Issuu on Google+


Enjoy Live Music At Rodney Strong All Summer Long!

2

4

t

h

N

A

N

U

A

L

Presented By

SUN JULY 13

CHRIS ISAAK SAT. JULY 26

MINDI ABAIR

JULY 13 | CHRIS ISAAK

with special guests ELLIO YAMIN opener SPENCER DAY

SAT. AUG 16

CHRIS BOTTI SUN. AUG 31

TOWER OF POWER

JULY 26 | MINDI ABAIR

opener JONATHAN BUTLER

DOORS 4 PMs3(/73 PM SONOMA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA VIP tickets include a reserved seat in front of the stage and a complimentary glass of Rodney Strong wine. All artist dates are subject to change without notice.

AUG 16 | CHRIS BOTTI

AUG A UG 3 31 1 | TOWER TOWE R O OF FP POWER OW E R

© 2014 Rodney Strong Vineyards, Healdsburg, CA

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Ŵ

www.rodneystrong.com/events

P L A C E M A T T E R S.

Through 4th of July Weekend

20–30% Off Silver & Turquoise Jewelry

JOIN J OIN US F FOR OR A

TASTE OOF BAUMAN BAUMA AN N! :15 P M|F REE THURS | JUNE 26 | 6 6:15 PM FREE Learn about our our Professional TRAINING programs Gp rog r ams Hear about our passionate nate m mission is sion Enter to win raffle le p prizes rizes Meet Dr. Ed Bauman u man EXPERIENCE A TASTY ST Y DEMO DEMO And more! ore!

)/*-?np((-J›J\YXjkfgfc›707.829.8544›KÆ=('Æ-#JXk0Æ-#Jle('Æ-

RSVP ONLINE | BAUMANCOLLEGE.ORG | 800-987-7530


EVENTS

Tuesday, July 8, 7pm: Petaluma Wed., July 16, 7pm: Healdsburg

Tuesday, July 22, 7pm

Friday, July 25, 7pm LIT NIGHT WITH

BRAVE NEW WORLDS WITH

ELLEN GUSTAFSON We the Eaters: If We Change Dinner, We Can Change the World SEBASTOPOL

ERIKA JOHANSEN The Queen of the Tearling

JOSEPH BOYDEN The Orenda PETALUMA

PETALUMA & HEALDSBURG

Wednesday, July 23, 7pm

JACQUELINE WINSPEAR

The Care and Management of Lies: A Novel of the Great War MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

Wed., July 9, 5:15pm & 7pm

JEFF ABBOTT Inside Man

FREE in-store event (7pm) RSVP for Dinner to Die For (5:15pm) events@copperbook.com

Wednesday, July 30, 7pm

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

DEBORAH HARKNESS The Book of Life (All Souls Trilogy #3) PETALUMA

Friday, July 11, 7pm LIT NIGHT WITH

ELI HOROWITZ The Silent History PETALUMA

Tuesday, August 5, 5pm Thursday, July 31, 7pm COPPERFIELD’S PAIRING WITH

Turquoise for

Summer Come in to view our collection 8JOETPS3PBEt8JOETPS $" 707 836 1840 markshimizudesign.com

MAXIMILLIAN POTTER Tuesday, July 15, 6pm DEBUT BREW WITH

EDAN LEPUCKI California HOPMONK TAVERN

HENRY TRIONE Footprints of the Baker Boy MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

Shadows in the Vineyard HEALDSBURG ALSO APPEARING:

Friday, August 1, 6–8pm HANDWRITTEN WINES’ STORYTELLERS SERIES Tickets & info: copperfieldsbooks.com

Tuesday, August 12, 7pm LIT NIGHT WITH

Also, HOT SUMMER NIGHTS with local Redwood Writers in Montgomery Village, every Tuesday at 6pm in July!

MALCOLM BROOKS Painted Horses PETALUMA

All events are FREE unless otherwise noted!

VISIT OUR STORES: SEBASTOPOL • PETALUMA

HEALDSBURG • NAPA • CALISTOGA • MONTGOMERY VILLAGE • SAN RAFAEL

WWW.COPPERFIELDSBOOKS.COM

ŵ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

FEATURED UPCOMING


Bohemian

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

4

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Stett Holbrook, ext. 202

News Editor Tom Gogola, ext. 106

Staff Writer Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Charlie Swanson, ext. 203

Contributors Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Michael Houghton, James Knight, Blake de Pastino, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Flora Tsapovsky

Interns JoshuOne Barnes, Jesse Bell

Design Director Kara Brown

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Lynda Rael, ext. 204

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2014 Metrosa Inc.

Cover illustration by Michael Houghton. Cover design by Kara Brown.


N

VA

PO

5

RI

ZE

RS

The North Bay’s Best New Age Smokeshop

E-Cigarettes

nb MUSICAL MANSION

Records left behind by residents of a famous commune tell a tale of the times, p17.

‘We’re kind of seeing if our scene is ready for something like that.’ A RTS P23 Brown’s Budget and the North Bay P8 ‘Grease’ in Word and Song P 24 California Beer Fest P33 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p11 Wineries p14 Swirl p15

Cover Feature p17 Culture Crush p22 Arts & Ideas p23 Stage p24 Film p25

Music p26 Clubs & Concerts p27 Arts & Events p30 Classified p35 Astrology p35

ABOUT THE COVER ARTIST Michael Houghton is an illustrator and graphic designer, living and working in Santa Rosa, his favorite place on earth. He absolutely loves what he does, which includes a super-rad variety of projects. Check out more of his work at www.designedbymonkeys.com, www.facebook.com/designedbymonkeys, and his line of T-shirts at designedbymonkeys.etsy.com.

Liquid Nicotine E-Juice Buy 2 Get 1 FREE E-Juice

No SmokeÊUÊNo Tar SIGNATURE STORE

SANTA ROSA 3372 Santa Rosa Ave. 707.545.4975 Dec 17–Dec 23 9–10, Dec 24 9–6 CLOSED CHRISTMAS

* /1ÊUÊ£ÈÊ7iÃÌiÀ˜ÊÛiÊUÊÇäÇ°ÇÈÓ°™{Óä - Ê, ÊUʣ䙙Ê{̅Ê-ÌÊUÊ{£x°{xÇ°Ó{Óä *ÊUÊ££äÊ-œÃVœÊÛiÊUÊÇäÇ°ÓÓÈ°Ç{Óä

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Photo courtesy Burdelll Collection

V

E P A

PE

S


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies I Like Obamacare BY JESSIE DE LA O

M

ore than 7 million people signed up for health coverage under President Obama’s health reform law in 2014.

Specifically in California, droves of people flooded the online Covered California website to sign up, at times making it impossible to complete the application process. Others opted to seek help by phone or from health insurance brokers and certified enrollment counselors—although they too ran into problems with the Covered California website. There were likely some people who became frustrated with the whole process and probably gave up. If you didn’t enroll, then expect to incur a tax penalty next year. The positive aspect of the Affordable Care Act is that it will benefit many people, including students who are considered independent from their parents, people who have otherwise lost their medical insurance due to job loss or a “qualifying event,” or those who simply cannot afford the cost of other healthcare options, such as COBRA. For those who cannot afford specific medical plans through Covered California, they may be eligible to obtain payment assistance through Medicaid. For the millions of people who are now covered through Obamacare, there’s a great sense of relief, because they can now get proper medical care, which they previously may have had to put off due to the unfortunate financial circumstances. I personally had not planned to sign-up for healthcare in late March. About three years ago, I was laid off from my job and gave up paying out-of-pocket for healthcare insurance because my monthly premiums became too expensive. Now I’m playing the waiting game with the government and Covered California, while my paperwork is processed. Here’s hoping Covered California is prepared for the next surge of applicants enrolling in healthcare this fall, as well as the commotion conservatives will continue to make in opposition to the Affordable Care Act. Jessie De La O is a student at Sonoma State University and a freelance writer. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Disastrous Conformity

Victoria Hogan seems to think that good Democrats must not challenge the wisdom of party leaders (Letters, June 18). But from LBJ’s escalation of the Vietnam War to President Clinton’s corporate NAFTA pact to President Obama’s escalation of the war in Afghanistan, such conformity has been disastrous. Along the way, Hogan is so eager to be a party gendarme that she can’t resist pseudo-factual distortion. From her letter, you’d never know that I’ve been a registered Democrat for the vast majority of my voting-age life. But if she’s determined to root out Greentinged deviation inside the California Democratic Party, I’d suggest she start at the top. As the Sacramento Bee noted (Sept. 13, 2010), Jerry Brown went on CNN in 1998 to denounce then–President Clinton for “overwhelming” policy failures and leading the Democratic Party to be “taken over by a confederacy of corruption, campaign consultants and lobbyists.” And guess what? Jerry Brown “said he voted for Ralph Nader instead of Clinton in 1996.” But for people with Hogan’s mentality, Gov. Brown later redeemed himself by proving to be—yes—a corporate Democrat.

NORMAN SOLOMON Inverness

Stop the Presses What we have left of our rural habitat we must keep sacred! The expansion of a 60,000-square-foot industrial printing operation at Ratna Ling in the remote Cazadero hills of Sonoma County would be a grave mistake.

The operation would bring in toxic chemicals, commercial vehicles, water pollutants and an extreme fire threat to a delicate area of our county. Ratna Ling has already shown that they have no regard for laws and regulations by committing serious permit violations. With their track record, we should not be awarding them with an exemption to county plans that have reserved this area for forest and agricultural use. Supervisors Carrillo, Rabbitt and McGuire have shown their support for this industrial operation that has been creeping into our community. Supervisors, I ask you how many times we must make the same mistakes? Again and again we have seen nature around us destroyed. Reversing our impact has proven challenging if not impossible.

There are places where such activities are appropriate and have the adequate infrastructure to accommodate this production and scale. That place is not here, nor should we continue to destroy our habitat to allow for it to be.

SUNALI SIKAND Cazadero

Destruction of Berryessa Mike Thompson, the Bureau of Land Management, the Department of the Interior, Napa County supervisor Diane Dillon, Tuleyome’s Napa branch director Carol Kunze, and Sens. Barbara Boxer and Diane Feinstein are the pack who contributed to or directed the destruction of Lake Berryessa (“Ghost Lake,” June 18). Their goal has been to eliminate family recreation and motorized boating. Stimulus funds were used to destroy infrastructures, marinas and all facilities. The Thompson/Boxer bills to create the Berryessa Snow Mountain Monument are incongruous with the Thompson/Dillon pretense that they want recreation at the lake. This


Rants

has been and continues to be a land/ water/resource grab. The Thompson/ Dillon Orwellian speak is the rhetoric of distraction and distortion. Neither has good intentions for Lake Berryessa, a regional asset and boater destination, and its community.

LUCY WHITE

Via online

Support Our Libraries How have reductions in staffing and hours of operation of the Sonoma County Library affected you? The cuts started in 2011 after the Bush administration/Wall Street collapse of 2008 and 2009 caused mandatory, across-the-board funding reductions. The library’s operating hours of 52 hours per week were sliced to 40 hours per

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

week. Attendance plummeted from 2.9 million in 2010 to 1.9 million in 2013. Today, the Sonoma County Library struggles to do its job with barely $33 per capita here versus $51 in Napa County and $95 in Marin County. Contact your county supervisor. Ask him or her to place a funding ballot measure of 1/8 of 1 percent or a parcel tax of $25 on November’s ballot. A vote of more than 66 percent is needed to pass. Regular hours and full staffing would resume. Teen parents, children and seniors will thank you, and planning would start for a new Roseland District branch. Visionary educational advocates from Ben Franklin to Sam Brannon to Andrew Carnegie would be pleased. A young person or brand-new Sonoma County reader will gain his or her reading skill and an ability to soar.

FRANK BAUMGARDNER

Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

Tues-Fri 7:30-6:00 321 Second Street

769-0162

Petaluma

HONDA TOYOT A M AZ DA NI S SAN SUBARU


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

Paper THE

DEBR IEFER Cannabizness The High Times Medical Cannabis Cup is coming to the Sonoma County Fairgrounds this weekend, for a second year of marijuana-driven commerce and commingling. There will be music by Moe, a chill vibe will permeate the public lands, and the police will be called only if necessary, says Sonoma County Supervisor David Rabbitt, who recalls a fun and trouble-free 2013 event. While he’s not headed to the fair, Rabbitt says when it comes to pot legalization, “I think we’re heading in that direction.” The Cup comes to Santa Rosa just as the U.S. Congress tells the Drug Enforcement Agency it can’t use federal funds to shut down state-licensed dispensaries. The bud is loose. According to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, there’s a pro-pot town hall in Missouri, hemp seeds are legally growing in Kentucky, and Jamaica (of all places) is decriminalizing possession.

CONE ZONE While the new state budget is well-received in Sonoma County, road-improvement funds are still needed.

Bust to Boom

Gov. Brown’s budget not so bad, county officials say BY TOM GOGOLA

N

orth Bay county leaders are encouraged, cautiously optimistic and reasonably excited about Gov. Jerry Brown’s $155 billion budget for 2014–15. And make no mistake, nobody’s complaining about $100 million in partial payback to counties for unfunded state mandates included

in the budget, approved earlier this month. But though Napa County is happy with its share of transportation dollars, Sonoma County still can’t fix its roads under an unyielding state gas-tax formula; Medi-Cal reimbursement rates in Marin County have disappointed local leaders; and everyone’s missing redevelopment agency funds, which Brown ended in 2011.

The governor’s $1.6 billion rainyday fund was met with praise from Marin County supervisor Kathrin Sears. “Overall, it’s refreshing to be talking about potential investments and paying down debt, as opposed to the large state deficits we all experienced with the economic downturn,” she said in a statement. Sears was appointed by Brown to the 3rd District seat in 2011; she won it the following year. ) 10

In California, police chiefs helped write a dispensaries law that sets the state up for a future, fully encoded legal status for pot. That bill passed the state Senate unanimously and is headed to the Public Safety Committee after a yea-vote in the Assembly’s Committee on Business, Professions and Consumer Protection. Meanwhile, despite our suggestion, GOP gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari won’t support legalization to win over a few million Californians. Keeping it illegal is one area that the candidate and Gov. Brown agree, a Kashkari spokeswoman told Debriefer. Brown and Kashkari: fracking, yes; legalizing marijuana, no.

Hospital Cure As the battle to reopen Palm Drive Hospital in Sebastopol ) 10 The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.


