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Bohemian

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Stett Holbrook, ext. 202

News Editor Tom Gogola, ext. 106

Staff Writer Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Charlie Swanson, ext. 203

Contributors Michael Amsler, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, James Knight, Katie Stohlmann, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Flora Tsapovsky

Design Director Kara Brown

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Lynda Rael, ext. 204

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2014 Metrosa Inc.

Cover design by Kara Brown.

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A RTS P 2 0

A–Z Bills, Revisited NEWS P8 Marriage of Figaro STAG E P21 The Test Passes F I LM P22 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p11 Wineries p14 Swirl p15

Cover Feature p16 Culture Crush p19 Arts & Ideas p20 Stage p21 Film p22

Music p24 Clubs & Concerts p25 Arts & Events p28 Classified p31 Astrology p31

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‘There was a feeling of pumping down so many things, like flipping hamburgers.’

360b/Shutterstock.com

nb CHE HO, LET’S GO T-shirt images of Che Guevara have given way to Gadsden chic, p16.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Always Open

The Arlene Francis Center is a hub of community art and conversation BY ANGELA GONZALEZ

H

aving a social venue with an eclectic gathering of people, a diverse culture and a wide range of stories to share is vital to our community.

The concept of peace and sustainability can truly be nourished in a collective of people who trust one another and build strong bonds based on simple conversation that involves listening, learning and sharing. Santa Rosa’s Arlene Francis Center for Spirit, Art and Politics was founded with these ideas in mind. It’s fun to be yourself here. Whether you are having a bad hair day, going through a lot personally or are just super-stoked about life 24/7, you will leave this place knowing your time was well spent. The center is a nonprofit organization run with the help of dedicated volunteers. We host benefits for other nonprofit groups and classes taught by members of the community. Our Wednesday weekly open mic is always a blast, and if you walk by and see Bruce on his laptop, you can pretty much bet on him opening the doors to you, even if we’re “technically” closed. In addition to entertainment, another primary focus of the AFC is the encouragement of lifelong learning. We have special guest speakers, spoken word events, jazz ensembles, dance parties, free-style artists, folk singers, punk singers, independent film screenings, trapeze artists, symphony orchestras, comedy shows, rock musicians, Black Panther parties, world-renowned poets, flamenco dancers and, for the first time ever, the center’s director, Martin Hamilton, will be staging Shakespeare. Groups such as Americans for Safe Access, Justice Coalition for Andy Lopez and the Heru Network meet to discuss issues. There’s also a weekly improv jam, Saturday morning capoiera, and Green Party and Homeless Task Force meetings. And every Wednesday afternoon, the break-dancing crew takes the floor. At the Arlene Francis Center, the space is yours. The ideas are free, and the possibilities are endless. Angela Gonzalez is assistant to the director of the Arlene Francis Center. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Get It Straight

Sure hope your new feature “Debriefer” is not a harbinger of the way the new editors at the Bohemian will be dealing with the community they are attempting to serve. This alternative to Sonoma County’s daily has a proud history of covering the local progressive community, so your snarky piece about the Andy Lopez coalition (“Ravitch, Run,” May 21) was a surprise. Maybe the “Debriefer” had a bad day, so he couldn’t find the time to actually contact anyone from our group regarding our plans for responding to the much-delayed decision by the Sonoma County district attorney as to whether or not she’ll ever be indicting Deputy Gelhaus for Andy’s murder last Oct. 22. But wait! He admittedly had time for his contact in Ravitch’s office, who gave him the feedback that the Justice Coalition for Andy Lopez (JCAL) is spreading “rumors” in an attempt to “push Ravitch’s hand” for said decision. He even compared our “tactics,” which he misrepresented, to those of “irresponsible right-wing news outlets”! Wow! Those are a lot of assumptions without talking to anyone! Unless your “Debriefer” is psychic, could you please explain just how he arrived at all these erroneous conclusions? It’s true that the JCAL has been on alert for the past two weeks and has organized around the possibility that the DA might actually make her decision after over seven months of investigation. Would the “Debriefer” prefer that we just wait without any kind of contingency plans? And he was just plain wrong when he wrote that “protests were planned unless she ruled now.” The protests are planned only if she doesn’t charge Gelhaus. Get it straight, Debriefer! And by the way, isn’t the idea of “debriefing” its readers the whole point of a respected newspaper’s mission?

Are you now just limiting this effort to a short, skinny column on one page? We understand that it is difficult to fit in the actual news with all the wine and food ads, but somehow this paper has managed to do it for over 30 years. I sincerely hope that a new editorial team will not change that tradition. Gabe Meline— we miss you!

MARY MOORE Camp Meeker

Editor’s note: ‘Debriefer’ is two columns in length, twice as long as the Bohemian’s previous news brief column. ‘Debriefer’ included a follow-up item about Ravitch’s forthcoming decision in the May 28 issue.

Bike Friendly I’ve ridden close to 100,000 miles, on three different bicycles, mostly in Sonoma County. Showing drivers you care about staying out of the way, and using courtesy, eye contact and a smile, makes the experience a lot more enjoyable and a lot less fearful (Open Mic, May 21). I’ve been buzzed a few dozen times, and have had the “Why did you get so close?” chat with some bikers trying to show me something, but most folks are pretty cool. Be nice out there, folks. Some of these drivers are also lovers, and you may need ’em on your side of the bed some day.

REDWOOD BABY Via the internet

Good points, Tom, but it’s worth keeping in mind that there are situations when a bicyclist or group is in no way acting out of “self-entitlement” or aggression by occupying a lane when safe to do so. As drivers, we should keep this in mind and not bug out and honk a horn whenever we have to wait 10 seconds to pass. Bridges are key examples. Many, like the bridge out of Pt. Reyes on Shoreline Highway south out of town, have no

Rants

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

Engaging speakers, artists and entertainers exploring the theme

Going to the EDGE Saturday, June 14 1pm to 5pm Jackson Theater at Sonoma Country Day School Food and wine reception following Advance Tickets: $40 general | $25 students Learn more about TED, TEDx and this event at www.tedxsonomacounty.com This independent TEDx event is operated under license from TED.

bike lane. Just because a stripe exists somewhere on the side of the road does not mean that you can safely pass. As of June this year, you cannot legally pass a bike without three feet of clearance, minimum. On a bridge like that, it’s totally unsafe to pass anyway. The dude honking in a case like this was likely the aggressive instigator, although he may have not realized that, and did not necessarily deserve a beat-down. Clearly, everybody needs to chill a bit. I’m just pointing out that occupying a lane, in some situations, like a blind curve or bridge, is the correct thing to do per California’s motor vehicle code, and not a display of aggression.

JAMES

Via the internet

Electoral Guidance I would have appreciated an article of recommendations from the Bohemian editorial team for the current election. The Press Democrat had a few recommendations, as did the San Francisco Chronicle. As the leading liberal journal in the North Bay, your input on the election was missed. Please do so for the big election in November.

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

NB BOB

Via the internet

Editor’s note: Because we cover Sonoma, Napa and Marin counties, it’s not feasible to publish a complete voter’s guide, but we will continue to publish coverage of key races and ballot initiatives. Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Paper THE

DEBR IEFER Hello, Nurse In December, a jury ruled against Santa Rosa Junior College in a character-defamation suit, awarding a former faculty member $250,000. Now the school is gearing up for a multimillion dollar lawsuit involving the same person. Daniel Doolan was hired as SRJC’s first full-time male nursing faculty member in 2009. On Sept. 7, 2012, he filed suit against the school claiming gender discrimination, sexual harassment, failure to prevent harassment and defamation of character. “The jury found in favor of the district for three out of four of those charges,” says Karen FurukawaSchlereth, SRJC vice president of human resources. But for the charge that stuck, Doolan was awarded 10 times the amount he had asked for. “He had a phenomenal reputation up until this stuff happened,” says Doolan’s lawyer, Dustin Collier.

CHARGE ’ER UP A bill from Assemblyman Al Muratsuchi would require your landlord to install electric-car chargers.

A-to-Z Bills

As promised, an update on a bunch of bills under consideration in Sacramento BY TOM GOGOLA

A

ssemblyman Wesley Chesbro’s shellfish resolution would help build the state’s aquaculture industry. It awaits a committee vote June 17. (AJR 43)

Bicycle taxes in a bill by Sen. Mark DeSaulnier would fund trails with a new tax. It pedaled to the Assembly May 29. (SB 1183) Campaign-finance reform was tackled by Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski, whose resolution has

been languishing in committee since April. (HR 37) Dogs in restaurants! Assemblywoman Mariko Yamada’s bill would let localities welcome dogs in alfresco areas. Keep your paws crossed as the Senate considers it. (AB 1965) Electric cars are coming, and your landlord has to help set up a charging station, per a bill from Assemblyman Al Muratsuchi. It sped to the Senate last week. (AB 2565) Fish identification at the grocer’s can be a little . . . fishy. Sen.

