic-but-not-certified practices and have expanded to host events, renewable energy practices and youth education about growing food. Heck, even grownup kids find the youth garden fascinating and can learn a thing or two about growing food. Laguna Farms holds its annual Laguna Fest Aug. 17. During the day-long event, participants can learn how to create fire by friction, tour the Laguna de Santa Rosa, ask experts for garden advice, try herbal preparations, find something to wear in an up-cycled clothing swap and learn about composting. Laguna Farms is located at 1764 Copper Road, Sebastopol. 707.823.0823. —Nicolas Grizzle

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare.

Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

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weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun; closed Tues. 3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.


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Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Annapolis Winery Decades before the cool Sonoma Coast became hot property, the Scalabrini family quietly planted their vineyards high above the coastal fog. Small, family-run, and a popular wedding spot; the Gewürz sells out fast. 26055 Soda Springs Road, Annapolis. Open daily. 707.886.5460.

Cartograph Wines From a kayak in Minocqua Lake to the streets of Healdsburg, Alan Baker followed his muse. On-point Pinot Noir, Gewürztraminer with gravitas. 340 Center St., Healdsburg. By appointment; opening noon–6:30pm daily, in fall 2014. 707.955.5836. Eric Kent Wine Cellars Nevermind the art of wine, there’s art on the wine. Limited release Chard, Pinot, Syrah from ad man turned cellar geek. 1014 Hopper Ave., Santa Rosa. Barrel tasting, by appointment only. 707.527.9700.

Jordan Vineyard & Winery Fronted by poplars, wreathed in ivy, robed in privets—à la chateau. Favored by restaurants nationwide, Cab and Chardonnay are served in a sumptuous sitdown tasting with cheese and hors d’oeuvres. How do they peel those little eggs? 1474 Alexander Valley Road, Healdsburg. Tour and tasting, Monday–Saturday, Sundays through October. $20–$30. 800.654.1213.

Stephen & Walker The

Monticello Vineyards

sign says, um, “cult wines,” but take another look: Local winemakers who have crawled up from the very trenches of the business are offering Howell Mountain Cab, a Pinot Noir triptych, Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel, and Muscat Canelli here. 243 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Daily, 11am–7pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.431.8749.

Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Timber Crest Farms

Silver Oak Silver Oak truly is a venerable cult wine, confounding to outsiders who don’t feel the magic. Folks love the Silver Oak; the Silver Oak is good. 915 Oakville Cross Road, Oakville. Monday– Saturday, 9am–5pm; Sunday, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $20. 707.942.7022

Animal labels abound at Peterson Winery’s expanded tasting room adjacent the cellar. Is that a Jackalope, or is that just the Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel? Also on hand is Papapietro-Perry and the six Family Wineries of Dry Creek. Dashe Cellars crafts mainly powerful Zinfandels and other reds. At Kokomo Winery, it’s about the reds. Also look for Mietz Cellars, Lago di Merlo and Collier Falls. 4791 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Tasting rooms generally open daily from around 11am to 4:30pm. 707.433.0100. 707.431.7568.

N A PA CO U N TY Cuvaison Estate Wines (WC) Producing some 65 percent of its product as Chardonnay, Cuvaison has a 22,000-square-foot cave. 4550 Silverado Trail N., Napa. By appointment. 707.942.6266.

Freemark Abbey In 1881, Josephine Tychson was the first woman to own and operate a winery in the valley. Enjoy the Cabs. 3022 St. Helena Hwy. N. (at Lodi Lane), St. Helena. Open daily, 10am-5pm. 800.963.9698.

Paul Mathew Vineyards Sunny, corner

Jericho Canyon Vineyard Oh boy, boutique

tasting room in downtown Graton offering a singular expression of Valdiguié, progressively deeper and more aromatic Pinot Noir, and cushioned benches to sink into should you become lost in reverie as a result. 9060 Graton Road, Graton. Thursday– Sunday, 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.865.2505.

Napa Cab from celebrity consultant Michel Rolland and high-rollers who used to spend half the year in Hawaii? Well, yeah, but they’re super nice, work hard, and their wines are tops. Cab and Sauv Blanc. 3322 Old Lawley Toll Road, Calistoga. Tour and tasting by appointment only, $30. 707.942.9665.

Smith-Madrone Riesling is Smith-Madrone’s main fame claim. Its Riesling has steadily gained fame while Napa Valley Riesling in general has become a rare antique. 4022 Spring Mountain Road, St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.2283. Trahan Winery In the fancy heart of downtown Napa, a low-budget “cellar” where wines are shelved, with clever economy, in stacks of wood pallets; vibes are laid-back and real. Carneros Chardonnay and fruity but firm and focused Cab and Merlot from Suisin Valley. 974 Franklin St., Napa. Open daily, noon–5:30pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.257.7477. V. Sattui Though a regular stop on the tourist circuit, it remains charming in the Italian style. With no distribution except via the Net, wines can only be purchased onsite. 1111 White Lane, St. Helena. Open daily, 9am–6pm. 707.963.7774.

Vermeil Wines Pair the Chardonnay with baked brie en croute, if you’re having that kind of Super Bowl party. Also rare Charbono from OnThEdgle Winery, and late harvest Sémillon, perfect for potato chips. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Sunday–Thursday, 10am–5:30pm; Friday– Saturday, 10am–8pm. Tasting fee, $12. 707.341.3054.

That Grape from Galicia Thick-skinned, salty and a little bitter, local Albariño makes good BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

he way the story usually goes, some Bordeaux-besotted character vows to make wines that “rival the best of France.” Who dreams of besting the wines of Rías Baixas, Spain? Hoping to score two or three local specimens of Albariño, an aromatic, “alternative” white varietal made from a thick-skinned grape native to northwestern Spain, and grown on just 21 acres in Sonoma and Napa counties, I was surprised to find more than a few. With International Albariño Day on Aug. 2, I set off on a little winetasting fiesta.

Peter Franus 2013 Napa Valley Albariño ($26) This wine hits all the right notes. Cool, gentle aromas of applesauce, guava, pear and melon rind precede a surprisingly rich, Roussanne-like palate, with a characteristic salty sensation—often said, particularly of Spanish Albariño, to evoke the damp, Galician coast. The grapes are from a ranch south of Napa that’s also home to the “Oreo cows” familiar to highway motorists. Gordian Knot 2012 Russian River Valley Albariño ($23) After touring Spain, Anne Giere and Tim Meinken replanted one acre of their estate to Albariño. Here’s a floral aroma, yellow roses and lemon skin, with tangy flavors of lemon and unripe pear, yet persistent on the palate. Try this instead of Pinot Grigio. Saddleback 2012 Carneros Albariño ($24) Completely different, and distinctly toasty-oaky, with lemon, pear and lavender. But the bitter melon palate is nothing like the expected butterball. Pineapple and mango come in later, bringing it all together. Imagery Estate 2013 Sonoma Valley Albariño ($29) More like a Sauvignon Blanc, with green, “cat pee” and jasmine aromas, bitter melon, bits of pear and peach; crisp and dry. Marimar Estate 2013 Russian River Valley Albariño ($32) Marimar Torres grows a little Albariño alongside Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. The most delicately floral of the bunch, with lime blossom, this feels like Pinot Blanc—pear and melon and a hint of that salty persistence. Artesa 2013 Carneros Albariño ($28) Apropos offering from this Spanish-owned winery. Here the fragrance is more of ripe, brown-speckled golden apples, less of melon. Crisp palate with just enough of that salty weight to drink nicely with a steak salad. Mahoney 2011 Las Brisas Vineyard Carneros Albariño ($20) The smoky, oaky nose suggests barrel fermentation, with sweet caramel, pineapple and mango, but flavors of salted kiwi marinated in the juice of underripe pears. Sneak this into a paper bag tasting and watch your friends’ confident “Ah, Cali Chardonnay” pronouncements disintegrate into confusion over this deliciously different, Galician anomaly.


Dylanologists dig up dirt on the DylanLondon connection BY JONAH RASKIN

W

hat does Bob Dylan have in common with Sonoma County’s literary legend Jack London? Not much, if you ask die-hard London fans. But ask renowned Dylanologist Scott Warmuth and you’ll hear a different story. The New York Times, The New Yorker and The Daily Beast have all paid homage to Warmuth’s scintillating brand of scholarship, which has stirred up the Dylan world. According to Warmuth, the American folksinger purloined words, phrases and sentences by the dozens from the novels, short stories and letters written by the author of The Call of the Wild, White Fang and nearly 50 other books published from about 1900 to 1916. All the supposedly borrowed lines appear in Dylan’s memoir, Chronicles: Volume One, published in 2004. In feisty articles such as the “Dylan Dossier: The Jack London File” and “Charlatan Bob: Deconstructing Dylan’s Chronicles: Volume One” that were published online and in the pages of The New Haven Register, Warmuth presents strong evidence of what might be called literary larceny. To make his point, Warmuth prints the original London texts and Dylan’s copies so that readers can compare and contrast. In the second of his classic dog stories, Jack London writes, “Life had a thousand faces and White Fang found he must meet them all.” In Chronicles, Dylan writes, “A folk song has over a thousand faces and you must meet them ) 18

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DYLAN COVERS LONDON

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BOHEMIAN GROOVE Bob Dylan’s borrowings reveal that he read Jack London’s work widely.