Ż

...Tons of beers not bottled or available on any shelves ...New Freakin’ Firkin tapped every Thursday ...Daily Brewery tour schedule listed at bottom of our website

Wed-Fri 2pm-9pm Sat & Sun 11:30am-8pm

www.LAGUNITAS.com Less than $6 a month!

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

BECOME A PARKS MEMBER Sonoma County

Regional Parks

Member

Annual Membership Includes: D12-month day-use parking pass DFree night of camping DMap to all county parks DProgram & merchandise discounts DLocal merchant discounts DAdmission to Tolay Fall Festival

Individual/Family Golden Years (60yrs+) Access

$69 $39 $23

(SHUPDQHQWO\GLVDEOHGDYDLODEOHDW3DUNV2I¿FHRQO\

Get your Parks Membership: On-line at sonomacountyparks.org,or at Sonoma Outfitters, REI Santa Rosa, Oliver’s Markets, Sebastopol Hardware, or staffed park entry stations

sonomacountyparks.org

707/565-2041

71 Brookwood Ave., Santa Rosa 707.576.0861 Mon–Sat 10am–6pm, Sun 11am–4pm • www.wbu.com/santarosa

Birdseed • Feeders • Birdbaths • Optics • Nature Gifts • Books

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

...Live local music & killer food every day we’re open


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

10

NOW N O W OPEN O PE N M E M B E R S H I P S

Where families

LLEARN EARN & PLAY together!

BIRTHDAY BI IRTHDAY PARTIES PARTIES E

Open O pen TTues–Sun ues–Sun

:6WHHOH/DQH‡6DQWD5RVD :6WHHOH/DQH‡6DQWD5R RVD

707.546.4069 70 7.546.4069

PLAY P LAY FO FOR R FFREE RE E 1st Weds Wed s of o f Every E ve r y Month M on t h

STATE APPROVED SINCE 1988

250 Hrs Certification

3 Weeks Summer Intensive *UNn*ULs*ULns!UGn Cost: $  www.lifestreammassageschool.com 707.812.5120

METABOLIC MELTDOWN CAMP

Fast results for busy women

JULY 14–AUG 8

Early registration discount still available! New Santa Rosa location added! Check it out online!

707.217.3795 70 7.2 17.3795 5

www.winecountrybootcamp.com w w w.wine c ountr ybootc amp.c om o

Budget ( 8 The Marin County board president echoes others in support of “a down-payment on nearly $900 million owed to local governments for unfunded mandates� which would send up to $750,000 to Marin County. “With 30 percent of county revenues coming from the state to implement programs on its behalf, avoiding the ‘boom and bust’ budget cycles of the past should bring more certainty to local budgets,� Sears wrote. Sears highlighted the budget’s 5 percent increase to CalWORKs welfare grants; $7 million for the Golden Gate Bridge suicide barrier; and “new funding of $264 million that expands preschool for children from poor families.� Sears said she had hoped the budget would increase Medi-Cal rates to doctors. As is, it’s difficult for doctors to agree to care for Medi-Cal patients in expensive areas, she said. Napa County Supervisor Michael Luce is “generally encouraged� with Brown’s “backto-basics budget that takes care of the physical needs of the people in our communities.� Along with the state’s partial payback to counties, “there’s more money being repaid than we had expected,� Luce say. “There’s lots of emphasis on infrastructure, jails and water-system improvements, more money for roads, and a good use of cap and trade.� Still, the state is continuously missing out on “glaring opportunities� to develop affordable housing, he says. There’s no more money from the state for a worker-proximity housing program that helped lowand moderate-income residents with loans for purchases made 10 to 15 miles from where they worked. “Affordable housing funding disappeared with redevelopment,� Luce says. Sonoma County supervisor David Rabbitt emphasizes schools, roads—and Facebook—in his

assessment of the Brown budget. The plan offers “school-speciďŹ c items that don’t reect the county budget per se, but we’re all in the same boat in terms of making sure that education is moving in the right direction,â€? Rabbitt says. Sonoma County just passed a $1.5 billion budget, put $8 million in a reserve fund and earmarked another $8 million for roads. The county can’t ďŹ x its roads fast enough because of high asphalt prices and a 19-year-old state gas-tax formula, says Rabbitt. Sonoma gets slighted on the tax because of its population-to-roadmiles ratio, about a half-million people to 1,382 miles of road. Santa Clara County, by comparison, “has half the roads, with more than double the population,â€? says Rabbitt. Rabbitt notes that $250 million in cap-and-trade revenue earmarked for transportation is “going right to the high-speed rail project. That’s in the budget. It means less money available for local roads.â€? Rabbitt is keen on the county’s share of an $11.9 billion water bond, and highlights a $10 million wildďŹ re-prevention grant, which will prove useful “once the ďŹ re season kicks into high gear—this is about really being prepared.â€? Rabbitt is pushing the state to provide more assistance to those low-paying supportive healthcare jobs, the “thousands of workers who take care of invalid folks [and] who don’t make a lot of money,â€? Rabbitt says. The supervisor notes that Facebook helped put the state in the black thanks to its capitalgains payments to California. The social-media giant paid $1 billion in taxes in 2013, and capital gains taxes to the state are estimated at over $2.5 billion over the next ďŹ ve years. State legislative auditor Mac Taylor recently described the state’s response to stock-market volatility and the boom-and-bust effect on capital gains taxes: “You have to have very strong reserve, and it’s important to not overcommit to spending programs.â€?

DEBRIEFER

(8

enters its third month, a new executive director has been installed and a doctor-led plan to reopen moves forward, even as there are murmurs about a plan for Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital to reopen Palm Drive’s physical therapy unit. Daymon Doss, the new director of the Palm Drive Health Care District, was appointed earlier this month to replace outgoing CEO Tom Harlan, a lightning rod for critics of the hospital’s management. Palm Drive Hospital, after decades in service, was unable to pay its bills and closed April 28. A doctor-led plan to reopen was spearheaded by Dr. Jim Gude and the nonproďŹ t Palm Drive Foundation. Gude has since stepped back from the action. As the foundation solicits public input for its plan, the district board is reviewing numerous options. One board member described “a very credible, encouraging proposal from Memorial to take over the physical therapy center.â€? Meanwhile, the foundation’s red “Open Our Hospitalâ€? lawn signs are cropping up all over the West County.

Smoke Signals Welcome to summer. Marin County sent out letters to residents last week urging them to prune vegetation back from housing and other structures. And with good reason. Fires have sparked early in the season in the woods and hills around the county. On June 12, the Marin County Fire Department tweeted that crews were working a 10-acre vegetation ďŹ re in Samuel Taylor State Park. That blew up into a 35-acre ďŹ re, Marin County’s ďŹ rst of the ďŹ re season. On June 15, a small ďŹ re popped up in Marinwood along Highway 101. A few days later, a spate of early summer blazes broke out around San Rafael; the ďŹ res were attributed to homeless encampments in the San Rafael hills.—Tom Gogola


NAKED LUNCH After building a name for their farmers market fare, Jason Sakach and Dalia Martinez opened Naked Pig.

Swine Times The Naked Pig Cafe brings creative eats to an unlikely location BY FLORA TSAPOVSKY

A

t a street corner on the outskirts of Santa Rosa’s SOFA neighborhood, overlooking an auto repair and a tire shop, sits the Naked Pig Cafe. If the ideal brunch destination consists of cutesy calm, the Naked Pig, established in the middle of a parking lot, defies this notion. Customers sit at wooden tables

on the sidewalk but don’t seem to care about the gritty urbanism. Why should they, if a list of local, organic and sustainable vendors is proudly displayed on the door and the rustic chalkboard menu announces items such as “waffles with Gravenstein apples compote and salted caramel”? The owners are Santa Rosa natives and high school sweethearts Dalia Martinez and Jason Sakach. The Naked Pig is reminiscent of Guerrilla Foods, their popular tent at the Santa

Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market and other outdoor events. Martinez and Sakach have been perfecting their morning treats for two years. Additionally, they’ve hosted “guerrilla” garden parties in their backyard, inviting guests to eat and occasionally watch a movie. With the good times followed an agenda, as the couple became advocates for the “cottage food law”—California legislation that allows foods prepared in home kitchens to be sold to the public. “It was a small liberation in what

is a very limited economy,” says Martinez. As of April, however, Martinez and Sakach decided to move their activity to a professional kitchen and open a place of their own. “We wanted to bring people into a space that feels more like home,” explains Martinez. As for the location, she says, “we’re always driven by all things underground and seek out up-and-coming places. And those always come with a little grit.” The restaurant is open Wednesday to Sunday for breakfast and lunch only. Martinez is responsible for the everchanging menu, with weekday items overthrown by decadent weekend choices. Sakach runs the front of the house. Plates come out of the small kitchen generously decorated with greens; the food is hearty and only somewhat adventurous, as brunch should be. The waffles ($12), bacon-flavored or smothered in nectarines, are destined to be the crowd-pleaser everyone raves about, and so is the green onion biscuit ($14). A couple of dishes, however, err on the greasy side—the German pulled pork sandwich ($14) featured succulent meat in a very buttery, glistening bun, but redeems itself with the crunchy coleslaw. Similarly, the brie and beets sandwich ($12) goes easy on the beets but is very generous with the cheese and homemade aioli. Seasonal fruits and vegetables also get a chance to shine in such dishes as the delicious Santa Rosa plum and goat cheese salad ($12) and the avocado toast ($12.50), abundant with fresh avocado and bacon. A little fine-tuning of the menu should guarantee the Naked Pig a culinary victory, and soon evenings will come into play, with hamburger and beer nights. You might expect to find a restaurant like the Naked Pig in Healdsburg or Sebastopol. By the way people dress up to sit at a concrete parking lot next to an auto repair, it’s clear the Naked Pig has found fertile territory in Santa Rosa. Naked Pig Cafe. 435 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.978.3231.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Flora Tsapovsky

Dining

11


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

12

Lo C Coco’s oco’s C u c i n a R u s t iicc a

2014 2 014 14

Voted V ote ted Best Bes est Italian Italia Italian restaurant restau re staurant ant of of the the th North N orth Bay. ort Bay ay. —North — North B Bay ay Bohemian B o h e m i an

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Casino Bar & Grill California. $. Unpretentious, creative and affordable, Casino is a whispered-about landmark among locals in the know. Dinner nightly. 17000 Bodega Hwy, Bodega. 707.876.3185.

LoCoco’s L oC oco’s is oCoco’ is everything eeverythi ver y th i ng an a n Italian Italia t a l ia n restaurant rrestauran est au ra nt should ssho houl u ld be—boisterous, b be— e—boisterous oi s t er ou s , busy, b usy, usy y, ffu fun, u n, w wit with ith eexcell excellent xcel lent aau authentic uthenti thent ic ffo food ood ooff tth the he b be best est q quality quality: ua l it y : fresh ffrres e sh sseafood, ea food eaf od, meats m meat eat s and aan nd pasta. pas a sta. ta.

7077 707 0 77- 52 5 2 3 --2227 2 22 7 2227

SEERVING RV I NG L U UNCH NC H & D IINNER N N ER

H IST ISTORIC OR IC R AI AILROAD L ROAD S Q QUARE UA A R E, 1 117 17 FOU OURTH RT H ST TREET R E ET T, SA ANTA N TA R OS OSA A

Farmhouse Inn & Restaurant CaliforniaFrench. $$$$. A splurgeworthy, romantic inn with an extensive wine list and highly polished service. Dinner, ThursMon. 7871 River Rd, Forestville. 707.887.3300.

Hana Japanese. $$$-$$$$. R AT ATED ED

of best

b tthh e

n i aan ia o h em

’’ss

An oasis of cool tucked away in the atmosphereless Doubletree Hotel complex. Reservations on the weekend a must. Lunch and dinner daily. 101 Golf Course Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.586.0270.

Healdsburg Bar & Grill American. $-$$

05 y 20 h baay n o rt e h tth

G IF IIFT T CE ERTIFICATES RT TIFIC AT E S AV VAILABLE VA I L A BL E L OC OC OCOS OS . N NET ET

Gourmet burgers and potent cocktails from the owners of Cyrus. It ain’t fancy, but it’s awfully good, with topnotch ingredients and low prices. Lunch and dinner daily. 245 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.3333.

Kirin Chinese. $$. Specializing in Mandarin, Szechuan and Peking styles. Kirin’s pot stickers are the best in Sonoma County. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner, Sun. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1957.

Catering and Take-Away Platters Vegetarian, Vegan Options Available. Gluten-Free Friendly

2759 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa 707.541.3868 info@heirloomfinefood.com

8492 Gravenstein Hwy (in Apple Valley Plaza), Cotati. 707.665.9628.

Old Chicago Pizza Pizza. $$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600. Real Döner Turkish. $-$$. Casual, cafe-style ordering from a friendly staff. Get the coffee and buibal yuvasi dessert. Lunch and dinner daily. 307 F St, Petaluma. 707.765.9555. Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner, Sat. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Sushi Hana Japanese. $$. Popular sushi destination offers delightful treats. Dollar sushi night on Wed and Sat really packs ’em in. Lunch and dinner daily. 6930 Burnett St, Sebastopol. 707.823.3778.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Maguire’s Pub Irish pub.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $.

$-$$. Pub food–burgers, fish and chips, hearty salads. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch, Fri-Sun; dinner, Tues-Sun. 145 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.9800.

Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Mai Vietnamese Cuisine Vietnamese. $. Fresh and authentic, with a warm and breezy atmosphere. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun.

Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh Thai food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some

of the best fried bananas to be found. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner, Sun. (Cash only.) 809 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.458.8845.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525. Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists with its fresh catches. A wide selection of nigiri, depending on what’s fresh. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, Fri-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.3620. Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.4870. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary


Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panĂŠed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Cindy Pawlycyn’s Wood Grill & Wine Bar American. $$-$$$. Classic American fare that stays up on current mainstays like crispy pork belly, braised short ribs and crab roll but doesn’t skimp on the burger. Long wine list, kids menu, patio and more. Lunch and dinner, WedSun. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia� cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun.