Alex Padilla would mandate the labeling of yer lingcod. It swam through the Senate, 36–0. (SB 1138) GMO labeling struck out. Sen. Noreen Evans’ bill failed by two freaking votes. (SB 1381) Hound-dog hunting for bears is a pet issue of Assemblyman Tim Donnelly, whose attempt to overturn a ban on dogs-hunting for bears failed. (AB 2205) Immigration was taken up by Assemblyman Luis Alejo, who would end the deportation of taxpaying immigrants. His ) 10

Now Doolan has filed a second suit, claiming the school retaliated against him for his complaints (he was fired in 2013) and manipulated his tenure track process. Collier says the lawsuit seeks $1.6 million in economic losses and emotional distress. The case could go to trial as early as spring, 2015. Meanwhile, SRJC has hired Bertrand, Fox and Eliott, a large San Francisco law firm that specializes in public entity defense for the upcoming case. The school’s attorney in the 2013 case “had other commitments,” says Furukawa-Schlereth. “This firm is on an approved list of firms that can be used by this district.” Doolan took a lower-paying job at a different school after being fired from SRJC. He has since applied to SRJC, not for his previous position but for a position in the same ) 10

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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bill has yet to cross the border out of the Assembly. (AB 2014) Juvenile justice initiatives include Assemblywoman Nora Campos’ inclusion of youth in corrections programs. But it’s been incarcerated in the Senate since May 8. (AB 1920) Low-income persons can thank Yamada for her bill offering waterbill help. Her bill flowed out of the Assembly and headed to the Senate. (AB 1434) Marijuana-dispensary laws are a mess, and Sen. Lou Correa created a single set of state regs in a bill that passed the Senate last week and awaits a toke in the lower chamber. Naloxone’s known to save addicts, and Assemblyman Richard Bloom’s bill makes it easier to access the drug. There’s a Senate hearing June 9. (AB 1535) Oil vey! Sen. Holly Mitchell’s fracking moratorium bill failed to make it out of the Senate last week. (SB 1132) Paid sick leave is the subject of a bill from Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, which passed May 29. Your turn, senators. (AB 1522) Reverse mortgages prey on the elderly and Jose Medina offered an Assembly bill to reform the practice. It passed; a Senate hearing was scheduled for June 4. (AB 1700) Sen. Bill Monning wants to slap a warning on your soda, and his bill passed the Senate last week, 21–13. This Coke’s for you, Assembly. (SB 1000) Trafficking in humans: bad. A Senate bill would impose a threeday jail bid for johns. It passed May 27 and awaits a happy ending in the Assembly. (SB 1388) Unsafe handguns include semiautomatic and single-shot pistols in Roger Dickinson’s bill adding the weapons to a state registry. The Assembly agreed and sent the bill to a Senate committee for a June 10 shootout. (AB 1964) X-rated actors would have to engage in safer-sex practices under a bill from Assemblywoman Isadore Hall. A 48–13 vote sent it over the hump to the Senate. (AB 1576) Ziplines at Yountville veteran’s home prompted Yamada’s bill to regulate the state VA. Her bill zipped through the Assembly May 28. (AB 1580)

DEBRIEFER

(8

department, Furukawa-Schlereth confirmed. She also said the school is planning to appeal the December ruling.

Clean Bottle BottleRock seems to have cleared its name. Latitude 38, the new ownership group, was under a microscope this year after last year’s producers racked up about $10 million in debt to vendors. “This world is small and everyone’s talking,” said David Graham, CEO of Latitude 38, a day before Friday’s kickoff. “They’re all asking each other, did you get paid? And fortunately, they are [getting paid].” So far, the only major complaint this year seems to be the twohour wait for shuttles back to the parking lot on Saturday, which saw 34,000 attendees out of the total 81,000 tickets sold for the weekend. Sunday’s exit was much smoother. “There was a lot of work that needed to be done there, and they got on it right away,” says Captain Steve Potter of the Napa Police Department. Napa police made seven arrests over three days at the festival: five for public intoxication, one DUI and one for delaying or obstructing an officer. “The feedback I’ve heard from people here in town is that it was a lot easier to figure out this year, and people had a good time,” says Potter. “Operationally, we exceeded expectations,” says a hoarse, but happy Graham. “We’re ecstatic that the drama of the BottleRock brand is over. The brand’s been cleaned up.” In fact, Graham says he met with agents all weekend, and they’ve already started booking sponsors and bands for next year. “We did this in three months, imagine what we can do in a year.” —Nicolas Grizzle

PETAL POWER Peter Lowell’s restaurant chef Natalie Goble works with pineapple guava blossoms from a backyard grower.

Hyperlocal When Peter Lowell’s restaurant says local, they mean it BY STETT HOLBROOK

E

arly this spring, there was a knock at my door. It was Lowell Sheldon, owner of Peter Lowell’s restaurant in Sebastopol. He wanted to know if I would trade some of the lemons from my prolific backyard tree for a meal. Of course I said yes. I couldn’t use all the lemons, and there was something cool about sharing them with a local restaurant.

While this winter’s killer freeze put a big dent in my lemon crop, Sheldon was able to fill two fivegallon buckets. In return, I got a great breakfast. I felt like I played a small role in the lemon-curd tarts the restaurant made. Turns out Sheldon sources a lot of his produce this way. Once he was out for a run and discovered a pineapple guava tree overloaded with fruit. Now he harvests some of the crop each year. He also barters for neighborhood figs, persimmons, quince, peaches,

apples and other fruit. Restaurants that tout their local and seasonal produce are now the norm. Defining local is a gray area, but not at Peter Lowell’s. They are hyperlocal. They don’t just serve produce from Sonoma County. The focus is on fruit, vegetables, fish and meat from western Sonoma County. Some of that comes from the numerous small-scale farms that dot the area. Some comes from Two Belly Acres, the restaurant’s two-acre farm on Green Valley Road. And

some comes from people like me, residents with a tree or bush that overflows with fruit once a year. “During certain times of the year there is always going to be a glut of something,” Sheldon says. Now that the word is out about restaurant’s west-of-101 sourcing, customers and local residents call when they have a surplus crop. This gleaning started out as an economic necessity. When the restaurant opened in 2008, Sheldon’s commitment to locally sourced ingredients proved costly. He grew up in Sebastopol and his family had several fruit trees. Why buy apples when he could harvest a few boxes from his mom’s tree? Ditto bay leaves and lemons. In time, that neighborhood sourcing became part of the restaurant’s business plan. While food costs are still high, chef Natalie Goble says seeking out neighborhood growers makes economic sense. “There is a real sense of ownership and they also help us keep the doors open.” Of course there is a culinary benefit, too. Goble waits for local tomatoes or blueberries to ripen to their “absolute best.” The produce doesn’t spend time in transit or in a distributor’s refrigerated warehouse. “We’re letting the fruit or vegetable really shine,” she says. Fish and meat comes from local sources, too, but those are commercial suppliers. For legal and practical reasons, there aren’t any backyard sources for beef or lamb. The restaurant also purchases some of its produce from local distributors, especially during the winter months. There are challenges to the restaurant’s über-local focus. Some diners are miffed when their burger doesn’t come with a slice of tomato, even if they are available in warmer climates just a few miles to the east. “The challenge is usually waiting,” Goble says. But it’s food worth waiting for. Peter Lowell’s, 7385 Healdsburg Ave., Sebastopol. 707.829.1077.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Michael Amsler

Dining

11

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12 eekda y Every W

Salmon Caesar Salad & Sauvignon Blanc

ERS BURGEWS & BR$ 15

$

15

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

11-6pm Weekdays & Friday Caesar salad with Cajun grilled salmon garnished with roasted garlic and croutons! M e n ti o n a Mention ad d with w ith purchase p u rc h a s e

11-6pm Weekdays & Friday Any burger & brew

707.258.BEER 7 07. 258 .BEER • BEST BEST BREW BR E W PUB PU B PU 902 9 02 MAIN MAI N S ST, T, N NAPA APA • D DOWNTOWNJOES.COM OWNTOWNJOES .COM

S O NOMA CO U NTY Chicama Peruvian Grill Peruvian. $-$$. Tantalizing menu of authentic cuisine. The ceviche’s already a hit. 3345 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.570.2057.

Dempsey’s Alehouse

Celebrating Our 5th Year Anniversary!

Newly renovated to reflect the rustic charm of the property. A fusion of Wine Country and California cuisines, the menu features ingredients sourced from Corks own garden along with local Sonoma County farmers and purveyors.

20% Wine Club Member Dining Discount Open daily for Lunch and Dinner Brunch on weekends Tasting Room Open Daily

5700 Hwy 116 • Forestville • 707.887.3344 • www.Corks116.com

Gourmet pub fare. $-$$. Popular brewpub and bistro, award-winning handcrafted beers, outdoor dining in summer and pork chops to die for. Lunch and dinner daily. 50 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.765.9694.

Real Döner Turkish. $-$$. Casual, cafe-style ordering from a friendly staff. Get the coffee and buibal yuvasi dessert. Lunch and dinner daily. 307 F St, Petaluma. 707.765.9555. Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner, Sat. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Stout Brothers Pub & Restaurant Irish. $$. Atmospheric, if a little faux, but a great ploughman’s lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Valley. 415.331.2600.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Dierk’s Parkside Cafe

Volpi’s Restaurant

American. $. Classic, fresh diner food in a comfortable diner setting. Ought to be in a movie. Breakfast and lunch daily. 404 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.573.5955. Dierk’s Midtown Cafe, 1422 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

Italian. $$-$$$$. Festive atmosphere teams with great traditional Italian dishes at one of county’s oldest eateries. Accordion in the speakeasy if you’re lucky. Dinner daily. 124 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.2371.

Gypsy Cafe Diner. $$. Breakfast all day and excellent lunch featuring eggs Benedict, chilaquiles and pulled-pork sandwiches. Friday night dinners feature signature fried chicken, fresh local fish, burgundy pot roast, Diestel turkey meatloaf and organic spinach ravioli. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon; dinner, Fri. 162 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.861.3825.

Yao-Kiku Japanese.

MARIN CO U N T Y

authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Madrona Manor Eclectic California cuisine. $$$$. Romantic fine dining in grand historic landmark mansion. Seasonal menu and superior wine list. Dinner daily. 1001 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.4231.

Boca South American. $$$-

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch and dinner daily. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Peter Lowell’s

American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill

California. $-$$. Casual, organic cuisine with a healthy twist. Italian-inspired cafe, deli, wine bar. All food offered as takeout. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7385 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.1077.

$$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Buckeye Roadhouse

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Wed-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly

M&G’s Burgers & Beverages American. $. The ultimate in American cuisine. Crispy fries, good burgers and friendly locals chowing down. Lunch and dinner daily. 2017 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.454.0655.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups,

Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Thurs-Mon. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists with its fresh catches. A wide selection of nigiri, depending on what’s fresh. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, Fri-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.3620. Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500.

