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2014 20 14 NNorBays! orBays! Votee for your favorite bands and enter the 24-hour band contest at Bohemian.com

Climate Protection Campaign p6 ‘Big Biz’ Democrats p8 Green String Farm p12

Climate Changers Local Solutions for a Sweaty Planet p17

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2014 Metrosa Inc.

Cover illustration by Trevor Alixopulos. Cover design by Kara Brown.


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‘We’re not inclined to get the blue stamp of the federales as a tattoo on our right cheek.’ D I NI NG P12 Sebastopol’s Warped Brews P15 Broadway to Hollywood P23 North Bay Hootenany P26 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p12 Breweries p15 Brew p16

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ABOUT THE COVER ARTIST This issue’s cover art is by Trevor Alixopulos, a Sonoma County-raised cartoonist and illustrator who has drawn for everyone from the ‘Bohemian’ to ‘Playboy.’ His graphic novel, ‘The Hot Breath of War,’ is avaialble from Sparkplug Comic Books. See his work at alixopulos.com.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Climate Change We are leaders, but there is more to do BY ANN HANCOCK

R

ecently, we were scouting for outstanding climate-protection solutions that we could import here. We contacted communities nationwide that excel in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We spoke with a person in the Washington, D.C., area who said, “You’re from Sonoma County? Why are you asking us about solutions? Everyone knows that Sonoma County is the leader.” This reaction reinforces what we’ve heard for years. Sonoma County is known as the California of California, meaning that as California is the nation’s climate-protection leader, Sonoma County is California’s climate-protection leader. We can take pride that we inspire other communities. Why is this happening here? I believe it’s because business people, policymakers and citizens care about more than themselves and what’s immediately in front of them. The evidence is everywhere from the extraordinary level of volunteerism to our climate leadership. The most recent example is Sonoma Clean Power. The creation of this new public agency is the result of collaboration among government, business and the community over many years. Because California now has two successful “community choice” programs—Marin’s and Sonoma’s—the model is gaining momentum. Some 12 other California communities are now starting up community choice programs. (But AB 2145 will limit consumer choice. Please check out www.no2145.org. ) Although we can take pride in Sonoma County’s accomplishments, we have a lot more to do to leave our children a life-sustaining planet. The concentration of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere continues to rise, increasing the blanket of heattrapping gas that causes global weirding, such as the drought, Superstorm Sandy and other extreme weather events. We must keep pushing solutions commensurate with the scale of the crisis. Please join us. Ann Hancock is the co-founder and executive director of the Climate Protection Campaign. www.climateprotection.org. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Why I Like You

The Bohemian is always a pleasure to read. I prefer hard copy to any online experience, and the quality of the paper, the layout and organization never fail to please. Yours is the only publication I look at that does not have typos, grammatical errors and ridiculously bad writing. Please take a look at SFGate. com and the Pacific Sun for thousands of bad examples of what I mean. The Bohemian is obviously staffed by intelligent people who care about producing a quality publication. When I open an issue, I know I am in good hands and will have a good time reading through all the thoughtful and accurate info. Thank you for the weekly pleasure.

KATHY DUBY Mill Valley

Climate-Friendly Food I am delighted that the EPA has finally moved to abate the disastrous impacts of climate change by regulating carbondioxide emissions from power plants. But given the adverse reaction from the coal industry, the agency should have issued parallel regulations on emissions from meat-industry operations. Each state could then determine its own strategy for curbing greenhouse gases.

In the meantime, each of us can reduce the devastating effects of climate change every time we eat. Our local supermarket offers a rich variety of plant-based lunchmeats, hotdogs, veggie burgers and dairyproduct alternatives, as well as ample selection of vegetables, fruits, grains and nuts. Product lists, easy recipes and transition tips are readily available online.

STEVE ALDERSON Santa Rosa

Share the Road Assuming every motorist is a careless idiot, and getting out of their way will never shift bicyclists out of second-class citizenship (Open Mic, May 21)—this is a civil rights issue, as much as it is an issue about access to education, because transportation is vital to economic and social opportunities in this sprawling society. It’s also a health issue, since regular exercise while commuting would eradicate America’s obesity epidemic. Sharing the public roads is possible without friction, but not without education. A motorist is legally required to provide three feet of clearance to cyclists in a traffic lane. That can be done without crossing double yellow lines by most cars. My 1983 bike route sign introduced both Share the Road, a meme gone national, and three feet clearance, now the law in 23 states, including California.

A 2006 U.N. report estimated that meat production accounts for 18 percent of man-made greenhouse gases. A 2009 article in the respected World Watch magazine suggested the contribution may be closer to 50 percent.

Sure, cyclists like the tech titan in Mill Valley and neon-clad crews blowing through stop signs and red lights give riders a bad name. But bicyclists aren’t killing 30,000 motorists a year, along with several hundred pedestrians and bicyclists.

The meat industry generates carbon dioxide by burning forests to create animal pastures and by combustion of fossil fuels to confine, feed, transport and slaughter animals. The much more damaging methane and nitrous oxide are discharged from digestive tracts of cattle and from animal waste cesspools, respectively.

The documented failure to charge motorists who’ve killed pedestrians or cyclists with their vehicle reflects the motor-vehicle bias of our entire transportation system. Engineered solutions, such as bike lanes and separate paths, have not increased safety over sharing existing roads legally and visibly. Education of motorists and


THIS MODERN WORLD

cyclists on how to share the road has been squeezed out by engineering costs for separate but unequal bike facilities. The carnage in crosswalks demonstrates pedestrians’ need for traffic-calming and pedestrian-friendly sidewalks.

STEPHEN SIMAC Stinson Beach

Open Our Hospital My husband and I attended our first Palm Drive Hospital community meeting and came away delighted. The Open Our Hospital campaign created by the allied physicians of Palm Drive and the Palm Drive Health Care Foundation makes sense on a business level. It is so refreshing to see fiscal responsibility embraced. Spending wise money by hiring professionals with successful track records such as nationally

By Tom Tomorrow

recognized hospital-turnaround expert Terry Newmyer is a good move. His excellent presentation showed various cutting-edge ideas to make Palm Drive the state-of-the-art hospital our community can get behind. Imagine marketing a “no wait” emergency room. St. Helena Hospital did this with great success. Imagine our already in-place, award-winning stroke and orthopedic surgery specialists turning Palm Drive into a “destination hospital.” I’m excited by the possibilities and I want to be involved. The difference now is that rather than feeling pity for a dead horse being beaten, I can envision the jewel just waiting to be polished within those hospital walls.

SUSAN BENDINELLI

Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 1-17, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Rants

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 1-17, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

8

Paper THE

Who Is Levine?

A

But Levine, who represents

For centuries, the process of making cheese has involved aging the wheels on wooden racks. But thanks to a ruling last week by the FDA, the process of aging on wood may soon be outlawed. “This could potentially shift the entire industry, nationally,” says Sheana Davis, owner of the Epicurean Connection cheese shop in Sonoma and producer of the city’s annual cheese industry conference. Many local cheese makers, like Matos St. George, Vella Cheese Co. and Bellwether Farms use wood to age their cheese.

The government’s primary concern is the bacteria listeria. On March 11, the FDA suspended production at Roos Foods, Inc. due to an outbreak stemming from the company’s “Hispanicstyle cheese products” that resulted in one death and at least eight infections.

Critics pounce as freshman Assemblyman cruises to primary win BY TOM GOGOLA Marin and parts of Sonoma County, has peeved area progressives since he was first elected in 2012 after serving as a San Rafael city councilman. In almost any other part of the country than hyper-liberal Marin and Sonoma, Levine’s positions on many issues would make him the most progressive pol on the block. Yet detractors say he’s a prime example of a politician with excessive fealty to anti-environmental

Cheese Police

The FDA cited several companies after an inspection of upstate New York cheese production facilities, prompting a request for clarification from state officials, who had been allowing the process of aging cheese on wood, as had cheese-friendly states like Wisconsin and California. The response from the FDA cites a rule requiring that food-making equipment be able to be adequately cleaned, and “wooden shelves or boards cannot be adequately cleaned and sanitized,” says the agency in a statement.

OUR MAN IN SACRAMENTO Is Assemblyman Marc Levine progressive enough for the North Bay?

ssemblyman Marc Levine sailed to an easy primary victory last week, earning what will almost certainly be a second term in the Sacramento statehouse. He’ll square off in November against Republican challenger Gregory Allen.

DEBR IEFER

interests, a charge that stems in part from a vote he abstained from that would have granted the California Coastal Commission the right to levy fines on ecoviolators without a court order. He had originally supported the bill. Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Gary Cohn argued in a well-traveled piece on capitalandmain.com that Levine embodies the California “corporate Democrat.”

) 10

Listeria is not the only microbe capable of growing on wooden cheese boards. In fact, many microbes that inhabit the cheese’s resting place are essential to the unique flavor and texture of a given cheese. “It’s potentially pretty devastating to cheese makers,” says Gordon Edgar, San Francisco author of Cheesemonger: Life on ) 10 The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.


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Veteran progressive activist and media critic Norman Solomon, an occasional contributor to these pages who ran for Congress in 2012, says Levine is cut from the same cloth that elevated Jerry Brown to the governorship. Solomon, who lives in Inverness and supported Diana Conti over Levine this year, says that “the Jerry Brown situation is part of a pattern that is replicated by Marc Levine. It’s seen as a winning approach—talk progressive and govern corporate centrist.” Leo Wallach, a political consultant for Levine, roundly disagrees with the “corporate Democrat” tag and says the report was a “cooked-up hit piece on Marc.” “I don’t think Marc likes labels,” he says, “but the accurate label would be ‘progressive independent Democrat.’” Wallach says that label inspires some voters while making others nervous about Levine’s principles. “He didn’t take the interest-group path to Sacramento,” Wallach says. “He has progressive values and an independent approach.” You might say the same of Brown, who also cruised to a primary victory last week and will face moderate Republican Neel Kashkari in November. But in one critical way it is difficult to equate Levine as a sort of Mini Moonbeam beholden to corporate interests: Big Oil is the state’s largest and most powerful special-interest lobby. A recent California Common Cause study of the lobby’s influence found the oil and gas lobby, led by the Western States Petroleum Association, had spent nearly $15 million in 2013–14. Levine has accepted zero dollars from the gas and oil lobby. By contrast, Brown has taken more than $2 million from the industry in recent years. The “corporate Democrat” tag represents a curious evolution of descriptors, when you consider that a similar “new Democrat” designation was applied to Bill Clinton in 1992, when none other than Jerry Brown was seen as the great progressive antidote to Clinton-style centrism. Brown’s campaign that year was a model of

pre-big money politics; he vowed to accept individual donations of no more than $100, and roared into the Democratic convention with hundreds of delegates in his camp. Now the local media has taken to calling Levine a “new-style Democrat,” who has accepted contributions from various real estate interests, the California Chamber of Commerce and a hedge-funder or two. But he has offered legislation that flies in the face of the “corporate Democrat” charge, says Wallach. The first bill Levine offered this session would have banned plastic shopping bags in big retailers. Opposed by the chamber, it petered out in the Assembly and Levine sent it to the “inactive file.” Levine also played into the hands of the tax-and-spend-liberal crowd when he pushed a bill that would double fees on automobile registration to support fingerprint identification programs. It passed. Critics of Levine point to his vote last year on a bill that set the stage for an expansion of fracking in the state. Levine had previously offered a bill of his own that would have put a moratorium on the practice, and says he still supports a moratorium. This year, the Press Democrat reported that a profracking supporter paid for antifracking materials on his behalf, raising the ire of local progressives. To opponents, the Coastal Commission non-vote was fauxprogressivism of the worst sort. Yet Wallach says it signaled Levine’s deep-dive into the details of the bill, which, Wallach says, would have “created some bad incentives and unintended consequences” had it passed. Wallach insists that Levine supported the principle driving the bill. “Some of these things are very technical, and it’s very important to have a legislator who is willing to look past the title of a bill.” But the anti-Levine forces are not assuaged. U.S. Congressman Jared Huffman was one of numerous statewide Democrats to endorse him this year, a move Solomon calls “unconscionable.” “Progressive independent Democrat” or company man? If reelected, Levine’s next term will be revealing.