13

SMALL BITES

Kenwood Restaurant Emerging from the congested streets of Santa Rosa onto Highway 12 east is always a revelation. As the highway opens up into an expanse of vineyard covered hills and estate wineries in Kenwood, I remember anew: Oh, yeah. I live in wine country. “Wine country� is a marketing conceit, a state of mind and a real place. All three come together beautifully at the Kenwood Restaurant. The restaurant, which changed ownership six months ago, serves a menu of eclectic, upscale comfort food in a drop-dead gorgeous setting. While the execution of some dishes is clumsy, the restaurant is a real road-side attraction. The deeply, caramelized, batter-free fried chicken ($13) is a standout. Spaghetti Western ($10, a mix of bucatini, bits of pork belly, fava beans and baby artichoke) is a winner, as is the plump, house-made hot dog ($15). In spite of its casual persona, the restaurant takes its commitment to local and sustainably sourced ingredients seriously. The list of local purveyors is long. Given the restaurant’s wine-centric location, I’d expect a deeper and more diverse wine list. There is a nice list of draft beers, however. The best seats are out on the patio with a view of the bubbling pond, wildflowerchoked meadows and vineyards and hills beyond. Sitting outside on a warm summer eve with a glass of wine and nibbling on something raised a few miles away, it’s easy to drift into your own wine county idyll. The Kenwood Restaurant, 9900 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. 707.833.6326. —Stett Holbrook

3&7)77-:)0=%98,)28-'-8%0-%2 b03'%0%2(36+%2-' b

Located inside

OXBOW PUBLIC MARKET 610 First Street Napa, CA 707.257.4992 WWW.CAMOMI.COM

It’s going to be a hot summer VIETNAMESE CUISINE

BURSTING

with Flavor & Nutrition • GMO free beef • free range poultry • organic veggies & tofu

320 West 3rd St, Ste G Santa Rosa • 707.595.4447 www.phocrazy.biz

2>5544“C40B“?0BCA84B“34;8 2 >5544 “ C40B “ ?0BCA84B “ 34;8

2^\Tca h^da 2^\Tcah^da IIced ced N Nutella utella Mo Mocha cha or Ghost G host C Chile hile Mocha Mocha Sun & M Sun Mon on 77am–7pm am–7pm TTues ues tthru hru Sat Sat 7am–10pm 7am–10pm =Tf;^RPcXX^] =Tf;^RPcX^] ' !' 1 a ^ f ] B c  '!'1a^f]Bc ((Just Just bbehind e hin d M ain Street) S tre et ) Main

unwind on the coast Happy Hour 3-5 Daily

875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized

Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Assorted Indian snacks, Mixed Platters $6 Samosas $3. All Bottled Beer $3

Authentic Indian Cuisine & select American Summer Fare

Bombay style Indian Chinese entrees also Open for Lunch & Dinner 11:30am–9pm

Sizzling Tandoor II 9960 HWY 1 s 707-865-0625

707.927.3623 707.927.3623 $<PX]Bc=P_P ' $< PX]Bc=P_P molinaricaffe.com m olinaricaffe.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.


Wineries

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY DaVero Sonoma Get lubed with spicy extra virgin from California’s first Tuscan olive trees; rare Sagrantino wine is in a different league. Jams, soaps and balm from the farm, too. 766 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 10am-5pm daily except Tuesday. Nominal fee $15. 707.431.8000. Hawley Winery Barrel-

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

AGLE CO BE

A

S

AN

EE FF

BLU E

fermented Viognier, kiwistyle Sauvignon Blanc, plus toothsome reds. Winemaker John Hawley helped to grow some of the big-name brands; now his sons have joined him in this small, Dry Creek Valley family business. 36 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 6pm; $5 fee. 707.473.9500.

C TA R O SA,

FRESH ROASTED COFFEES ~ HOME MADE PIES 540 Larkfield Center, Santa Rosa 707.535.07 76 BLU EBE AGLECO FFEE.COM

es alades Quinoa & Roasted Carrot Garden Niçoise French Green Lentil Full Catering Orchard Harvest Menu Available Salade Verte

Ayurvedic

Indian Head Massage • improves mobility in

neck and shoulders • relief from tension headaches,

eyestrain, and sinusitis

ON SITE MASSAGE AVAILABLE

Margery Smith 707.536.1797

John Tyler Wines For decades, the Bacigalupis have been selling prized grapes to the likes of Chateau Montelena and Williams Selyem. Now, the third-generation wine growers offer the pick of the vineyard in their own tasting room, brandnew in 2011. Graceful Pinot and sublime Zin. 4353 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open dail,y 10:30am–5pm. Tastings $10. 707.473.0115. Occidental Road Cellars High-end clients like Schramsberg and RadioCoteau buy most of the Prathers’ grapes; just 5 percent are made into their own wine, and at a comparative “grower’s discount.” Chard, Pinot, and cool-climate Syrah at its very best. 2064 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Building 7, Sebastopol. By appointment, Saturday 1–4pm. 707.874.9470.

Old World Winery Meaning, a simpler time when grapes were trodden under bare foot and wine was made the natural way? Yes. Fun fact: the small, family-owned winery was the original Williams-Selyem location. 850 River Road, Fulton. Thursday– Sunday 11am–5pm or by appointment. Tasting fee $5. 707.578.3148.

Quivira Winery Certified biodynamic producer that promotes creek stewardship and steelhead-salmon-habitat restoration. Dry Creek Zinfandel is a regular favorite; Mourvèdre and other Rhône varietals are outstanding. As the steelhead have lately rediscovered, Quivira is worth returning to year after year. 4900 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5pm. 800.292.8339.

Robledo Family Winery Sauvignon Blanc, Merlot and “Los Braceros” red blend are highly recommended. 21901 Bonness Road, Sonoma. Open daily, Monday–Saturday, 10am–5pm; Sunday, 11am– 4pm. 707.939.6903.

Sonoma Valley Portworks Although it’s a small-time crime to call a wine “port” what wasn’t made in Portugal, it’s all on the level here at the home of DECO California Port. Everybody gets a button: “Lick my glass!” 613 Second St., Petaluma. Thursday–Monday, noon to 5pm. No fee. 707.769.5203.

Unti Vineyards Very friendly and casual with an emphasis on young Italianstyle wines. Yum. 4202 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment. 707.433.5590. VJB Estate Buon giorno! Aglianico, Nero d’Avola, Barbera! But first, for you, my friend, Prosecco! Espresso, gelato, pizzeria, deli sandwich! If Il postino rides his bicycle straight through the courtyard, don’t be the least bit surprised. 60 Shaw Ave., Kenwood. Marketplace open daily, 10am–5pm. Saturdays and Sundays through harvest, Sonoma Valley Tenors sing from the balcony at 2pm. Tastings $5– $10. 707.833.2300.

N A PA CO U N TY Bouchaine Vineyards Venerable producer of estategrown Burgundian style wine

in the rustic wind-scraped hills of Carneros. Pinot Noir and Pinot Meuier with a coolclimate, cherry-skin crispness that nearly crunches in the mouth, and Chardonnay with a “mouth of butter.” Patio service in fair weather, cozy hearthside tasting in cooler days; good-humored hospitality throughout. 1075 Buchli Station Road, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–4pm; tasting fee $5. 707.252.9065.

Freemark Abbey In 1881, Josephine Tychson was the first woman to own and operate a winery in the valley. Enjoy the Cabs. 3022 St. Helena Hwy. N. (at Lodi Lane), St. Helena. Open daily, 10am-5pm. 800.963.9698.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

Silver Oak Silver Oak truly is a venerable cult wine, confounding to outsiders who don’t feel the magic. Folks love the Silver Oak; the Silver Oak is good. 915 Oakville Cross Road, Oakville. Monday– Saturday, 9am–5pm; Sunday, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $20. 707.942.7022 Trahan Winery In the fancy heart of downtown Napa, a low-budget “cellar” where wines are shelved, with clever economy, in stacks of wood pallets; vibes are laid-back and real. Carneros Chardonnay and fruity but firm and focused Cab and Merlot from Suisin Valley, Napa’s much less popular stepsister to the east. 974 Franklin St., Napa. Open daily, noon–5:30pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.257.7477.


15 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Suite Stuff

If you fall hard for the wines at Soda Rock, you can stay for breakfast BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

’ll bet that more than a few winery visitors have wistfully slurred, after a few (or many) splashes of strong and heady Zinfandel, “Oh, I wish I could live here!” Well, click your heels three times. Plunk down a fat card, and Soda Rock Winery can be home to you, for a night or two.

Soda Rock is one of eight Wilson Artisan Wineries, the wine empire helmed by Ken and Diane Wilson. The Wilsons bought the historic site in 2000, but did not open the hospitality complex (winemaking happens at sister wineries Mazzocco and deLorimier) until 2011. The place required a lot of renovation. Although the stone facade looks very much like a historic winery, it was actually built in 1869 as the post office for the town of Soda Rock. When the P.O. moved to nearby Jimtown, the “town” was no more. This rentable town has been restored in old-timey fashion, with the happy amenity that, unlike in actual old times, folks aren’t turned away on account of ethnicity or marital status. In fact, the place is geared to weddings, which often take place in a photogenic, rickety old horse barn. Guests may stay in four furnished king suites complete with kitchenettes, the most popular of which is the water tower. Rates start at $185 for club members. “This is adorable,” a visiting tourist recently exclaimed upon strolling in the tasting room. It’s spacious and rustic enough, and features the big, heavy wood bar rescued from the old Geyserville Smokehouse. Six wines are offered for a modest $5. I like the 2012 Mendocino Sauvignon Blanc ($16)—zippy grapefruit and bitter melon balance. Fermented in stainless steel but with partial malolactic, the 2012 Alexander Valley Chardonnay ($24) seems awkward—what is the point of a “no oak” Chard if it’s got a cheesy, oaky aroma nevertheless? But the 2012 Dry Creek Valley Gewürztraminer ($24) redeems the white slate with classic, spicy aromas and an eminently quaffable, dry palate of lychee fruit. But that’s the last dry wine, it’s not much of an exaggeration to say, as we move from Gewürztraminer to the reds. It’s a Wilson thing. From the 2010 Meeks Merlot ($28), with blackberry liqueur leaping from the glass, to the chocolate liqueur notes of the sweet, tongue-coating 2010 General Alexander Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($50) and the vanilla-and-graham-cracker-withblueberry-jam of the 2011 Marshall Alexander Valley Zinfandel ($32), which might almost be poured over a pancake, these wines might not win points with the restraint and balance crowd. But, hey, while you’re on vacation—if just for the afternoon—indulge a little. Soda Rock Winery, 8015 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily, 11am– 5pm. Tasting fee, $5. 707.433.3303.

BAY VIEW RESTAURANT & BAR – BODEGA BAY ESTA BLISH ED IN 1984

Traditional Italian and Local Seafood at Affordable Prices SERVING DINNER Wednesday–Sundays (Saturday Piano Bar) ~ Full Bar, Fireside Lounge, Outdoor Patio ~ Featuring Sonoma County Wines ~ Spectacular Sunset Views ~ Winemaker Dinner Series featured Monthly ~ Groups and Receptions Welcome

Inn at the Tides 800 Hwy One, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

킬타


ųŚ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; P arentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; N Night ight Ou Out! t! Kids K ids Night Night aatt tthe he Mus Museum eum Saturday Saturday June 28 Jun e2 8 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm p Drop off Drop off your your kids k i ds aand nd e njoy aan n eevening ve n i n g enjoy o ff. Kids Kids will will take take over ove r off. th eM useum and and join j o in the Museum iin n after-hours af ter-hours fun f un w ith d inner, g am es , with dinner, games, an d cr af t s . and crafts. R ecomme m nded for fo or Recommended cchildren hildren entering entering g rades 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6. 1 6. 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C; grades

$ 25 2 5 for for member, member, $3 32 2 for for non-members, non -members, $2 20 0 ssibling ib lin g d discount i s co u n t member, member, $2 27 7 sibling sibling discount discount non non-member -member

Advance reservations Advance reser vations required required at at www.schulzmuseum.org/classes-camps w w w.schulzmuseum.org/classes- camps orr 70 o 07.284.1265 7. 284.1265

)BSEJFT-BOFt4BOUB3PTB $" )BSEJFT-BOFt4BOUB3PTB $" tTDIVM[NVTFVNPSH    tTDIVM[NVTFVNPSH

Guelaguetza is a historic cultural event from Oaxaca. Our goal is to educate the community about Oaxacan culture and cultures from other parts of Mexico. A benefit for local scholarships and students in Oaxaca.

Come and get your Come see us connect with our roots and pass on traditions to new generations

Cute, Cool Outfits

The famous Guelaguetza festival is held each July in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. The areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s indigenous peoples honor the goddess of maize (corn) through ceremony and ritual. Come experience the traditions of mole and world acclaimed cuisine.

for these hot Summer daysâ&#x20AC;Ś

www.guelaguetzafoundation.org

117 West Napa St, Ste B, Sonoma 707.933.8422 | Mon-Sat 11-7 | Sun 12-6 www.sonomaconsignment.com

Your visionâ&#x20AC;Ś my resources, dedication and integrityâ&#x20AC;Ś Together, we can catch your dream.

Realtor Coldwell Banker

Suzanne Wandrei

cell: 707.292.9414 www.suzannewandrei.com

Eco Green Certified


+

ųŻ

W E I L L H A L L L AW N SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY | GREEN MUSIC CENTER

4th of July

F I R E W O R K S S P E C TAC U L A R W I TH J U DY CO L L I N S A N D T H E S A N TA R O S A S Y M P H O N Y M AT T H E W

G A R B U T T,

S

U

M

M

E

AY D A R O F , LY D R O A E O F E , M N O U F C ! Y C I L I S M U A M F C F I T O ETS O K I C R I RT AT O P O D D T AN D OU E. L AN B R A O VAIL A INDO AYS W W L O A E N ER AR D

D UN

AN IDS 12

K

N CE O I R P 2

N.

AW THE L

1/

R

2

1

4

F R I D AY

JULY 4 7: 3 0 P M

G AT E S O P E N A N D FESTIVITIES BEGIN 3 HOURS PRIOR TO SHOWTIME

CONDUCTOR G M C . S O N O M A . E D U

0

|

8 6 6 . 9 5 5 . 6 0 4 0

U S E P R O M O C O D E : P R I C E L E S S T O U N L O C K M A S T E R C A R D B E S T S E AT S

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

ųź


NORTH NOR TH BAY B A Y BOHEMIAN BOH E MI A N | JUNE J UNE 25-JULY 25 - J UL Y 11,, 20 2014 1 4 | BOHEMIAN.COM BO H E M I AN . C O M

20

SORTING THROUGH H THE PAST A After fter burn burning ning in 11969, 969, the ruins o off the Chosen Family commune ne became a bonanza bonanza for fo or state archaeologists. archaeologists.