Dylan ( 17 all if you want to play this stuff.” In the short story “The White Silence,” London writes that in the Arctic, “all movement ceases, the sky clears, the heavens are as brass; the slightest whisper seems sacrilege.” In Chronicles, Dylan writes, apropos of country-andWestern singer Hank Williams, “When I hear Hank sing, all movement ceases. The slightest whisper seems sacrilege.” Many of Dylan’s adaptations of London are both playful and brilliant. In his article “Song of the Wolf,” Warmuth points to a passage in which London observes that his main character

is “forced to the edge of the fire or the deep snow” and that “ten thousand years of culture fell from him, and he was a cave-dweller.” Dylan borrowed the imagery and describes Johnny Cash as a kind of “cave dweller” who “sounds like he’s at the edge of the fire, or in the deep snow, or in a ghostly forest.” Other similarities are less potent. In “Bâtard,” yet another dog story, London uses the phrase “a mass of bristling hair.” Dylan purloined it and used it to describe folk singer Dave Van Ronk—the inspiration for the Coen brothers movie Inside Llewyn Davis—as “a mass of bristling hair.”

No big deal, readers might say. But Warmuth insists that when you add them all up, Dylan’s borrowings are a big deal, that they show that the singer read London’s work widely, that he was captivated by London’s language and that he felt so strongly about it that he inserted huge chunks of it into his own work. Call Dylan a blatant copycat or a lyricist in love with London’s writing. The title of Warmuth’s article in The New Haven Register, “Charlatan Bob,” suggests that he wanted to expose the folksinger as a fraud. Perhaps he did. Today, however, he doesn’t call Dylan a “charlatan” or a thief. “To nail him down has never been my goal,” he

says in a phone interview from his home in Arizona. “From the start, I’ve wanted to know what books Dylan reads and how his creative process operates, because his art is so compelling.” Warmuth is one of several students of Dylan’s work profiled in David Kinney’s Dylanologists: Adventures in the Land of Bob, a fast-paced book released this spring about Dylan’s fans and followers that reveals a lot about Dylan himself. As Kinney recognizes, sometimes it helps to take a sideways glance at an artist and not look him directly in the face. Kinney borrows the conceit for his book from The Shakespeare


to use other writers’ plots, says one biographer.

Wars, a non-academic study in which author Ron Rosenbaum doesn’t write about Shakespeare, as one might expect, but about the legendary scholars who have written about Shakespeare, yet another genius who pilfered and tweaked material from historians who preceded him. Jack London was as big a thief as Shakespeare, though he got into more trouble than the Bard. Copyright law posed more of a problem for writers in 1900 than in 1600. All his life London borrowed from his favorite authors and his literary role models, some of them famous, such as Rudyard Kipling. Not surprisingly he was labeled the “Kipling of the Arctic.” Other writers whose work he looted were less well-known, such as Egerton Young, the author of My Dogs in the Northland, published in 1902, one year prior to the appearance of London’s own shaggy-dog story, The Call of the Wild. When copyright issues arose, London usually won; he had the money to defend

himself in court and knew how to manipulate the media. Andrew Sinclair, author of Jack: A Biography of Jack London says, “Jack certainly thought that he had the right to use other people’s plots in the same way as he used other people’s political ideas.” Jack London never drew clear lines to divide fact from fantasy or to separate imitation from originality. He also recognized that copying could be the sincerest form of flattery, and that young talented writers improved by mimicking veteran authors. Ever since the Renaissance—and perhaps before—new writers have cannibalized old writers, and the literature of the present day has fed on the literature of the past. As the Irish playwright Oscar Wilde astutely noted, “Talent borrows, genius steals.” He surely had himself in mind, and maybe Jack London too. If he were alive today, Wilde would recognize Bob Dylan as yet another genius and literary thief. In his own defense, Dylan might borrow from Jack London, who said, “I think the

Warmuth knows the Dylan discography backward and forward. “I’m a Blonde on Blonde baby,” he says. “The first album I heard was Desire, when I was 10. My parents had it.” Blonde on Blonde is, as he knows, as tangled as any Dylan album. On the 12th cut, “4th Time Around,” Dylan offers his take on “Norwegian Wood,” Lennon’s homage to Dylan. Princeton University historian Sean Wilentz describes the tune as “Bob Dylan impersonating John Lennon impersonating Dylan.” For more than 60 years, Dylan fans have been scratching their heads and trying to figure him out, even when he seems obvious. When squares and traditionalists complained they couldn’t understand his 1963 ballad “Blowing in the Wind,” Dylan explained tongue-in-cheek, “There ain’t too much I can say about this song except that the answer is blowing in the wind.” Everybody and anybody who was hip in 1963 knew exactly what he meant. The only Americans who didn’t understand belonged on the far side of the generation gap. “Something is happening here,” Dylan sings in “Ballad of a Thin Man,” one of the most memorable tracks on Highway 61 Revisited, his sixth studio album, recorded the same year as the 1965 Newport Folk Festival when he went electric. All Dylan fans know the line that follows it: “But you don’t know what’s happening here, do you, Mr. Jones.” Like his mentor, Beat poet Allen Ginsberg, Dylan wanted his fans to dig deeply into his work. Then, too, in the spirit of poet Walt Whitman, he crafted songs about himself, about America and about ordinary Americans. To his own voice he’s added the voices of the famous, the notorious and the anonymous, hoping listeners would turn up the volume, tune into the words and identify pilfered phrases, images and sounds. What he’s done is what singers often do: “cover” the work of others. Jack London “covered” other writers too, though London fans and scholars are often embarrassed by them. ) 20

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LITERARY LARCENRY? Jack London believed he had the right

whole subject of plagiarism is absurd. I can conceive of no more laughable spectacle than that of a human standing up on his hind legs and yowling plagiarism. No man with a vivid imagination needs to plagiarize.” According to musicologist Greil Marcus, Dylan fans—more than the fans of any other ’60s band, including the Beatles, the Stones and the Grateful Dead—assume that his songs are richly encoded and that it’s their mission in life to dig out the hidden messages and decode them. What’s perhaps more significant is that Dylan’s elliptical writings have given birth to the tribe of “Dylanologists,” including the very first, A. J. Weberman, and the very best, Scott Warmuth. In New York in the 1970s, Weberman claimed that he sorted through Dylan’s garbage and found a motherload of confidential stuff. Maybe he did. Maybe he just talked trash. Scholars have poked holes in the stories about his adventures in dumpsterland. He did, however, coin, or at least popularize, the words “garbology” and “Dylanology.” A pioneer in the field, Weberman published the infamous Dylan to English Dictionary and argued that many of Dylan’s songs were about and specifically written for him. Warmuth, the dean of Dylanologists, and Kinney, student of Dylanology, seem like fictional characters who have wandered from a Jack London tale: twins and doubles who genuinely admire one another. Keen critics of pop culture, both were shaped by the kinds of college classes that train students to discover influences and then provide credit where credit is due. Many of us were. Still, they both gave up on dreary footnotes and hoary bibliographies ages ago. A liberal arts major in college, Warmuth was born in 1966, 90 years after London, an illegitimate kid traumatized by the circumstances of his own birth, arrived in the world, and 25 years after Abram and Beatrice Zimmerman, descendants of Russian Jews, named their infant son Robert Allen.


Dylan ( 19

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That feeling you get when you find a great booth at your favorite summer festival, is the best way to describe a visit to Native Riders. From custom made leather clothing dripping in fringe to colorful feather accessories, the store feels like a rare journey back to a time when quality and originality matters. The experience continues with every new treasure you discover. There’s leather hides, turquoise and silver jewelry, Tandy products, craft findings, bohemian clothing, sage, sweetgrass, incense, Panama hats, hand-crafted knives, Mountain T-shirts, custom leather belts and Native American art. The list could go on and on but suffice to say, this is definitely the most enjoyable place to shop for yourself or buy that unique gift for that special person. They’re enviro-conscious too! Between the nostalgic tunes playing and the friendly faces, it just doesn’t get better than Native Riders. They making going local so easy. Enjoy!

2836 Hwy 116 S Sebstopol • 707.829.8544 Tue–Fri 10–6, Sat 9–6 Sun 10–6

AMERICAN ICON Many Bob Dylan fans assume his songs are richly encoded

and that it’s their mission to dig out the hidden messages.