DEBRIEFER

(8

the Wedge. “This is a tradition that’s been going on for, really, a thousand years.” New regulation might force cheese makers to change their recipes, and it could prove too expensive for small businesses to buy new equipment. The FDA was reportedly in the process of issuing an updated statement to its ruling Tuesday, but details were not available before deadline. Calls to the USDA were not returned by press time.—Nicolas Grizzle

Vote. Or Else. Last week’s primary election saw some dismally low percentages of people making it out to the polls—the worst ever, according to some reports. Well, it’s a good thing Assemblywoman Mariko Yamada isn’t in charge, because all you non-voters would have gone to jail! OK, that’s overstated. But Yamada, D-Davis, said in a recent interview that Americans might consider a compulsory-voting system similar to Australia’s. Her suggestion came in the context of a discussion where Yamada lamented Supreme Court campaign-finance rulings, and voter-suppression efforts. Yamada noted that one solution to voter apathy would be to penalize non-voters, though she didn’t say what form the penalty would take. Australians can be fined for not voting in federal elections. Repeat offenders are forced to listen to Olivia Newton John records. Yamada hasn’t offered any legislation, so stop freaking out, we were just talking. She is terming-out of Sacramento this November. We’ll be checking to see if she takes any fact-finding holiday trips to Australia. —Tom Gogola


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Dining Nicolas Grizzle

VEGGIE WHISPERER Farmer Bob Cannard’s reverence for plants and soil borders on the spiritual.

Certified Delicious Fresh faces, old-school values make up Green String Farm BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

I

n the middle of a lecture on the second day of class for the new crop of Green String Institute interns, pioneering farmer, gardener and teacher Bob Cannard slams his fist on the handmade picnic table that serves as the outdoor classroom.

“First week of June, yellow wax beans, because I pay attention to nature!” Not one of the dozen of so students is surprised or concerned

at this outburst—in fact, about half crack a knowing smile. Cannard rose to fame in the farming community with Alice Waters, founder of Berkeley’s celebrated Chez Panisse restaurant. Cannard continues to provide produce to the restaurant. Like Waters, Cannard cares deeply about how food is grown, pushing him to create his own “beyond organic” certification label, Green String Certified. “We don’t do anything nonorganic, but we can’t use the

o-word,” says Cannard. “We can’t afford to be certified, and we’re not inclined to get the blue stamp of the federales as a tattoo on our right cheek.” To certify the 140-acre Petaluma farm, which includes several acres of vineyards with partner Bob Cline, would cost about $200,000 annually and require four full-time administrative staff, says Cannard. Not just that, but farms can’t claim to be above the standard set by the government. “You can’t have anything that

claims that you’re better than organic,” says Cannard. “That’s unconstitutional.” Instead, he self-certifies. “It’s based upon our integrity. You can believe us or not believe, it’s up to you.” He says it’s a workaround that he hopes will catch on with other small farms. Cannard’s reverence for the soil and plants is almost spiritual. His respect for nature is evident in his gardening methods, which includes leaving many weeds to grow among his crops. “One of the elements of physical completeness [of plants] is nutritional soundness,” he says. “Another element is etheric sweetness. It had everything that it needed so that it can be a most wonderful kind of plant, whatever plant that it is. A well-grown eggplant is a tremendous example,” he adds. “A beautifully grown and perfectly ripe eggplant is the only fruit that I’ve ever picked that, once harvested, will for a few seconds vibrate with happiness in your hand. Just shimmers.” After a pause, he adds, “Literally.” That intensity and knowledge draws in students every three months to participate in the Green String Institute’s internship program. The current session of curious cultivators will live, eat and work on the farm for one season. Rebecca Winters, a 33-year-old 2013 graduate of the Green String Institute, came to California from Brooklyn, where she was a successful graphic designer. “There’s nothing here that’s not intense,” she says, referring to life on the farm—as well as the flavor of the produce. Top-tier restaurants know this and use that intensity to their plates’ advantage. Petaluma’s Central Market, Wishbone and Thistle Meats all routinely shop at Green String Farm for things like veggies, fruit and eggs. And it’s not just for their customers. “A lot of chefs shop here for their homes,” says Winters. Green String Farm’s store is open daily 10am to 6pm. 3571 Old Adobe Road, Petaluma. 707.778.7500.


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Cape Cod Fish & Chips Fish and chips. $. A dingy hole in the wall–just like a real chippy! This popular lunch spot offers perfectly cooked fish and chips to eat in or take out. Open daily. 7530 Commerce Blvd, Cotati. 707.792.0982.

Dry Creek Kitchen American. $$$-$$$$. Refined and contemporary American menu with multicultural influence. Seafood and vegetables reign! Dinner daily; lunch, Fri-Sun. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Haku Sushi. $-$$. Cleverly named rolls like “Jedi Mind Trick” and “Roll me a Fatty” are as flavorful as they are fun. Lunch and dinner daily. 518 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.541.6359. Khoom Lanna Thai. $$. Outstanding Thai dishes and seasonal specialties with an authentic cooking style. Fresh ingredients, serene dining room, convenient Railroad Square location. Lunch and dinner daily. 107 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8424.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Osake Sushi Bar & Grill Japanese. $$$. Gourmet sushi, exotic seasoned seaweed salad, robata grill specialties and premium sakes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2446 Patio Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8282.

Pamposh Indian. $-$$. Clean, fresh, exciting traditional Indian food. Chicken tikka masala is indescribably good.

Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner, Sun. 52 Mission Circle, Ste 110, Santa Rosa. 707.538.3367.

Phyllis’ Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an oldfashioned patty. Lunch and dinner daily. Two Sonoma County locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 1774 Piner Road #B, Santa Rosa. 707.521.0890. Two Marin County locations: 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.898.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

Simply Delicious Italian/ Mediterranean. $-$$. Tiny cafe with huge flavors. All dishes are homemade, with lots of organics. Fantastic lasagna, margherita pizza and meatball or chicken parm sandwiches. Dinner, Tues-Sun. 2780 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2083.

Thai Orchid Thai. $-$$. Rich Thai food made with crisp, fresh ingredients, reasonably priced. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 1005 Vine St, Healdsburg. 707.433.0515. Toyo Japanese Grill Japanese. $$$. Well-crafted traditional Japanese with some modern extras like deep-fried mashed potato croquettes with mayo. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8871.

Tres Hombres Mexican. $-$$. Excellent food in Petaluma’s Theater District, and a fun place to hang before or after a flick. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.773.4500.

Water Street Bistro Eclectic. $$. Homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and entrées. Breakfast and lunch daily. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.9563.

West Side Bar & Grill Sports Bar. $$. Home of the almost-famous bacon

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 1-17, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

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cheeseburger. Seventeen beers on tap (wine list available). Fourteen flat screen televisions to watch all of the hottest sports events. Two great pool tables. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd # B8, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9453.

Willi’s Seafood & Raw Bar Seafood. $$. Delicious preparations of the freshest fish and shellfish. Lunch and dinner daily; dinner, Mon-Sat. 403 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.9191.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 6770 McKinley St #150, Sebastopol. 707.523.4814.

MA R I N CO U N T Y Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Thank T ha n k Y You o ou We’re p We’re proud roud to to be be an an insider’s insider ’s ffavorite avorite ffor or sso om many any y years. ears .

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch

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EA ATS TS

D DRIN R I N KS KS

CATE C AT E RING RING

135 FO 135 OURTH U RT H S TR TREET EE T SA ANTA N TA R O OSA SA 707.545.6900 7 0 7. 5 4 5 . 6 90 0 JACKSONSBARANDOVEN J AC K S O N S B A R A N DOV E N . CO COM M


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e v e i l e b in a i n r o f i cal

made LOCALS DO IT BETTER.

SERVING DINNER Wednesday–Sundays (Saturday Piano Bar)

BAY VIEW RESTAURANT & BAR – BODEGA BAY ESTA BLISH ED IN 1984

Traditional Italian and Local Seafood at Affordable Prices

FATHER’S DAY ~ JUNE 11 ~ Full Bar, Fireside Lounge, Outdoor Patio ~ Featuring Sonoma County Wines ~ Spectacular Sunset Views ~ Winemaker Dinner Series featured Monthly ~ Groups and Receptions Welcome

Inn at the Tides 800 Hwy One, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

Dining ( 13 and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Thurs-Mon. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists with its fresh catches. A wide selection of nigiri, depending on what’s fresh. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, Fri-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.3620.

N A PA CO U N T Y Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

SMALL BITES

K&L Goes XL When Sebastopol’s Barlow development got underway last year, there was talk that downtown restaurants would suffer as the masses headed to the shiny new project and its ample parking. But if K&L Bistro was feeling any trepidation, you wouldn’t know it now. The 12-year-old restaurant just completed an extensive renovation, and the place looks reborn. Owners Karen and Lucas Martin (K&L, get it?) had long been eyeing the knitting shop next door. Thanks to an improving economy and a friendly landlord, they broke down the walls to add some needed space. The restaurant reopened May 26. The restaurant tripled in size and is now 3,200 square feet with space for a hundred diners. There’s a gorgeous, 26-foot-long copper bar (and a new full liquor license), an oyster bar, booth seating and outdoor dining. The tiny kitchen got an upgrade too. The restaurant’s menu of bistro classics, however, remains largely the same, but there is now an eclectic bar menu (i.e., corned beef tongue sliders, Korean fried chicken, pork belly and watermelon salad) and nine craft beers on tap. Is Lucas Martin worried about the Barlow siphoning away business? “No, everything is good,” he says. “We’re all in this together. I couldn’t be happier.” K&L Bistro, 19 S. Main St., Sebastopol. 707.823.6614. klbistro.com.—Stett Holbrook

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroir-

informed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.


Breweries Bear Republic Brewing Company One of the originals on the North Bay craft-beer scene, this family-owned brewery only gets better with age. Most famous for Racer 5, the Healdsburg location offers a surprisingly diverse selection of beers beyond the better-known names. 345 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. 707.433.2337. www. bearrepublic.com.

Carneros Brewing Company The focus is on flavor, not high ABV, with a Hispanic influence, at least on names of brews like Jefeweizen and Cervesa Pilsner. 22985 Burndale Road, Sonoma. 707.938.1880.

Hopmonk Tavern Founded by Dean Biersch of Gordon-Biersch, Hopmonk offers house-brewed beers Kellerbiers and Dunkelweizens, in addition to an impressive rotating list of seasonal craft beers from California and beyond. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 707.829.7300. 691 Broadway. Sonoma. 707.935.9100. www. hopmonk.com.