N A PA CO U N TY Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef

and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Carpe Diem Wine Bar Californian. $-$$. Right in the heart of downtown Napa, Carpe Diem’s contemporary and innovative menu includes a variety of seasonal flatbreads, an ostrich burger, the famed short-rib sliders and much more. Over 45 wines by the glass, six draft beers and an impressive reserve wine list round out this warm, inviting space. Dinner daily. 1001 Second St., Napa. 707.224.0800.

Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French Laundry Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Keller’s institution is among the

very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

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Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Father’ F a t h er’s D Day ay

Gillwoods Cafe Diner.

June J u n e 115 5

$-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

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Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

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salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

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Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA COUNTY $

SUMMER S UMMER SPARKLE SPARKLE

Wineries

NORTH N ORT H INDIAN INDI A N CUISINE C U ISINE

70 7.53 8 .33 6 7 707.538.3367 5522 M ission Circle, Ci rcle, Santa Sa nt a Rosa Ro s a Mission (at (a at H Hwy w y 12 & M Mission i ssion Blvd.) B l v d .)

www.pamposhrestaurant.com w w w.pa mposh rest au ra nt.com o

Thai House Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

Everett Ridge Vineyards & Winery As is the custom at sister winery Esterlina, orange cheese puffs are served for palate cleansing between sips of exclusive Cole Ranch Riesling and big, soft and fruity reds. Plus, inexpensive, solid and sassy “Diablita� rocks screwcapped bottles of Sonoma County Red, White, Pink and Zin. Dandy view can be enjoyed from the tasting room or the patio. 435 West Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.433.1637.

Inman Family Wines Inman Family Wines Unique, single-vineyard Russian River Pinot Noir is a good reason to visit Inman Family Wine’s new winery and tasting room; you’ll crush on the “Endless Crush� sparkling Brut, too! 3900 Piner Road, Santa Rosa. Open 11am–4pm, Thursday through Monday. 707.293.9576.

Moondance Cellars Dogs, Cabs and cars are the focus; when a supercharged 1965 Corvette is parked in front, the vintner is in the house. Also, Port and Sherry from Sonoma Valley Portworks. 14301 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Daily 11am–6pm. $5 tasting fee. 707.938.7550.

Paul Mathew Vineyards Sunny, corner

v in a nt ico

tasting room in downtown Graton offering a singular expression of ValdiguiÊ, progressively deeper and more aromatic Pinot Noir, and cushioned benches to sink into should you become lost in reverie as a result. 9060 Graton Road, Graton. Thursday– Sunday, 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.865.2505.

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Russian River Pinot for $18 at no-nonsense, solid producer. 5220 Ross Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only, Monday–Friday. 707.887.8130.

Stonestreet Late wine magnate Jess Jackson took to the hills in a big way. Eight hundred acres, 400 blocks, at elevations up to 2,000 feet. Tasting room is a fewfrills affair, while “mountain excursions� offer views plus Cab and Chardonnay, plus lunch. 7111 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily, 11am to 4:30pm. $12, $15 and $25; Mountain excursion, $75. 707.433.9463. Topel Winery Hailing from Hopland, Topel offers estategrown Meritage and other wines in this well-appointed tasting room with casement windows open to the street, across from Oakville Grocery. Cedar, chicory, chocolate and brown spice–makes one hungry for a portobellomushroom-on-focaccia sandwich. 125 Matheson St., Hopland. Open daily, 11am– 7pm. Tasting fees, $5–$12. 707.433.4116.

MARIN COUNTY Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001. Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

NAPA COUNTY Benessere Vineyards Super Tuscan with a side of Zin, on the site of the original Charles Shaw, for you history buffs. Super Sangiovese, puckery Pinot Grigio, and pretty, perfumed Aglianico, what the Romans enjoyed as the legendary “falernum.�

1010 Big Tree Road, St. Helena. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee, $20. 707.963.5853.

Chateau Montelena The winery triumphed at the 1976 “Judgment of Paris� tasting where French judges, quelle horreur, found that they had awarded top honors to a California contender. 1429 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 9:30am–4pm. 707.942.5105. Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.257.2345. Eagle & Rose Estate (WC) Tours of this small winery are led either by the winery owner or the winemaker himself. 3000 St. Helena Hwy. N., Napa. By appointment. 707.965.9463.

Jericho Canyon Vineyard Oh boy, boutique Napa Cab from celebrity consultant Michel Rolland and high-rollers who used to spend half the year in Hawaii? Well, yeah, but they’re super nice, work hard, and their wines are tops. Cab and Sauv Blanc. 3322 Old Lawley Toll Road, Calistoga. Tour and tasting by appointment only, $30. 707.942.9665.

Silver Oak Silver Oak truly is a venerable cult wine, confounding to outsiders who don’t feel the magic. Folks love the Silver Oak; the Silver Oak is good. 915 Oakville Cross Road, Oakville. Monday– Saturday, 9am–5pm; Sunday, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $20. 707.942.7022 Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

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Winds of change at cryptic Carneros winery BY JAMES KNIGHT

D

on’t blame yourself if you’ve never heard of Donum Estate. Ditto Robert Stemmler, Donum’s sister brand named for Sonoma County’s most influential wine legend whose name is news to you. But if you experience a little déjà vu on the road to the winery, you can blame the Microsoft corporation.

Anyone who switched on a Windows PC since fall 2001 has seen “Bliss,” the image of surreally green, rolling hills purchased from local photographer Chuck O’Rear by the software giant to serve as the default wallpaper on its Windows XP system. Since replanted in grapevines, the actual landscape is just up the road from Donum Estate, also launched during the harvest of 2001. This spring, while “Bliss” cropped up in the media again when XP was put to pasture, Donum invited a few wine-media types to the estate to quietly announce a sort of reboot of their own. German winemaker Robert Stemmler came to California at the invitation of Peter and Michael Mondavi in 1961. He set up his own winery in the late 1970s, and while he did not focus on Pinot Noir at first, he was ahead of his time, sourcing from the Bohan vineyard on the Sonoma Coast. Famed Napa winemaker André Tchelistcheff, fond of glove-related tasting notes, was said to have described Stemmler’s Pinot Noir as having the sensual aroma of a woman’s leather glove. Since Stemmler retired in 1989, his friend Anne Moller-Racke has had a hand in the business, first running it as a sideline to Buena Vista, which the Racke family, German spirits barons, then owned. In 2001, Moller-Racke created Donum Estate on a one-time dairy that retains its working ranch character. The Donum label goes on “highly allocated” Pinot Noir at $70 and up; the Stemmler label, which pictures the 15th-century tapestry Les Vendanges, sells $20–$45 bottles of more fruit-forward wines. New winemaker Dan Fishman, who ditched a doctoral program on a whim to start as a harvest intern at the winery seven years ago, has been given liberty to experiment; the 2012 Skin Contact Chardonnay ($30), for instance, was fermented on the skins like a red wine. It’s a different animal of Chardonnay, but not one of those lately controversial “orange wines.” With aromas of raw, chopped papaya, Sweet Tarts and salty Vermentino on the tongue, it’s rich without being buttery, and has a long, tangy finish. Barrel samples of upcoming Carneros and Anderson Valley Pinots from whole-cluster fermented and single clone selections show lots of smoky potpourri and red plum promise. Stemmler Wines, 24520 Ramal Road, Sonoma. No tasting room; visits by appointment only (inquire for availability). 707.939.2293.

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Kerry McCracken cranks out a Pliny T-shirt at Farm Fresh HQ in Sebastopol.

L

ike so many icons of American culture, the T-shirt owes its ascendancy to the U.S. military. In what is widely considered the first printed T-shirt, an American Air Corps gunnery unit shirt made the cover of Life magazine in July 1942, complete with a wearer bearing a large weapon. But the history of the T-shirt goes back even further in military lore, to earlier American military adventures. The original T-shirt wearers were members of the

American Navy fighting in the Spanish American War at the end of the 19th century. The soldiers were issued T-shirts as part of their uniform, and they

henceforth carried the mantle of the T-shirt as outerwear. The T-shirt would become the goto garment for blue-collar America. In time, it would then emerge as an icon in its own right, malleable to the whims of the Zeitgeist. By the 1950s, T-shirt-cool had taken hold and spoke to the newly self-anointed American rebel spirit, with its whiff of anti-heroic martyrdom and the triumph of the

underdog: Marlon Brando in his white T-shirt prowling the waterfront, James Dean’s outsiderloner in denim and white cotton. “The T-shirt has been used to convey both rebellion and conformity, depending upon the context and the type of messages,” writes Diana Crane in her book, Fashion and Its Social Agenda: Class, Gender, and Identity in Clothing.