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Moreover, an older generation of London biographers knows little if anything about Bob Dylan. Earle Labor, author of the deďŹ nitive London biography, 2013’s Jack London: An American Life, says, “I’ve heard about the Bob Dylan connection, but don’t know more than that. I’d like to know what you discover.â€? Even younger “Londonologists,â€? as one might call them, aren’t aware of the link. Jeff Falconer, a docent at the Jack London State Historic Park and a longtime fan of both London and Dylan, didn’t know Dylan borrowed from London. “I don’t think Jack would have been offended by Dylan’s borrowings,â€? he says, “though if he knew how much money he had, he might hit him up.â€? He added, “I like the idea that Dylan digs London.â€? Nearly a hundred years after

his death, London’s books still sell. Dylan keeps on writing and performing. Scott Warmuth continues to read London and listen to Blonde on Blonde and Desire. “I recognized long ago that, like London, Dylan could have rested on his laurels,â€? Warmuth says, then pauses a moment and adds, “I’m impressed that he tours at a pace that would tire folks half his age and that he keeps trying new things. Before listeners can ďŹ gure out his latest album, he’s already on to the next. There’s always more to say about Dylan. I don’t know what more one could want from an artist.â€? Jonah Raskin is the editor of ‘The Radical Jack London: Writings on War and Revolution’ and the author of ‘Burning Down the House: Jack London and the 1913 Wolf House Fire.’ He taught Jack London’s work at Sonoma State University, where he worked for 30 years.


ist uitarrin. g d Ma er an fiddl tudio 55 es, p29. , r e t gwri 1, at S Venu r, sonay, Aug. Clubs & e g n See Frid G Si LON plays on A ING mnes STR ucia Co L

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Now in its seventh year, the Petaluma Music Festival is one of the most popular and community-friendly festivals in the North Bay. The headliner this year is New Orleans funk and jazz jam band Galactic. Rock and soul favorites the Mother Hips, country-and-western act Brokedown in Bakersfield and the Brooklyn funk and soul band Sister Sparrow & the Dirty Birds round out the bill. These performers will appear on three stages throughout the day. There will also be a silent auction, Lagunitas beers and specialty foods. All proceeds benefit music education programs for Petaluma area public schools. The Petaluma Music Festival takes place on Saturday, Aug. 2, at the Petaluma Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Drive, Petaluma. Noon. $40; $85 VIP. Petalumamusicfestival.org.

For the last eight years, photographer Penny Wolin has traveled the United States documenting and interviewing other American photographers of Jewish ancestry, chronicling the culture and different artists’ reactions to their heritage. Her previous photo documentary on the subject, The Jews of Wyoming, exhibited solo at the Smithsonian Institution, and now Wolin has a new project that she will be discussing and previewing called Descendants of Light. Wolin examined the works of photographers like Annie Leibovitz and Joel Meyerowitz, and a selection of Wolin’s photos and her new book will be on display when she gives a special arts lecture on Saturday, Aug. 2, at Calabi Gallery, 456 10th St., Santa Rosa. 6pm. Free. 707.781.7070.

San Francisco’s Avi Vinocur and North Carolina’s Patrick Dyer Wolf are blue-collar songwriters playing roots and country, who began collaborating after meeting in San Francisco in 2007. While looking for an appropriate name for their dusty, catchy melodies, they landed on an unincorporated town in Texas that lay exactly halfway between their respective hometowns. Goodnight, Texas was born and immediately hooked audiences with a blend of hard-rocking stompers, lonesome ballads and dynamic live performances. This week, Goodnight, Texas comes to the North Bay when they play as part of the Summer Concert Series on Sunday, Aug. 3, at Long Meadow Ranch Winery and Farmstead. 738 Main St., St. Helena. 2pm. $25–$35. 707.963.4555.

Described as “animated sounds for cartoons that never happened,” the wild, unpredictable jazz of Dr. Abacus comes to Smiley’s Saloon for a night of crazy sounds and zany antics. The five members of Dr. Abacus don festive costumes, wield a cacophony of horns and percussion and blare a loony blend of hyperactive music and imaginative compositions—look no further than their old-timey “Banana Peel Two Step” to hear the wildness. Their live shows never fail to “animate” audiences. Dr. Abacus plays on Thursday, July 31, at Smiley’s Saloon, 41 Wharf Road, Bolinas, 8pm. Free. 415.868.1311.

—Charlie Swanson

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Arts Ideas NOW HEAR THIS This WWII-era gun bunker above Rodeo Beach will become an unlikely soundstage.

Waves of Sound ‘The Infinite Swell’ resonates in Marin Headlands BY CHARLIE SWANSON

A

rtist and curator Alan So sees—or rather, hears—art differently. So in 1998, he founded the San Francisco nonprofit Mediate, an art group dedicated to redefining boundaries in the art world with unique and multi-sensory experiences.

“We’re just such a visual world, and a visual community, that art is considered visual,” explains So. “There wasn’t a really huge sense in the art world that sound was seen as an art form. I wanted to push that a little. I wanted to say sound is art, and sound can

be explored in many different realms.” With that in mind, Mediate’s multidisciplinary artists founded the Soundwave Festival in 2002, a biennial event that delves into new themes with a season of art installations throughout the Bay Area. The festival’s sixth season comes to the Marin Headlands on Sunday, Aug. 3, with a performance in Battery Townsley at Fort Cronkhite called “The Infinite Swell.” This season’s theme is “water,” a topic chosen not only for its present scarcity in California but for the mystery and power it holds. Artists from around the country are invited to express their

relationship with sound and water. “The Infinite Swell,” according to So, is the most adventurous event of this season. “It’s one of the most resonant spaces I’ve ever been to in my life,” he says of Battery Townsley, a former military installation built into the Marin County bluff that used to house guns aimed toward the ocean. It was largely abandoned after World War II, and is now part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. It is full of tunnels and passageways that open into expansive concrete rooms, and acts like a megaphone to create amazing reverberations. “The Infinite Swell” offers three

separate concert sets, taking audiences into different parts of the battery. Three artists, well known in their own right, explore water in its many forms and with varied expressions. Travis Johns, a Bay Area native now living on the East Coast, builds instruments. For this installation, he has constructed a sonograph that measures vibrations, like a seismograph. But instead of earthquakes, it measures sound vibrations and creates art from a pen that records the vibrations. Johns uses the naturally occurring pools of water, where battleship guns used to sit, to generate vibrations and sound— and one-of-a-kind art prints— which he’ll be giving away. Chris Duncan is an Oaklandbased artist known for everything from paintings to video and sound art. He has been recording sounds in a cave just below the battery at sea level, and he’s using those recordings to create a reverberating performance while testing the sonic possibilities of ice. Jim Haynes, who, like a scientist, creates art through chemical reactions, is known as the “rust master.” For this installation, Haynes uses steam and corrosion to create a reactive process with vibration to discover the sounds that accompany a largely visual process. The “Infinite Swell” is no ordinary concert experience, and the adventure begins with the hike 20 to 30 minutes uphill from the parking lot to the battery site. Jackets and blankets are encouraged, as the site is often subject to fog and wind. The only other requirement is an open mind. ‘The Infinite Swell’ takes place Sunday, Aug. 3. Parking is at Rodeo Beach, Mitchell Road, Marin Headlands. Performance starts at 6pm; arrive by 5:30pm. $15–$20. 415.484.6278.


STRIKE A POSE ‘Cabaret’ is the first of six works staged by new North Bay theater company.

Cabaret Time North Bay Stage Co. makes its debut BY DAVID TEMPLETON

‘T

here will be no swastikas on bare bottoms in this production, because I don’t know that anyone really wants to see that.” Director John DeGaetano, whose high-energy production of Cabaret just opened at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts, is referring to the legendary 1998 Broadway production of the John Kander and Fred Ebb musical in which the Master of Ceremonies (played by Alan Cumming), bares his bottom, revealing the Nazi insignia. Though DeGaetano’s production uses the same script as the 1998 version—staged at Wells Fargo as an actual 1931-style Berlin cabaret, complete with German food and German beers served at patrons’ tables—he admits that this Cabaret doesn’t step so far

‘Cabaret’ runs Friday–Sunday through Aug. 10 at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts. 50 Mark West Spring Road, Santa Rosa. Friday–Saturday, 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sunday. $36. 707.546.3600.

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Stage

across the boundaries of taste. “Ours is not quite as raunchy as that one,” he confesses. For the long-time local actordirector, associated for years with the Raven Players in Healdsburg, Cabaret represents more than just a new opportunity to stage one of the world’s most successful musicals. With this show, DeGaetano kicks off the start of a brand-new theater company. North Bay Stage Company (www.northbaystageco.org) was formed to give many of DeGaetano’s colleagues in Healdsburg new opportunities, and with a performance space in Santa Rosa, the company hopes to draw larger audiences to experience their work. Cabaret is the first of six shows announced for the company’s inaugural season. “The idea behind the new company is to broaden the footprint for some of our local actors,” DeGaetano says. “Healdsburg was so far away, it was a little hard for some actors to make it all the way up there. And now we have a shot at drawing more talent from San Francisco and the East Bay too.” Case in point, Cabaret features San Francisco performer Michelle Jasso in the lead role of Sally Bowles, and Pedro Rodeles, from Berkeley, as the Master of Ceremonies, who will share the part with Bonnie Jean Shelton, marking a rare appearance by a woman in the iconic, slightly sinister role. It’s just one of many surprises DeGaetano has worked into the familiar but enduringly popular story. “There are definitely a few other surprises in the show,” he says. “It’s a bit of a different concept than what people have experienced before. Yes, Cabaret is a popular piece, and it’s been done many times—but I promise you, you’ve never seen it like this.” With or without bare bottoms.