Lagunitas Brewing If you haven’t hit up the beer garden at the North Bay’s most laid-back brewery, waste no time and get down there, preferably on one of the many nights of live music. Sip on a Little Sumpin,’ Hop Stoopid, Hairy Eyeball, Pils . . . you are getting verrrrrryyy thirsty . . . 1280 N. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. 707.778.8776. www. lagunitas.com. Old Redwood Highway Brewery Now that they’ve made the leap from the garage to an actual building, this Windsor-based brewery has really taken off. Part of the appeal, beyond delicious beers, is the focus on locally sourced ingredients. 9000-A Windsor Road, Windsor. 707.657.7624.

101 North Brewing Company A new addition to the North Bay craft beer scene, this brewery’s Heroine IPA has 101 North winning at the beer game just out the gate. Based in

Petaluma, put it on your “oneto-watch” list. 1304 Scott St., Ste. D. Petaluma. 707.778.8384. www.101northbeer.com.

Russian River Brewing Co Tasty pizza and excellent—and worldfamous— brews. Two words: beer bites! 725 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. 707.545.2337. www. russianriverbrewing.com.

Ruth McGowan’s Brew Pub Straight outta Cloverdale, Ruth McGowan’s citrus wheat ale makes summer days fly by just right. During the colder days of winter, try the dry Irish stout. 131 E. First St., Cloverdale. 707.894.9610. www. ruthmcgowansbrewpub.com.

Stumptown Brewery A day on the river isn’t complete without a stop at Guerneville’s best (and only) brewery. Better yet, sip ale on the expansive patio overlooking the Russian River, and let those kayakers do all the work for you. 15045 River Road, Guerneville. 707.869.0705. www. stumptown.com.

Third Street Aleworks Third Street is sometimes overshadowed by a worldrenowned brewery just around the corner, but their Bombay rouge—a malty, drinkable IPA—can hold its own in a roomful of crowded beers. 610 Third St., Santa Rosa. 707.523.3060. www. thirdstreetaleworks.com.

Woodfour Brewing An artisan brewery located in the Barlow in Sebastopol, Woodfour is one of the only completely solar-powered breweries in the country. 6780 Depot St., Sebastopol. 630.854.1721. www. woodfourbrewing.com.

MA R I N CO U N T Y Broken Drum Brewery & Wood Grill Voted Best North Bay brewpub by Bohemian readers in 2011, the time is right to stop in for a handcrafted German lager, bock or summer golden ale at San Rafael’s friendliest beer establishment. 1132 Fourth St., San Rafael. 415.456.HOPS. www.brokendrum.com.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Fun specials, great live music. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Marin Brewing Co. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and award-winning porkbeer sausage. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

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Mill Valley Beerworks If there is a beer heaven, it might look a little like this Mill Valley gem of a spot. An impressive draft list is well stocked with old and new favorites. 173 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley. 415.888.8218. www.millvalleybeerworks.com.

Located inside

Moylan’s Brewery & Restaurant At Moylan’s, the

OXBOW PUBLIC MARKET 610 First Street Napa, CA 707.257.4992

M stands for malty. Hit up this Novato landmark for traditional ales that won’t fail the taste test. 15 Rowland Way, Novato. 415.898. HOPS. www.moylans.com.

WWW.CAMOMI.COM

Pizza Orgasmica & Brewing Company What goes together better than beer and pizza? Not much. Wash down a hefty slice of pepperoni with an Orgasmica kolsch, a cold-aged ale with a crisp, refreshing finish. 812 Fourth St., San Rafael. 415.457.BEER. www. pizzaorrgasmica.com.

N A PA CO U N TY Downtown Joe’s Restaurant & Brewery Boasts a brewery built by Chuck Ankeny—the great-grandson of Adolf Hamms—this Napa mainstay has serious historical chops. Try the palate-altering Golden Thistle Very Bitter ale, and prepare to be amazed. 902 Main St., Napa. 707.258.2337. www.downtownjoes.com.

Napa Smith Brewery Brewer Don Barkley was part of the revered New Albion Brewery, America’s first craft brewery since Prohibition, back in 1978. He’s now part of the team creating goldmedal winning IPAs, wheat beers, pilsners and more at Napa Valley’s only production brewery. 1 Executive Way, Napa. 707.254.7167. www. napasmithbrewery.com.

TOAST DAD THIS FATHER’S DAY SUN, JUN. 15, 11-4PM The Oyster Girls will be serving raw or BBQ oysters paired with Korbel Natural Champagne.

See Sebastopol’s

New Remodel

Dine with us soon!!

Complimentary tours. Special Case Sale 30-40% off, mix & match.

13250 River Road, Guerneville 10am to 5pm ~ 707.824.7316 www.korbel.com Celebrate Responsibly.

20 Years Strong in Sonoma County County! y! Serving authentic Thai cuisine 707.829.8889 In Downtown Sebast Sebastopol opol 707.575.9296 Santa Rosa M–F 11–3 & 4:30-9pm, Sat 12-9p 12-9pm pm thaipotrestaurant.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 1-17, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

S O N OM A CO U N T Y

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NORTH BAY BOH EMIAN | JUNE 1 1-17, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Unicorn’s Lair Sebastopol’s Warped Brewing a taproom worth a token BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

9592 Sonoma HXZtKenwood, CA 707.833.5891

VIETNAMESE CUISINE

BURSTING

with Flavor & Nutrition • GMO free beef • free range poultry • organic veggies & tofu

320 West 3rd St, Ste G Santa Rosa • 707.595.4447 www.phocrazy.biz

unwind on the coast Happy Hour 3-5 Daily

Tasting T asting a R Room oom Hours: 10 am tto o 4:30 pm

Enjoy Enj oy rresponsibly. esponsibly. kenwoodvineyards.com k enwoodvineyards.com m

Assorted Indian snacks, Mixed Platters $6 Samosas $3. All Bottled Beer $3

Authentic Indian Cuisine & select American Summer Fare

Bombay style Indian Chinese entrees also Open for Lunch & Dinner 11:30am–9pm

Sizzling Tandoor II 9960 HWY 1 s 707-865-0625

sn’t beer refreshing?

In the sense that, if you mention “orange wine,” which has nothing to do with oranges, mind you, be prepared for a maelstrom of controversy. Brew a beer with actual oranges—just because you can—and the response is more likely to be “Yeah!” Name the beer “Unicorns Are Real,” and it’s “Hell yeah!” Now that’s refreshing. The unicorn theme is one of those obscure 1980s references that, according to employees at Noah and Mirjam Bolmer’s Warped Brewing Company taproom in Sebastopol, may or may not be revealed in due time. Meanwhile, Warped has become such a popular hangout that hours have been extended to seven days a week, even while the small bar seats fewer than 10, plus a few patio tables overlooking the Barlow retail district, which filled up quickly on a recent Friday afternoon by 5pm. The theme is nothing like that of Barley and Hops, the popular Occidental tavern that the Bolmers also operate. Painted deep blue, with Pac Man–themed fermentation tanks, it’s all 1980s arcade games here. Remember Michael Jackson’s Moonwalk—the game? I don’t, either. There’s no food for sale at Warped, although a bar of soap ($7) made from their beer by a third party smells so malty and sweet that one might be tempted to dig in after a flight ($9) of four samples, each 6 ounces. Quite a value. Unicorns Are Magic is an orange-infused pale ale with a cult following, although it’s only in its second batch. The first was made with blood oranges stewed into the mash tun; the second, with Cara Cara navel oranges. But it has none of the overt fruity flavors, say, of some apricot ales. “That wasn’t the intent,” says assistant brewer Mark LaGris. Instead, it’s got a malty, cracked grain note, and a sort of distant, orangey inflection to the dry ale flavor. Orbital Outrage, a California steam beer, is a warm-fermented lager that is frankly a bit more fruity than the Unicorn. Pixelated Porter has an ultra-burnt malt aroma, and is more smoky than chocolatey. For me, the champion is Crash of ’83 IPA—hella more fruity than the Unicorn, due to the dry-hopped addition of key hop varieties. There’s an almost butterscotchy richness underling the fruity hops, and while not drying, it’s not cloyingly sweet, either. This is a delightful IPA, served in a no-frills, fun place by folks enthused about their product. I hope that Warped earns extra lives. Warped Brewing Co., 6790 McKinley St. #190, Sebastopol. Open daily, 1:30–9pm. 707.829.2061.


17 NO R RTH TH BAY B A Y BO H E M IIA AN | J JUNE UNE 1 11-17, - 1 7, 201 20 14 4 | BOH B EMI AN A N.COM .C O M

Beat the Heat The North Bay responds to the Climate Crisis

Greg Gr eg Roden

BY TOM GOGOLA, NICOLAS GRIZZLE AND STETT HOLBROOK

CARBON FARMER

Nicasio N rancher rancher and Marin Carbon Carbon Project Project cofounder founder John Wick Wiick spreads spreads compost compost over over his land. land.

P

resident Barack resident Barack Obama Obama an d th aders of th and thee le leaders thee in dustriialized ((r ead: industrialized (read: ccarbon arbon emittin g) emitting) nations of the the world world have have nations the planet planet away away failed to turn the from its plunge plunge off the the climateclimatefrom change cliff. cliff. Fortunately, Fortunately, change there are are peoplee showing showing there them the the way. way. them

Here H ere in the the North North Bay, Baay, efforts efforts to to com combat mbat a the the climate climate cri crisis sis ar aree in full effect. eff ffeect. We We profile profile three three of them them in this this year’s y ear’s annual annua a al Green G een Issue. Gr Issue. (Also (A Also read read thiss week’s thi week’ e s Open Mic fr from om the the Climate Climatte Protection Pr otecttion C Campaign’s ampaign’s Ann H Hancock, ancock,, p6). p6 6). ) While W none none of these these groups groups can can save save thee world th world on th their eir o own—at wn—at le least ast n not ot y yet— eet— their th eir actions action c s are are essential essential for fo or showing showing th thee rrest est of us and and our our ineffectual ineff ffeectual leaders leaders what what ccan an an and nd must be done. done.

Th Thee stakes stakes couldn’t couldn’t be b high higher. er. Th Thee eff effects ects of climate climate ch change an nge ar aree aalready lready upon us—extreme us—extreme weather, weath a err, changing changing ec ecosystems, osystems, m mass ass eextinction, xtin inction, i ffailin failing ili g cr crops. ops. The The doomsday doomsday scenarios scenarios will ccontinue ontinue to to un unspool. spool. IIss it too too llate? ate? M Maybe. ay ybe. But But isn’t isn’t it better better tto o do w what hat w wee ccan? an n? L Let et th tthose ose le leading ading th thee fight against against climate climate ch change ange in th thee N North orth Bay Baay serve serve aass our our inspiration. i spiration. in — —Stett Stett Holbr Holbrook rook ) 18