The Th he Hip Hippie ppie Under U Underground rgrou und Vinyl V iin nyl rrecords ecords uneart unearthed hed at 1960s 1960s commune coommune reveal reveall eclectic eclectic tastes tastes BY BLA BLAKE KE DE PASTINO

T

hee Grateful h D De ad once once lived lived Dead tthere, th ere, aapparently pparently ttaken ta ken with th thee aacoustics coustics of th living room. room. thee living Its bucolic bucolicc grounds grounds were were ffeatured eatured on o the the back back cover cover of the the Dead’s Dead’s 1969 1969 album album A oxomoxo oa. Aoxomoxoa. And An d th thee cr crush rush of musical musical lluminaries uminaries who who passed passed through through it in clude Grace Grace S lick, J anis J oplin, include Slick, Janis Joplin, N ina Sim one an dafi ve-year-old Nina Simone and five-year-old girl named named C ourtney L ove. Courtney Love. B ut the the country country u estate known known as as But estate

Rancho O Rancho R Olompali lompali in M Marin arin County Coun ntty w as best known known as as the the site site of a social soci o al was eexperiment x xperim ent that that lasted lasted aall lll of 600 d ays, a commune commune called called the the Chosen Chossen days, F a y, w amil here at on nearly Family, where onee point nearly 9 0 people sought sought refuge refuge from from the the 90 tu umult of San San Francisco Francisco street street life liffe in tumult th he late late 11960s. 960s. the An d if their their musical musical tastes tastes were were And an ny indication, indication, archaeologists archaeologists say, say, any it ts members mem mb bers were were ssurprisingly urprisingly its d iverse. diverse. Th Chosen F amily eexperiment xperiment Thee Chosen Family rran a fr an om th ll of 11967 967 until from thee fa fall llate a e ssummer at ummer 11969, 969, after after an el lectrical fir onsumed th electrical firee cconsumed thee 226-room 6-room mansion mansion that that w as was

headquarters, le avin v g th its headquarters, leaving thee commune in social social an aand d financial financial commune disarray. disarray. Breck Parkman Parkman began began E. Breck exploring the the site—now site—n now en shrined exploring enshrined in a state state p ark—as early earl a y aass 11981, 981, park—as seeking tto o eexplore xplore th he historical historical seeking the realities behind behind what what he he believes believes realities are preconceived preconceived notions notions about about are the commune commune and and itss members. mem mbers. the “I’ve used used the the contemporary contemporary “I’ve archaeology of Olompali Olom mpali tto o aaddress ddress archaeology the concept concept of stereotype, stereo ottypee, in thi the thiss case, what what we we gen erally cconsider onsider case, generally to be th ‘hippiee,’” says says Parkman, Parkman, to thee ‘hippie,’” senior ar chaeologist ffor or C alifornia’s senior archaeologist California’s state p arks. And And most mosst recently, recently, his his state parks.

w ork h as ffocused ocused on th spect work has thee aaspect of m aterial cculture ulture th at’s perh aps material that’s perhaps m ore closely clossely aassociated ssociated with hi ppie more hippie lif fe th an an aany ny oth er: music. life than other: Aft er d ecades of research research After decades p unctuated e b y ccomplications omplications an d punctuated by and del ays, Parkman Parkm a an has has excavated excavated delays, an d an alyzed 93 vin yl rrecords ecords and analyzed vinyl fr om th arred ruin from thee cch charred ruinss of O lompalii’s mansion. mansion. “To “To date, date, Olompali’s I’ ve m anaged to to identify 55 of I’ve managed th ose rrecords, ecords, with somewhat somewhat those ssurprising urprising results,” results,” he he says. says. In stead of the the Grateful Grateful De ad Instead Dead an d Jefferson Jeff ffeerrson Airpl ane, he he found found and Airplane, J udy Garl land, Burl Burl Ives, Ives, Steve Steve Judy Garland, La aw wrence and and Eydie Eydie Gormé; Gormé; rather rather Lawrence


house, but many members also worked as their stage hands; in fact, most were on duty at a concert on the night of the fateful fire in 1969. And of course, its members can be seen on the back of Aoxomoxoa, lounging with the band, their manager Hank Harrison, and his daughter, Courtney Love, on the hillside by the mansion. In the end, Parkman says, the discography discovered at Olompali reinforces the often overlooked fact that the commune’s members were a more complex group than could be defined by what he calls “a simplistic ‘one size fits all’ definition of a hippie.” “Various aspects of the archaeological record at Olompali help inform our understanding of the ’60s counterculture movement, but these vinyl records are particularly helpful,” Parkman says. “The range of musical genres represented by these 55 records suggests to me that the

commune members came from all kinds of backgrounds before joining the Chosen Family and, by default, before joining the counterculture. “How might that compare if you were to examine the musical tastes of those joining an outlaw biker gang in the 1970s or a street gang today? “We have stereotype images of the biker and gangbanger too. What if we discovered that bikers came from all walks of life and appreciated a wide variety of music before donning their colors? That may very well be the case. “What is a hippie?” Parkman muses. “These 55 records suggest it might have been any one of us, in the right moment in time.” This article originally appeared on Western Digs (www.westerndigs.org).

21 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Photos courtesy California State Parks

than the voices of counterculture, he uncovered scores of albums of classic jazz, folk, show tunes, even comedy. “The wide range of musical styles represented by this discography suggests that the people who came together to form this ‘hippie’ commune had a wide range of backgrounds, including their musical tastes,” Parkman says. His findings, which he reported in the journal World Archaeology, were long in coming. Parkman originally started a salvage excavation of Olompali’s burnedout mansion in 1997. But it soon became clear that the site was contaminated with toxic building materials, especially asbestos and lead. Five years passed before hazmat crews could dig up the debris—which they did without concern for archaeological methods—and dump it into a series of 55-gallon drums. In 2009, another crew in protective suits cleaned and sorted the debris in the barrels, leaving Parkman with, among other artifacts, nearly a hundred vinyl

discs. None of them was playable, and only a handful had their labels intact. But in many cases, the discs still had readable stamper codes, also known as matrix codes, the series of numbers and letters etched into the disc between the last track and the center label. Many of those could then be traced to catalog numbers and the titles of the albums. To confirm his findings, Parkman took an additional step: he measured the number and length of the tracks on each side of the disc and compared them to the album associated with the code. All told, he identified 55 of the records. Only two turned out to have been released during the days of the Olompali commune: Renaissance by Vanilla Fudge, and Super Session by Mike Bloomfield, Al Kooper and Stephen Stills. The rest were an eclectic mix— jazz standards like Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Gershwin Songbook, Vol. 2, Broadway themes like My Fair Lady and South Pacific, and Bill Cosby’s comedy album Why Is There Air? While perhaps surprising in their variety and rather establishment tastes, Parkman says, these records were not the soundtrack of daily life at Olompali. Instead, they’re artifacts of the various segments of mainstream culture that the Chosen Family’s members had once identified with, and in some ways, tried to leave behind. “I don’t believe most of these records were listened to during the years of the commune, but rather reflect where these people came from before arriving at Olompali,” he says. “The records arrived at Olompali as literal cultural baggage.” Indeed, music was a large part of life at the commune, he adds, but it wasn’t the music of Judy Garland or Harry Belafonte. The Chosen Family was famously and intimately connected to San Francisco’s music scene, especially the Grateful Dead. The commune was not only based in the band’s former


NORTH NOR TH BAY B A Y BOHEMIAN BOH E M I A N | JUNE J UNE 25-JULY 25 -J U L Y 1, 20 2014 0 1 4 | BOHEMIAN.COM BO H E M I AN . C O M

22

Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

ROLLING STONE Allen Stone rocks the Lagunitas Brewery July 1. See Clubs & Venues, p27.


SPICE OF LIFE Tristan St. Germain is just one of the acts scheduled to perform at the North Bay Cabaret variety show.

Cabaret Buffet The Whiskey Tip to showcase growing North Bay scene BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

T

he audience had a beef with Oakland vaudevillian Jamie DeWolf last time he was in town.

To be specific, it was beef liver, and it came from a game DeWolf calls “What’s Down My Pants?” at the C Media party at Santa Rosa’s Arlene Francis Center in April. It ended with cow’s liver being thrown into the audience, then thrown back in disgust. “I got a couple of calls after that,”

says Jake Ward, who produced that event. Still, Ward is bringing the magnetic, controversial and talented poet and emcee DeWolf back to headline the first North Bay Cabaret at Santa Rosa’s Whiskey Tip Thursday night. “‘Tourette’s Without Regrets’ was the inspiration,” says Ward, referring to DeWolf’s racy monthly Oakland variety show. “We’re kind of seeing if our scene is ready for something like that.” This event probably won’t be as controversial or profane as the

Oakland show, but it will feature burlesque by Eva D’Luscious, music by Josh Windmiller (of the Crux) and others, standup comedy by deadpan goth Oliver Graves, dance, spoken word, DJs and emcees. In short, it’s all over the place—and that’s just how it’s supposed to be. “It’s such a buffet of a cabaret,” says Windmiller, who also books events in the North Bay. The style morphed out of the Arlene Francis Center, which has been hosting unclassifiable events like this for

years. “To see this as a spreading out of that patchwork cabaret is really cool,” Windmiller adds. The event is really two shows packed into one night, says Shey Roth, who is responsible for the hip-hop and dancing portion of the event. “There’s the frenetic, unpredictable thing outside, and inside is the shelter, the structured format.” Three emcee duos (headlined by Spends Quality and Elle Araminta) will be spitting rhymes while DJs spin vinyl during and between sets all night long. Dance performances by Reprezent Break Dance crew and others get the party moving, while spoken word by Brianna Sage and others inspires a poetic verse or two. “It’s like a yin and a yang all in one,” says Roth. Like Ward and Windmiller, Roth, the producer of Good HipHop Monthly, also started his booking career at the Arlene Francis Center and is glad to see the vibe spreading throughout the city. “Connecting the two sides of Santa Rosa is a really important part of this,” he says. “We want to show other venues, other audiences what kind of talent we have showcased here,” says Ward, referring to his work at the Arlene Francis Center. The diversity is “something really special that people are catching on to,” says Windmiller. It’s important for the overall strength of an arts community to showcase under-the-radar acts, he says. “You can’t really build a community of music and a scene based just on headliners.” The North Bay Cabaret takes place Thursday, June 26, at the Whiskey Tip. 1910 Sebastopol Road, Santa Rosa. 7pm. $10. Ages 21 and over. 707.843.5535.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Alex Shapiro

Arts Ideas

23


Stage

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

SLICK PRODUCTION The enduring

musical ‘Grease’ premiered in 1971 as a cutting social critique.

‘Grease’ Still Sings Be Well, Live Better, Stay Healthy

Help

6th Street production is all about the music

for ADHD, Attachment and Learning Disorders.

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

Neurofeedback has been rated the #1 alternative to medication by American Academy of Pediatrics. Call 707.829.8315 or e-mail davidsortino@comcast.net for a free consultation.

The experts in placement services when medical needs arise

707.595.5258

www.familyhomehelp.com

NEUROFEEDBACK INSTITUTE Blog: Go to Dr. David Sortino

G

rease, the musical, written by Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey, is a modern miracle of the stage—a show that retains its popularity after over 30 years, despite the fact that, aside from a few good tunes, it’s a fairly terrible play. Let’s just get that fact out of the way. When Grease first appeared in 1971, it was a raunchy, edgy, dangerously subversive attempt to show that our nostalgic view of 1950s teenage innocence was all smoke and mirrors. As such, it was something special. Since that initial version, beginning in 1972 with the play’s move to Broadway and on through to the hit 1978

movie and a series of subsequent revivals, the edgy material has been tamed down. What remains is a series of broad vignettes about cartoonish teenage stereotypes, interspersed with ballads and song-and-dance numbers. Which brings me to the current production at 6th Street Playhouse. Using one of the latest script dilutions, the sprightly, effervescent cast, under the direction of choreographerdirector Staci Arriaga, puts on a first-rate dance show, supported by some outstandingly good singing voices. The musical numbers, easily the best I’ve seen in a community or college-level production, are so good that I found myself longing for the next one to begin during the play’s many “talking sequences.” The story of tough guy Danny Zuko (Anthony Guzman, consistently entertaining) and his on-again, off-again courtship of good girl Sandy (Amanda Pedersen, miscast, but with a great voice that somewhat makes up for it), Grease may once have had something to say about the joys and troubles of being young, but most of what was once truly insightful has been weeded out. Though amusing, the characters are now so over-the-top they make the kids from Scooby Doo look like something from an Arthur Miller play. Fortunately, supporting players, including an outrageously good April Krautner as sex-kitten Marty, acrobatic Trevor Hoffman as the car-loving, gang-fighting delinquent Kenickie and Sidney McNulty as the endearing dropout Frenchy, at least make these sequences watchable. The reason to recommend Grease, though, is those musical numbers. With strong musical direction by Nathan Riebli and a sensational band, the show soars every time it sings, which, thankfully, is often. Rating (out of 5): ++++ ‘Grease’ runs Thursday–Sunday, through July 6 at 6th Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Thursday–Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees, Saturday–Sunday. $15–$35. 707.523.4185.


Film

25 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

SANTA ROSA JUNIOR COLLEGE presents

BROADWAY IN BURBANK

PRESENTING FIVE SHOWS IN COMPLETE ROTATING REPERTORY

JUNE 20 – AUGUST 9, 2014

VOICES OF ANGELS The music of the Four Seasons makes gangsters

weep in ‘Jersey Boys.’

Doo Whopper

Clint Eastwood takes ‘Jersey Boys’ from stage to screen BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

hird act troubles mar one of Clint Eastwood’s best movies, an adaptation of the hit showbiz musical about Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, Jersey Boys. Events are rejiggered so that the triumph (the 1967 smash “Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You”) can come after a sketchily and half-heartedly directed tragedy.