DISCOVER

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UNFORGETTABLE. A NEW AMERICAN CLASSIC.” PETER TRAVERS

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‘BOYHOOD’ ISN’T JUST A MASTERPIECE.IT’S A MIRACLE.’’ ANN HORNADAY

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BOY’S LIFE Ellar Coltrane emerges as the central character of ‘Boyhood.’ BOYHOODMOVIE.COM

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Time Machine

‘Boyhood’ chronicles a fictional family over 13 years BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

n the engrossing Boyhood, Richard Linklater (Before Sunrise, School of Rock) follows a small group of actors over the course of 12 real-time years. Mason (Ellar Coltrane) and his sister, Samantha (Lorelei Linklater), live with their mother, Olivia (Patricia Arquette). Father Mason Sr., known as Dad (Ethan Hawke), lives elsewhere. We see the actors age in their roles over the course of a decade, and it all happens without the big crises: no weddings, no funerals, no arrests, no sieges by cancer. As Mason grows from five to 18, Boyhood becomes his movie. He’s in almost every scene. It may be that Linklater had something more familyfocused in mind when he began; sister Samantha, for instance, is a delightful brat but later becomes laid-back and secretive. As for mom and dad, Hawke’s character grows up in tandem with his

son but maybe has a harder time for it, trading his GTO for a minivan and growing a sad little mustache. And Olivia is drawn to men who look like they have it figured out, but who turn out to be Republican martinets with personal problems. Boyhood is grounded in the cultural war. We see the kids campaigning in their neighborhood for Obama, and later, when Mason celebrates his 15th birthday at his step-grandparent’s place in the piney woods, his presents are a 20-gauge shotgun and a Bible with his name embossed on the cover in gold. It’s an affectionate visit, even if Mason doesn’t know how to take it. If there is such a thing as history too recent to remember, there’s also such a thing as memories too beautiful to carry in the mind. Boyhood recovers them, or at least the memories like them. Linklater is a constant student, gladly learning and gladly teaching. ‘Boyhood’ is playing at the Rafael Film Center, 118 Fourth St., San Rafael. 415.454.5813.


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Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic, Alicia Baker, Bruce Gassman, Jet Black Pearl, Polkacide, Tara Linda, Motor Dude Zydeco, The Great Morgani, The Mad Maggies, Sourdough Slim, Paul Betken, The Steve Balich Sr. Polka Band AND SO MUCH MORE!

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Music

JERSEY SCORE Real Estate’s latest

release probes deeper material.

Boys of Summer The alluring properties of Real Estate

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

F

ormed in suburban Ridgewood, N.J., Real Estate deliver shimmering summer jams on songs boasting increasingly contemplative themes. Their deceptively simple and subtle melodies hypnotize and transport audiences back to hazy memories of youth, though the band’s latest album, Atlas, hints at a dawning realization that summers don’t last forever. This week, Real Estate comes to Sonoma County, performing on Saturday, Aug. 2, at Gundlach Bundschu Winery, in a special outdoor concert with support from S.F. indie band Sonny & the

Sunsets and Brooklyn-based solo artist Kevin Morby. The members of Real Estate were born and bred on countryclub links and infused with smalltown boredom, and their initial self-titled debut in 2008 coasted on those easy vibes. Frontman Martin Courtney, bassist Alex Bleeker and guitarist Matthew Mondanile all share songwriting credits (the band’s lineup is rounded out with drummer Jackson Pollis and keyboardist Matt Kallman) and returned with their 2011 sophomore release, Days. Days took steps toward sophistication and restraint. Open acoustic chords layered with swirling lead parts and stirring vocal melodies earned praise from critics and adoration from fans for their blend of Beach Boys–inspired harmonies and jangly R.E.M.styled guitar hooks. It would be three years before Real Estate released Atlas, and in that time the band clearly matured in both sound and feeling. Released in March, Atlas has earned even higher praise and a debut spot at number 34 on the Billboard Top 200 Chart. Atlas is an important work for the band, not only for its unshakable hooks and rhythms, but for its evolving depth. The album opens with the plaintive “Had to Hear” before diving into the nostalgic “Past Lives” and the album’s first single, “Talking Backwards.” The clean, delicate lead parts and upbeat vocals take on a dreamy Steely-Dan-meets-the-Shins sound. Yet the group keeps the pace light, and the music never drags. “I’m just trying to make some sense of this before I lose another year,” sings Courtney on standout song “The Bend,” which, like “Horizon,” tenderly explores the theme of the relentlessly approaching future. Throughout, the band’s awareness of its place in time and their desire to navigate with a conscious pace makes Atlas their most musically cohesive and satisfying work yet. Real Estate play on Saturday, Aug. 2, at Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St., Sonoma. 7pm. $40. 707.938.5277.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Goo Goo Dolls Platinum-selling pop rock band plays the outdoor venue. Jul 30, 7pm. $50-$70. Sonoma Mountain Village Event Center, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park.

North Bay Cabaret Featuring music by Jaime DeWolf, burlesque, variety side shows, spoken word and live painting. Jul 31, 8pm. Whiskey Tip, 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

multi-show residency. Jul 31, 8pm. $35-$45. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

It’s a Grand Night for Singers Vocalists from around Northern California and beyond take turns onstage. Piano accompaniment by host Richard Evans. First Saturday of every month, 7pm. $15. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Clubs & Venues

Petaluma Music Festival Galactic, the Mother Hips, Brokedown in Bakersfield and many others appear at the allday event to benefit music in the schools. Aug 2, 12pm. $40. Petaluma Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma.

Real Estate

SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Jul 31, Brindl. First Wednesday of every month, Chamber Music. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center

Acclaimed indie rock band utilizes both highly evocative songwriting and graceful musicianship. Aug 2, 7:30pm. $40. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Santa Rosa Symphony

Jul 31, Choppin Broccoli. 6770 McKinley Ave, Sebastopol.

A special thank-you concert for the community and featuring Mariachi Sol de México de José Hernàndez. Jul 31, 7pm. Free. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Aubergine Aug 2, Rings of Saturn. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Barlow Event Center

Bergamot Alley Jul 31, Brad Barton. Aug 5, the Jacktones. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Brixx Pizzeria

MARIN COUNTY The Infinite Swell Dramatic acoustics offer a sonic adventure like no other, with performances by Chris Duncan, Travis Johns and Jim Haynes. Aug 3, 5:30pm. $15$20. Battery Townsley at Fort Cronkhite, 1049 Mitchell Rd, Mill Valley.

The Stone Foxes The SF band play a mix of country, rock and blues, with the Shams opening. Aug 2, 9pm. $12-$15. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

NAPA COUNTY David Grisman Sextet Mandolin player and composer performs the first of a

Aug 2, Spyglass. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

Cloverdale Plaza Aug 1, Tab Benoit. Cloverdale boulevard between First and Second street, Cloverdale.

D’Argenzio Winery Jul 31, the Hots. 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.280.4658.

Downtown Guerneville Plaza Jul 31, David Laflamme and It’s a Beautiful Day. 16201 First St, Guerneville.

Epicurean Connection Aug 1, live music. Aug 6, Three on a Match. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Flamingo Lounge Aug 1, Reckless in Vegas. Aug 2, Lovefool. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Jul 31, Brooke & the Caterpillar. 6948 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol. 707.829.9500.

Napa's premier intimate intimate concert conceert venue,e, restaurant, venu restaurant, tap wine bar b and private event space.

Forestville Club Aug 2, Whiskey & Circumstance. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

your

French Garden Aug 3, David Laflamme and It’s a Beautiful Day. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Green Music Center Aug 3, pianoSonoma. Aug 2, National Youth Orchestra. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

DAVID GRISMANN RESIDENCY:

DAVID GRISMAN G SEXT SEXTET TET

7.31

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jul 31, Pato Banton. Aug 1, Shotgun Wedding Quintet. Aug 4, Reggae on the River AfterParty with Irie Dole. Tues, open mic night. Wed, Brainstorm EDM show. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Aug 1, Full Chizel. Aug 2, the Hellhounds. Aug 3, Gypsy Jazz Caravan. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Aug 2, Jesse Simpson Trio with Eric Markowitz and Smith Dobson. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Ives Park Jul 30, Nina Gerber and Chris Webster. Aug 6, the Blue Moon Band. Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

Lagunitas Amphitheaterette

MATT COSTA COOSTA

WITH R RIVVRS IVVRS TO TO OPEN OPEN

Lagunitas Tap Room Jul 30, Doug Adamz & Chris Goddard. Jul 31, the Jen Tucker Band. Aug 1, Jay “Buckaroo” Bonet. Aug 2, Gypsy Jazz Caravan. Aug 3, the Harvest Band. Aug 6, Sour Mash Hug Band. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Landmark Vineyards Aug 1-2, Carrie Manolakos and Morgan Karr. 101 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.0216.

Live Musicians Co-Op

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Aug 2, Rings of Saturn. 925 Piner Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8845.