17

others occupy nostalgia space in our bureaus until such time as a garage sale is declared or a rag is needed to wash the car. We may outgrow the T-shirt, but not the message. Or we may outgrow the message and sell the shirt on E-bay for $60 to some crazed Uriah Heep fan in Antwerp. T-shirts are basically an easy and generally cheap way to selfidentify. But our era does offer more than its share of the willfully offensive T-shirt—shock for shock’s sake messaging under the mantle of “free expression” as the obtuse rationale du jour. Earnest expressions of self-identity and defiance—“I Had an Abortion”— have given way to the truly tasteless T’s of our time. For example, those “Keep Calm and . . .” T-shirts raise questions about how shock value has entered our politics as a form of legitimate discourse—and what the implications are for a country that greets serious issues with mocking retorts. When so much national energy is spent, for example, talking about rape and trying to end it, what’s the social value of wearing a T-shirt that declares “Keep Calm and Rape On”? One might argue, none at all. Or maybe it’s all just payback for the “identity politics” movement of the American progressive left. “I think stupid is the new cool,”

says Matt Morgan, founder and president of Sebastopol’s Farm Fresh Clothing, which sells organic cotton T-shirts made with sustainable practices. “Conservatives have figured out that they have to do something to be cool, to connect. But they are trying too hard.” Conversely, the T-shirt, lowly though its origins may be, has been absorbed into haute couture rituals of appropriation as well. The legendarily most expensive T-shirt available costs $400,000, is custom-made and comes with diamonds embedded into the fabric. We’ve come a long way from the three-for-$10 concert T-shirts from 1970s flea markets. Those shirts were pretty cool, but they fell apart after one washing. And, speaking of falling apart, you can tell a lot about where a country’s sensibilities lie by the T-shirts it favors. In this country, the most iconic T-shirt image these days has got to be the famous Gadsden “Don’t Tread on Me” flag. That shirt has supplanted the iconic face of Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara. The Che shirt had a decades-long run as go-to garb for any would-be radical with a bone about imperial America and its various excesses of war and white privilege. Got a problem with America? Get yourself a Che shirt! That’ll

show ’em! The Che shirts had built-in shock appeal for anyone interested in posturing radical chic while still chomping a Big Mac with the “I’m with Stupid” masses. But Che has left the building. The 9-11 attacks unleashed waves of embittered hypernationalism in this land, as right-wing intolerants got their footing in the smoldering ruins and ran with the imagery like so many chuckleheads with bullhorns. The premise was a nasty nostalgia for easy arguments of the “America: Love It or Leave It” variety. Those attacks, commemorated in the aftermath with T-shirts proclaiming “Never Again,” which came complete with an appallingly distasteful duo of flaming buildings, sharpened lines of disagreement over how America reckons with its various global roles, including and especially those weirdly conjoined roles where we throw lots of bombs and culture out there and see what sticks. The ascendancy of an invigorated American right wing, with the Nuge at the helm, found purchase in the culture war with a twin-barreled push of nationalist symbolism and a selfassertion notable for its pig-headed indifference to the offensiveness it was spewing. Often, the two comingled on T-shirts. A new vocal minority of right-wing ) 18

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

America gave the world the T-shirt, and the world, in turn, gave Americans cheap Chinese T-shirts of the “big box” variety. Crane notes that Americans purchase about a billion T-shirts every year. “Technical developments in the 1950s and 1960s, such as plastic inks, plastic transfers and spray paint, led to the use of colored designs and increased the possibilities of the T-shirt as a means of communication,” writes Crane. Nothing says conformity like the social phenomenon of the big-box uniculture wardrobe, recognizable as a regional fashion trend where everyone wears the same T-shirt and khaki-shorts combo to the beach. While itchy and ill-fitting, these shirts offered ersatz individuality in the guise of innocuous or goofy declarations, or, more to the point, with pictures of a large and intimidating pickup truck with messages about God, Guns and Freedom. But wherever we buy them and for whatever reason we wear them, we all love our T-shirts and we all have that one we’ve kept forever. We go on vacation, we buy the shirt. There’s a family reunion, and we’re making shirts to commemorate it. “I was there: McCarthy Family Picnic, 1995.” We wear some T-shirts until they’re practically falling apart;

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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T-Shirts ( 17

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culture warriors strapped on the Gadsden T-shirt and the gun, watched Red Dawn for the 243rd time, and went to war . . . at Chilis. The election of Barack Obama in 2008 upped the culture-right ante by proposing that the easy symbolism of Obama trumped his wishy-washy neo-liberal pragmatism and complex, corporatist mind-set. Obama defied an easy T-shirt designation, so we were treated to all of them: Obama with a Hitler moustache, Obama wearing Muslim garb, Obama with “the Joker” paint job. As Che chic gave way to Gadsden harrumphing in the Obama era, new questions were raised about the symbolism depicted across one’s chest: How are we defined by T-shirts, and how do we define ourselves to the global T-shirt culture created by Americans? Americans’ twin obsessions with self-identity and consumption—the relentless pursuit of pigeonholing and product—come to roost in the T-shirts we purchase as signifiers of a cultural or ethnic sensibility. And in our world of rampant false equivalencies, false flags and false charges concerning “the Other” in the White House, the right wing has managed to insert itself squarely into the field of “identity politics” with some pungently abrasive Che mojo of its own. “Identity politics” has been appropriated and reconfigured as anti-government chic, complete with a new conservative discourse that demands a “post-racial” vernacular. It’s payback time, and the T-shirt is front and center in these days of down-market rightwing reckoning. I’m reminded of those old shirts from the 1980s that read, “It’s a Black Thing: You Wouldn’t Understand.” Nowadays, the theme from race-baiting agitators is, we understand all too well. “T-shirts speak to like-minded people; a particular T-shirt may not be meaningful to those with different views and affiliations,” writes Crane. “This reflects the fragmentation of leisure cultures

into lifestyles and subcultures and other groupings whose members respond to the enormous cultural complexity of their surroundings by orienting themselves toward those who are like rather than those who are unlike themselves.” Nowadays, right-wing fringe politics have re-oriented mainstream discourse into a mucked-up post-racialism with the help of T-shirts and other messaging vehicles that, for example, decry welfare and food stamps. There’s a T-shirt that puts Obama’s face on a food stamp and declares him the “Food Stamp President,” for all the self-selected world to see. This is the shock-for-shock’ssake state of America, where reactionaries offer snidely imagistic putdowns in lieu of debate: One man’s “New Jim Crow” is another’s “Been There, Done That.” At the same time, a new, homegrown industry of T-shirt manufacturers, embodied by Farm Fresh, has emerged on the scene, offering U.S.-made products whose politics are stitched into the fabric of the shirts themselves—and who offer a sort of “Don’t Thread on Me” counter to the Gadsden flag-wavers. Farm Fresh’s client list includes the worker bees at Facebook and Google (they also make the Bohemian’s T-shirts), and the company also creates message shirts that light-heartedly tread onto hot-button issues like global warming or melting Japanese nuclear reactors. But Morgan hits on an issue that speaks to the way the cultural right has been winning the “messaging” war. “The issues are real,” he says, “but we are being light-hearted about it. I do sense a basic fear—in our market, in our meetings—that everyone is afraid to go that extra step.” Morgan recounts the hullabaloo that ensued when Farm Fresh created a T-shirt reading “Dog Has a Plan.” “Everyone was so nervous about releasing that shirt,” he says.

The Th he week’s week eek’ss events: events: s a sselective elecctive guid guidee

SONOMA

Koi & Queens ens If you’ve ever wandered the str streets eets of o San Fr Francisco ancisco and seen those brigh brightly htly color colored ed koi lks and aband doned buildings, you can thank celeb rated str eet artist fish stenciled on sidewalks abandoned celebrated street ding voice in the t city’s queer str eet-art movement is also known ffor or Jeremy Novy. The leading street-art ag-queenn portr aits,, pop-cul ture-inspired pieces piecees that explode his series of stenciledd dr drag-queen portraits, pop-culture-inspired ma, opening this with color and attitude.. Pridee Month brings Novy’s work to Sonom Sonoma, ant Fund. A Collection of week and benefiting thee Russian River Sisters Sisters’’ Gr Grant ueens and KKoi ooii SStencils tencils byy Jer Jeremy emyy Novyy exhibits thr through rough g June,, with Drag Queens pening rreception eceptiion Friday y, June 6, at the Epicurean Epicurean Connection, C an opening Friday, West Napa SSt., t.,, Sonoma.. 6pm.. 707.935.7960. 7077..935.7960. 122 West

SEBASTOPOL

Ready dy to Rock R As North Bay super supergroups groups go, ffew ew can claim all-star statu status us as readily readily as he five-piece collabor ative gr the Rock Collection Collection.. Th The collaborative group oup is led by drummer n and ffeatures eatures e heavy hitters Melvin Seals (Jer ry Gar cia Band), Greg Anton (Jerry Garcia (ALO) and Robin Sylvester Sylvester (RatDog). (RatDogg). This week, Stu Allen, Dan Lebowit Lebowitzz (ALO) ollection returns retuurns to Hopmonk, and they’r history the Rock Collection they’ree set too make history he band band’ss deb but music video live. live Join these very talented by filming the debut ay Friday y, June 6, musicians for a night of funn and filming. The Rock Collection pla play Friday, bastopol, 230 0 Petaluma Petaluma A ve.,, Sebastopol.. 8pm.. $20. $20. 707.829.7300. 7077..829.7300. at Hopmonk Sebastopol, Ave.,

S A N TA R O S A

Healing Journey Journ ney Jessica Peters Malmberg, mberg, aka sin singer nger and songwriter P Petracovich, etracovich, has h spent the ncer with thee help of her ffamily, amilyy, friends and thee community at last year battling cancer om succe ssful tr eatments, P etracovich gets back b large. As she recoverss fr from successful treatments, Petracovich onstage, nual Journeyy to Heal benefit this week. The pow werful and headlining the first annual powerful oined byy acco omplished p musician TTad aad W agner; g ar rt and a silent melodic songwriter is joined accomplished Wagner; art ed, rraising aising m oney to give ffamilies amilies battling cance er a chance to auction are also featured, money cancer etracovich plays the Journey to Heal show Sun nday, June 8, at recover and reconnect. P Petracovich Sunday, ter, 99 Sixth SSt., t., Santa Rosa. 3–6pm. $15–$25. 707 7707.528.3009. 7..528.3009. the Arlene Francis Center,

YOUNTVILLE-CORTE MADERA

The Reader er Speaks Spe eaks

HONESTY ROOM M Dar Williams Wiilliams Wi plays pl ays C City ity W Wi Winery inery i in n Napa on Thursday, Thursdayy, June 5. See See Concerts, Concertss, p25. p225. 5

Garrison Keillor is the consummate storyteller storyteller.. Best known ffor or his natio national nal rradio adio eillor has spent 40-plus years spo spotlighting otlighting gr great eat program, A Prairie Homee Companion, KKeillor Keillor is in tthe he spotlight himself newest collection, The music and stories. Now Keillor himself,, with his newest from om The New YYorker oorkerr, monologues fr from om A Pr Prairie raairie Home Keillor Reader. Compilingg work fr ever before-p ever-bef e published p pieces, pieces The KKeillor eeillor illor Readerr is essential ffor or Companion and new, never-before-published aconteur. Keillor Keillor makes two North Bay appear a ances any fan of the masterfull rraconteur. appearances this week, Lincoln Theater (100 California California Drive, Yountville; Younntville;; $20–$35; first on Monday, June 9, at the Lincoln Tuuesdaayy, June 10, at Book Passage Passage (51 Tamal Taam mal Vista Blvd., 7pm; 707.226.8742) and again Tuesday, 9277..0960). Corte Madera; 1pm; 415.927.0960).