Yet the movie succeeds. Eastwood brings it home with a nearly no-star cast; its one star, Christopher Walken, playing Gyp DeCarlo, a well-mannered mafia don, is Oscar-bound. Watching Walken’s jaw tremble while he listens to Valli sing about mother love, we view not only one of the best actors alive, but also see Eastwood sparing us overpraise for the Four Seasons’ music. The Four Seasons’ white doo-wop, inescapable in the 1960s, had an eerie jet-age glaze on it—in these mixes, with the archaic keyboards, you think less about Johnny Ace and all the other black doo-woppers excluded from this picture, and think more about Joe Meek over in the U.K. The debut of “Sherry” on American Bandstand is greatly evocative: Valli’s rich chilling wail, the cramped studio blocked by a clunky TV camera, a waxy Dick Clark paralyzed behind his podium. Valli is played by John Lloyd Young as a man so uncomplicated that he’s slightly mysterious, a workaholic who sacrifices himself for his shady partner (Vincent Piazza of Boardwalk Empire). He’s instantly likable. The down side: we don’t see enough of the debuting Renée Marino as Valli’s tough wife. Snipers have been describing this as an overlong Behind the Music episode, but it’s more like an engrossing oral history of a band’s rise and fall, with conflicted perspectives and old hurts. The direct address to the camera works well, sometimes brilliantly. Beyond the Jersey metaphysics, there’s something deep and tangy and downbeat here, countering the hysterical ebullience of the tunes. At heart, it’s a musical about overwork and debt. ‘Jersey Boys’ opens Friday across the North Bay.

2014 SEASON:

A CHORUS LINE THE ODD COUPLE BY NEIL SIMON LA CAGE AUX FOLLES NOËL COWARD’S PRESENT LAUGHTER 9 TO 5 THE MUSICAL FOR INFO AND TICKETS: 707-527-4307

www.SummerRep.com

66/27 /27 – 77/3 /3

HHonorable onor able

Obvious O bvious C Child hild (10:30-1:00-3:00-5:00)-7:00-9:00 (10 : 30-1: 00-3 : 00-5 : 00 ) -7: 00-9 : 00

R

For N For No oG Good ood Reason R eason R ((1(10:30-3:45) 0 : 3 0 -3 : 4 5 ) The T he German German D Doctor oc tor o PPG13 G13 ((1:15-4:00)-6:45-9:10 1:15- 4 : 00 ) -6 : 45-9 :10

The Rover The Rover R FFri-Tue ri-Tue OONLY NLY (3:40)-9:05 ( 3 : 4 0 ) - 9 : 05 Supermensch: S upermensch : The T he L Legend egend o off S Shep hep ri-Tue ONLY ONLY (10:45) (10 : 45) Gordon G ordon R FFri-Tue Chinese C hinese Puzzle Puzzle R

FFri-Tue ri-Tue ONLY ONLY (1:00)-6:30 (1: 00 ) -6 : 30 BBest est iinn Na pa Napa

Yo Y o el el R Rey ey Roasting R o as t i n g a and nd Arthouse A rthouse 1217 W 1217 Washington ash i ngton SStt Downtown D owntown Calistoga Ca l istoga www.yoelrey.com w w w.yoelrey.com

7707.321.7901 07.321.7901

Words W ords and and Pictures Pictures PPG13 G13 (12:45)-6:00-8:45 (12: 45 ) -6 : 00-8 : 45

Chef R (10:15-12:55-3:30)-6:15-9:00 Chef (10 :15-12: 55-3 : 30 ) -6 :15-9 : 00 Belle B elle PPGG (1(10:45) 0 : 45) Snowpiercer S nowpiercer R

OOPENS P E NS WWEDNESDAY E DNE SD AY 77/2! / 2 ! ((11:00-2:00-5:15)-8:30 11: 00-2: 00-5 :15 ) -8 : 30

551 S 551 Summerfield ummer field Road R oad Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707.522.0719 707. 522 .0719 www.summerfieldcinemas.com w w w. summe r fie ldc ine mas .c om


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

Music

Napa's premier intimate intimate concert conceert venue,e, resta restaurant, venu urant, tap wine bar b and private event space.

your ON SALE S NOW

MIKE MI KE BIRBIGLIA

12.12

THEE BANGLES

6.27

SOLDT OSIGUNT-UP CAROLINA CAROLINA IS 7.3 CHO COLATE DROPS WAIT L CHOCOLATE

AL STEW STEWART WART

RICHARD ARD THOMPSON ALL RE REQUEST EQUEST SHOW

7.5

77.8 .8

LEWIS BLACK CK THE RANT IS DUE UE

MARTHA WAINWRIGHT W A AINWRIGHT

7.10, 7.11 & 7.12 12

7.15

BREAKAWAY PATRIOT ATRIOT WITH AALEC LEC LEE PLUS US THE IRON HE HEART EART AND KRISTEN VAN DYKE D AND

THE HEE ENGLISH BEAT

7 17 7.17

7 18 & 7.19 7.18 7 19

S SOLD OOUT

W WAIT LLIST SSIGN-UP

THE BUNNIES B

MATT SCHOFIELD SCHOFI IELD 7.22

XALL ORIGINAL MEMBERS 7.26

DAVID GRISMAN RESID RESIDENCY: DENCY:

CHRIS SMITHER

77.31 .31

81 8.1

NNEW MONSO OON MONSOON

D HICKS DAN

DAVID GRISMAN GRISSMAN SEXTET SE EXTET

8.7

F OR A COMPL FOR COMPLEE TE LI LINE N UP V ISIT WW NE W WW.CI W. CI T Y WI N E RRY.CO Y.CO M 1 0 3 0 M A I N S TT.. s 7 0 7 . 2 6 0 . 1 6 0 0

8.9

SOUND CHECK Nathan Prowse supports the local music scene with his co-op rehearsal space and venue.

Under the Radar Santa Rosa’s Live Musicians Co-op expands its vision

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

N

estled among nondescript industrial blocks on Santa Rosa’s Piner Road is one of the most extensive and all–encompassing musical centers in the North Bay.

Music scholar and educator Nathan Prowse started the Live Musicians Co-op nearly eight years ago as a small rehearsal and recording space. The locally raised musician, who studied at Santa Rosa Junior College and Sonoma State before earning a degree at the Musicians Institute in Los Angeles, returned to the North Bay and saw the slim pickings that local musicians had in terms of space for making music. “There’s a ton of talented musicians around,” says Prowse,

“but the area doesn’t support live music. I don’t know why.” Prowse saw an opportunity to put together a successful business model for the underground scene with his co-op. Bands pay a monthly fee and are guaranteed rehearsal time in one of the space’s soundproof studios, complete with equipment and gear. There are also state-of-the-art recording studios, with reasonable rates and a professional mindset. “It’s more of a networking hub for musicians, a cesspool of ideas,” says Prowse. For him, it’s all about the community, and the co-op has long worked with nonprofits like the InterFaith Shelter Network to offer free music and dance lessons to disadvantaged youth. In the last two years, the co-op has doubled in size. The largest rehearsal space has been outfitted with a top-notch sound system and dance floor. “We’re not a bar, we’re not somewhere you eat. This is where you hear live music,” says Prowse. This summer, the co-op is bringing underground music back to Santa Rosa with an exciting concert series. Out of all the eclectic offerings, the most intriguing show is expat Chinese punk band Stegosaurus? The group was formed in 2009 in Shanghai by four Americans, two of whom hail from Sonoma County, and mashes up a fun and addictive brand of outlandish punk mixed with Chinese pop and throwback rock riffs. Stegosaurus? play for the first time on American soil, kicking off a DIY tour at the Live Musicians Co-op. The show also features local alternative rockers Green Light Silhouette and indie-rock pop endeavor Survival Guide, which features Petaluma vocalist and musician Emily Whitehurst, best known as the voice of seminal punk outfit Tsunami Bomb. The co-op will also host contestants in the Bohemian’s 24-Hour Band contest later this summer. Stegosaurus? play Wednesday, July 2, at the Live Musicians Co-op, 925 Piner Road, Santa Rosa. 7pm. $6. 707.527.8845


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Benefit for Seva Foundation Featuring the Chris Robinson Brotherhood, the Fall Risk, Corinne West Band and hosted by Wavy Gravy. Jun 30, 8pm. $40-$100. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

North Bay Cabaret New variety show features Dixie Giants, Josh Windmiller, standup comedy and burlesque from Eva Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Luscious. Jun 26, 7pm. $10. Whiskey Tip, 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Will Kimbrough The singer-songwriter performs his own hits and those heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s written for other artists. Jun 27, 8pm. $25-$27. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

MARIN COUNTY Spanish Gold Featuring Patrick Hallahan of My Morning Jacket, Dante Schwebel of City and Colour, and Adrian Quesada of Brownout. Jun 26, 9pm. $12-$15. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Preservation Hall Jazz Band New Orleans legends are back in the Napa Valley, with Martin Harley and fireworks. Jun 28, 7pm. $55-$85. Robert Mondavi Winery, 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 707.968.2203.

Dwight Yoakam The iconic honky-tonk songwriter and entertainer makes his Uptown debut. Jun 27, 8pm. $82-$127. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Roma Roasters Jun 27, Disclaimer. Jun 28, Bee Rays. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Andrews Hall Jun 25, Joe Chaplain. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Aqus Cafe Jun 28, Coyote Club. Jun 29, Page 17. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Bergamot Alley Jun 29, Ultra Grass: David Thom and friends. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Brixx Pizzeria Jun 28, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

Cloverdale Plaza Jun 27, Southern Culture on the Skids. Cloverdale Blvd between First and Second St, Cloverdale.

Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Argenzio Winery

Jun 27, Wendy Dewitt. Jun 28, Dawn Angelosante. Jun 29, Craig Corona. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Jun 28, Lee Charlton Trio with Norris Clement and Rob Wright. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Amphitheaterette Jun 30, the Wood Brothers. Jul 1, Allen Stone. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jun 25, the Gypsy Trio. Jun 26, the String Rays. Jun 27, Machiavelvets. Jun 28, Jinx Jones. Jun 29, Vintage Grass. Jul 1, Allen Stone. Jul 2, the Deadlies. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Live Musicians Co-Op

Jun 26, Amaya & Jaclyn. 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.280.4658.

Jun 27, the Phenomenauts. Jun 28, Havenside. Jul 2, Stegosaurus?. 925 Piner Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8845.

Epicurean Connection

Lounge at La Rosa

Jun 25, Robert and Amy Ethington. Jun 27, Keady Phelan. Jun 28-29, live music. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Jun 25, Choppin Broccoli. 500 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.3663.

Flamingo Lounge Jun 27, Zoo Station. Jun 28, Jukebox Heroes. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Forestville Club Jun 27, Jacob Green. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

French Garden Jun 27, Un Deux Trois. Jun 28, the Smilinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iguanas Trio. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Glaser Center Jun 28, Kelly Brandeburg. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Graffiti Jun 27, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

27

HopMonk Sonoma

Main Street Station Jun 26, Susan Sutton Jazz Piano. Jun 28, Jess Petty. Jun 29, the Cazadero Jazz Project. Jul 1, Vernelle Anders. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

with Austin

Mc Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bullpen

Paper Bird

with The

Spanish Gold: Patrick Hallahan

Jun 26, Elaine Dempsey. Jun 27, Tony Gibson. Jun 29, the Tonewoods. Jul 1, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

Jun 27, Claude Bourbon. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

with Clear

Plastic Masks

)UL-XQHÂ&#x2021;SP

UK Guitar Legend

Albert Lee Dagwood Blondies

6DW-XQHÂ&#x2021;SP

Pink Floyd Tribute

House Of Floyd :HG-XO\Â&#x2021;SPÂ&#x2021;FREE

SHOW!

7KXU-XO\Â&#x2021;SPÂ&#x2021;FREE

SHOW!

Steep Ravine

The Boston Boys )UL-XO\Â&#x2021;SP

The Killer Queens

HopMonk Sebastopol

Phoenix Theater

Jun 27, Pep Love & Vokab Kompany. Jun 28, Jelly Bread. Tues, open mic night. Wed, Brainstorm EDM show. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques & Guac. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jun 27, Berner. Jun 28, Obvi. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apple Roadhouse Jun 25, Brooke & the Caterpillar. Jun 27, Logan Greene and Lucille )

(My Morning Jacket) Dante Schwebel (City & Colour) & Adrien Quesada

with The

Jun 27, GrandMothers of Invention. Jun 28, Igor & the Red Elvises. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Jun 28, 2pm, Charged Particles. 139 Piper St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3772.

Americans

7KX-XQHÂ&#x2021;SP

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

Occidental Center for the Arts

DeLone 8:00pm

:HG-XQHÂ&#x2021;SP

Jun 27, DJ Prodkt. Jun 28, George Heagerty & Never the Same. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Healdsburg Library

Monday ~ Open Mic Night

All Girl Queen Tribute Band with

The Jean Genies David Bowie Tribute 6DW-XO\Â&#x2021;SP

The Santana Tribute

Caravanserai

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley

28

CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House )YLHRMHZ[Â&#x2039;3\UJOÂ&#x2039;+PUULY -90Â&#x2039;!74+669:Â&#x2039;

(5,=,505.>0;/

.9(5+46;/,9:6-05=,5;065 :(;Â&#x2039;!74+669:Â&#x2039; 96*2()033@:<9-96*2

0.69 & ;/,9,+,3=0:,: :<5Â&#x2039;!74+669:Â&#x2039; /(>(00(5

3,+2((7(5(

73<:-9(5.<0+9@&-(0;/(26;906 >,+ Â&#x2039;!74+669:Â&#x2039; ),(;3,:;90)<;,)(5+

;/,9,<5065 -(5;(:@;90)<;,

;/,),(;3,:*65*,9;;/(;5,=,9>(:0: ;/<9 Â&#x2039;7PM DOORS Â&#x2039;(33(.,: -90!74+669:Â&#x2039; /(>(00(59,..(,

Fri

Jun 27

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW Western Dance Party!

BUCK NICKLES

AND LOOSE CHANGE 8:00

LE JAZZ HOT Jun 28 Quartet of the Hot Club Sat

of San Francisco 8:30

RECKLESS IN VEGAS Jul 5 The Rat Pack Rocks Out 8:30 Sat

BBQS ON THE LAWN! AN AFTERNOON WITH Jun 29 RUTHIE FOSTER Sun

Fri

Jul

4

Sun

6

Jul

Music ( 27

105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

Petty. 4550 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.861.9338.

Whiskey Tip

Redwood Cafe Jun 25, Mexican Connection with Jose Arnulfo. Jun 27, Chris Makonnen and the Visionaires. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Jun 28, Miracle Mule. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Ruth McGowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewpub

Award Winning Soul, Blues, Gospel Entertainer

Jun 27, live music. Jun 28, Bruce Halbohm. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

THE ZYDECO FLAMES

Sally Tomatoes

The West Coastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Premier Zydeco Band

PETER ROWANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 5TH ANNUAL BLUEGRASS BIRTHDAY BASH

SPECIAL GUESTS THE ROWAN BROS.