Beat the Heat ( 17 Marin Carbon Project

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Most efforts to cool the planet focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions and switching to cleaner, more energy efficient technologies. But there’s another approach that gets far less attention: carbon sequestration, which involves taking carbon out of the atmosphere and putting it into the ground, where most of it came from. The Marin Carbon Project (MCP) has been quietly doing that work for the past six years. When the Bohemian ďŹ rst reported on the project in our 2012 Green Issue, they were very much in the proof-of-concept stage. They have since scaled up and taken the show on the road. “It’s better than successful,â€? says co-founder John Wick. The project began after researchers noticed that dairy ranches with high concentration of manure spread over them had high levels of carbon and organic matter in the soil, greener grass, and greater water retention. Guided by UC Berkeley scientist Whendee Silver, the researchers applied a half inch of compost to a test plot on Wick’s ranch in West Marin to see what was going on. They were thrilled by what they discovered underground. After one year, test plots showed at least one ton of carbon per hectare. A year later, without adding additional compost, they found another ton of carbon in the soil. Same thing the year after that. And on it went. If adopted widely enough, Wick believes the technique can make agriculture a global carbon sink and bring atmospheric carbon down. “We can actually do this,â€? he says. Tory Estrada, who serves on the MCP’s steering committee and is policy director for the Carbon Cycle Institute, the nonproďŹ t organization that oversees the MCP, is working with ranchers to show them what compost and a host of techniques like restoring native plants and

waterways will do for their soil—and their bottom lines. Not all farmers are concerned about climate change, so he doesn’t always lead with beneďŹ ts to the climate, but ranchers are very concerned about the cost of importing hay during times of drought. According to MCP research, using their techniques results in an average of 50 percent more grass growth because the soil holds more water. And banked carbon in the soil will become a valuable commodity as the cap-and-trade market grows. Disseminating these practices via local resource conservation districts throughout the country could kickstart a whole new approach to farming—and a cooler climate. Estrada hopes better soil and pasture management will lead to agriculture being seen as an incentivized climate solution, like electric vehicles and solar power, which both enjoy public subsidies. “That’s when this thing will go viral,â€? he says. Meanwhile, Wick is working with San Francisco to help nullify the city’s carbon emissions to make it the world’s ďŹ rst “climate beneďŹ cial city.â€? He’s also talking with Levi’s, the North Face and Patagonia to explore sourcing wool from carbon sequestering farms. Cool stuff for a hot planet.—Stett Holbrook

Daily Acts Trathen Heckman is in his backyard micro-ecosystem with the buzzing honeybees and the kiwis, the root medicines and the roosters, as he explains the mission of Daily Acts, the Petaluma organization he founded. Heckman, a former pro snowboarder and happy refugee from corporate America, decided about 10 years ago that he wanted to become “less a part of the problem,� as he puts it, and set his shoulder to the wheel of activism with a plan to give people the tools and skills to act locally while fretting globally. He was feeling, he says, “a lack of


Tom Gogola

19

Going to the EDGE Saturday, June 14 1pm to 5pm GROWING GREEN Trathen Heckman founded Daily Acts to develop

community-scale environmental activism.

connection, a lack of vitality.” He was out there slogging away in the Babylonian trenches, until 9-11 and the death of his mom, twin events which became the catalyst for Heckman to zero-in on how he wanted to live. He sought out pioneer activists in what was then a new world of backyard wetland-to-forest systems, admired their spirit and sensibilities and wondered, he says with a gleam and a laugh, “what’s in their Wheaties? Enter Daily Acts, a nonprofit that offers workshops, actions, networking and other activities to help engender a shared sense of connectivity, vitality and a general community joie de vivre that is heavy on volunteer labor and cross-generational appeal. Among its other successes, Daily Acts has spearheaded legislative efforts in Sonoma County, for example, to make it easier for people to set up graywater-reuse systems in their homes, through

a project called the “Laundry to Landscape” program. This is the lingo of the lush and fecund backyard ecosystem, replete with propagation guilds and edible landscapes, sustainability tours and “mulch madness” parties. Daily Acts also brings the edible-ecosystem model to schools, churches, government plots and, critically, minority communities. Heckman’s wise to the elitism critique and notes that the organization recently put together its 100 Salsa Gardens project that came complete with lots of donated wine barrels and buy-in from the county’s large Latino population. Add “ecological equity” to the vernacular. We’re living in a period characterized by a “confluence of crises unlike anything we’ve seen in human history,” Heckman says as he plucks raspberries and boysenberries

) 20

Jackson Theater at Sonoma Country Day School Food and wine reception following Advance Tickets: $40 general | $25 students Learn more about TED, TEDx and this event at www.tedxsonomacounty.com This independent TEDx event is operated under license from TED.

Capture his gaze! Shop our stylish, comfortable womens and mens apparel. Complete your look with shoes from Naot, Merrell, Pikolinos, Keen, Born, Teva. Extensive selection available for women, men and children. Remember Father’s Day Sun, Jun. 15th Open Daily 10–6pm • 707.824.4300 195 N Main St, Sebastopol

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 1-17, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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Beat the Heat ( 19

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from his backyard food forest. With a sweep of his arms, he describes the layers, from the root medicines down below to the top of a lone towering redwood, with layers in-between yielding a bounty that Heckman says runs from between 500 and 1,000 pounds of food a year. It’s a living embodiment of human-scaled efforts to combat climate change, a marvel of sustainable cool that pushes back against hardened notions of suburban life. The “crabgrass frontier,â€? as described by Kenneth Jackson in his landmark 1985 study of the same name on the social construct of suburbia, is giving way, slowly, to an actual model of down-home “conservativeâ€? values that highlights, well, actually conserving things, appreciating their value, and reusing resources instead of wasting them. Heckman’s efforts speak to a curious—and welcome—turn of events in the development of the American suburb. The suburban boom in the U.S. kicked into gear in the post– WW II era, when cookie-cutter neighborhoods were carved out of farm ďŹ elds for returning veterans. The war years themselves had seen the phenomenon of the “Victory Garden,â€? where Americans were encouraged to do their part to beat fascism by growing lettuce and tomatoes at home. Once the war ended, the homegrown gardens gave way to grass planted on former farmland, and the eco-nighmare lawnmowers invaded, like Patton. Nowadays, efforts such as Heckman’s are part of a new push to achieve victory over the global scourge of rising temperatures and sea levels which has, despite the best efforts of the climatechange deniers, manifested in tangible impacts, such as the drowning of the Florida Keys and hundred-year storms that happen every three years. For his part in this new war effort, Heckman installed a 1,500-gallon water tank that captures rainwater from his gutters and recirculates it

throughout the property. The tank helps create the ground-level wetland that supports all measure of berries, fruits and veggies, stuff like jasmine, garlic and Pakistani black mulberries, and a plum tree that’s been grafted so several varieties grow from the main trunk. Daily Acts’ offices are several blocks away from his homestead, and Heckman notes that you can see what his organization’s efforts have yielded. Most of the homes here in pretty Petaluma hew to standardized suburban practices of green lawns and mowers thereon, but every so often, there’s a wildower outlier that’s been given over to an edible front yard. “It was such a different world a decade ago,â€? he says.—Tom Gogola

Sonoma Biochar Project There is a substance that’s easy to make that could reverse the trend of global warming, increase plant production, retain water and eliminate the need for chemical fertilizers. No, it isn’t that magic extraterrestrial spice from Dune; it’s something everyone can make in their own backyard. It can be scaled up for large projects. It can even be made as a byproduct of energy production. It’s virtually unknown to most of the world. It’s biochar. “It seems too good to be true,� says David Morell, former Environmental Protection Agency administrator and project manager of the Sonoma Biochar Project. “If it’s as good as its proponents say, why isn’t it used everywhere? And it feels like magic—we’re sequestering carbon, capturing energy, helping plants grow, saving the planet, yadda, yadda. And that makes something hard to sell. “I’ve actually run seminars on this,� adds Morell. “‘If it’s such a good idea, why aren’t we doing more of it?’ The answer has to do with marketing.� Let’s back up a step. First of all, what is biochar? It’s basically


and farms like Green String and Swallow Valley—to build the county’s first integrated biochar production system. It makes about 500 pounds of biochar per day, enough to just about cover a quarter-acre. Even with this breakthrough—they designed and built the unit from scratch to ensure minimal air emissions—they’re on “the low end” of biochar production. “It’s like buying a car that you have to crank on the front,” says Morell, adding that the top-tier units cost upwards of $250,000. As for marketing, that’s something Raymond Baltar has been working on as director of the Sonoma Biochar Initiative, the nonprofit arm of the Sonoma Ecology Center which oversees the Sonoma Biochar Project. “There is not a huge market right now for biochar,” he says. “It’s growing, but it’s still pretty small compared to other soil amendments out there because it’s so new.” For his MBA thesis at Dominican University, Baltar wrote a business plan for a gassification program at the Sonoma County landfill that also produced biochar. “We showed pretty conclusively that in order to make the project work you needed biochar and the electricity generation portion of it,” he says. “Initially, I think, biochar caught wide attention because of the potential for carbon sequestration,” says Morell. “Putting carbon effectively into the ground is an attractive process. But the economics of that is near zero. In the U.S., we have no carbon credits. We have no ability to generate economic return from dealing with the planet’s climate challenge. That’s kinda crazy, but it’s true.” One of the downsides raised about biochar is that if this is done at scale, people might start farming trees just to make biochar. “But that might help carbon dioxide absorption anyway,” Baltar says.—Nicolas Grizzle

21

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charcoal made from biomass like plants and trees that have been pyrolized—that is, burned at very high temperatures (650–930 degrees) without fire. “The heat drives off all the gasses that are in the wood, leaving pure, elemental carbon behind,” explains Morell. Carbon is retained much more efficiently through this process, and that sequestered carbon can be buried in the earth, where it retains about 80 percent of its carbon for at least a hundred years, according to Johannes Lehmann of Cornell University, one of the nation’s leading biochar scientists. Lehmann theorizes that 10 to 12 percent of the world’s carbon emissions can be offset by replacing a slash-and-burn technique with slash-and-char, which would turn the waste plants into biochar through on-site pyrolisis units. So far, biochar has proven to be the most realistic—if not the only—carbon-negative energy production method we’ve ever known. The idea of burying charred wood goes back to about 2,500 B.C.E., when indigenous peoples in the Amazon rainforest began making and burying primitive biochar to make the notoriously infertile soil better for growing crops. They didn’t worry about carbon sequestration, however. Atmospheric carbon dioxide has increased from 280 ppm in 1750 to 367 ppm in 1999, according to data from Cornell University, and the levels of today have not been exceeded at any time in the past 420,000 years. But the data on biochar’s big four benefits—carbon sequestration, soil health, water conservation and energy production—only goes back about 15 or 20 years, says Morell. His work focuses largely on water retention, which he says has shown, in some cases, to be as high as 8 percent more than nonbiochar soil. The Sonoma Biochar Project kicked into gear with a $75,000 federal grant in October—which was matched by the Sonoma County Water Agency and by passionate experts like Morell


PIANO MAN After meeting Ira Gershwin as a child, Richard Glazier’s love of musicals deepened.

Show Tunes

Pianist Richard Glazier brings Hollywood to life in one-man show BY JESSE BELL

C

lassically trained pianist and showtune aficionado Richard Glazier is in the middle of watching the reality show Sister Wives when I phone him at his home in Sacramento. “Have you ever seen it?” he asks slyly. Having established that Glazier has an appreciation for the type of entertainment that is less unassuming than the sublime material he is used to performing

is a testament to his love of all things entertainment. It’s also an indication of his sense of humor. Glazier will be sharing his love of cinema, as well as his encyclopedic knowledge of the Gershwin brothers, at the opulent Rafael Film Center on June 18 in “Broadway to Hollywood,” a oneman, multimedia journey into the art of movie music. “I want [the audience] to feel like they are sitting in my living room and I am going to take [them] on a magical carpet ride.” Glazier says.