—Charlie —C harrlie S Swanson wanson

NO R RTH TH B BAY A Y BO H E M I AN AN | J JUNE U NE 4 4-1 -10 0,, 20 114 4 | BO BOH OH E MI AN A N.COM .C O M

Crush ush u h CULTURE URE

19

Arts Ideas Michael Amsler

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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COUTURE CULTURE Fashion designer Andrea Kenner cultivates North Bay fashion at her shop Tamarind.

Scene Setters Local fashion takes root

W

hile it doesn’t have the size or support of the local food movement, the North Bay’s local fashion scene is home to a growing coterie of designers. “They’re hiding, they’re very scattered,” says Andrea Kenner, a radiant fashionista herself. Kenner, a Sonoma County native, is the owner of Tamarind, a new boutique at the Barlow in Sebastopol. After 10 years of

BY FLORA TSAPOVSKY

designing ever-changing trends for fashion brands in New York City, Kenner needed to make a change. “There was a feeling of pumping down so many things, like flipping hamburgers,” she recalls. “Now I’m focusing on curating timeless pieces with a story behind them that are created in a slower process and are going to last forever.” Among Tamarind’s selection of well-known luxury brands is a small selection of local accessory designers. The store carries leather bags by Chantel

Garayalde, jewelry by Becky Kelso and Padé Vavra, and handcrafted scarves by A Curious Beast, all from Sonoma County. Garayalde came back to Sonoma County in 2009 after stints in L.A and New York. “Lately, I see more curiosity and sophistication in the local market,” Garayalde says. As a local designer, she feels less pressure compared to fastpaced Los Angeles. “There’s so much talent here, even if we don’t mold ourselves around trends,” she says.

Kenner is determined to turn this miniature representation into a movement. To expand the local fashion community, Kenner and Santa Rosa designer Hilary Heaviside are creating a fashion “think tank” to exchange ideas and help grow the local scene. When Kenner talks about her plans for Tamarind and the North Bay, a wishful question arises: While L.A is slowly becoming the cool, understated alternative to New York, could Northern California be next in line? Anything is possible, as the local fashion community currently leaves a lot to the imagination. If lifestyle blogger Adrienne Shubin can’t name a local fashion designer off the top of her head, what are the chances you can? Shubin, the vibrant woman behind therichlifeonabudget. com, a Kenwood-based blog, loves shopping—online and, alas, at Macy’s. “I feel badly that my go-to places are Macy’s or Goodwill, as I miss out on handcrafted, special goods,” she admits. “I’d love to help the community and shop local, be exposed to more designers.” Kenner is hoping to give local fashion that exposure at an alllocal fashion event at the Sonoma County Museum. The event is being imagined as part fashion show and part exhibition. “Innovative clothing and accessories design are a natural extension of the creative culture of this region, so it’s a natural fit for the museum,” says Diane Evans, the museum’s executive director. Meanwhile, Kenner is putting together her own fashion line. “We’ll see what comes out of the woodwork,” she concludes with shy optimism. Better fashionably late than never.

Eric Chazankin

SAUCY Eugene Walden and Kelly Britt fight a battle of love and lust in ‘The Marriage of Figaro.’

Naughty by Nature Mozart’s ‘Figaro’ offers randy fun BY DAVID TEMPLETON

M

ozart’s comic opera The Marriage of Figaro was composed 228 years ago, and was based on a play so openly and outrageously sexual that it was banned in Vienna. Though Mozart, with librettist Lorenzo Da Ponte, toned down the licentious stuff just enough to slip it past the censors of the day, the story retained much of its naughty nature, and became an enormous hit among opera-goers of the 18th century. Of course, what once was considered shocking is often only moderately so today. That said, The Marriage of Figaro, even in 2014—as evidenced by Cinnabar Theater’s hilarious and at times ingenious staging—is still pretty darn filthy. And it still sounds great.

‘The Marriage of Figaro’ runs Friday– Sunday through June 15 at Cinnabar Theater. 3333 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. Friday–Saturday at 8m. 2pm matinees on Sunday. $25–$40. 707.763.8920.

21 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

The 17-piece orchestra, under the crystal-clear direction of Mary Chun, nails the rousing (and instantly familiar) overture, and does wonders with Mozart’s playfully intricate score. The principal singers (many of them professional opera talent with New York, San Francisco and even Carnegie Hall experience) are also marvelous actors. Under the unceasingly clever direction of Elly Lichenstein, the cast, including a large ensemble of local veterans, is given a string of funny, silly, antic, outrageous and delightful things to do, including some inspired physical comedy. This is definitely not one of those “stand there and sing” kinds of operas. And with a sharp English translation by Jeremy Sams, the jokes in the libretto land with precision, ease and pitch-perfect timing. Figaro (an inspired Eugene Walden) is a servant in the household of the morally flexible Count Almaviva (Christiaan Smith-Kotlarek), who’s married to the beautiful, steady-hearted Countess Rosina (Bharati Soman). On the day of Figaro’s wedding to the countess’s maid, Susanna (Kelly Britt), a series of outlandish coincidences and calamities occur, most of them having to do with someone maneuvering furniture and circumstances in order to end up sleeping with someone. In four cleverly coordinated acts, the duke attempts to seduce Susanna, who conspires with the countess and Figaro—and the count’s deliciously randy yet sincere page Cherubino (Cary Ann Rosko)—to exact their comic revenge. Subplot upon subplot leads to some surprise twists and the requisite happy ending, all layered in and around Mozart’s gorgeous music— and the occasional erection joke. Still as smutty after all these years, and just as irresistible, Cinnabar’s Marriage of Figaro is scandalously good fun. Rating (out of 5): +++++

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Film

PILLOW TALK Scott Marlowe and Matthew Risch share a moment amid the growing

HIV menace brought to life in ‘The Test.’

Tested

Indie drama evokes the early days of HIV in S.F. BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

C

hris Mason Johnson’s low-budget romance The Test does a startlingly good job of evoking San Francisco in 1985, not through CGI, but by finding the corners that haven’t changed in 30 years. Johnson keeps the camera up on the rooflines of the Upper Castro’s Victorians, scoping the weddingcake turrets, cornices and decorated gables. It’s a tight yet handsome story of the early days of HIV testing, when the form of the plague and its rules were starting to materialize. The sonic-scape helps transport you back, with an original soundtrack by Ceiri Torjussen and a dozen oldies—a lot of Martha and the Muffins and the-lady-or-thetiger menace of Laurie Anderson’s spoken word piece “Born, Not Asked.” The Bronski Beat’s lament “Smalltown Boy” gives us as much backstory as we need about the callow kid Frankie (Scott Marlowe), who was likely bullied out of some nice town by some nice people. Frankie is an understudy in the McManus dance troop; he has a growing crush on his fellow dancer,

the swarthy and sardonic Todd (Matthew Risch). Todd is open about his side-job as a hustler, and that makes Frankie hold off—he has a fear of disease, made manifest in the subplot about the mouse problem Frankie has in his flat. The Test is a dance movie as much as it is reminiscence. We see the tensions of Frankie’s life through the sort of moments Degas caught, the dancer’s stretches and warm-ups, and the intimate moments—in Frankie’s case, searching among his freckles for a hidden sarcoma. The men of the ensemble are in a piece called “After Hours,” a pretty unmistakable dance about cruising. Sidra Bell, who did the choreography, may have been trying to evoke the contortionism of the Twyla Tharp era. According to Johnson, the title has a trifold meaning, with the ultimate test of responsibility being the last. I don’t know if that test is as vital— who could ever stay faithful in San Francisco? Still, this is a memorable movie about the city’s edge-ofdoom days, the quiet fear and the remorseless beauty. ‘The Test’ opens June 6 at Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24

CURED Robert Smith lays into a tune during the band’s two-and-a-half-hour show.

BottleRock Bender Savoring BottleRock’s second go-round

BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE AND CHARLIE SWANSON

wo of the Bohemian’s music critics attended BottleRock, the three-day Napa music fest that brought rappers Outkast, rockers the Cure and cowboy Eric Church to the city of 78,000 over the weekend. When they finally caught up with each other, they had plenty to talk about.