8.1

8.2

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Aug 4, Foxygen. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Aug 3, Goodnight, Texas. 738 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.4555. )

CHRISS SMITHER

WITH W ITTH SSAD AD RROBOT OBOT 8.13

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Forchetta / Bastoni


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Music ( 27

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Wed, Jul 30 8:45–9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 10:15am– SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE 12:40pm Youth and Family 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7-10pm SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club Thur, Jul 31 8:45–9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:15-10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Aug 1 8:45–9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 7-11pm Steve Luther DJ hosts a WEST COAST SWING PARTY Sat, Aug 2 8:30–9:30am JAZZERCISE Sun,Aug 3 8:30–9:30am JAZZERCISE 5–9:30pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, Aug 4 8:45–9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7–9:30pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tue, Aug 5 8:45–9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:30–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri

THE TWO MIKES

NICASIO’S FAVORITE MIKES, LIPSKIN AND DUKE 8:00 / No Cover Fri

Aug 8

Western Dance Party!

BUCK NICKELS & LOOSE CHANGE

Original Songs, Great Harmonies 8:00 Tue A True Hall of Famer Aug 12 BILLY JOE SHAVER 8:00

Aug 16 JEFFREY BROUSSARD Sat

& THE CREOLE COWBOYS

Sat

Aug 23 Sun

Aug 3 Sun

Aug 10 Sun

Aug 17 Sun

Aug 24 Sun

Aug 31

Rancho Debut!

Authentic Louisiana Zydeco 8:30

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL

Lounge at La Rosa Jul 30, Choppin Broccoli. 500 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.3663.

Main Street Station

Together for the Third Time! Aug 1

8:30

BBQs ON THE LAWN!

TOM RIGNEY AND FLAMBEAU & DANNY CLICK AND THE HELL YEAHS! KRONOS QUARTET WANDA JACKSON PLUS RED MEAT ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL CHUCK PROPHET & THE MISSION EXPRESS Gates at 3, Music at 4

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922

1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Jul 31, Susan Sutton Jazz Piano. Aug 1, Frankye Kelly. Aug 2, Yancy Taylor Trio. Aug 3, Eddie Neon. Mon, Gypsy Cafe. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen Sun, DJ Prodkt. Tues, Thurs, 9pm, karaoke with Country Dan. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Aug 2, Andrew Freeman Band. Aug 5, Timothy O’Neil Band. Sun, Vanguard Jazz Ensemble. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Occidental Center for the Arts Aug 2, Planet B. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.542.7143.

Red’s Apple Roadhouse Aug 1, Saffell. 4550 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.861.9338.

Redwood Cafe Jul 30, Quasar Wut-Wut. Aug 1, Ring of Truth Trio. Aug 2, Foxes in the Henhouse. Aug 5, Rock Overtime. Thurs, Open Mic. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 707.829.7300 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE 2 30 P E TA L U M A A VE | S

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN THU T HU JUL JUL 31 31 REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL

PATO P AT TO BANTON BANTON

$$15 15 A ADV/$20 DV/$20 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 1

HIP H IP HOP HOP | JAZZ JA Z Z | FREESTYLE FR E E S T Y L E

Showtimes: Sun 12pm/Thur 8pm/Fri & Sat 9pm

>K_l.&*(›North Bay Cabaret >=i`/&(›Midnight Sun Massive >Sat 8/2›The 808 Band with RadG >=i`/&/›Shotgun Hoedown >JXk/&0›I-Triniti, Big Yard Band,

Chris Makonnen & The Visionaries

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WITH W ITH

IRIE IR IE DOLE DOLE & SPECIAL SPECIAL GUESTS GU EST S

$$10/ 10 / LADIES LADIES FREE FREE BB44 111/DOORS 1/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 8

Sonoma County’s Original Roadhouse Tavern

Shows: 21+ 8–11pm Great Food & Live Music

GYPSY G YPSY JJAZZ AZZ | A ALT LT B BLUEGRASS LUEGR A SS | FFOLK O LK

DUSTBOWL D USTBOWL R REVIVAL EVIVAL $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SAT S AT A AUG UG 9

CLASSIC C L ASSIC | ROCK ROCK | COVERS COVERS

BLUE B LUE ROCK ROCK COUNTRY COUNTRY CL CLUB LUB ((ANALY ANALY R REUNION EUN IO N A AFTER F TE R P PARTY) AR T Y ) $$55 ALUMNI, ALUMNI, D DOOR/$10 OOR/$10 G GA/DOORS A/DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM/21+

MON M ON A AUG UG 1 11 1

REGGAE R EGG AE | D DANCEHALL A N CEH A L L | H HIP IP HOP HOP

MONDAY M ONDAY NI NIGHT GHT E EDUTAINMENT DUTAINMENT W WITH ITH

DJJ JACQUES D JACQUES & D DJJ GUACAMOLE GUACAMOLE

$$7/ 7/ LADIES LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W W W. H O PM ONK .CO M BBook ookk yyour our

Aug 2, Petty Theft. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Aug 2, Over Easy. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610. Wed, North Bay Blues Jam. 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

MON M ON A AUG UG 4

REGGAE R EGGAE O ON NT THE HE R RIVER IVER AFTER-PARTY AFTER-PARTY

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Sally Tomatoes

$$13/DOORS 13/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Now Open, our newly remodeled patio! Every Wednesday Country Jam Night plus Fried Chicken Dinner Special 7–10pm Wed 7⁄30 ˜Restless Sons 7–10 Thu 7⁄31 ˜Patio Show with Tommy Rox 5:30–8 Karaoke Party with DJ Huey Dawg 8–11 Fri 8⁄1 ˜The Harvest Band 8–11 Sat 8⁄2 ˜Luv Planet Exposed (acoustic) 5–8 Richie Blue Band 9:15–11:30 plus hugeLARGE 8–9

Lunch served Mon–Sat 11:30–2:30pm Rasta Dwight's BBQ Fri, Sat & Sun Night 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove

next ne x t eevent vent with with u us, s, u up p tto o2 250, 50, kkim@hopmonk.com im@hopmonk .com

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707.795.5118

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SONGS HE SINGS Indie singer-songwriter Matt Costa plays City Winery Napa on Aug. 2. See Clubs & Venues, adjacent page.

Society: Culture House Sun, Church on Sundays. Thurs, Casa Rasta. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann and guests. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa.

Spancky’s Sat, live music. Thurs, Dj Tazzy Taz. Thurs, 7pm, Thursday Night Blues Jam. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sugarloaf Ridge State Park Aug 1, the Blues Pirates. 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.5712.

The Sunflower Center Jul 30, Didjeridu Summit: Ondrej Smeykal & Stephen Kent. Aug 6, Tiana Malone Jennings. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Toad in the Hole Pub Fri-Sun, live music. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Twin Oaks Tavern Jul 30, the Restless Sons. Jul 31, 5pm, Tommy Rox. Aug 1, the Harvest Band. Aug 2, Richie Blue Band with hugeLarge. Aug 3, Blues and BBQ with Johnny Tsunami. Aug 5, Levi’s Workshop with Levi Lloyd. Aug 6, Biscuits and Gravy. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Whiskey Tip Aug 1, Midnight Sun Massive. Aug 2, the 808 Band. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Wells Fargo Center Aug 2, Amanda Miguel y Diego Verdaguer. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Zodiacs Jul 30, Chop Wood Carry Water. Aug 1, Zigaboo Modeliste & the New Aahkesstra. Aug 2, brunch with Ian Scherer. Tues, DJ Chalice & DJ Sizzlak. Sun, Sheldon Bermont & the Outcrowd. Thurs, 4pm, Throwdown Thursdaze.

256 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix Jul 31, Stax City. Aug 1, Moetar and the Austin Willacy Band. Aug 2, the Sun Kings. Aug 3, 11am, Charlie Thomas Lindley. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Jul 31, Orquesta Borinquen. Aug 1, Marisol y la Revancha. Aug 5, MND’s Summer Bash. Sat, DJ Night. Sun, Mexican Banda. Wed, Rock and R&B Jam. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Aug 1, Junk Parlor. Aug 2, Vintage Grass. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Marin Country Mart Aug 1, Nick Demopoulous. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur.

19 Broadway Club Jul 30, LaTiDo with Edgardo Cambon. Jul 31, Jeff Subaru Band. Aug 5, Abya Yala. Aug 6, Mark Sexton Band. First Sunday of every month, 19 Broadway Good Time Band. Mon, 9pm, open mic. First Friday of every month, First Fridays Reggae. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.