A self-confessed “old soul,” Glazier watched the film Girl Crazy as a precocious nine-yearold and fell in love with the sound of Judy Garland’s voice and the complexities of the Gershwin compositions. A pre-teen Glazier was compelled to write a letter of gratitude and appreciation to Ira Gershwin (brother George had passed away in 1937) at the behest of his aunt. Glazier received a response from Ira himself five months later. Soon after, a regular

correspondence developed, culminating in a visit to Ira Gershwin’s Beverly Hills home, where Glazier had the honor of playing “Embraceable You” and “Love Is Here to Stay” on George’s piano. A career born of awe and admiration followed. Glazier’s love of a Gershwin tune has taken him all over the world, most notably playing gratis through the Pro Musicis Foundation for various institutions, including Riker’s Island prison in New York. “The prisoners loved it!” he says, making sure to add that these were the female inmates. Richard Glazier has played the Smith Rafael Film Center on two previous occasions. After a screening of the documentary Note by Note, Glazier “brought the house down with his rendition of George Gershwin’s ‘Rhapsody in Blue,’” and later when he performed his Judy Garland multimedia show, says Richard Peterson, director of programming at the Rafael. “Richard is an adept storyteller as well as a consummate musician, and while he performs the music that made Broadway and Hollywood great, he can also share the history,” says Peterson. Glazier confesses that he has “a great passion for voices of the past—old movies, old things.” His love of musicals and talent for telling a good story will no doubt translate well with fellow musical enthusiasts around the Bay Area as well as a younger crowd or those just learning about this genre of film. Richard Glazier will be performing ‘Broadway to Hollywood’ at the Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center on Wednesday, June 18, at 7:30pm. www.cafilm.org.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 1-17, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Illustration by Al Hirschfeld

Arts Ideas

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Stage

S.F. CONFIDENTIAL Peter Sinn Nachtrieb’s play brings quirky San Francisco to life.

Dark, Wry ‘T.I.C.’ leavens heady subjects with humor BY DAVID TEMPLETON

‘T

his is a very busy time for me, shows opening all over,” enthuses Bay Area playwright Peter Sinn Nachtrieb, speaking from Wooly Mammoth Theater in Washington, D.C., where his newest show, The Totalitarians, opened recently. “It’s a dark comedy,” Nachtrieb says of the sharpwitted political satire. Of course, the phrase “dark comedy” pretty much describes everything Nachtrieb writes, including the offbeat T.I.C. (Trenchcoat in Common), opening this weekend at Main Stage West in Sebastopol. Directed by Sheri Lee Miller, the play features Ivy Rose Miller as a teenage girl who starts a blog about the strange people who live in her San Francisco apartment building. “It’s got every archetype of a

Bay Area inhabitant you can think of,” says Nachtrieb. “I wanted to populate the play with lots of different types, people we don’t really know very much about, but who we see every day.” Asked if his characters spring from his imagination or are suggested by real folks he’s actually encountered, Nachtrieb laughs. “Well, I don’t know that many flasher-exhibitionists,” he allows, referring to one colorful character played by Gary Grossman. “That character did emerge out of my own head, but most of the other characters are suggested by people I’ve observed, people who just seem very serious, very singleminded and driven by different causes, though I don’t always know what those causes are.” In the case of T.I.C., those “causes” take the story in some pretty unexpected directions, plunging our young protagonist into a weirdly funny, but potentially dangerous, world. As a playwright specializing in dark comedies, Nachtrieb knows he must maintain a very a careful balance between what is funny and what is “dark.” “It’s that tension between the lighter moments and the darker ones that I really like exploring,” says Nachtrieb, who honed his skills writing for the beloved Bay Area comedy troupe Killing My Lobster. “My background is in writing sketch comedy, so the funny stuff is kind of my ‘sweet spot.’ With my plays, I always want to tackle serious issues, serious ideas, but it’s always through the lens of comedy, because that’s just how I see things.” It has been pointed out that many of Nachtrieb’s characters are, for lack of a better terms, a little “inappropriate,” like the flasher in T.I.C. “Yes,” he laughs. “And one thing I’ve found is that the characters who are the most fun to write, are the ones who are the most inappropriate.” ‘T.I.C. (Trenchcoat in Common)’ runs Thursday–Sunday, June 13–June 29 at Main Stage West. 104 N. Main St., Sebastopol. Thursday–Saturday, 8pm; 5pm matinees on Saturday and Sunday. $15–$25. 707.823.0177


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ONE DAY AT A TIME Tom Cruise has to relive a worse day in ‘Edge of Tomorrow’

than Bill Murray ever did.

Die Hard

‘Edge of Tomorrow’ mashes up ‘Groundhog Day’ and ‘Starship Troopers’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

n Edge of Tomorrow, brass-hatted communications officer William Cage (Tom Cruise) stupidly angers his CO, Gen. Brigham (Brendan Gleeson), who is preparing D-Day II against Fortress Europe. The continent is occupied by alien “mimicsâ€?—giant Rastafarian wigs made out of barbed wire, spinning around at high speeds like a carnival eggbeater ride. Busted down to private, Cruise is the new meat in a death sandwich, militarily exo-skeletoned but killed instantly on the Normandy beachhead. He comes back to life to relive the events, this time with some extra knowledge of how to survive. Shortly after a number of deaths, Cage meets Rita (Emily Blunt) a celebrity ace of the war, the so-called Angel of Verdun; that WWI battleďŹ eld was the site of a rare defeat for the frightwigs. Minimalist acting on Blunt’s part; she emotes believable trauma, without being all that interesting. Director Doug Liman’s straightforward mashup of Groundhog Day and Starship Troopers, taken from a highly derivative Japanese novel, has one strong virtue: it’s close to Harry Harrison’s parody of Robert Heinlein, Bill, the Galactic Hero, complete with mean fellow soldiers, defective equipment and bloodthirsty sarges. (Bill Paxton, excellent, is set to take over any R. Lee Ermey parts.) Another virtue is the spirited ďŹ nale in a postapocalyptic Louvre—heads up Arc du Carrousel! Early mysteries leads to cast-iron plot points, obvious solutions and the unlikely rational explanation for Cage’s “slightly different day, same shit.â€? Some ďŹ nd Groundhog Day deep, but there isn’t delve-worthy material here. The tomorrow we can forecast is one where movies devolve into shooter games. Edge of Tomorrow’s manifold deaths and reboots give that ominously huge gamer audience the pleasure they weren’t getting in the cinema: the aspect of being able to reset and play again.

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Wed, June 11 8:45–9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 10:15am– SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE 12:40pm Youth and Family 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7-10:00pm SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club Thur, June 12 8:45–9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:15-10:00pm CIRCLES & SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, June 13 8:45–9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 7:30–10:30pm CALIFORNIA BALLROOM DANCE Cha Cha Lesson Sat, June 14 8:30–9:30am JAZZERCISE 10:30am–12:30pm SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE CLASS 1-5pm FOR THE LOVE OF SOUL with Isoke Femi 7pm Steve Luther TOP 40s DANCE HITS! Sun, June 15 8:30–9:30am JAZZERCISE 5–9:30pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, June 16 8:45–9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7pm–9:30pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tue, June 17 8:45–9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:30–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC

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TIP OF THE HAT Frankie Boots & the County Line play Saturday’s Hootenany show.

It’s a Hoot Hootenanny takes over the Arlene Francis Center

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

E

ven though the North Bay Hootenanny is a year-round, multi-venue endeavor that promotes local acts and good music, most people still associate the name with the Hootenanny’s annual weekend party held at the Arlene Francis Center in Santa Rosa.

It began five years ago as a oneday bash, though the weekend expanded into two days of music a few years back. Now Hootenanny founder Josh Windmiller is going even further by adding a third day and hosting multiple stages for this year’s show running June 13–15. “This event is where the spirit of the Hootenanny is really evident,” says Windmiller. “Everything’s happening at the same time.” The jam-packed days of music

Sterling Munksgard

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feature two stages, with bands in both the larger brick room and the smaller saloon stage playing near the bar. It’s not an event about headliners as much as it is a communal get-together “for the bands as much as the audience,” remarks Windmiller. Along with the stages, there’s a jam room where impromptu collaborations are encouraged. There is also dancing and lessons in the Arlene Francis Center’s classroom and family-friendly activities throughout. With a strong slant toward roots and Americana, the Hootenanny includes a wide variety of North Bay and Bay Area musicians. Friday sees popular acts like the Dixie Giants and Ring of Truth, and it also features Santa Rosa indie folk punk band Rags, who Windmiller refers to as “one of the best kept secrets in the North Bay.” Saturday is a full afternoon and night of music with more local favorites like Frankie Boots & the County Line playing alongside soon-to-be favorites like San Francisco’s Heartache Sisters and the Corner Store Kids, a band that Windmiller says learned their trade playing a lot of late-night house shows. Sunday is it’s own beast, an afternoon Windmiller is calling the “Hooligan Street Fair,” with six marching bands taking over the lot outside the center, including the Chaotic Noise Marching Corps and the Ten Men Brass Band, both of whom are currently touring their way up to the Honk Fest West in Seattle. It’s a dizzying amount of good music, and sure to bring out big crowd. “These events are about the joy of discovery,” says Windmiller. “There’s a special energy that pops up here, one that really resonates with people.” The North Bay Hootenanny Weekend Party takes place on June 13–15, at the Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 6pm, Friday; 2pm, Saturday–Sunday. $10–$20 (kids 12 and under free). 707.528.3009.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Blue Rose Ball Steve Forbert, Mark Karan, Josh Joplin, Jason Crosby and many others appear to honor the memory of Joe Capone and benefit the Old Adobe School. Jun 14, 8pm. $100. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Country Summer Hunter Hayes and Darius Rucker headline the two-day, outdoor festival featuring contemporary country music acts. Jun 13-14. $49-$119 per day. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Huichica Music Festival David Longstreth of Dirty Projectors headlines event that also features Mount Eerie, Vetiver, Kelley Stoltz and others. Jun 13-14. $75-$120. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

North Bay Hootenanny Weekend Party The Dixie Giants, the Corner Store Kids and Ben Weiner’s Big Band headline three days packed with local bands on multiple stages. Jun 13-15. $10-$20. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

MARIN COUNTY Ian Dogole Dogole and his troupe of world-class jazz musicians perform. Jun 15, 7pm. $20-$25. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY The Both: Aimee Mann & Ted Leo The storied songwriters again collaborate in this new rock duo. Jun 11, 8pm. $35-$45. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Erik Jekabson Quartet & John Santos Presented by the Napa Valley Jazz Society. Jun 15, 4pm. $20-

$40. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Ginger Baker’s Jazz Confusion Legendary Cream and Blind Faith drummer returns with a new jazz fusion experiment. Jun 17, 8pm. $40-$50. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Jun 13, Greenhouse. Jun 14, Ring of Truth. Jun 15, Gary Vogensen Sunday Ramble. Second Wednesday of every month, Jazz Jam. Second Thursday of every month, open mic night. Third Wednesday of every month, West Coast Singer Songwriter Competition. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Jun 12, Conceptualized. Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Bergamot Alley Jun 15, Steep Ravine. Jun 17, the Crux. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Burgers & Vine Jun 14, Midnight Sun Massive. 400 First St E, Sonoma. 707.938.7110.

Cloverdale Plaza Jun 13, Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys. Cloverdale Blvd between First and Second St, Cloverdale.