Jun 27, Christos 3D. Jun 28, Pacific Haze. 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

(5</,(73<:

Sun

Sonoma Community Center

>,+Â&#x2039;!74+669:Â&#x2039; >693+9,..(,

Sun

THE JERRY HANNAN BAND

Jun 29, Kitchen Concert. 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.579.2787.

(formerly Tiny Television)

Sonoma Plaza

4(5.6205.A(5+9,),3:6<31(/A

;/,690.05(3>(03,9: 73<:7<9,966;:

5V*OPSKYLU<UKLY[V(SS(NLZ:OV^Z 7L[HS\TH)S]K7L[HS\TH

7

^^^TJULHYZJVT

PETTY THEFT Jul 13 The Ultimate Tom Petty Tribute Jul 20

& SAN GERONIMO Gates at 3, Music at 4

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Jun 28, Hula Mai. First St E, Sonoma.

Station 1870 Jun 26, Dan Goldfus. Jun 27, Greg Ried. Jun 28, Brooke & Morgan. 123 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.623.9619.

Jun 27, Thrive with Iriefuse. Jun 28, Elements of Soul. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Zodiacs Jun 25, New Copasetics. Jun 27, Stu Allen and Mars Hotel. Jul 2, David Thom Band. 256 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Jun 27, Led Kaapana. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Belvedere-Tiburon Library Jun 27, 11am, Charged Particles. 1501 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon. 415.789.2665.

Dance Palace Jun 25, Yesway. Jun 28, Noah Griffin sings Cole Porter. Jun 29, Piano duo Valeria. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Fenix Jun 26, Phil Gates Band. Jun 27, Amber Morris. Jun 28, Wall Street. Jun 29, Caminos Flamencos. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Jun 29, Mexican Banda. Jun 26, Orquesta Rumbache. Jun 27. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

HopMonk Novato Jun 27, Bandworks. Jun 28, Rock Skool. Jun 29, Susan Cowsill with Monica Pasqual. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club Jun 25, salsa night. Jun 26, Lumanation. Jun 27, Blackwater Gold. Jun 28, DJ Dragonfly. Jun 29, the Machiavelvets. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osteria Divino Jun 25, Noel Jewkes. Jun 26, Passion Habanera. Jun 27, Rob Reich Trio. Jun 28, David Jeffreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz Fourtet. Jun 29, Jake Leckie Trio. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jun 25, Wendy DeWitt with Kirk Harwood. Jun 26, C-JAM. Jul 1, Swing Fever. Jul 2, Rusty String Express. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Jun 27, Josh McIntosh and Rattlesnakes in the Garden. Jun 28, Soul Mechanix. Jun 29, Junk Parlor. Tues, John Varn and Tommy Odetto. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Stout Brothers Jun 25, Iron Rhythm. Jun 27, DJ Lazyboy. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Sugarloaf Ridge State Park

70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 707.829.7300 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE 2 30 P E TA L U M A A VE | S

Jun 27, Funky Fridays: Streetwise with Blythe Klein. 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN THUR T HUR JUN JUN 26 DINING D INING

+SONOMA + SONOMA L LOCATION+ OC ATION+

The Blue Heron Restaurant & Bar

HERETIC H ERETIC BREWING BREWING C COMPANY OMPANY

BEER DINNER DINNE R BEER

Jun 29, Blues Burners. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

$$65/DOORS 65/ DOORS 6PM/21+ 6PM /21+

FRI F RI JJUN UN 27 27

CLASSIC C L ASSIC UNDERGROUND UNDERGROUND BAY BAY AREA AREA HIP HIP HOP HOP

PEP P EP LOVE LOVE AN AND D VOKAB V OKAB K KOMPANY OMPANY

Tradewinds Jun 27, Flashback Friday with DJ Dave. Jun 28, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. 8 210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

$$10ADV/DOORS 10ADV/ DOORS 99PM/21+ PM /21+

SAT S AT JJUN UN 2 28 8

FFUNK UNK | SSOUL OUL | R A AND ND B

JJELLY ELLY BREAD BREAD

$$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

MON M ON JJUN UN 30 30

FFREE R EE M MOVIE OVIE N NIGHT IGHT

DO D O THE THE RIGHT RIGHT THING THING G 25TH 2 5TH ANNIVERSARY ANNIVERSARY FFREE/ REE / DOORS DOORS 77PM/17+ PM /17+

MON M ON JJUN UN 30 30

REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL | H HIP IP H HOP OP

MONDAY M ONDAY NI NIGHT GHT E EDUTAINMENT DUTAINMENT W WITH ITH

Twin Oaks Tavern Jun 25, Bootleg Honeys. Jun 27, Ragtag Sullivan. Jun 28, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bunchovus. Jun 29, El Dorado Syncopators. Jul 2, Biscuits and Gravy. Jun 29, Blues and BBQ with the Blues Defenders. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Hair Extensions and Color Expert

Lynnette Irish

DADDY D ADDY ROLO ROLO

(KMEL / P (KMEL PIRATE IRATE DJS DJS / REGGAE REGGAE GOLD) GOLD) $$10/ 10/ LADIES LADIES $$55 BB44 111/DOORS 1/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W W W. H O PM ONK .CO M BBook ookk yyour our

next us, up 250, ne x t eevent vent with with u s, u p tto o2 50, kkim@hopmonk.com im@hopmonk .com

Vino di Amore at the at th e B Barlow a r l ow 707.861.3476 70 7.8 . 61 . 34 3 76

Jun 26, the Josh Bishop Band. Jun 27, Mark McDonald. Jun 28, the Honeydippers.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Bonnie & the BANG BANG Art-rock band out of S.F. recently left their day jobs to embark on a never ending U.S. tour. June 27 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

King Khan & the Shrines After a hiatus, the psychedelic garage-rock outfit returns with signature theatrics and insanity. June 28 at the Chapel.

Sharon Van Etten Singer-songwriterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expressive, atmospheric sound is in full effect for two nights. June 29-30 at the Independent.

The Winery Dogs Rock supergroup comprises members of Poison, Mr. Big and Dream Theater. June 30 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SF.

Deafheaven Black metal rockers play densely layered and dynamic songs off new album. July 2 at Great American Music Hall.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


Rancho Nicasio

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Sausalito Seahorse

Cloverdale Performing Arts Center presents the Actorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Theater for Children of Santa Rosa production of

Jun 26, Donna Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;acuti. Jun 27, Juke Joint. Jun 28, Chris Haugen & Fiver Brown. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Jun 25, Spark & Whisper. Jun 27, Eli and Javiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gypsy Jazz. Jun 28, Fenton Coolfoot & the Right Time. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jun 26, Emma Lee. Jun 27, Jon Hammond Trio. Jun 28, Beso Negro. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jun 25, Paper Bird. Jun 27, Albert Lee. Jun 28, House of Floyd. Jul 2, Steep Ravine. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Jun 26, Amy Helm and the Handsome Strangers. Jun 27, Tea Leaf Trio. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Town Center Corte Madera Jun 29, 2pm, James Moseley Band. 100 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961.

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards Jun 28, Steel Jam. Jun 29, the Blues Box Bayou Band. 2000 Main St., St Helena, 866.708.9463.

Billcoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Billiards Jun 26, Amber Snider. Jun 29, live music. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

City Winery Napa Jun 27, the Bangles. Jun 29, John Pizzarelli. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant Jun 25, Skunk Funk. Jun 26, Kerouac. Jun 27, David Mâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ore. Jun 28, STR8 UP. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

FARM at Carneros Inn Jun 26, Dan Daniels Trio. Jun 25, Swell Surf Trio. 4048 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 888.400.9000.

Goose & Gander Jun 29, Pion 2 Zion. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jun 26, Bro. Stephen. Jun 27, Annie Rue and friends. Jun 28, Joel: the Band. Jun 29, Sing Napa Valley Fundraiser. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Turtle Power Classic-rock drummer makes stop in Santa Rosa Drummer Johny Barbataâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s discography reads like a music connoisseurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vinyl collection: the Turtles, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Jefferson Airplane, Jefferson Starship, Linda Ronstadt. There are dozens more bands, over a hundred albums and 20 hit singles in all. Barbata tells the stories of his time in the music business in his 2005 memoir, The Legendary Life of a Rock Star Drummer. Speaking by phone from Oklahoma, Barbata says he took lessons from and become friends with the greatest drummer in history, Buddy Rich. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I opened for him at a gig and did a drum solo in a song. He said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a lot of balls to do a drum solo.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? That three-minute solo pales in comparison to this one: Fourth of July, 1969, playing with Johnny Lewis at the Atlanta Pop Festival, in front of 150,000 people, the power goes out during the first song. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I started to do a drum solo, the promoter comes up to me and says, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whatever you do, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop playing or thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a riot.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Fortyfive minutes later, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still playing. I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe it.â&#x20AC;? Just when he could wail no more, the power came back on and Barbata received a five-minute standing ovation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was literally the night the lights went out in Georgia,â&#x20AC;? he says with a laugh. Barbata will be speaking, playing and signing copies of his book on Saturday, June 28, at Stanroy Music Center. 640 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. Noon to 5:30pm. Free. 707.545.4827.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

Join Cloverdale Performing Arts Center on a wild journey into Boglewood Forest! This play has fairies, gold, a greedy Bogle, and a lot of fun! This magical journey is brought to you by Actorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Theater for Children of Santa Rosa, and only coming to CPAC for one weekend, so buy your tickets now!

'SJEBZ +VOFBUQNĹ&#x2014;4BUVSEBZ4VOEBZ +VOFBUQN Tickets: $7 ONLINEDMPWFSEBMFQFSGPSNJOHBSUTDPNĹ&#x2014;IN PERSON: at Mail Center, Etc. 03BUUIFUIFBUFSCFGPSFQFSGPSNBODF JGBWBJMBCMF

.BJM$FOUFS &UDJTOFYUUPUIFUIFBUFSBU"/$MPWFSEBMF#MWE $MPWFSEBMF

/$-07&3%"-&#-7% $-07&3%"-& $" Advertising Sponsored by County of Sonoma Board of Supervisors

June 28, 8pm FREE

The Happy Movie! Understand Your Most Valued Emotion July 5, 8pm $10

Kamakakehau Fernandez A Night of Hawaiian Music July 12, 7:30pm $10

The MetaQuizzical CafĂŠ A Musical Science & Philosophy Salon

Showtimes: Sun 12pm/Thur 8pm/Fri & Sat 9pm

>=i`-&).Â&#x203A;Thrive with Iriefuse >JXk-&)/Â&#x203A;Street Urchinz &

They Went Ghost

>Jle-&)0Â&#x203A;Hip Hop Sundaze f/A-Plus >=i`.&+Â&#x203A;The AllwaysElvis Band >Sat 7/5Â&#x203A;Trailer Park Rangers with David T Carter

29 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Jun 27, Buck Nickels and Loose Change. Jun 28, Le Jazz Hot. Jun 29, Ruthie Foster. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.


Arts Events

ALEJANDRO SALAZAR

Galleries RECEPTIONS Jun 28 Christie Marks Fine Art Gallery, “Alejandro Salazar-Selected Works, 2011-2014,” expresses the artists unique and abstract figures. 5pm. 322 Healdsburg Ave, 2nd Floor, Healdsburg. 707.695.1011. Alejandro Salazar, Figura Interna

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30

SELECTED WORKS 2011 – 2014

June 27 – August 11, 2014 Artist Reception: Saturday June 28, 5 – 8pm

Christie Marks Fine Art Gallery The North Bay’s new destination for contemporary art 322 Healdsburg Ave., 2nd Floor. Healdsburg, CA 95448 Hours: Thursday – Monday, 1 – 5:30 PM www.christiemarksfineart.com

Graton Gallery, “Scenes from the Road,” art by Pam Powell, Linda Ratzlaff and others. 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912. Napa Valley Museum, “Wayne Thiebaud: Works on Paper,” exhibiting nearly 50 years of Thiebaud’s work and reflecting his passion for art education. 5pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Jun 29 RiskPress Gallery, “Critters,” exhibiting the work of Jann Aanestad and papier-mache artist Nancy Winn. 4pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol.

Jul 1 O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, “Water,” presents the element in all its forms. 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

SONOMA COUNTY Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Jun 29, “Michael Mudd / Brian Martinelli,” the two artists and other guild members are on display through the month. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

C14 Contemporary Arts Through Jul 6, “Presence,” displays paintings, sculpture and mixed media from the gallery’s core artists. 6780 Depot St, Suite 100, Sebastopol. 707.827.3020.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Jul 6, “From the Pen to the Comic Pages,” exhibits the evolution of the comic strip. Through Aug 11, “Heartbreak in Peanuts,” over 70 comic strips focusing on lost love. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Jul 2, “Electric Visions,” showcases Richard Fung’s photography. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Epicurean Connection Through Jun 30, “Jeremy Novy Stencils,” the SF street artist appears with a collection of his iconic drag queen and koi stencils. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Fulton X Gallery Through Jun 29, “Evolution Revolution,” juried exhibit reflects the evolution of all things organic and man-made. 1200 River Rd, Fulton.

Gallery One Through Jun 30, “A Gem-Small Works,” features the work of Else Gonella, Lori Mole, Helen Moreda, Alan Plisskin and Joanne Tepper. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Jul 6, “1000 Tiny Cuts,” Graton artist Claude Smith’s installation highlights the gallery wide exhibit featuring 17 Bay Area artists. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Jun 29, “Treescapes,” exhibits the paintings and prints of artist Green Greenwald. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Mahoney Library Gallery Through Jul 11, “The Art of the Young Child” SRJC, 680 Sonoma Mountain Parkway, Petaluma. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 9 to 1; Sat, 10 to 3. 707.778.3974.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jun 29, “Surfaces,” exhibits three sculptors Michael Hannon, Kari Minnick

and Pam Morris. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Jul 6, “Images of Sonoma County,” juried photography exhibit. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Paul Mahder Gallery Jun 27-29, “The Art of John Lennon,” the art of the legendary musician is on display as a special preview exhibition at the newly opened gallery. 226 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Redwood Cafe Through Jun 30, “June Art Show,” shows works from photographer Ken Bradley, sculptor Rick Butler and others. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

RiskPress Gallery Through Jun 29, “Alive at the Cusp: Remaking Our Relations,” displays collage work from six women envisioning the complex relations within ourselves and our surroundings. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jul 6, “Abundance: The Promise of Spring,” featuring Robert Benson, Karen Spratt and other fine artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

SSU Library Art Gallery Through Jul 12, “Divergent Acts,” displays current works by SSU sculpture alumni. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Upstairs Art Gallery Through Jun 29, “French Impressions,” Carolyn Wilson’s richly textured watercolor paintings of France. 306 Center Ave, Healdsburg. SunThurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

MARIN COUNTY Aroma Cafe Through Jul 4, “Reflections on Water,” photo exhibit benefits the Gallinas Creek Watershed. 1122 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jun 26, “Memories


Marin MOCA

Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Dance

Through Jul 13, “Summer National Juried Exhibition,” including 45 works from around the nation in a wide variety of mediums from glass to 3D printers to Swarovski crystals. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Alice in Wonderland

Marin Society of Artists Gallery

Days of Wine & Lavender

Whimsical ballet is inspired by the classic story. Jul 1-2, 7pm. $15-$20. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 707.588.3400.