T

Charlie Swanson: So, the “blast from the past” festival was actually pretty fun. Nicolas Grizzle: Yeah, so many ’90s bands got back together. Smash Mouth sounded surprisingly good. I mean, they are the musical equivalent of Guy Fieri—pre-packaged mass

appeal in a predictable format, but they sure know how to get a crowd going. And those catchy keyboard licks are just, they’re like Cheetos—I know they hold no nutritional value, but damn if I don’t want another one right away. They had the crowd in the palm of their hand, and kids half my age were singing along. I don’t know if those kids were even born yet when these songs first came out. What was a standout for you? Swanson: The Cure, closing out Friday night, was the highlight for me. The headliners flew in from England just for this show and played for two-and-a-half hours. They opened up fast and loud, which really got the crowd going. Robert Smith, the lead singer, was

in rare form—he’s still the male icon for tangled hair and messy lipstick. He danced along as the spider that caught the fly during “Lullaby” and sweetly wrapped himself in his own arms, so tight, never wanting to let go. Grizzle: Wow, that sounds amazing. Swanson: When they finally did have to leave, the crowd helped them finish the lyrics to their encore of “Why Can’t I Be You?” when the power was cut at 10pm and the band blew kisses and said goodnight. Grizzle: Well, my favorite on Saturday was not the headliner, it was Weezer. The Blue Album is one of my all time favorites, but I’d never seen the band live. They opened with the Blue Album’s first song, “My Name Is Jonas,” and of course hit “Undone: The Sweater Song,” “Buddy Holly,” and “Say it Ain’t So,” which was so, so powerful live. They switched instruments for a while and let the drummer sing while the lead singer and guitarist Rivers Cuomo played drums with this I’m-concentratingsuper-hard-right-now look on his face. Swanson: Haha, like drums are really so hard to play. Grizzle: Well, maybe not for Weezer’s songs. Anyway, they surprised me with “Surf Wax America,” the song about commuting to work on a surfboard. It’s a great summer song. Swanson: Talk about throwbacks—if you like being told to put your hands up, you would have loved the Gin Blossoms. Apparently they weren’t satisfied with their own drummer, because the band asked the crowd to clap along about 78 times in their first three songs. After opening with their ’90s hit “Follow You Down,” the group played an enjoyable enough set, sprinkled with anecdotes about losing a Grammy to the Beatles and other big-shot stories. Grizzle: Did you see anything cool from some of the younger bands? Swanson: Oh, totally. TV on

the Radio came out and just got to business. They were musically tight and didn’t have to ask the crowd to put their hands up every 10 seconds. And Delta Rae, from North Carolina, played a supremely Southern set of folk, rock and roots. The bulk of the band is the three Hölljes siblings, blonde Nordic figures with powerful siren voices. The crowd loved their rendition of Bruce Springsteen and Patti Smith’s “Because the Night.” Their fiery passion resonated with the growing crowds on Friday afternoon. Grizzle: That’s the same vibe I got from Matt & Kim on Saturday. It’s just two of them, but they got the crowd to blow up balloons, and it felt like a happy party. That audience was a lot younger than the crowd for Heart, who played at the same time as Outkast at the end of the festival. Heart actually went longer and had the power cut during their Led Zeppelin medley. Swanson: Did you see any crazy stuff happen? Grizzle: We were in the front 10 percent of the massive crowd during Outkast’s set. About an hour into the set, somebody literally pooped in the crowd. We smelled it right before someone started yelling “They’re pooping!” and we took that as our cue to leave. Swanson: Whoa, seriously? How the hell does that even happen? Grizzle: Well, the subwoofers were super-loud—like, painfully loud. Maybe they hit the brown note, I don’t know. Swanson: That’s pretty gross. I left early, at like 9pm, but it still took almost an hour to get a shuttle back to the parking lot. Grizzle: It took me over three hours to get from the festival to my car when all the music was over. The line for the shuttles back to Napa Pipe four miles away was total chaos, but I heard that was fixed by the next day. If the lineup is this good next year, I’d probably go again. Swanson: Hey, if they get Crash Test Dummies to perform, I’m there.

Concerts

Dar Williams

Dutoit Conducts Beethoven

The singer-songwriter performs her debut album, The Honesty Room, in its entirety. Jun 5, 8pm. $35-$45. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

The conductor leads the San Francisco Symphony with selections from Beethoven and Shostakovich. Jun 5, 8pm. $20$150. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Clubs & Venues

SONOMA COUNTY

Michale Graves Former Misfits frontman Michale Graves performs a solo acoustic show, with support from local acts Resilience, Violation and others. Jun 10, 7pm. $12-$15. Live Musicians Co-Op, 925 Piner Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8845.

Volker Strifler Funky Fridays outdoor concert series kicks off. Info at www. funkyfridays.info. Jun 6, 6:30pm. $10. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

MARIN COUNTY DjangoFest Mill Valley A three-day celebration of Gypsy jazz music headlined by the Robin Nolan Trio, the Rhythm Future Quartet and others. Jun 6-8. $35-$60. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

John Vanderslice Indie songwriter plays with Amber Rubarth as part of the Sunday Cookout Concert Series. Jun 8, 5pm. $10-$25. Hopmonk Novato, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

SONOMA COUNTY Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Roma Roasters Jun 6-7, live music. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe Jun 6, Spyglass. Jun 7, The Hillwilliams. Jun 8, Alan Early. First Wednesday of every month, Chamber Music. First Thursday of every month, Celtic Night. Second Wednesday of every month, Jazz Jam. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Jun 7, 1pm, the Hero Project. Jun 8, 3pm, Petracovich. Jun 9, Stirling with Ian Shoop and Diynasaur. Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Brixx Pizzeria Jun 7, Levi Lloyd. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

Cloverdale Plaza Jun 6, Shana Morrison and Caledonia. Cloverdale Blvd between First and Second St, Cloverdale.

Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Argenzio Winery Jun 5, Bearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Belly. 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.280.4658.

Epicurean Connection

NAPA COUNTY The Both: Aimee Mann & Ted Leo

Jun 5, Ragtag Sullivan. Jun 8, Halfpence and Haypenny. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

The storied songwriters again collaborate in this new rock duo. Jun 11, 8pm. $35-$45. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Grand Night for Singers

Glaser Center

Vocalists from around Northern California and beyond take turns onstage. Piano accompaniment by host Richard Evans. First Saturday of every month, 7pm. $15. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Jun 7, Wendy DeWitt with Kirk Harwood Blues Bash. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491. Jun 7, Maria Bija and Christian Foley-Beining. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Guerneville Library Jun 7, the Stoney Point Ramblers. 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Jun 6, the Rock Collection. Jun 7, Crazy Famous. Tues, open mic night. Wed, Brainstorm EDM show. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques & Guac. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Jun 6, Wendy Dewitt. Jun 7, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Jun 8, Gypsy Jazz Caravan. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Jun 7, Lorca Hart Trio with Ben Stolorow and Sam Bevan. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jun 4, the Tonewoods. Jun 5, Steve James. Jun 6, Steve Pile Band. Jun 7, Lee Howardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Musical Universe. Jun 8, Roy Book Binder. Jun 11, Del Ray and Suzy. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Mc Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bullpen Sun, DJ Prodkt. Tues, Thurs, 9pm, karaoke with Country Dan. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

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K_lij-&,Â&#x203A;Love Beat Productons Presents

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cirque De Lovebeatâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;4 DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;? =i`-&-Â&#x203A;ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ROLL

Twice As Good JXk-&.Â&#x203A;BLUES

Blues Pirates Jle-&/Â&#x203A;HOUSE/NU DISCO f/Sunshine Jones Scaninasian, Tim Brown Thurs 6/12

Dustin Saylor =i`-&(*Â&#x203A;>pgjpIfZb

FINAL WEEKEND!

MARCUS SHELBY RON CARTER BILL CHARLAP & RENEE ROSNES BOBBY HUTCHERSON STUDENT WORKSHOP WITH CHARLES LLOYD & ZAKIR HUSSAIN CLAUDIA VILLELA PONCHO SANCHEZ

Junk Parlor Sat 6/14Â&#x203A;9cl\j&Jflk_\ie

Levi Lloyd & Friends Sun 6/15Â&#x203A;J_lZbA`m\

DJs & Oysters Levin & CÂş., 306 Center St., Healdsburg [cash/check]

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub Jun 6, Tommy Thomsen Band. Jun 7, Andrew Freeman Band. Jun 8, the Sean Carscadden Trio. Jun 10, the No Buenos. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Jun 5, Young Dubliners. Jun 6, Metalachi. Jun 7, Highway Poets. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jun 7, Kris Delmhorst. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater Jun 6, the Chicken Thieves. Jun 7, Thought Vomit. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Mon, 7pm, young peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AA. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe Jun 6, the 7th Sons. Jun 7, Onye and the Messengers. Thurs, Open Mic. Second Wednesday of every month, Sound Kitchen. Second Sunday of every month, trad Irish. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Jun 8, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;GIIN. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. ) 707.869.0821.

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Wed, June 4 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE W/PATTI JOHNSON 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE 12:40pm Youth and Family 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7-10:00pm SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club Thur, June 5 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE W/PATTI JOHNSON 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE 12:40pm Youth and Family 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7-10:00pm SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club Fri, June 6 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE W/PATTI JOHNSON 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm CIRCLES Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARES Square Dance Club Sat, June 7 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE Sun, June 8 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, June 9 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE W/PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:00pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING 9:30pm

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

4*/$&t-*7&.64*$/*()54":&"3 Fri Jun

6

Sat Jun

7

FIRST FRIDAYS REGGAE NIGHT W/BROKEN SILENCE SOUND 9pm | free

POOR MANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WHISKEY W/ STEEP RAVINE CMVFHSBTT

9pm | $15 adv/$20 DOS

BONNIE & THE CLYDES JEB BRADY BAND CMVFT

6-8pm | free

Wed Jun

11

Free

DMBTTJDSPDLDPWFST 

9pm | Free

13

10

FENTON COOLFOOT 5-8pm w/ COLIN BROWN TRIO 9-12pm

RADAR LOVE & BLUE BAYOU Fri June

Tues Jun

Thur Jun

12

FAIRFAX FEST KICK-OFF PARTY W/VINYL 9pm | $17adv/$20DOS

FAIRFAX FEST

FENTON COOLFOOT & THE RIGHT TIME 12-2am, OONA 10-11:30pm, JEFF CAMPBELL 8:15-9:45pm, BIG EARL & THE CRYING SHAME 5-8pm

SatJun

14

$20 Sun June FAIRFAX FEST -ACHILLES WHEEL 9-12pm LAUREN MURPHY W/DOUG HARMAN 7-8:30pm $10

15

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'"*3'"9t#30"%8":$0.t

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

25

Hopmonk Sebastopol

Music ( 25

26

T Carter. 256 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Fri, Flaunt Fridays with DJ Stevie B. Sat, This Is the Remix with Will Styles. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

June Ju ne 6

Jun 7, Ruby Mountain. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

June Ju ne 8

Society: Culture House

LLONESOME ON O ESOME LLOCOMOTIVE OCOMOTIVE HOWELLDEVINE HO WELLDEVINE June J une 15

SSAN AN GERONIMO GERONIMO June Ju ne 222 2

MARK M ARK SEXTON SEXTON BAND BAND June Ju ne 229 9

PPION ION 2 ZION ZION 1– 4pm Every 1–4pm Every Sunday Sunday tthis his Summer Summer tthru hru 8/31 8/31 NO C OV ER NO COVER L iv e m usic, ccocktails ocktails & food food Live music, ou tside iinn ggarden arden outside @goosegandernapa @ goosegandernapa

11245 245 S Spring pring St, St, St. St. Helena Helena 7707.967.8779 0 7..9 6 7. 87 7 9

Thurs, Casa Rasta. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann and guests. Sun, Church on Sundays. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa.