Epicurean Connection Jun 15, Lauren Ruhl and Jon Emery. Second Thursday of every month, open mic with Josh Windmiller. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Finley Community Center Second Friday of every month, Tom Shader Trio. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jun 13, Sol Horizon. Jun 14, Jimmie Vaughan & the Tilta-Whirl Band. Tues, open mic night. Wed, Brainstorm EDM show. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques

Hopmonk Sonoma Jun 13, Bobby Jo Valentine. Jun 14, the Welcome Matt. Jun 15, Hannah Jern-Miller. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

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& Guac. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Jun 14, Stephanie Ozer Trio with Andrew Emer and Phil Thomson. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Amphitheaterette Jun 16, Tumbleweed Wanderers. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jun 11, Del Ray and Suzy. Jun 12, Lowell Levinger. Jun 13, JimBo Trout. Jun 14, Jenny Kerr. Jun 15, LipBone Redding. Jun 18, the Royal Deuces. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Thurs, Susan Sutton Jazz Piano. Sun, Kit Mariah’s Open Mic Night. Mon, Gypsy Cafe. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen Jun 13, DJ Sameo. Jun 14, Charlie Unplugged. Sun, DJ Prodkt. Tues, Thurs, 9pm, karaoke with Country Dan. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Wed, trivia night. Second Saturday of every month, Bluegrass Night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Jun 13, Tainted Love. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jun 14, Geoff Muldaur. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater Jun 14, Heroes and Villains EDM show. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Second Thursday of every month, writers workshops. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Raven Theater Windsor Jun 13, Vinyl Revival. 195 Windsor River Rd, Windsor.

Red’s Apple Roadhouse Jun 11, the Jen

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//JAXONDRIVE JAX A XOND O ND RIV IVE


Music ( 27

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 1-17, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Tucker Band. Jun 13, Kyle Martin Band. Jun 18, Tyler Gregory. 4550 Gravenstein Hwy. North, Sebastopol. 707.861.9338.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Jun 14, Jacob Green. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sally Tomatoes Jun 13, the Teleblasters. Wed, North Bay Blues Jam. 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Sebastiani Theatre Jun 13, Dead on Live. 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Jun 13, Alphabet Baroque. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Bohemian’s annual North Bay Music Awards are back

Sebastopol Library

The NorBays, the Bohemian’s annual celebration of local music and all-around good time, is coming to Sebastopol’s Hopmonk on Aug. 16.

Jun 14, Rua Samba. 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.823.7691.

Stout Brothers Jun 11, Brandon Butler and Probable Cause. Jun 12, Craig Corona. Jun 14, DJ Rick Vegaz. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Sugarloaf Ridge State Park Jun 13, Funky Fridays: V-Train Xpress. 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin

DeLone 8:00pm

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Aoife O’Donovan with Liz

Longley

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Melvin Seals & JGB with Lauren Murphy )UL-XQH‡SP

Holly Williams with Anderson

East

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The Right Honorable

Austin de Lone’s Big Band )UL-XQH‡SP

Hot for Teacher

the Van Halen Experience 6DW-XQH‡SP

Summer Solstice Celebration with

Mark Karan

& Very Special Guests 6XQ-XQH‡SP

Remi & Chloe 7XH-XQH‡SP

Ray Bonneville with Mike

Beck

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Paper Bird

with The

Americans

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

707.829.7300 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 S E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE 230 P E TA L U M A A V E | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN WED W ED JUN JUN 1 11 1 BASS B A SS | TRAP TR AP | EDM ED M

BRAINSTORM: B RAINSTORM: K THEORY THEORY $$10ADV/$15/DOORS 10ADV/$15/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

FRI F RI JUN JUN 13 13

HIGH H IGH V VIBES IBES REGGAE R EG G AE

SOL S OL H HORIZON ORIZON

$$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT JUN JUN 14 14

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MONDAY M ONDAY NI NIGHT GHT E EDUTAINMENT DUTAINMENT W WITH ITH

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Return of the NorBays!

The Blue Heron Restaurant & Bar Jun 15, Levi Lloyd. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Tradewinds Jun 13, the Great Willy Jordan. Jun 14, the Antiquaters. Jun 18, Ralph Woodson Unplugged. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. Mon, Blues Defenders Pro Jam. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Twin Oaks Tavern Jun 11, Country Jam night with Kevin Russell. Jun 13, The Allways Elvis Band. Jun 14, Trainwreck Junction. Jun 15, Blues and BBQ with Jimmy Smith Band. Jun 18, Biscuits and Gravy. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

We’ll be handing out gold record awards for the best bands in nine different categories of music, honoring the top talents in Sonoma, Marin and Napa counties. We’re also returning with another 24-Hour Band Contest. Here’s how it works. Preliminary write-in voting for the NorBays is live now on bohemian.com. Tell us your favorite bands in genres ranging from folk to world to rockand-roll. If you’re a band, tell your fans. If you’re a fan, tell your friends. The bands with the most write-ins go on to the final voting round on July 2. Voting ends July 27. The winners will be announced and awarded at the show. As before, the 24-Hour Band Contest is taking sign-ups from all skill levels. Tell us who you are and what you play. On Aug. 15, we’ll pick names at random to form bands made up of complete strangers. You then have one earthly rotation to come up with two original tunes and perform them at the show the next night at the NorBays. Sign up now at bohemian.com and keep rockin’ in the free world. The 2014 North Bay Music Awards and 24Hour Band Show happens Saturday, Aug. 16, at Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. $10 (all ages).—Charlie Swanson

Vino di Amore Jun 12, Steve Winkle. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

Whiskey Tip Jun 12, Dustin Saylor. Jun 13, Junk Parlor. Jun 14, Levi Lloyd

and friends. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Zodiacs Jun 11, David T Carter. Jun 12,

the Linda Ferro Band. Jun 13, Melvin Seals & the Jerry Garcia Band. Jun 14, Gene Washington and Ironsides. 256 Petaluma


Blvd North, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

Belrose Theater Thurs, open mic night. Second Wednesday of every month, Ragtime jam. 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6422.

Fenix Jun 13, Chris Cain Band. J un 14, Silver Moon Big Band. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Jun 12, Orquesta Borinquen. Wed, Rock and R&B Jam. Sat, DJ Night. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Jun 13, Prezident Brown. Jun 14, Big Tree. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club Jun 11, Colin Brown Trio. Jun 12, Radar Love. Jun 13, Vinyl. Jun 14, Fairfax Fest Saturday with Fenton Coolfoot. Jun 15, Achilles Wheel. Jun 17, Buddy Owen Band. Jun 18, Hi Beamz. Tues, Bluesday Piano Night. Mon, 9pm, open mic. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Jun 13, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Jun 14, Honeydust. Jun 15, King & Ace. Jun 18, Rory McNamara, Stevie Coyle and Doug Adamz. Sat, Ukulele Jam Session. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, open mic with Simon Costa. Second Wednesday of every month, Acoustic Guitar Showcase. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Station House Cafe Jun 15, the Easy Leaves. Third Monday of every month, Blue Monday with Paul Knight. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jun 11, Aoife O’Donovan. Jun 12, Melvin Seals & the Jerry Garcia Band. Jun 13, Holly Williams. Jun 15, the Right Honorable Austin de Lone’s Big Band. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Jun 13, Terrapin Family Band with Lebo. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Sun, Midnight North. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Town Center Corte Madera Jun 15, 2pm, Z and the Benders.

100 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961.

NAPA COUNTY City Winery Napa Jun 12, Red Molly with Aoife O’Donovan. Jun 13, Tommy Castro & the Painkillers. Jun 14, Bob Schneider. Jun 16, Milk Carton Kids. Jun 18, Josh Rouse with Doug Paisley. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Jun 11, Pion 2 Zion. Jun 12, Jeff Fetters. Jun 13, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Jun 14, Jinx Jones. Jun 17, the Sorry Lot. Wed, Jumpstart. Sun, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

FARM at Carneros Inn Jun 12, Dan Daniels Trio. Jun 11, Trio Soleá. Jun 18, D’Bunchovus Trio. 4048 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 888.400.9000.

Goose & Gander Jun 15, San Geronimo. 1245 Spring St, St. Helena. 707.967.8779.

Silo’s Jun 12, Syria T Berry. Jun 13, Wendy Dewitt. Jun 14, Revolver. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Osteria Divino Jun 11, Stuart Rabinowitsh. Jun 12, Passion Habanera. Jun 13, Grant Levin Trio. Jun 14, Denise Perrier. Jun 15, Jake Leckie Trio. Jun 17, Con Quimba. Jun 18, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jun 11, Donna D’acuti. Jun 12, Wanda Stafford. Jun 17, Swing Fever. Jun 18, Marianna August. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Jun 14, Fairfax Festival After Party. Jun 15, La Mandanga. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 1-17, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

MARIN COUNTY

Sleeping Lady

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

San Francisco’s City Guide

Jolie Holland Indie singer-songwriter tours in support of her latest, highly acclaimed record. June 11 at the Independent.

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW

LAURIE MORVAN BAND Jun 13 Blues Diva, Guitar Slinger 8:00 Fri

FATHER’S DAY Gatesiscaatt34, BBQ ON THE LAWN! Mu

TOMMY CASTRO AND THE Jun 15 P AINKILLERS SPECIAL GUESTS KEITH Sun

Atlanta-based R&B singer who works with the likes of Kayne West possesses soulful range. June 13 at Yoshi’s S.F.

CROSSAN AND NANCY WRIGHT Fri LOCAL ALL-STARS Jun 20 HIGH TIDE COLLECTIVE

The Rubinoos

Sat

Syleena Johnson

Seminal ’70s–’80s power-pop act from Berkeley still cranks out pop gems. June 14 at Great American Music Hall.

Blues, Funk, Soul 8:00 / No Cover

SHANA MORRISON Jun 21 Songwriter/Singer 8:30 Sun

Boogie Woogie Queen

Jun 13, Laurie Morvan. Jun 15, Tommy Castro & the Painkillers. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Instrumental metal group returns from hiatus, still armed with towering riffs and immense volume. June 15 at Slim’s.

Fri

5:00 / No Cover Western Dance Party!

Yann Tiersen

Sat

Sausalito Seahorse

French multi-instrumentalist with an avant-garde streak performs music from new, largely acoustic folk-rock album. June 17 at Regency Ballroom.

Rancho Nicasio

Jun 12, College of Marin Big Swing Jazz Band. Jun 13, James Moseley Band. Jun 14, the Overcommitments. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello and Seth. Sun, live salsa music. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Pelican

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Jun 22 Jun 27

Rancho Debut!

WENDY DEWITT’S

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Sun

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Jun 29 AN AFTERNOON WITH RUTHIE FOSTER

3, Gates att 4 Music a

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

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11350 350 Third Third St, St, Napa Napa | 7707.259.0123 07.259.0123

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NORTH BAY BOH EMIAN | JUNE 1 1-17, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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RECEPTIONS

Pie Eyed Open Studio, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joe Szuecs Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? the artist appears with his re-purposed objects turned into fantastical art. 4pm. 2371 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.477.9442.

Jun 14 C14 Contemporary Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Presence,â&#x20AC;? displays paintings, sculpture and mixed media from the galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s core artists. 5pm. 6780 Depot St, Suite 100, Sebastopol. 707.827.3020.

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Marin Society of Artists Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Solstice,â&#x20AC;? artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice exhibit features a wide range of works in various media, all inspired by the longest day of the year. 2pm. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

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Party SONOMA COUNTY Arts Guild of Sonoma

June 14, 7:30pm $10

Billy Love Express Original rock, R&B, funk and blues GEMINI Party! June 20, 8pm $15

Jens Jarvie

Ecstatic Solstice Kirtan June 21, 8pm $20Adv/$25Door

Fanna-fi-Allah

Sufi Qawwali Music

to Mon, 12pm to 5pm. 707.812.7101.