Events A walk through vibrant purple lavender gardens at peak season along with wine tasting, live music and tour of the grounds all benefiting the Ceres Community Project. Jun 28, 12pm. $95. Matanzas Creek Winery, 6097 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa. 707.528.6464.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

High Times Medical Cannabis Cup

Through Jun 28, “Norm Catalano photography” 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Trade show and expo features booths and seminars all about medical cannabis. Jun 28-29, noon. $40-$100. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1 350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Through Jun 29, “The Long Voyage,” the art of sculptor Joe Brubaker. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Toby’s Gallery Through Jun 30, “For the Birds,” presented by the Artists in the Schools Program. 11250 Hwy 1, Point Reyes Station.

Marin County Fair “The Happiest Fair on Earth” returns with concerts from Huey Lewis & the News, Nightranger, Joan Jett & the Blackhearts, the Wailers and others. Jul 2-6. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Music in the Vines

NAPA COUNTY Dennis Rae Fine Art Through Jun 30, “ELEMENTAL,” new works by Bernard Weston and Ronald Jermyn are drawn from their inspiration of nature and a place of inner peace and strength. 1359 Main St, St Helena. Daily, 10am-6pm 707.963.3350.

Jessup Cellars Through Jun 25, “Neil Young Series,” Grammy-award winning art director Jenice Heo’s exhibit of original rock-and-roll paintings. 6740 Washington St, Yountville. Daily, 10am-6pm 707.944.5620.

Comedy Dave Ross Standup comedian appears for two shows. Jun 28, 7 and 9:30pm. $12. Murphy’s Irish

River of Renewal The cautionary documentary follows eight years of struggle over water rights. Discussion follows. Jun 27, 7pm. Jenner Community Center, 10398 Hwy 1, Jenner.

Shine a Light

Through Jul 12, “Solstice,” artists choice exhibit features a wide range of works in various media, all inspired by the longest day of the year. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. MonThurs, 11am to 4pm; Sat-Sun, noon to 4pm. 415.454.9561.

Seager Gray Gallery

two days of fundraising for the popular film fest. Jun 28-29. $10. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Scorsese’s documentary on the Rolling Stones screens as part of the Rock Cinema Series. Jun 25, 7pm. $5. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

The San Agustin: California Shipwreck Documentary about the oldest known West Coast shipwreck screens in conjuncture with the Marin Fair. Jul 2-6, 7pm. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800. Jun 28, 7pm. $20. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Food & Drink Ales For ALS BBQ and beer tasting benefits ALS research. Jun 26, 7pm. $35-$40. Third Street Aleworks, 610 Third St., Santa Rosa. 707-523-3060.

California Beer Festival Marin County

Film

Heretic Brewing Company Beer Dinner

Plays as part of the Rock Cinema series. Jul 2, 7pm. $5. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Live music and food accompany over 70 craft brews on tap from breweries located around the state and beyond. Jun 28, 12:30pm. $40$55. Stafford Lake Park, 3549 Novato Blvd, Novato.

Jun 26, 6pm. $65. Hopmonk Sonoma, 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Home Brewing Workshop

Spike Lee’s joint gets a 25th anniversary screening. Jun 30, 7pm. Free. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

The Beverage People lead a workshop on how to make cream ale, provide sample tastes and give practical advice to making a successful homebrew. Jun 29, 10am. $75. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Mini Mill Valley Film Fest Fundraiser

Steven Raichlen: Man Made Meals

Keeper of the Beat and Northern Lights screen over

The author and BBQ guru gives a

Do the Right Thing

LES MISÉÉRABLES MIS JUNE 27–JULY 20 “An uplifting theme of heroic human commitment and to stirring music... an enthralling stage spectacle. Songs that hit the audience where it lives.” ~ Richard Hummlet, Variety

Presented by the Raven Players.

Turandot

Fundraiser for Disability Services & Legal Center includes live music, gourmet foods, auction and more. Jun 26, 6pm. $50-$60. Paradise Ridge Winery, 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.9463.

Almost Famous

VICTOR HUGO’S

) 32

1115 15 N North th St St., H Healdsburg ldd b 7 0 7 - 4 3 3 - 6 3 3 5 www.raventheater.org

31 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

of Dreams” exhibits new paintings by Bay Area artist Sanjay Vora.Jul 1-Aug 31, “Group Show” 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.


32

A E

( 31

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

demo and shares highlights from his new cookbook, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Man Made Meals.â&#x20AC;? Jun 26, 6:30pm. Cooking School at Cavallo Point, 601 Murray Circle, Sausalito.

For Kids Camp Shakespeare Jun 30-Jul 11. $450. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

The Wizard of Oz For Students Entering Grades 1st through 12th, Auditions June 23rd! FREE weeklong theater residency Jun 28, 2 and 4pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Cristina HenrĂ­quez. Jun 26, 6pm, Summer Lovinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2.0, a night of Young Adult Authors. Jun 27, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Midnight in Europeâ&#x20AC;? with Alan Furst. Jun 28, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flying Shoesâ&#x20AC;? with Lisa Howorth. Jun 30, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Are Called to Riseâ&#x20AC;? with Laura McBride. Jul 2, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Care and Management of Liesâ&#x20AC;? with Jacqueline Winspear. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Jun 29, 3:30pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Free Spirit:Growing Up on the Road and Off the Gridâ&#x20AC;? with Joshua Safran. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Napa Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Jun 28, 1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meditations of a Modern Mysticâ&#x20AC;? with Maurine Doerken. 3740 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa 707.252.8002.

Healdsburg Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books

Lectures Bridget Brehen

4*/$&t-*7&.64*$/*()54":&"3 Thur Jun

26

LUMANATION SFHHBFSPDL

9pm | Free

BLACKWATER GOLD BGSPGVOL

WITH LUCIA COMNES DUO 9pm | $10

Sat Jun

28

4pm & 9pm | FREE

1

Thur Jul

3

Sun Jun

29

9pm | Free

5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm | Free

Wed Jul

2

ERNEST RANGLIN MFHFOEBSZ +BNBJDBOHVJUBSJTU WITH 9 PIECE BAND 8pm | $20 Adv / $25 OOS

FIRST FRIDAYS REGGAE NIGHT

WITH BROKEN SILENCE SOUND 9pm | $15

WYNONNA W YNONNA & TTHE HE B BIG IG N NOISE OISE SSat. at. July July 19 19

OFF TTHE O HE B BLACK L ACK CCROWES R OW E S SSun. un. July July 2 20 0

BUDDY OWEN BAND CMVFT

HAPPY HOUR WITH FENTON COOLFOOT & THE RIGHT TIME

TTHE HE VOICE VOICE OF OF FOREIGNER FOREIGNER

RICH R ICH R ROBINSON OBINSON

9pm | $10

THE MACHIAVELVETS 9pm Free Tue Jul

27

GODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ROBOTS .VNCBJ

4FFJOGPBUXXXIFMQBESJFOOFIFBMDPN

LLOU OU G GRAMM R AMM SSun. un. JJuly uly 1 13 3

Fri Jun

DR DRAGONFLYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GROOVE GARDEN WITH

MULTI BAND BENEFIT SHOW 4pm

THE ATRE, NAPA FFri. ri. July July 11 11

Fri Jul

4

0QFO.JDX%FSFL4NJUIFWFSZ.POEBZ]QN'SFF

'"*3'"9t#30"%8":$0.t

KENNY K ENNY LOGGINS LOGGINS

with wi th SSpecial pecial Gu Guest est B BLUE LUE SSKY K Y RIDERS RIDER S

SSat. at. July July 26 26

KENNY W KENNY WAYNE AYNE SSHEPHERD HEPHERD B BAND AND FFri. r i. A Aug ug 1

LLISA ISALLeaner LAMPANELLI LAM PAToNurELLI eaner M Meaner eaner Tour

Task Force on the Americas presents talks from the GAP director and others on recent Guatemala events. Jul 2, 7pm. $10-$25. Redwoods Presbyterian Church, 110 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur.

Marin Theatre Company

Matthew Lewin

MINE Art Gallery

Emergency medicine expert and California Academy of Sciences researcher gives a special lecture on wilderness medicine. Jun 29, 7pm. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Jun 29, 3pm, Poetry and Prose Reading Series, Authors Molly Giles ans Sara Tolchin read. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

Photographine Cultures Photographer Robert Holmes describes his experience documenting exotic locations, different cultures and tribal peoples. Jun 26, 7pm. $10. University of San Francisco North Bay Campus, 416 B St, Santa Rosa.

Readings

FFri. r i. A Aug ug 15 15

Arlene Francis Center

SSat. at . A Aug ug 22 22

Jun 28, 7:30pm, Poetry In Soundspace Motion. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa 707.528.3009.

BUILT B UILT TTO O SP SPILL ILL THE MARSHALL THE MARSHALL TTUCKER UCKER BAND BAND with w ith M MOONALICE OONALICE

SSat. at . A Aug ug 23 23

TTHE HE DAN DAN BAND BAND

11350 350 Third Third St, St, Napa Napa | 7707.259.0123 07.259.0123

www.uptowntheatrenapa.com w w w.uptowntheatrenapa.com

Jun 29, 2pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flying Shoesâ&#x20AC;? with Lisa Howorth. 104 Matheson St, Healdsburg 707.433.9270.

Bergamot Alley Jun 26, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gatheringsâ&#x20AC;? with Jack Sonni. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg 707.433.8720.

Book Passage Jun 25, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Book of Unknown Americansâ&#x20AC;? with

Jun 30, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Year of the Rooster,â&#x20AC;? the New Play Reading Series presents this still-in-development play. Free. 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley 415.388.5208.

Napa Bookmine Jun 25, 5pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brazenâ&#x20AC;? with Katherine Longshore, part of the Teen Book Club series. Jul 1, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How Formal?â&#x20AC;? with Stephanie Hammer. 964 Pearl St, Napa.

Readersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Books Jun 25, 7pm, Last Wednesday Food Book Group. Jun 29, 2pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who We Areâ&#x20AC;? with Micaela Luque. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

Rebound Bookstore Jun 28, 4pm, Hand to Mouth/ Words Spoken Out, poet Gerald Nicosia and a special guest read, followed by open mic. 1641 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.482.0550.

San Rafael Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Jun 25, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ways of the Deadâ&#x20AC;? with Neely Tucker. Jun 26, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yours for Eternity: A Love Story on Death Rowâ&#x20AC;? with Damien Echols. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Santa Rosa High School Jun 27, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Distant Neighborsâ&#x20AC;? with Wendell Berry & Gary Snyder, Presented by Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books. 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Tobyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gallery Jun 26, 5:30pm, Artists in Schools student poetry reading. 11250 Hwy 1, Point Reyes Station.

Theater A Chorus Line SRJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the beloved Broadway musical. Through Aug 9. $18-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

Failure: A Love Story MTC closes their season with the West Coast premiere of the Philip Dawkins-penned story of the three Fail sisters aiming to find love before their time is up in 1920s Chicago. Through Jun 29. $37-$58. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The Fellowship World premiere performance. Inspired by J.R.R. Tolkein, a small-town misfit sets out on a quest. Through Jul 13. AlterTheater Ensemble, 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.2787.

The Full Monty: The Musical ETC presents the fun and revealing Broadway show. Through Jun 29. $36. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Grease Head â&#x20AC;&#x153;greaserâ&#x20AC;? Danny Zuko and new (good) girl Sandy Dumbrowski try to relive the high romance of their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Nights.â&#x20AC;? Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jul 20. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

La Cage aux Folles SRJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the acclaimed comedy musical classic. Through Aug 9. $18$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

Les MisĂŠrables The epic musical is produced by the Raven Players. Jun 27Jul 20. $25-$30. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.


Moonlight & Magnolias

33

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

9 to 5: The Musical SRJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the musical based off the 1980â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movie. Through Aug 9. $18$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

The Odd Couple SRJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents Neil Simonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seminal comedy about mismatched roommates Oscar and Felix. Through Aug 9. $18-$25. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

One Singular Sensation Transcendence Theatre Company kicks off their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broadway Under the Starsâ&#x20AC;? series with this musical revue. Jun 27-Jul 5. $42-$125. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Present Laughter SRJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the witty 1939 comedy about a comedy actor facing a bizarre series of events. Through Aug 9. $18-$25. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

13 Bells of Boglewood Actorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theater for Children present this magical journey through Boglewood forest. Jun 27-29. $7. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

T.I.C. (Trenchcoat in Common) The comedy written by SF playwright Peter Sinn Nactrieb follows a girl exploring her apartment building during a dull summer vacation. Through Jun 29. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Beer Here Now California Beer Festival comes to Marin

Keep your eyes open this weekend for Burt, the hearty and bouncy brown bear whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s often spotted wandering the grounds at the California Beer Festival. The high-ďŹ ving beer enthusiast can often be seen sipping among the 70 plus craft beers on tap. Breweries from near and far are participating in the juried competitive tasting, with even a few standout Oregon crafters making an appearance. In fact, last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Brew Overall was awarded to the Believer Double Red Ale from Eugene, Ore.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ninkasi Brewing. This year, the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own signature Burts Honey Wheat Beer joins the throng of hopeful brewers looking to bring the award back to the Golden State. When Burt isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tasting brews, he can be seen dishing out and scarďŹ ng down Hawaiian barbecue and garlic fries from a variety of local food offerings. After heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done satisfying his hunger, Burt then heads down to the live music stage and dances his scruffy tail off. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun and lively lineup features dub rockers IrieFuse, classic rock mimics the Unauthorized Rolling Stones and rad new wave rockers the 85â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. If you see Burt the Bear, remain calm, grab a tasting cup and go in for the bear hugâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s his only weakness. Burt, beers and music come together for an afternoon of premier beers in a beautiful outdoor setting. The California Beer Festival takes place on Saturday, June 28, at Stafford Lake Park, 3549 Novato Blvd., Novato. 12:30pm. $45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$65. Tickets available online and at HopMonk Novato. 415.892.6200.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Charlie Swanson

Joan Baez á­&#x152; Los Lobos á­&#x152; Indigo Girls

Jackie Greene á­&#x152; Darlene Love á­&#x152; Playing For Change Garth Hudson (The Band/The Last Waltz) featuring Sister Maud HUDSON Tim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien & Darrell Scott á­&#x152; Rodney Crowell

Beausoleil avec Michael Doucet á­? The Wood Brothers á­? Amy Helm Tom Paxton á­? Paper Bird á­? The Blues Broads á­? Joe Pug á­? The Duhks Eliza Gilkyson á­? Mary Gauthier á­? Poor Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Whiskey á­? Wavy Gravy David Luning á­&#x152; Patchy Sanders á­&#x152; Spark & Whisper á­&#x152; Perfect Crime Bootleg Honeys á­&#x152; Rhythm Rangers á­&#x152; Highway Poets á­&#x152; MORE

AT BEAUTIFUL BLACK OAK RANCH â&#x20AC;˘ LAYTONVILLE Tickets & Info. 415-256-8499 (Inticketing) katewolfmusicfestival.com

SUMMER S UMMER SPARKLE SPARKLE 10 % O 10% OFF FF ANY ANY S equined A pparel! Sequined Apparel!