Open Secret Aug 1, Bodhi and friends. 923 C St, San Rafael. 415.457.4191. Aug 2, the Good Luck Thrift Store Outfit. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Osteria Divino Jul 30, Jonathan Poretz. Jul 31, Deborah Winters. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jul 30, Martha Crawford. Jul 31, Bobbie Norris and Larry Dunlap. Aug 5, Swing Fever. Aug 6, Haute Flash Quartet. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Jul 30, W+T. Jul 31, Loyal Rose. Aug 1, Rockit Science. Aug 2, Feather Witch. Aug 3, the Devil Shakes. Aug 5, Tommy Odetto and Tim Baker. Aug 6, the Weissmen. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Aug 1, the Two Mikes. Aug 3, 4pm, Tom Rigney & Flambeau. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Cruising Club

Sweetwater Music Hall Jul 30, Meghan Linsey. Jul 31, Blackalicious. Aug 1, the Pimps of Joytime. Aug 3, Scary Little Friends. Aug 6, Imperial Messenger Service. Mon, Open Mic. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Jul 31, San Geronimo. Aug 1, Jerry Garcia Birthday Celebration with Stu Allen and the Mars Hotel. Aug 2, Go by Ocean. Aug 3, Walking Spanish. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Sun, Midnight North. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Town Center Corte Madera Aug 3, Mixed Nuts. 100 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961.

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards Aug 3, Jazz Mirage. Aug 2, Steel Jam. 2000 Main St., St Helena, 866.708.9463.

City Winery Napa Aug 1, Chris Smither. Aug 2, Matt Costa. Aug 3, Rick Stevens Anniversary Show. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant Jul 31, Full Chizel. Sun, DJ Aurelio. Wed, Jumpstart. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

FARM at Carneros Inn Jul 30, Swell. Jul 31, Dan Daniels Trio. Aug 6, Whiskey & Honey Trio. 4048 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 888.400.9000.

Goose & Gander Aug 3, Pion 2 Zion. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Hydro Grill First Saturday of every month, AlwaysElvis. Sun, 7pm, Swing Seven. Fri, Sat, blues. 1403 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9777.

Oxbow Public Market Aug 1, Uke-a-Palooza. 610 First St, Napa.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jul 31, Garage Band 101. Aug 1, Steve Sage. Aug 2, Darrell Edwards Heavy Weather Band. Aug 3, 2nd Planet. Aug 6, Full Chizel. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria Jul 30, James & Ted. Jul 31, Le Jazz Hot. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

29 Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin

DeLone 8:00pm

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Imperial Messenger Service 7KX$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

JIG with JUSTice and The Sparrows featuring Robert Steiner, Cerica Liam & Neel Foon )UL$XJ 6DW$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

Todd Snider

with Great

American Taxi

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Fri Aug

1

Beso Negro

with Slim Jenkins, Marty O'Reilly and Carny Bastards 7KXU$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

Israel Vibrations www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

9pm | Free | 21+

THE STONE FOXES

WITH THE SHAMS 9pm | $12 Adv/ $15 DOS | 21+

Sun Aug

3

6pm | Free | 21+

6pm | Free | 21+

6

5

TPVM GVOL

9pm | Free | 21+

9pm | Free | 21+

8

Tue Aug

MARK SEXTON BAND

FIGHTING SMOKEY JOE SPDL Â&#x2021;%21(6 2)$)($7+(5Â&#x2021;+81*/,.($+81 Fri Aug

2

THE GROOVEMASTERS

14 PIECE CHILEAN REGGAE BAND

Wed Aug

Sat Aug

19 BROADWAY GOOD TIME BAND

ABYA YALA SFHHBF SPPUT KB[[ SPDL

Nicole Atkins :HG$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

FIRST FRIDAYS REGGAE NIGHT WITH BROKEN SILENCE SOUND SYSTEM

Thu Aug

7

GYPTIAN WITH

FULL BAND! SFHHBFTVQFSTUBS

9pm | $25 Adv | $30 DOS | 21+

MELVIN SEALS AND JGB

9pm | $30 Adv | $35 DOS | 21+

Sat Aug

9

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Mon, Blue Monday Jam Session. 300 Napa St, Sausalito.

Sausalito Seahorse Jul 31, Geanie Stout. Aug 1, Scary Larry & the Monsters. Aug 2, Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;rumba. Aug 3, Orquesta la Moderna Tradicion. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello and Seth. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Jul 30, Bearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Belly. Jul 31, Diane Zellers. Aug 1, Luvplanet. Aug 3, Dave Getz. Sat, Ukulele Jam Session. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jul 31, Dr. Abacus. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Spitfire Lounge First Friday of every month, Truthlive. Last Thursday of every month, the North Bass DJ night. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Studio 55 Marin Aug 1, Lucia Comnes.

July 30, 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm $15 Adv/$20 Door

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

An Evening With Didjeridu Masters

Stephen Kent & Ondrej Smeykal August 6, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8pm Donation

Matthew Curry Nineteen-year-old blues guitar phenom burns it up with the Daniel Castro Band. July 31 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s S.F.

Foxy Shazam Heavy-hitting rock band plays off new and raucous selfreleased record, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gonzo.â&#x20AC;? Aug 1 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Xiu Xiu Experimental indie outfit plays avant-garde electronic punk with emotional undertones. Aug 1 at Bottom of the Hill.

Echo & the Bunnymen Iconic new wave band from Liverpool tours in support of 12th studio album. Aug 2 at the Regency Ballroom.

Alex G Philadelphia lo-fi songwriter plays with moody underground act Elvis Depressedly. Aug 5 at Rickshaw Stop.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Off The Grid

Hawaiian Folk & Island-Style Music Tiana Malone Jennings & Friends August 9, 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm $10

Mettaquizzical CafĂŠ

Musical Multi-Media Science & Philosophy Salon Special Guest: Green Mary

August A u g u st 3

PPION ION 2 ZION ZION August A ugust 10

GGROOVE ROOVE SSESSION ESSION August A ugust 17

MARTY M ARTY OO'REILLY 'REILLLY August A ugust 24

SSCOTT COTT PEMBERTON PEMBERRTON August A ug ust 31 31

MARK M ARK SEXTON SEXTON BAND BA N D 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4pm Every Every Sunday Sunday this this Summer Summer tthru hru 8/31 8/31 NO NO C COVER OV ER Live music, music, ccocktails ocktails & food food Live outside iinn tthe he ggarden arden outside @goosegandernapa @ goosegandernapaa

11245 245 S Spring pring St, St, St. St. Helena Helena 7707.967.8779 0 7..9 6 7. 87 7 9

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Osher Marin JCC

1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.


N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | JULY 3 0 -AU G UST 5, 2 0 14 | B O H E M I A N.COM

30

Arts Events Galleries RECEPTIONS Jul 31 Sebastopol Center for the Arts, “Play it Again, Sam” exhibits collage and recycled art.. 6pm. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. TuesFri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Aug 2 di Rosa, “Ones and Zeros,” group exhibition explores the digital age and the impact of new media on present-day culture. 6pm. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991. RiskPress Gallery, “Stumbling Toward Ecstasy!” showing the book art of artist and poet Mark Wangberg. 5pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol.

SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center Through Aug 24, “Chopped & Screwed,” artist Mary Roll displays her body-centric paintings and drawings. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Arts Guild of Sonoma

strips focusing on lost love. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Christie Marks Fine Art Gallery Through Aug 11, “Alejandro Salazar-Selected Works, 20112014,” expresses the artists unique and abstract figures. 322 Healdsburg Ave, Second Floor, Healdsburg. ThursSun, 1pm to 5:30pm and by appointment. 707.695.1011.

Chroma Gallery Through Aug 3, “The SOFA Show’” a showcase of art, photography and crafts by SOFA district artists. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

East West Cafe Through Jul 31, “Eleonore Miller Exhibit” 128 N Main St, Sebastopol. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily 707.829.2822.

Eggen & Lance Chapel Through Aug 29, “Petal to the Metal: Scrapture,” exhibits recycled metal art by local artist Ron Petty. 1540 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3747.

Finley Community Center Through Jul 31, “Ships of the Ages,” features model ships built by members of Redwood Empire Model Shipwrights. Aug 5-Sep 12, “Art Quilts,” presented by Santa Rosa Quilt Guild. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Through Aug 4, “Anji Bartholf,” new guild member and her art is featured. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and SunMon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Gallery One

Backstreet Gallery

Gallery 300

Aug 4-31, “New Works in Glass and Paintings,” a solo show by Kate Black. 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa.

Calabi Gallery Through Aug 30, “Summer Selection Exhibition,” showing new works from gallery artists and an inventory of vintage pieces. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Aug 11, “Heartbreak in Peanuts,” over 70 comic

Through Aug 30, “Sonoma Scapes,” collects several artists works in a multi-media show. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277. Through Aug 14, “Ceiling to Floor,” work by Jennifer Hirshfield, Alejandro Salazar and C.K. Itamura. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Graton Gallery Through Aug 3, “Scenes from the Road,” art by Pam Powell, Linda Ratzlaff and others. Aug 5-Sep 21, “Teachers and Influences,” featuring paintings by Sandra Rubin alongside works by artists who have influenced and inspired her.

9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Sep 7, “Cry, Love Life” exhibits artist Jenny Honnert Abell’s playful collage work. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Aug 31, “Colors of Summer,” juried art exhibit featuring local artists. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.542.7143.

The Prince Gallery

Unity Church of Santa Rosa Through Aug 17, “Risha Arts,” prints and paintings that revolve around themes of transformation and healing. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.542.7729.