Charles M Schulz Museum

Falkirk Cultural Center, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reflections,â&#x20AC;? presenting ceramic pieces that reflect thoughts and expression. 5:30pm. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

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Arts Events

Through Jun 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Michael Mudd/Brian Martinelli,â&#x20AC;? the two artists and other guild members are on display through the month. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Atascadero Creek Winery Through Jun 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buon Fresco and Inks,â&#x20AC;? Solo show of fresco fragments made in the true ancient technique of roman frescos with a contemporary twist by French-American artist isabelle Proust. 6542 Front st, Forestville. Thurs

Through Jul 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;From the Pen to the Comic Pages,â&#x20AC;? exhibits the evolution of the comic strip. Through Aug 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heartbreak in Peanuts,â&#x20AC;? over 70 comic strips focusing on lost love. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Chroma Gallery Through Jun 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Follow the Money,â&#x20AC;? artist and instructor Nick Mancillasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; presidential portraits comment on the power of currency. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Jul 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Electric Visions,â&#x20AC;? showcases Richard Fungâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photography. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Epicurean Connection Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jeremy Novy Stencils,â&#x20AC;? the SF street artist appears with a a collection of his iconic drag queen and Koi stencils. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Finley Community Center Through Jun 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art at the Source Preview Exhibition,â&#x20AC;? features work from artists participating in the upcoming Art at the Source open studios weekends. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Jul 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;1000 Tiny Cuts,â&#x20AC;? Graton artist Claude Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s installation highlights the gallery wide exhibit featuring 17 bay Area artists. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Jun 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Metal Arts Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? shows functional and decorative art with metal. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Jun 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Treescapes,â&#x20AC;? exhibits the paintings and prints of artist Green Greenwald. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Mahoney Library Gallery Through Jul 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art of the Young Childâ&#x20AC;? SRJC, 680 Sonoma Mountain Parkway, Petaluma. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 9 to 1; Sat, 10 to 3. 707.778.3974.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jun 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Surfaces,â&#x20AC;? exhibits three sculptors Michael Hannon, Kari Minnick and Pam Morris. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Jul 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Images of Sonoma County,â&#x20AC;? juried photography exhibit. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Fulton X Gallery

Redwood Cafe

Through Jun 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evolution Revolution,â&#x20AC;? juried exhibit reflects the evolution of all things organic and man-made. 1200 River Rd, Fulton.

Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;June Art Show,â&#x20AC;? shows works from photographer Ken Bradley, sculptor Rick Butler and others. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Gallery One Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Gemâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Small Works,â&#x20AC;? features the work of Else Gonella, Lori Mole, Helen Moreda, Alan Plisskin and Joanne Tepper. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery Through Jun 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Water,â&#x20AC;? presents mixed media by Marylu Downing and Barbara Hoffman. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

RiskPress Gallery Through Jun 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alive at the Cusp: Remaking Our Relations,â&#x20AC;? displays collage work from six women envisioning the complex relations within ourselves and our surroundings. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jul 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Abundance: The Promise of Spring,â&#x20AC;? featuring Robert Benson, Karen Spratt and )

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 1-17, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org


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Seishin Studio & Gallery Through Jun 22, “Hitsohii (Similar),” features two artists, Shoji Uemura and Ken Matsumoto, working under the influences of East and West. 360 A St, Santa Rosa.

Towers Gallery Through Jun 26, “California on My Mind,” featuring painter Henry White. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. Thurs-Mon, 10am to 7pm. 707.894.4229.

MARIN COUNTY Aroma Cafe Through Jul 4, “Reflections on Water,” photo exhibit benefits the Gallinas Creek Watershed. 1122 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Art by the Bay Weekend Gallery Jun 14-Jul 27, “Chuck Eckart Exhibit,” the painter shows works from his rarely seen Ground Cover Series. 18856 Hwy 1, Marshall. 415.663.1006.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jun 26, “Memories of Dreams” exhibits new paintings by Bay Area artist Sanjay Vora. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Jun 15, “Visual Poetry/Disappearing Act,” Geraldine LiaBraaten’s photography explores words becoming images, while two artists highlight our role in species extinction. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA Through Jul 13, “Summer National Juried Exhibition,” including 45 works from around the nation in a wide variety of mediums from glass to 3D printers to Swarovski crystals. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jun 19, “The Beauty of Imperfection,” OHCA’s 11th annual Wabi-Sabi show, is a group exhibit inspired by Japanese aesthetics. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley.

Toby’s Gallery Through Jun 30, “For the Birds,” presented by the Artists in the Schools Program. 11250 Hwy 1, Point Reyes Station.

Youth in Arts Gallery Through Jun 20, “Everything Under the Sun,” featuring works donated by 10 artists for exhibition and auction leading up to the gallery’s Summer gala event. 917 C St, San Rafael. 415.457.4878.

NAPA COUNTY

Fairfax Festival

2014 201 4

Classic car event returns with live music, cook-offs, car showings and downtown cruising. Jun 12-15. Place to Play Park, 2375 W Third St, Santa Rosa.

Stuntology

Through Jun 30, “ELEMENTAL,” new works by Bernard Weston and Ronald Jermyn are drawn from their inspiration of nature and a place of inner peace and strength. 1359 Main St, St Helena. Daily, 10am-6pm 707.963.3350.

Absurd pranks and pointless techniques to amuse yourself, amaze your friends and annoy everyone else. Jun 17, 11am. Sebastopol Library, 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.823.7691. Jun 18, 11am. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Through Jun 30, “Window Weaving: Phase II” continues artist Mikey Kelly’s progressive installation. The artist works on the second phase of his window weaving May 26-30. 1136 Main St, Napa. 707.253.2551.

Jessup Cellars Through Jun 25, “Neil Young Series,” Grammy-award winning art director Jenice Heo’s exhibit of original rock-and-roll paintings. 6740 Washington St, Yountville. Daily, 10am-6pm. 707.944.5620.

Comedy Comedy Showcase Jun 15, 7pm. Hosted by Griffin Daley. Fenix, 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

You’re Funny But You Don’t Look Jewish Four Jewish comedians who also happen to be African American, Indian, Italian American and Vietnamese share the stage. Jun 14, 8pm. $20-$25. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Cotati Jazz Festival Music and fun in the afternoon, with local venues hosting jazz in the evening. Jun 15, 12pm. Free. La Plaza Park, Old Redwood Highway, Cotati.

18-22 18-22

Peggy Sue’s AllAmerican Cruise

Dennis Rae Fine Art

Grand Hand Gallery

33

Family film night, Fairfax history night, and a downtown parade with 2014 grand marshal Phyllis Gould (aka Rosie the Riveter) are just some of the highlights of the weekend event. Jun 14-15. Downtown Fairfax, Bolinas Road, Fairfax.

World Cup Carnival Party Kick off the games with a big bash featuring Brazilian food and drinks. Jun 12, 5pm. Rosso Rosticceria + Eventi, 1229 N. Dutton, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1229.

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GRUPO EL TIEMPO,

Broadway to Hollywood with Richard Glazier

LA SONORA SANTANERA,

Richard Glazier, concert pianist and master storyteller, gives a live multimedia performance dedicated to great movie music. Jun 18, 7:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

The Fruit Hunters Documentary that combs the globe for exotic fruits is shown. Jun 18, 8:30pm. $5. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Into the Unknown Motorcycle documentary celebrates release party. Jun 14, 8pm. $20-$25. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

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Concerts, Carnival Rides, Exhibits, Chef Demos, World’s Ugliest Dog® Contest, Kids Area, and Hands-on Fun!

The Hungry Heart Documentary film provides an intimate look at the often hidden world of prescription drug addiction through Fred Holmes, who works with patients struggling with this disease. Jun ) 14, 7pm. Jarvis

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Information Informa tion and Discount T Tickets ickets online: o

WWW.SONOMA-MARINFAIR.ORG WWW W.SONOMA . -MARINF FAIR.ORG

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other fine artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.


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VICTOR HUGO’S

LES MISÉÉRABLES MIS JUNE 27–JULY 20 “An uplifting theme of heroic human commitment and to stirring music... an enthralling stage spectacle. Songs that hit the audience where it lives.” ~ Richard Hummlet, Variety

Presented by the Raven Players.

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Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Vintage Film Series

The Power of Grounding

“After the Thin Man” is widely considered the best in the “Thin Man” series. Mon, Jun 16, 7pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Maria Owl Gutierrez leads a session of energy connections. Jun 13, 7:30pm. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

The Ghost Forest

Food & Drink Dakine Vineyard Tour, Tasting and Picnic Sat, Jun 14. $40-$45. Longboard Vineyards, 5 Fitch St., Healdsburg. 707.433.3473.

Demystifying Wine & Food Interactive discussions on pairings with delectable demonstrations. Sat-noon. $75. Hall Winery, 401 St Helena Hwy South, St Helena. 707.967.2620.

1115 15 North N th St St., H Healdsburg ldd b 7 0 7 - 4 3 3 - 6 3 3 5 www.raventheater.org

An evening with Judd Finkelstein Judd’s Hill Winemaker and City Winery executive chef Joseph Panarello will be using locally sourced ingredients to create a spectacular menu perfectly paired with the Judd’s Hill wine. Jun 14, 7pm. $80. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Rohnert Park Craft Beer Festival Sample a collection of craft brews from local breweries, along with food bites and live music. Jun 14, 1pm. $30. City Center Park, 475 City Center Dr, Rohnert Park.

For Kids Joan Baez ᭌ Los Lobos ᭌ Indigo Girls

Jackie Greene ᭌ Darlene Love ᭌ Playing For Change Garth Hudson (The Band/The Last Waltz) featuring Sister Maud HUDSON Tim O’Brien & Darrell Scott ᭌ Rodney Crowell

Beausoleil avec Michael Doucet ᭍ The Wood Brothers ᭍ Amy Helm Tom Paxton ᭍ Paper Bird ᭍ The Blues Broads ᭍ Joe Pug ᭍ The Duhks Eliza Gilkyson ᭍ Mary Gauthier ᭍ Poor Man’s Whiskey ᭍ Wavy Gravy David Luning ᭌ Patchy Sanders ᭌ Spark & Whisper ᭌ Perfect Crime Bootleg Honeys ᭌ Rhythm Rangers ᭌ Highway Poets ᭌ MORE

AT BEAUTIFUL BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE Tickets & Info. 415-256-8499 (Inticketing) katewolfmusicfestival.com

“Farmer D” Joffe teaches you how to create fertile soil. Jun 14. $20. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Summer Art Camp for Kids Twelve different classes to choose from, each a week long,including drawing and painting, music theater and printmaking. Jun 16-Jul 25. West Side School, Felta Rd, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Lectures Black Gold Composting Composting expert Daron

Healdsburg Copperfield’s Books Jun 13, 7pm, “Enough For All” with Kathleen Rose Smith. 104 Matheson St, Healdsburg 707.433.9270.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jun 17, 6pm, “Fourth of July Creek” with Smith Henderson, presented by Copperfield’s Books as part of the Debut Brews series. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.7300.

Guerneville native Greg King chronicles the struggle to save the redwood ecosystem in Northern California from corporate timber. Jun 13, 7pm. $5. Jenner Community Center, 10398 Hwy 1, Jenner.

Occidental Center for the Arts

TEDx Sonoma County

Jun 11, 11am, Summer reading program kick-off, kids can come sign up for a summerlong reading program and see Randal Metz’s Puppet Company perform “Why Mosquitos Buzz.” 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma 707.763.9801.

Join the conversation at TEDxSonomaCounty 2014 with the theme “Going to the Edge.” Jun 14, 1pm. Jackson Theater, Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 707.284.3200.