1310 Fourth 1310 Fo ur t h S St. t. @ C San Rafael Sa nR afael 415.482.9899 41 5 . 4 8 2 . 9 8 9 9 pleasuresoftheheart.com pleasuresoftheheart.ccom

LLoverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; overâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Playthings Playthings â&#x20AC;˘ SSensual ensual Lingerie Lingerie â&#x20AC;˘ GGift ift CCertificates ertificates â&#x20AC;˘ JJewelry ewelry

Sweet Hay by Carolyn Lord, Watercolor 5FOUI4U 4BOUB3PTBt5VFo4BUo 707tcalabigallery.com

Wed, Jun 25 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE 12:40pm Youth and Family 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE Thur, Jun 26 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:15-10:00pm CIRCLES & SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Jun 27 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 8:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm Steve Luther DJ HOSTS A WEST COAST SWING PARTY with Kelly, Edna & Dick Sat, Jun 28 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH CHALLENGE 12:30pm DANCE CLASS 2pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm Congressman Mike Thompson PASTA FEED Sun, Jun 29 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, Jun 30 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tue, Jul 1 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

A comedy about the true story of the trials and tribulations to write the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gone with the Windâ&#x20AC;? screenplay in 1939. Jun 26-29. Raven Theater Windsor, 195 Windsor River Rd, Windsor.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

ŵŶ

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

MEDICAL CANNABIS DELIVERY SERVICE CBD RICH STRAINS ORGANIC FLOWER GLUTEN FREE EDIBLES MEMBER REWARDS

E^][r=k'AZgrZ;Zkma K^Ze<Zk^K^Ze=h\mhkl +-(0LZ_^O^kb_b\Zmbhg MhmZeer<hg_b]^gmbZe

O]ddEYl[` Any Local Price

JnZebmr B=<Zk]l

1.707.568.0420

www.GREEN215.com

EASY, ONLINE ORDERING NO DELIVERY FEE NO MINIMUM ORDER REQUIRED

=hpgmhpgLZgmZKhlZ30-*.maLm9>Lm

17 years strong in Sonoma County

NOW OPEN SUNDAYS

Highway 101 at Steele Lane 2425 Cleveland Ave, Suite 175

Peacepipe

622 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa

707.541.7016

707.526.2800

8492 Gravenstein Hwy, Cotati

WEEKDAYS 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7; WEEKENDS 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5

thepeacepipesmokeshop.com

707.795.3420

SONOMA & MARIN COUNTIES

GREENLIGHT ALTERNATIVES

707.484.8921

WWW.GREENLIGHTALTERNATIVES.COM


BOHEMIAN

g

PLACE AN AD: Phone: 707.527.1200, Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:30pm Fax: 707.527.1288 | Email: sales@bohemian.com

?8E;PA@D Â&#x2019;QO`^S\b`g^OW\bW\U Â&#x2019;aSWa[WQ`Sb`]TWb Â&#x2019;ab`cQbc`OZe]`Y Â&#x2019;abcQQ]Q]\Q`SbS Â&#x2019;UcbbS`QZSO\W\U Â&#x2019;`]]TW\U

4/@E3AB@3AB=@/B7=< 1=<AB@C1B7=< %% &"&' 4O`ESab1]\ab`Q][ 8W[9S\\SRg1 /:WQS\aS%&$&'

Classes & Instruction

30th West Coast Dowsing Conference July 37, UC Santa Cruz - Metaphysical Workshops - Over 60 presenters - Dowsing Schools - Mystery School For Youth A Sustainable Activity that Sustains you! 415-823-9148 831-402-8101 dowserswestcoast.org

Notice of Sale ~ 500 Olive Street Storage The Following Units Were Notified In Writing That Their Units Will Be Sold At Auction On 7-3-2014 At 10:00am: Unit 205 N. Dougherty, Unit 214 Unknown, Unit 218 E. K. Turner, Unit 225 Unknown, Unit 231 Unknown, Unit 232 L. McDonald

g Psychics

PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

gg Adult Entertainment

Phone Entertainment

GET ON TO GET OFF The #1 Social Network for men who like men! Try For Free! 707.583.0075

&

A Wild Irish Rose

Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please call before 11pm. No calls from blocked phone #. Kara, 415.233.2769.

Alternative Health Well-Being

g Chiropractic

Authentic Professional Thai Massage Therapeutic Thai Massage $ 00 45 /hr Swedish Massage $ 00 60 /hr

Araya Thai Spa Open 10-8 daily

gg

1220 4th St, Ste. B, Santa Rosa

707.478.2689

Massage & Relaxation

Healing & Bodywork

A Safe Place To Be Real Holistic tantric masseuse/surrogate. Unhurried, private, heartfelt. First time client discount. Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat. Please call after 10:30am. 707.793.2232.

Full Body Sensual Massage

With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

g Professional Medical

SUBUTEX/ SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxy, Roxy, Norco, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal! Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

Great Massage By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883.

B-12 SHOTS HAPPY HOUR!

A Provider of Pleasure

THURSDAYS, 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6PM Only $20 (20% off)

"Your pleasure, my business." Women, men, couples,..by a gentleman. Since 1991. Aft/eve appts. 707.799.4467(C) or 707.535.0511 (L) Jimmy.

SPIRITUAL

Connections

Finding inspiration & connecting with your community

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Ready for Growth? Meet "Meditations of a Modern Mystic," author Maurine Doerken to explore and discover your inner potential. June 28 at 1. Copperfields Bookstore, 3740 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.252.8002. maurinedoerken.com

WALK-INS ONLY For energy, immunity, fatigue, anxiety. Also MIC for weight loss and detox.

Naturopathic Wellness Center Dr. Dana Michaels ND & Dr. Moses Goldberg ND 175 Concourse Blvd.

707.284.9200

Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of June 25

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) According to an astrologer named Astrolocherry (astrolocherry.tumblr. com), Aries is the sign of the freedom ďŹ ghter, the explorer, the daredevil and the adventurer. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all true; I agree with her. But hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an important caveat. As you get older, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your duty to harness all that hot energy on behalf of the softer, slower, more tender parts of your life. The coming weeks will offer you a great opportunity to work on that challenge. To get started, imagine how you can be a freedom ďŹ ghter, explorer, daredevil and adventurer in service to your home, family and community. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

After a thorough, detailed, painstaking analysis of the astrological omens, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m inclined to advise you to be neither thorough nor detailed nor painstaking in the coming days. Instead, I suspect you will thrive by being spontaneous and improvisatory. Wing it, baby! Throw away the script. Trust your gut. Play it by ear. Make it up as you go along. If you ďŹ nd yourself frowning with indecision and beset by lazy procrastination, you will know youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re off course. If you are feeling blithe and agile as you get a lot done with creative efďŹ ciency, you will know youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re right in the groove.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) The Japanese word tsundoku describes what happens if you buy a lot of books but never read them, leaving them piled up in a neglected heap. I recommend that you avoid indulging in tsundoku any time soon, Gemini. In fact, I urge you not to acquire any resources that you then proceed to ignore. You are in a phase of your astrological cycle when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crucial to make conscientious use of your tools and riches. To let them go to waste would be to dishonor them, and make it less likely that you will continue to receive their blessings in the future. Take full advantage of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s yours. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

If you could harness the energy from a typical lightning bolt, you would be able to use it to toast 100,000 slices of bread. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an impossible scenario, of course. But I see it as an apt metaphor for the challenge you have ahead of you. I suspect you will soon get access to a massive inďŹ&#x201A;ux of vital force that arrives in a relatively short time. Can you ďŹ nd a way to gather it in and store it up? Or will most of it, after the initial burst, leak away and be unavailable for long-term use? The secret to success will lie in whether you can ďŹ gure out how to create the perfect â&#x20AC;&#x153;container.â&#x20AC;?

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forget the suffering / You caused others. / Forget the suffering / Others caused you.â&#x20AC;? Czeslaw Milosz wrote these words in his poem â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forget,â&#x20AC;? and now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m passing them on to you. According to my reading of the astrological omens, now would be an excellent time for you to purge the old hurts you are still carrying, both those you dealt out and those you endured. Opportunities like this donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come along often, Leo. I invite you to repay emotional debts, declare amnesty, and engage in an orgy of forgiveness. Any other things you can think of that will help wipe the slate clean?

VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22)

When a Navajo baby laughs for the ďŹ rst time, everyone in the community celebrates. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regarded as the moment when the child completes his or her transition from the spirit realm into the physical world. The person who has provoked the babyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s laughter is charged with planning the First Laugh Ceremony, a party to commemorate the magical event. I foresee a comparable development in your life, Virgo. You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be laughing for the ďŹ rst time, of course, but I suspect your sense of humor will reach a new ripeness. How? Maybe you will be able to ďŹ nd amusement in things you have always taken too seriously. Maybe you will suddenly have a deeper appreciation for lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ongoing cosmic jokes. Or perhaps you will stumble upon reasons to laugh longer and harder and louder than you ever have before.

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) Would you like to be free from the experience of getting criticized? Do you think it might be nice if no one ever accused you of being wrong or off-track? If so, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how you should proceed, says American writer Elbert Hubbard: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do

nothing, say nothing, be nothing.â&#x20AC;? But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m afraid I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recommend that behavior for you, Libra. In the coming weeks, you have a sacred duty to your Future Self to risk being controversial. I urge you to take strong stands, speak raw truths, and show your real feelings. Yes, you may attract ďŹ&#x201A;ack. You might disturb the peace. But that will be an acceptable price to pay for the rewards you receive. This is one time when being courageous is more important than seeking harmony.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be respectful to your superiors, if you have any,â&#x20AC;? said Mark Twain. How do you respond to that impish nudge, Scorpio? Are there any geniuses and heroes out there whom you consider to be worthy of your respect? If not, I urge you to go out in search of some. At this phase of your evolution, you are in special need of people who inspire you with their greatness. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crucial for you to learn from teachers and role models who are further along than you are in their mastery of the game of life. I also believe it would be healing for you to feel waves of admiration and reverence.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone has something to hide,â&#x20AC;? declared Russian author Anton Chekhov. Is that true? Do even you blunt Sagittarians have something to hide? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to say that for 90 percent of you, the answer is yes. There are secrets you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want anyone to ďŹ nd out about: past events you are reluctant to disclose or shady deeds you are getting away with now or taboo thoughts you want to keep sealed away from public knowledge. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not here to scold you about them or to encourage you to spill them. On the contrary, I say itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to bring them fully into your conscious awareness, to honor their importance to your life story and to acknowledge their power to captivate your imagination.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) A German chemist named Felix Hoffman had a prominent role in synthesizing two very different drugs: aspirin and heroin. In analyzing your astrological omens for the coming months, I see you as having a similar potential. You could create good stuff that will have the power to help and heal, or you could generate borderline stuff that will lead to a lot of problems, or you could do both. How it all plays out really is up to your free will. For best results, set your intention to go in the direction of things like aspirin and away from things like heroin. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) This is a good time to risk a small leap of faith, but not a sprawling vault over a yawning abyss. Feel free and easy about exploring the outer borders of familiar territory, but be cautious about the prospect of wandering into the deep, dark unknown. Be willing to entertain stimulating new ideas but not cracked notions that have little evidence to back them up. Your task is to shake up the status quo just enough to invigorate everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emotional intelligence, even as you take care not to unleash an upheaval that makes everyone crazy.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

British poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1834) had an unusual fetish. He enjoyed eating apples and pears and other fruits while they were still hanging on the tree. Why? Maybe because the taste was as pure and brisk and naked as it could possibly beâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an experience that I imagine would be important to a romantic poet like him. In accordance with your astrological omens, I suggest you use Coleridgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quest for ultimate freshness as a driving metaphor in the coming week. Go to the source to get what you need. Dispense with intermediaries. Be as raw as the law allows.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žš NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Classifieds

FREE WILL


Oliver’s Commitment to Organics g Oliver’s is dedi dedicated icated to bringing you the very best in local l conventional and organic produc products. cts. That is why wee proudly carry Straus Family Creameryy products. Founded in 1994, in the small town of Marshall M along our Coast they were thee first certified organic dairy west of the Mississippii River and the first 100% certified org ganic creamery in the United States. organic W love We l their h i iic ice ce cream, we love l that h iit’s ’ llocal,l ffamily ily owned, d organic, i minimally i i ll processed processed, d, sustainable bl andd a ddelicious l way to cooll off ff this h summer. We know you’ll ll llove it too…

Whenn yo you ou supportt uus us,s, we supportt the tthem. em. %'"De`_jA`Z_eC`RUDR_eRC`dR#)%$&$! %'"D De`_jA j A`Z_eC e `RU UDR_eR RC`dR R#)%$&$ & ! | &%'64`eReZ2gV_fV4`eReZ(*&*&!"| &%'64 4`eReZ2 Z gV_fV4 V 4`eReZZ(*&*&!" | &'!>`_eVTZe`4V_eVcDR_eRC`dR&$(("#$ &' '!>`_eVTZe`4 ` 4V_eVccDDR_eRC R `dR R&$((" ( #$


NBB1426