Spancky’s Thurs, Dj Tazzy Taz. Thurs, 7pm, Thursday Night Blues Jam. Sat, live music. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Stout Brothers Jun 4, Lucas Ohio. Jun 5, Dustin Saylor. Jun 6, Clear Conscience. Jun 11, Brandon Butler and Probable Cause. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

The Blue Heron Restaurant & Bar Jun 8, Tom Finn. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Toad in the Hole Pub 1030 Main Street in downtown Napa M O R E I N FO

NVOH.ORG 707.260.1600

LOS CENZONTLES

PIONEERS OF MEXICAN ROOTS MUSIC IN CALIFORNIA SUNDAY, JUNE 8 AT 3PM

Sonoma County’s Original Roadhouse Tavern

Shows: 21+ 8–11pm Great Food & Live Music

˜Biscuits & Gravy Country Jam! ˜Karaoke Party with Scott Razor ˜The Grain ˜The Hots ˜Blues & BBQ Blues Defenders 5-8pm ˜Open Mic with Carl Green ˜Country Jam! with Kevin Russell ˜Karaoke Party with Scott Razor

Fri & Sat Nights: Rasta Dwight's BBQ! 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove

707.795.5118

TOMMY CASTRO AND THE PAINKILLERS

June 7, 4-10pm $10 sliding scale

Hemp History Week Sponsored by The Petaluma Grange 4 Music: Sound Gardens, 7 Film: Bringing It Home, 8 PM: Q & A, 8:30 Band: The Dream Farmers June 14, 7:30pm $10

Billy Love Express Fun + Dance Music June 21, 8pm $20Adv/$25Door

FROM THE FIRST FAMILY OF COOL SUNDAY, JUNE 29 AT 3PM

TICKETS: CITYWINERY.COM/NAPA

Jun 8, Left Coast Chamber Ensemble. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Fenix Jun 5, the Incubators. Jun 6, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. Jun 7, Fleetwood Mask. Jun 8, Farzad Arjmand. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Jun 5, Orquesta Bembe. Wed, Rock and R&B Jam. Sat, DJ Night. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Jun 5, Midnight Sun Massive. Jun 6, Rock Candy. Jun 7, Reckless In Vegas. Jun 9, Bandworks. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jun 4, Joan Getz Quartet. Jun 5, Kurt Huget and friends. Jun 10, James Moseley. Jun 11, Donna D’acuti. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Tues, John Varn and Tommy Odetto. First Wednesday of every month, the Weissmen. Mon, acoustic open mic. Second Wednesday of every month, Silver Dollar Soul Snap. Second Sunday of every month, Sexy Sunday: Women Rockers. First Thursday of every month, Burnsy’s Sugar Shack. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Mon, Wed-Sun, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Jun 6, Fried Chicken & Waffles. Jun 7, 77 El Deora. Jun 8, The Shots. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

19 Broadway Club

Sausalito Seahorse

Jun 4, Tommy Odetto Group. Jun 5, Dynamo Jones. Jun 7, Poor Man’s Whiskey. Jun

Jun 5, Judy Hall. Jun 6, Doc Kraft Dance Band. Jun 7, Dredgetown. Tues, Jazz with

Nickel Rose

Second Sunday of every month, Ian Scherrer. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. Mon, Blues Defenders Pro Jam. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Twin Oaks Tavern Jun 4, Biscuits and Gravy. Jun 6, the Grain. Jun 7, Bear’s Belly. Jun 11, Country Jam night with Kevin Russell. Jun 8, Blues and BBQ with the Blues Defenders. Every other Tuesday, Levi’s Workshop with Levi Lloyd. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Vino di Amore

JOHN PIZZARELLI

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Tradewinds Wed 6⁄4 Thur 6⁄5 Fri 6⁄6 Sat 6⁄7 Sun 6⁄8 Tue 6⁄10 Wed 6⁄11 Thu 6⁄12

twinoakstavernpenngrove.com

ROCKING RHYTHM AND BLUES FRIDAY, JUNE 13 AT 8PM

MARIN COUNTY

8, the Continentals. Jun 10, Bonnie and the Clydes. Jun 11, Colin Brown Trio. Tues, Bluesday Piano Night. First Friday of every month, First Fridays Reggae. Mon, 9pm, open mic. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Fanna-fi-Allah Sufi Qawwali Music

Jun 5, Bruce Halbohm and Greg Hester. Jun 6, Lisa Stano. Jun 7, Coyote Club. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

Whiskey Tip Jun 6, Twice and Good. Jun 7, Blues Pirates. Jun 8, Sunday Bumps. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Zodiacs Jun 4, David Thom & Windy Hill. Jun 5, Throwdown Thursdays Afternoon Jam. Jun 6, Supermule. Jun 7, Moonalice with Rattle Box. Jun 11, David

San Francisco’s City Guide

Timber Tambre Canadian blues-folk group tours in support of their latest acclaimed album. June 5 at the Independent.

Les Claypool’s Duo de Twang Primus bassist deconstructs Americana with collaborator Bryan Kehoe. June 7 at Great American Music Hall.

Justin Hayward Moody Blues lead singer performs two intimate solo shows. June 7–8 at Yoshi’s SF.

Eels Songwriter Mark Oliver Everett brings his indie rock to San Francisco as part of world tour. June 10 at the Palace of Fine Arts.

Guided by Voices Since reforming in 2010, prolific band has already put out more albums than most ever do. June 11 at the Regency Ballroom.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello and Seth. Sun, live salsa music. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

Jun 7, Rhythm Addicts. Sat, Ukulele Jam Session. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, open mic with Simon Costa. Second Wednesday of every month, Acoustic Guitar Showcase. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Studio 55 Marin Jun 7, Manring, Kassin and John R. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jun 4, Young Dubliners. Jun 6, the Tubes. Jun 7, Dead On Live. Jun 8, Lumanation. Jun 10, My Amp Student Showcase. Jun 11, Aoife O’Donovan. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Jun 6, Salsa Della Soul. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Sun, Midnight North. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Town Center Corte Madera Jun 8, 2pm, Michael Bartel. 100 Corte Madera Town Center,, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961.

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards Jun 7, Jazz Mirage. 2000 Main St., St Helena, 866.708.9463.

City Winery Napa Jun 6, Tristan Prettyman. Jun 8, Los Cenzontles. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Jun 5, Ralph Woodson. Jun 6, the Charles Wheal Band. Jun 7, Highwater Blues. Jun 11, Pion 2 Zion. Wed, Jumpstart. Sun, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

FARM at Carneros Inn Jun 5, Dan Daniels Trio. Jun 4, Saddlecats Trio. Jun 11, Trio Soleá. 4048 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 888.400.9000.

Goose & Gander Jun 8, Howell Devine. 1245 Spring St, St. Helena. 707.967.8779.

Silo’s Jun 5, Darrell Edwards. Jun 6, Lily Wilson with MarieJuliette Bird. Jun 7, Isis and the Cold Truth. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Music Maker John Vanderslice has an ear for analog John Vanderslice is all business when it comes to quality audio. The San Francisco–based singer, songwriter, producer and studio owner is a champion of analog recording, vintage gear and 45 rpm vinyl. When Vanderslice first opened his now iconic Tiny Telephone studio in 1996, it was a co-op rehearsal space, but it quickly became a recording space after the co-op dissolved and Vanderslice took the reins. Tiny Telephone recently opened a second studio in the city, and a third Oakland location is in development, all strictly dedicated to analog goodness. In addition to his day job, Vanderslice has also carved out an impressive musical body of solo albums, with 10 releases to his name since 2000. His latest, 2013’s Dagger Beach, is also Vanderslice’s first self-released album after moving away from his previous label, Dead Oceans. A songwriter who regularly stays well within the indie rock and alternative circles, Vanderslice marks new territory on Dagger Beach, a spacey and surprisingly jazzy departure, and one of his best efforts to date. This all means Vanderslice is an exceedingly busy man and has few live dates planned for the summer, yet somehow S.F. promoter extraordinaire KC Turner lured Vanderslice up to the North Bay for a special cookout concert this week alongside acoustic songwriter Amber Rubarth. It’s expected to sell out, so don’t sleep on the news. John Vanderslice performs Sunday, June 8, at Hopmonk Novato, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 4pm. $10–$25. 415.892.6200.—Charlie Swanson

Joan Baez ᭌ Los Lobos ᭌ Indigo Girls

Jackie Greene ᭌ Darlene Love ᭌ Playing For Change Garth Hudson (The Band/The Last Waltz) featuring Sister Maud HUDSON Tim O’Brien & Darrell Scott ᭌ Rodney Crowell

Beausoleil avec Michael Doucet ᭍ The Wood Brothers ᭍ Amy Helm Tom Paxton ᭍ Paper Bird ᭍ The Blues Broads ᭍ Joe Pug ᭍ The Duhks Eliza Gilkyson ᭍ Mary Gauthier ᭍ Poor Man’s Whiskey ᭍ Wavy Gravy David Luning ᭌ Patchy Sanders ᭌ Spark & Whisper ᭌ Perfect Crime Bootleg Honeys ᭌ Rhythm Rangers ᭌ Highway Poets ᭌ MORE

AT BEAUTIFUL BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE Tickets & Info. 415-256-8499 (Inticketing) katewolfmusicfestival.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Sleeping Lady

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Arts Events RECEPTIONS Jun 4 Redwood Cafe, “June Art Show,” shows works from photographer Ken Bradley, sculptor Rick Butler and others. 6pm. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Jun 6 Arts Guild of Sonoma, “Michael Mudd / Brian Martinelli,” the two artists and other guild members are on display through the month. 6pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115. Epicurean Connection, “Jeremy Novy Stencils,” the SF street artist appears with a collection of his iconic drag queen and Koi stencils. 6pm. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960. RiskPress Gallery, “Alive at the Cusp: Remaking Our Relations,” displays collage work from six women envisioning the complex

Graton Gallery

relations within ourselves and our surroundings. 4pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol.