Tracy Joy King Pharmacist offers tips and advice regarding high blood pressure meds. Jun 12, 1:30pm. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

Jun 13, 7pm, “A Manual for the Modern Mystic” with Rio Olesky. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Library

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books Jun 18, 7pm, “The Shaman Within” with Claude Poncelet. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

SHED

Readings Book Passage Jun 11, 7pm, “Good Hunting” with Jack Devine. Jun 17, 7pm, “Modernist Women Poets” with Robert Hass and othrs. Jun 18, 7pm, “Gone Feral” with Novella Carpenter. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jun 11, 6pm, “The Truth about the Harry Quebert Affair” with Joel Dicker. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jun 12, 7pm, “California Bones” with Greg Van Eekhout. Jun 13, 7pm, “My Real Children” with Jo Walton. Jun 14, 1:30pm, “California’s Fruits, Flakes and Nuts” with David Kulczyk. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Napa Copperfield’s Books Jun 15, 11am, “The Blender Girl” with Tess Masters. 3900-A Bel Aire Plaza, Highway 29 and Trancas Street, Napa 707.252.8002.

Jun 15, 10am, “Carnivore’s Manifesto” with Patrick Martins, talk and rib BBQ for Father’s Day. 25 North St, Healdsburg 707.431.7433.

Theater Experiment #514 Guesthouse Walk-through performance that includes puppetry, soundstories, animations and oracles. A small group of guests takes a journey into and through a secret handmade world of oracular visions. Through Jun 14. $15-$20. The Imaginists, 461 Sebastopol Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

Failure: A Love Story MTC closes their season with the West Coast premiere of the Philip Dawkins-penned story of the three Fail sisters aiming to find love before their time is up in 1920s Chicago. Through Jun 29. $37-$58. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The Full Monty: The Musical ETC presents the fun and revealing Broadway ) show. Through Jun

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

29. $36. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Grease Head “greaser” Danny Zuko and new (good) girl Sandy Dumbrowski try to relive the high romance of their “Summer Nights.” Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jul 6. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Marriage of Figaro The music of Mozart comes alive in this playful production of the classic opera. Through Jun 15. $9-$40. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Menopause the Musical The musical parody set to classic tunes from the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s. Jun 14, 3 and 7pm. $51-$71. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Moonlight & Magnolias A comedy about the true story of the trials and tribulations to write the ‘Gone with the Wind’ screenplay in 1939. Jun 13-22. $18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Other Desert Cities The Ross Valley Players present this 2012 Pulitzer Prize nominee for Best Drama that sees generations clash over politically explosive secrets. Through Jun 15. $15. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

South Pacific The Mountain Play Association kicks off its 101st season with the beloved musical presented at the outdoor theater on Mt Tamalpais. Through Jun 15. $20-$40. Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre, 801 Panoramic Hwy, Mill Valley.

T.I.C. (Trenchcoat in Common) The comedy written by SF playwright Peter Sinn Nactrieb follows a girl exploring her apartment building during a dull summer vacation. Jun 13-29. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the

Emphasize Eco Fairfax Fest focuses on community and sustainability In the small town of Fairfax, community comes first. This weekend’s Fairfax Festival presents a special focus on environmental issues, with the 10th annual Ecofest taking place both days, June 14–15. Fairfax has long set the standards for leading GMO-free campaigns and limiting large chain stores from sterilizing the economic and social landscape. Exhibitors from around Marin will be offering organic wine and beer, innovative environmental practices and interactive family fun that highlights the significant ways the community is moving toward sustainability. Throughout the weekend, the festival offers food, wine, art and live music on multiple stages, featuring favorite local acts like Danny Click and Beso Negro; the live acts continue through the night in Fairfax’s vibrant downtown clubs. Saturday features the annual parade that draws out the entire town. This year’s grand marshal is Phyllis Gould, a veteran of the Sausalito shipyards during WWII à la “Rosie the Riveter.” The Friday before the festival also boasts Fairfax history night, held at the Women’s Club, that explores 100 years of colorful characters and iconic memories as well as fun film showings at Central Field. The Fairfax Festival and Ecofest take place Saturday–Sunday, June 14–15, throughout downtown Fairfax. 10am–6pm. Free. www.fairfaxfestival.com.—Charlie Swanson

community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St,

Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of June 11

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) In its quest for nectar, a hummingbird sips from a thousand ďŹ&#x201A;owers every day. As it ďŹ&#x201A;aps its wings 70 times a second, zipping from meal to meal, it can ďŹ&#x201A;y sideways, backward or forward. If it so desires, it can also hover or glide upside-down. It remembers every ďŹ&#x201A;ower it visits, and knows how long it will take before each ďŹ&#x201A;ower will produce a new batch of nectar. To some Spanish speakers, hummingbirds are known as joyas voladoras, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;ďŹ&#x201A;ying jewels.â&#x20AC;? Now take everything Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve just said, Aries, and use it as a metaphor for who you can be in the coming week. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

In 1947, the impossibly wealthy Duke of Windsor went shopping in Paris to buy a gift for his wife, the Duchess. She already had everything she wanted, so he decided to get creative. He commissioned the luxury-goods manufacturer Hermes to build her a high-fashion black leather wheelbarrow. I am not urging you to acquire something like that for yourself, Taurus. But I do like it as a symbol for what you need in your life right now: a blend of elegance and usefulness, of playful beauty and practical value, of artistry and hard work.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) Your brain absorbs about 11 million pieces of information every second, but is consciously aware of less than .001 percent of all that richness. Or at least thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s usually the case. Having analyzed your astrological omens, I suspect that you might soon jack that ďŹ gure up as high as .01 percentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a 10-fold increase! Do you think you can handle that much raw input? Are you amenable to being so acutely perceptive? How will you respond if the world is 10 times more vivid than usual? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty conďŹ dent. I suspect you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t become a bug-eyed maniac freaking out on the intensity, but rather will be a soulful, wonder-ďŹ lled explorer in love with the intensity. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22) You have a strong, intricate understanding of where you have come from. The old days and old ways continue to feed you with their mysterious poignancy. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t love every one of your past experiences, but you love ruminating about them and feeling the way they changed you. Until the day you die many years from now, your history will keep evolving, providing an endless stream of new teachings. And yet at this particular moment in your destiny, Cancerian, I think your most important task is to focus on where you are going to. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I urge you to temporarily forget everything you think you know about your past and instead concentrate on getting excited about the future.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22)

In 1928, Bobby Pearce won a gold medal in rowing at the Summer Olympics in Amsterdam. An unforeseen event almost sabotaged his victory. As he rowed his boat along the Sloten Canal, a family of ducks swam leisurely from shore to shore directly across his path. He stopped to let them pass, allowing an opponent who was already ahead of him to gain an even bigger advantage. Yet he ultimately won the race, rowing with such vigor after the duck incident that he ďŹ nished well ahead of his challenger. I foresee a comparable sequence in your life, Leo. Being thoughtful and expressing compassion may seem to slow you down, but in the end that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hinder you from achieving your goalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and may even help.

VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) In one of her â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twenty-One Love Poems,â&#x20AC;? Adrienne Rich talks about her old self in the third person: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The woman who cherished / her suffering is dead. I am her descendant. / I love the scar tissue she handed on to me, / but I want to go from here with you / ďŹ ghting the temptation to make a career of pain.â&#x20AC;? With your approval, Virgo, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to make that passage one of your keynotes in the coming months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will have an excellent opportunity to declare your independence from an afďŹ&#x201A;iction youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been addicted to. Are you willing to say goodbye to one of your signature forms of suffering? LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;You should be interviewing roses not people,â&#x20AC;? says a character in Anne Carsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book The Autobiography of Red. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound poetic advice for you in the coming days, Libra.

More than you can imagine, you will beneďŹ t from being receptive to and learning from non-human sources: roses, cats, dogs, spiders, horses, songbirds, butterďŹ&#x201A;ies, trees, rivers, the wind, the moon and any other intelligences that make themselves available to you. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not saying you should ignore the revelations offered by people. But your emphasis should be on gathering in wisdom from life forces that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t communicate with words.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

William Shockley was a Nobel Prizeâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;winning physicist who co-invented the transistor. He also helped launch the revolution in information technology, and has been called â&#x20AC;&#x153;the man who brought silicon to Silicon Valley.â&#x20AC;? Time magazine named him one of the hundred most inďŹ&#x201A;uential people of the 20th century. On the other hand, Shockley became a controversial advocate of eugenics, which damaged his reputation, led many to consider him a racist and played a role in his estrangement from his friends and family. I suspect that you will have to deal with at least one Shockleytype phenomenon in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Will you overlook the bad stuff in order to take advantage of the good? Should you?

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Novelist Herman Melville wrote that in order to create art, â&#x20AC;&#x153;unlike things must meet and mate.â&#x20AC;? Like what? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sad patienceâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;joyous energies,â&#x20AC;? for example; both of them are necessary, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Instinct and studyâ&#x20AC;? are crucial ingredients, as well as humility and pride, audacity and reverence, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;a ďŹ&#x201A;ame to meltâ&#x20AC;? and a â&#x20AC;&#x153;wind to freeze.â&#x20AC;? Based on my interpretation of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, I believe you will soon need to meld opposites like these as you shape that supreme work of artâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;your life. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Haggis is a Scottish pudding. According to the gourmet food encyclopedia Larousse Gastronomique, it has â&#x20AC;&#x153;an excellent nutty texture and delicious savory ďŹ&#x201A;avor.â&#x20AC;? And yet, to be honest, its ingredients donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sound promising. To make it, you gather the lungs, liver, small intestine and heart of a sheep, put all of that stuff inside the stomach of the sheep along with oatmeal, onions, salt and suet, and then simmer the whole mess for three hours. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m guessing that your work in the coming week may have a certain metaphorical resemblance to making haggis, Capricorn. The process could a bit icky, but the result should be pretty tasty. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

Almost a hundred years ago, world-famous comedian Charlie Chaplin decided to take part in a Charlie Chaplin look-alike contest in San Francisco. He did his best to imitate himself, but it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t good enough. He didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come close to winning. But I think you would have a different fate if you entered a comparable competition in the coming weeks. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no question in my mind that you would be crowned as the person who most resembles you. Maybe more than ever before, you are completely yourself. You look like your true self, you feel like your true self, and you are acting like your true self. Congratulations! Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard work to be so authentic.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The art of medicine consists in amusing the patient while nature cures the disease,â&#x20AC;? said French philosopher FrancoisMarie Voltaire. That principle will be useful for you to invoke in the coming weeks. You deďŹ nitely need to be cured, although the â&#x20AC;&#x153;diseaseâ&#x20AC;? you are suffering from is primarily psychospiritual rather than strictly physical. Your task will be to ďŹ&#x201A;ood yourself with fun adventures, engaging stories and playtime diversions so that nature can heal you without the interference of your worries and kibitzing.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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FREE WILL


Local Brew

Already a favorite with the Beer aficionados of Oliver’s Market, as well as Sonoma County and beyond, Bear Republic is one of our “Go to” breweries. Located on the corner of Healdsburg’s historic downtown square, Bear Republic offers award-winning food and world class, handcrafted ales. Run by the Norgrove family, (third and fourth generation Sonoma County residents), Bear Republic is committed to brewing fresh, never-filtered, hand-crafted beer. The brews of Bear Republic have earned top honors in the American brewing industry. Bear Republic has donated to various organizations in the North Bay, including Rotary, Boys & Girls Club, Kiwanis, Active 20-30 Club, Big Brothers Big Sisters, PTA, Special Education, the Little League, and small worthy groups locally. Bear Republic is a perfect partner for Oliver’s Markets; both in philosophy and quality!

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