MARIN COUNTY Falkirk Cultural Center Through Aug 15, “Reflections,” presenting ceramic pieces that reflect thoughts and expression. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Through Aug 31, “Group Show,”new paintings by gallery artists. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One

Aug 5-10, “Creative Studio Pop Up,” local artists and craftsmen share a pop up show. 122 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.889.0371.

Aug 1-Sep 14, “The Box Show,” annual exhibit features 150 artists creations from a plain wood box. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Jack Mason Museum

Through Sep 7, “Showin’ on the River,” exhibits more than 40 artists work in a juried show. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Library Aug 1-29, “Books & Boxes,” a library art show. 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. Mon-Tues, 1 to 5 and 6 to 9; Wed-Sat, 1 to 5. 707.823.7691.

Sonoma County Museum Through Aug 17, “Siberia: In the Eyes of Russian Photographers,” spans a century of images from rural and urban Siberia. Through Aug 24, “From Hogarth to Hundertwasser,” features a rich collection of fine art prints dating from the 15th century to the present. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Aug 21, “Works of Nature,” melds nature photography and handstitched canvas work by Danielle Joy Reynolds. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Thumbprint Cellars Jul 30-Sep 11, “New Works by Molly Perez,” displaying expressive images from the Sonoma County artist. 102 Matheson St, Headlsburg. 11 to 6, daily 707.433.2393.

Through Jul 31, “The Paintings of Sarah Spector,” the colorful, avant-garde artist displays. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

fantastical journey with cocktails, feasts and fire dancers. Aug 2, 6:30pm. Cline Cellars, 24737 Arnold Dr, Sonoma, 707.940.4025.

Seager Gray Gallery

Sonoma County Fair

Through Jul 30, “Figures in Abstract,” fresh works that free the figure with abstract compositions. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

This year’s “Peace, Love & Fair” includes carnival rides, farm yard attractions, horse racing and concerts from country star Billy Currington, Lifehouse, Coco Jones and others. Through Aug 10. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.545.4200.

Comedy Lisa Lampanelli The Queen of Mean is back and sharper than ever. Aug 1, 8pm. $45-$75. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa, 707.259.0123.

Mark Pitta The standup comic headlines, with guest Maureen Langan. Aug 2, 8pm. $20-$25. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato, 415.899.9883.

Aug 1-Nov 30, “Radio Personalities of Wireless West Marin,” oral histories and photographs tell the fascinating stories of the men and women who worked for RCA. 15 Park Ave, Inverness. 415.669.1099.

Set ’Em Up, Knock ’Em Down

Marin MOCA

Melanie Vega

Through Aug 24, “Motion/ Emotion,” juried show features 150 artists working in a variety of media. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4, 415.506.0137.

Standup comedy headliner appears with guests El Marco Antonio Alvarez, Rudy O and host Juan Carlos. Aug 2, 8pm. $10. Christy’s on the Square, 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa, 707.528.8565.

Marin Society of Artists Gallery Through Aug 9, “Trends and Impressions,” includes a wide range of media in the juried member show. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11am to 4pm; Sat-Sun, noon to 4pm. 415.454.9561.

MINE Art Gallery Through Aug 3, “New Art Works Worth Seeing” brings together a collection of art that challenges and inspires. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Aug 21, “Bay Area Women Artists,” mixed-media artwork with emphasis on exploration and abstraction. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

New standup series presents L.A. comedians Dave Ross and Barbara Gray, hosted by Matt Lieb. Aug 4, 8pm. $20. Druids Hall, 1011 College Ave, Santa Rosa.

Events Beers & Barks Music, munchies and pet adoptions. Aug 2, 1pm. Lagunitas Tap Room, 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma, 707.778.8776.

Colossal Community Flea Market Treasures, refreshments and a booth for electronics recycling. Aug 2, 8am. Center for Spiritual Living, 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.4543.

Gigantic Comic Book Sale Thousands of comics available. Aug 1-2. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville, 707.869.9004.

Noche de Luna: South Pacific La Luz Center presents this

Field Trips iNaturalist Workshop series event is led by a docent. Aug 3, 10am. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

Napa Historic Bicycle Tour See the town in this leisurely two-hour ride. Aug 2, 10am. $5-$10. Goodman Library, 1219 First St, Napa.

Film Dinner & a Movie The recent Bond adventure Casino Royale plays in the market with special cocktails and culinary delights. Jul 31, 8pm. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Music Documentary Night Rare music docs screen. Jul 31, 7pm. Free. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station, 415.663.1075.

Some Like It Hot Billy Wilder comedy starring Marilyn Monroe, Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis plays as part of the Classic Film Series. Jul 31, 5:30pm. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.924.5111.

Food & Drink Cider & Cheese Pairing Workshop Presented by Kay Michaels, cheesemonger ) at NYC’s Eataly,

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Demystifying Wine & Food Interactive discussions on pairings with delectable demonstrations. Sat-noon. $75. Hall Winery, 401 St Helena Hwy South, St Helena, 707.967.2620.

Mad Hatter’s Tea Don’t be late for civilized and delicious tea and sandwiches. Jul 31. $5-$10. Bodega Bay Grange, 1370 Bodega Ave, Bodega Bay, 707.875.3616.

Market Day Farmer’s Lunch with Six Oaks Aug 2, 1pm. $34. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg, 707.431.7433.

The Power of Balsamic Workshop and tasting. Aug 2, 5pm. $25. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg, 707.431.7433.

Summer Party Aug 2, 10am. $15. DuttonGoldfield Winery, 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol, 707.827.3600.

Lectures Descendants of Light Art lecture looks at American photographers of Jewish ancestry. Aug 2, 6pm. Calabi Gallery, 456 10th St, Santa Rosa, 707.781.7070.

Industrial Scrap Magic Mixed media sculpture class is led by Monty Monty and Aileen Cormack. Aug 2, 1pm. $50-$60. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1500.

Book Passage Jul 30, 7pm, “The Mockingbird Next Door” with Marja Mills. Jul 31, 7pm, “French Ghosts, Russian Nights and American Outlaws” with Susan Spano. Aug 1, 7pm, a celebration of “Her Wild Oats” with Sam Barry, Amy Tan & Susanne Pari. Aug 2, 7pm, “Unstoppable” with Ralph Nader. $28.50. Aug 3, 7pm, “Strings Attached” with Joanne Lipman. Aug 5, “Queen of Hearts” with Rhys Bowen. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jul 30, 7pm, “Blueprint Your Bestseller” with Stuart Horwitz. Aug 5, 5pm, “Footprints of the Baker Boy” with Henry Trione. Aug 6, 7pm, “Queen of Hearts” with Rhys Bowen. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jul 30, 7pm, “The Book of Life” with Deborah Harkness. Aug 1, 7pm, “This Bright Light of Ours” with Maria Gitin. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Healdsburg Copperfield’s Books Jul 31, 7pm, “Shadows in the Vineyard” with Maximillian Potter, followed by wine reception at Bob Johnson Art Gallery. 104 Matheson St, Healdsburg 707.433.9270.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Jul 31, 7pm, “Living Life in Full Bloom” with Elizabeth Murray. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Handwritten Wines Aug 1, 6pm, “Shadows in the Vineyard” with Maximillian Potter. 1010 Main St, St Helena 707.944.8524.

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Performer and educator Eliot Kallen introduces the sounds of the expressive musical instrument. Aug 2, 2pm. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma, 707.763.9801.

Jul 31, 7:30pm, “Stewards of Coast and Redwoods” with Michele Luna. 130 S Main St, Sebastopol 707.829.8871.

Readings

Redwood Cafe

Aqus Cafe Aug 4, 6:30pm, Rivertown Poets: A-Muse-ing Monday. Mondays, 9:30am, Storytelling

Napa Bookmine Jul 30, 7pm, “Eliminating Satan and Hell” with Dr. V Donald Emmel. 964 Pearl St, Napa. Aug 3, 5pm, First Sunday Poetry Reading. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868.

Zodiacs Jul 31, 7pm, “Dancing with the

Dead” with Rosie McGee, with music by the Incubators and Stu Allen. $8. 256 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma 707.773.7751.

Theater As You Like It Marin Shakespeare Company kicks off its 25th Silver Season with the classic comedy from the Bard. Through Aug 10. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Cabaret North Bay Stage Company brings the classic musical to life. Through Aug 10. $36. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

A Chorus Line SRJC’s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the beloved Broadway musical. Through Aug 9. $18-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4307.

La Cage aux Folles SRJC’s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the acclaimed comedy musical classic. Through Aug 9. $18$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4307.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream Bacchus Theater Company presents the comedy outdoors as part of the Shakespeare on the Greens series. Through Jul 30, 7pm. Oakmont Golf Club, 7025 Oakmont Dr, Santa Rosa.

New Songs/New Works This fundraising event has new original songs written by local composers and performed by local musical theater notables. Aug 1-2, 8pm. $20. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato, 415.883.4498.

9 to 5: The Musical SRJC’s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the musical based off the 1980’s movie. Through Aug 9. $18$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4307.

The Odd Couple SRJC’s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents Neil Simon’s seminal comedy about mismatched roommates Oscar and Felix. Through Aug 9.

$18-$25. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4307.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Old Money The Ross Valley Player presents the clever comedy by Wendy Wasserstein. Through Aug 17. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.456.9555.

Phoenix The romantic comedy written by Scott Organ and directed by Beulah Vega plays Aug 1-24. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Present Laughter SRJC’s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the witty 1939 comedy about a comedy actor facing a bizarre series of events. Through Aug 9. $18-$25. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4307.

Rent A Throckmorton Theatre Youth Production. Jul 31-Aug 3. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Romeo & Juliet Presented by the Marin Shakespeare Company. Through Sep 28. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael. Vacant Lot Productions presents the premiere event at the former California Packing Company’s Plant No. 5, with an outdoor space within the remaining walls of the old Cannery. Through Aug 23. Shakespeare in the Cannery, 3 West Third St, Santa Rosa.

Two Gentlemen of Sonoma Shakespeare’s Verona-based comedy is set in 1840s California. Through Aug 2, 7pm. $20-$25. Sonoma Barracks, 36 E Spain St, Sonoma.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

LOL Comedy showcase comes to Santa Rosa Thanks to Comedy Central, YouTube, the Huffington Post, BuzzFeed, et al., comedians are cool again. Not that they weren’t before, but with social media, comedians are able to boost their underground, cult-celebrity status. This viral showcase for aspiring performers can generate some rather pitiful cases; however, it can also unveil some hidden gems. In a way, technology is taking us back to the frontier days of rogue performing, when artists performed for the love of their art. Santa Rosa native Dominic Del Bene, now working at San Francisco’s Rooftop Comedy where he has produced over 40 standup albums and more than a dozen festivals and shows across the country, will be presenting his monthly comedy series, “Set ’Em Up and Knock ’Em Down,” Aug. 4 at the Druid Hall in Santa Rosa. The show will feature L.A. comedians, Dave Ross, host of the TERRIFIED podcast on the Nerdist Network, and Barbara Gray who has appeared on Ellen, SF Sketchfest and Deadspin. Matt Lieb, winner of the 2013 Rooster T. Feathers Comedy Competition, will also be performing. If that isn’t enough, Petaluma’s HenHouse Brewing Co. and Benziger Family Wineries will be providing libations; all bar proceeds will benefit the Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition. Tickets are $20 with discounts available to members of SCBC and Benziger’s newsletter. Show will be at the Druid Hall, 1011 College Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.542.0908. For more info, visit setemupknockemdown.tumblr.com. —Jesse Bell

33 N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | JULY 3 0 -AU G UST 5, 2 0 14 | B O H E M I A N.COM

and Ellen Cavalli, co-owner of Windsor-based Tilted Shed Ciderworks. Aug 3, 3pm. $40. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg, 707.431.7433.

with Phaedra. 189 H St, Petaluma 707.778.6060.


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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of July 30

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) If a farmer plants the same crop in the same ďŹ eld year after year, the earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nutrients get exhausted. For instance, lettuce sucks up a lot of nitrogen. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better to plant beans or peas in that location the next season, since they add nitrogen back into the soil. Meanwhile, lettuce will do well in the ďŹ eld where the beans or peas grew last time. This strategy is called crop rotation. I nominate it as your operative metaphor for the next 10 months, Aries. Your creative output will be abundant if you keep sowing each new â&#x20AC;&#x153;cropâ&#x20AC;? in a fertile situation where it is most likely to thrive. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

Maybe your grandparents are dead, or maybe theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still alive. Whatever the case may be, do you have a meaningful or interesting connection with them? Is there anything about their souls or destinies that inspires you as you face your own challenges? Or is your link with them based more on sentimentality and nostalgia? In the near future, I urge you to dig deeper in search of the power they might have to offer you. Proceed on the hypothesis that you have not yet deciphered some of the useful messages you can derive from how they lived their lives. Explore the possibility that their mysteries are relevant to yours.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) The proliďŹ c American author James Fenimore Cooper (1789â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1851) wrote 32 novels. In those pages, he crammed in almost 1,100 quotations from Shakespeare. What motivated such extreme homage? I suspect he regarded Shakespeare as a mentor, and wanted to blend the Bardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intelligence with his own. I invite you to do something similar, Gemini. What heroes have moved you the most? What teachers have stirred you the deepest? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a perfect time to pay tribute in a way that feels selfempowering. I suspect you will beneďŹ t from revivifying their inďŹ&#x201A;uence on you. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

Was there an actual poet named Homer who wrote the ancient Greek epics the Iliad and the Odyssey? Or was â&#x20AC;&#x153;Homerâ&#x20AC;? a ďŹ ctitious name given to several authors who created those two master works? Whatever the case may be, we know that Homer plagiarized himself. The opening line of Book XI in the Iliad is identical to the opening line of Book V in the Odyssey: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now Dawn arose from her couch beside the lordly Tithonos, to bear light to the immortals and to mortal men.â&#x20AC;? So should we be critical of Homer? Nah. Nor will I hold it against you if, in the coming days, you imitate some ďŹ ne action or brilliant move you did in the past. It was great the ďŹ rst time. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure it will be nearly as great this time, but in a different way.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) The Earth has been around for almost 4.6 billion years. But according to scientists who study the fossil records, ďŹ re didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make its ďŹ rst appearance on our planet until 470 million years ago. Only then were there enough land-based plants and oxygen to allow the possibility of ďŹ res arising naturally. Do the math and you will see that for 90 percent of Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history, ďŹ re was absent. In evolutionary terms, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a newcomer. As I study your astrological omens for the next 10 months, I foresee the arrival of an almost equally monumental addition to your life, Leo. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t imagine what it is yet, but by this time next year, you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fathom how you could have lived without it for so long. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) In the nights to come, I expect you will dream of creatures like ďŹ ery monsters, robot warriors, extraterrestrial ghosts and zombie vampires. But hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the weird twist: They will be your helpers and friends. They will protect you and ďŹ ght on your behalf as you defeat your real enemies, who are smiling pretenders wearing white hats. Dreams like this will prepare you well for events in your waking life, where you will get the chance to gain an advantage over fake nice guys who have hurt you or thwarted you. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ ne if you want to turn the volume all the way up on your charisma and socialize like a party animal. I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t protest if you gleefully blend business and pleasure

as you nurture your web of human connections. But I hope you will also ďŹ nd time to commune with the earth and sky and rivers and winds. Why? You are scheduled to take a big, fun spiritual test in the nottoo-distant future. An excellent way to prepare for this rite of passage will be to deepen your relationship with Mother Nature.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21) You are hereby excused from doing household chores and busywork, Scorpio. Feel free to cancel boring appointments. Avoid tasks that are not sufďŹ ciently epic, majestic and fantastic to engage your heroic imagination. As I see it, this is your time to think really big. You have cosmic authorization to give your full intensity to exploring the amazing maze where the treasure is hidden. I urge you to pay attention to your dreams for clues. I encourage you to ignore all fears except the one that evokes your most brilliant courage. Abandon all trivial worries, you curious warrior, as you go in quest of your equivalent of the Holy Grail.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Broadway is one of New York Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main streets. It runs the length of the island of Manhattan. But hundreds of years ago it was known by the indigenous Lenape people as the Wickquasgeck Trail. It was a passageway that cut through stands of chestnut, poplar and pine trees. Strawberries grew wild in ďŹ elds along the route. Is there a metaphorical equivalent in your own life, Sagittarius? I think there is: a modest, natural path that you will ultimately build into a major thoroughfare buzzing with activity. Part of you will feel sad at the loss of innocence that results. But mostly youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be proud of the visionary strength you will have summoned to create such an important conduit.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) The heavenly body known as 1986 DA is a near-Earth asteroid thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1.4 miles in diameter. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s packed with 10,000 tons of gold and 100,000 tons of platinum, meaning itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth over $5 trillion. Can we humans get to it and mine its riches? Not yet. That project is beyond our current technology. But one day, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure we will ďŹ nd a way. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thinking thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a smaller-scale version of this scenario in your life, Capricorn. You know about or will soon ďŹ nd out about a source of wealth thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beyond your grasp. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m betting that in the next 10 months you will ďŹ gure out a way to tap into it, and begin the process. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just sort of drifted into it.â&#x20AC;? According to author Gore Vidal, â&#x20AC;&#x153;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost always the explanation for everything.â&#x20AC;? But I hope this wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be true for you anytime soon, Aquarius. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to be unconscious or lazy or careless about what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting yourself into. You must formulate a clear, strong intention, and stick to it. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean that you should be overly cautious or ultra-skeptical. To make the correct decisions, all you have to do is be wide awake and stay in intimate touch with whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best for you.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Members of the industrial band Skinny Puppy are upset with the U.S. military. They discovered that an interrogation team at Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guantanamo Bay detention camp tortured prisoners by playing their music at deafening volumes for extended periods. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why they sent an invoice to the Defense Department for $666,000, and are threatening to sue. Now would be a good time for you to take comparable action, Pisces. Are others distorting your creations or misrepresenting your meaning? Could your reputation beneďŹ t from repair? Is there anything you can do to correct peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s misunderstandings about who you are and what you stand for?

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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