Through Jun 22, “In Water,” presents mixed media by Marylu Downing and Barbara Hoffman. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Jun 7

Hammerfriar Gallery

MINE Art Gallery, “New Art Works Worth Seeing” brings together a collection of art that challenges and inspires. 5pm. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

Through Jul 6, “1000 Tiny Cuts,” Graton artist Claude Smith’s installation highlights the gallery wide exhibit featuring 17 bay Area artists. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Marin MOCA, “Summer National Juried Exhibition,” including 45 works from around the nation in a wide variety of mediums from glass to 3D printers to Swarovski crystals. 5pm. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137. Sonoma County Museum, “Siberia: In the Eyes of Russian Photographers,” spans a century of images from rural and urban Siberia. 6pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Jun 22, “Metal Arts Exhibit,” shows functional and decorative art with metal. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Jun 29, “Treescapes,” exhibits the paintings and prints of artist Green Greenwald. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

New Leaf Gallery

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY Atascadero Creek Winery Through Jun 20, “Buon Fresco and Inks,” Solo show of fresco fragments made in the true ancient technique of roman frescos with a contemporary twist by French - American artist isabelle Proust. 6542 Front st, Forestville. Thurs to Mon, 12pm to 5pm. 707.812.7101.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Jul 6, “From the Pen to the Comic Pages,” exhibits the evolution of the comic strip. Through Aug 11, “Heartbreak in Peanuts,” over 70 comic strips focusing on lost love. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Chroma Gallery Through Jun 11, “Follow the Money,” artist and instructor Nick Mancillas’ presidential portraits comment on the

power of currency. Reception, May 23 at 5pm. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Jul 2, “Electric Visions,” showcases Richard Fung’s photography. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Finley Community Center

Through Jun 29, “Surfaces,” exhibits three sculptors Michael Hannon, Kari Minnick and Pam Morris. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Jul 6, “Images of Sonoma County,”juried photography exhibit. Reception, May 23 at 6pm. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

(Similar),” features two artists, Shoji Uemura and Ken Matsumoto, working under the influences of East and West. Reception, May 31 at 6pm. 360 A St, Santa Rosa.

is a group exhibit inspired by Japanese aesthetics. Reception, Jun 3 at 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Creativity Jam

The Tibetan Gallery & Studio

Youth in Arts Gallery

Not Forgotten

Jun 6-20, “Everything Under the Sun,” featuring works donated by ten artists for exhibition and auction leading up to the gallery’s Summer gala event. 917 C St, San Rafael. 415.457.4878.

Event to remember Andy Lopez on what would have been his 14th birthday, with speakers and a march to Courthouse Square. Jun 7, 11am. Roseland Plaza, 665 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Through Jun 8, “The Sacred Earth & Healing Arts of Tibet,” handcrafted art by the monks of Gaden Shartse Monastery is exhibited with events occurring throughout the week. Reception, Jun 1 at 4pm. 6770 McKinley #130 (in the Barlow), Sebastopol. WednesdaySunday, Noon-7pm and by appointment 707-509-3777.

Towers Gallery Through Jun 26, “California on My Mind,” featuring painter Henry White. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. Thurs-Mon, 10am to 7pm. 707.894.4229.

Aroma Cafe Through Jul 4, “Reflections on Water,” photo exhibit benefits the Gallinas Creek Watershed. 1122 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jun 26, “Memories of Dreams” exhibits new paintings by Bay Area artist Sanjay Vora. Reception, May 24 at 4pm. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Jun 15, “Visual Poetry/Disappearing Act,” Geraldine LiaBraaten’s photography explores words becoming images, while two artists highlight our role in species extinction. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Headlands Center for the Arts

Through Jul 6, “Abundance: The Promise of Spring,” featuring Robert Benson, Karen Spratt and other fine artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Through Jun 8, “Graduate Fellows Exhibition,” shows works from the center’s resident artists with guest curator Xiaoyu Weng. Bldg 944, Fort Barry, Sausalito. Sun-Fri, noon to 4. 415.331.2787.

Fulton X Gallery

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Marin Society of Artists Gallery

Through Jun 8, “Art at the Source Preview Exhibition” features work from artists participating in the upcoming Art at the Source open studios weekends. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Through Jun 7, “Visions,” juried exhibit displays work in all media by MSA members. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. MonThurs, 11am to 4pm; Sat-Sun, noon to 4pm. 415.454.9561.

Seishin Studio & Gallery

Through Jun 19, “The Beauty of Imperfection,” OHCA’s 11th annual Wabi-Sabi show,

Gallery One Through Jun 30, “A Gem-Small Works,” features the work of Else Gonella, Lori Mole, Helen Moreda, Alan Plisskin and Joanne Tepper. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Through Jun 22, “Hitsohii

Dennis Rae Fine Art Through Jun 30, “ELEMENTAL,” new works by Bernard Weston and Ronald Jermyn are drawn from their inspiration of nature and a place of inner peace and strength. 1359 Main St, St Helena. Daily, 10am-6pm 707.963.3350.

di Rosa

MARIN COUNTY

Through Jun 19, “Art at the Source Preview Exhibition,” features work from artists participating in the upcoming Art at the Source open studios weekends. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737. Through Jun 29, “Evolution Revolution,” juried exhibit reflects the evolution of all things organic and man-made. 1200 River Rd, Fulton.

NAPA COUNTY

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Through Jul 20, “Sophont in Action,” Desirée Holman’s art mixes New Age and sci-fi. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Grand Hand Gallery

A day of art, music by Trio Soleá and family fun for all ages. Jun 8, 11am. $10-$20. di Rosa, 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa, 707.226.5991.

Powerhouse Brewing Reunion The Powerhouse crew celebrate 20 years with a BBQ, live music by Sugar Daddy Mama and more, benefiting the Sonoma Humane Society. Jun 7, 5pm. Jasper O’Farrell’s, 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.2062.

Rockabilly Roller Derby Circus Fire dancers, art, a rockabilly/ circus themed costume contest and live music from the Orchard Killers, the Moon Ryes and others. Jun 6, 6pm. $8. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.528.3009.

Through Jun 30, “Window Weaving: Phase II” continues artist Mikey Kelly’s progressive installation. The artist works on the second phase of his window weaving May 26-30. 1136 Main St, Napa. 707.253.2551.

SelfSudan Benefit

Jessup Cellars

Learn how to paint in nature while hiking in this “pop up” class. Jun 8, 10am. $20. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen, 707.938.5216.

Through Jun 25, “Neil Young Series,” Grammy-award winning art director Jenice Heo’s exhibit of original rock-and-roll paintings. 6740 Washington St, Yountville. Daily, 10am-6pm 707.944.5620.

Comedy Kabir ‘Kabeezy’ Singh & Bryan Moore The rising comedians appear together. Jun 6, 8:30pm. $15. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.226.0262.

Events Art at the Source Open Studios Self-guided tours of hundreds of professional artists’ studios in west Sonoma County. SatSun through Jun 8. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol, 707.829.4797.

Hosted by Nyoul Tong, founder and director of SelfSudan, with film screening and discussion. Jun 10, 7pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.528.3009.

Watercolor Class

Western Sonoma County Open Art Studios See and purchase fine art from hundreds of experienced and emerging artists, while traveling the scenic byways of western Sonoma County. Info and maps at www. artatthesource.org. Through Jun 8. Sonoma County, multiple locations, Sonoma.

Field Trips Badgers at Carrington Ranch Come out to learn more about the world of one of our elusive coastal inhabitants, the badger. Registration is required.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Nature Night Summer Campout

Film The Golden Land of Myanmar

Thumbs Up John Waters hitches a ride in his new book Hitchhiking began as a Depressionera necessity and is now regarded as an oddity. The general consensus is that you have to be deranged or desperate to hitchhike across the country today. Which is why it’s fitting that avant-garde weirdo film director and author John Waters did that very thing two years ago. The man behind such campy cult classics as Pink Flamingos and Cry-Baby, Waters traveled from his home in Baltimore to San Francisco in nine days, all the while depending on the kindness of strangers. He chronicles the adventure in his new book, Carsick, and appears June 7 at Book Passage to read and talk about his time on the road. In the book, Waters describes his own imaginary best- and worst-case scenarios, and delightfully recreates moments on the open road. Holding out a thumb, and sometimes a sign that read “I’m not psycho,” he caught rides with everyone from a touring rock band to a 20-year-old Republican city councilman, the latter of whom actually picked him up twice in two different parts of the country. Which makes one wonder: What’s this guy doing all day? And why is he out on the interstates picking up hitchhikers with pencil mustaches? John Water reads from Carsick on Saturday, June 7, at Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 7pm. 415.927.0960.—Charlie Swanson

Jun 7, 7am. Carrington Ranch, Coleman Valley Rd, Bodega Bay.

Bloomin’ Backyards Tour four Sonoma Valley gardens from master gardeners. Expert advice and

demonstrations will offer creative ideas for challenging environments. Jun 8, 9:30am. $35-$40. Sonoma Ecology Center, 20 E Spain St, Sonoma, 707.996.0712.

Filmmakers Shoshana Cathy Korson and Drow Millar premier their documentary on the simple of beauty of the politically charged country. Jun 8, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

Rear Window Hitchcock’s masterpiece plays as part of the Classic Film Series. Jun 5, 6:30pm and Jun 8, 3:30pm. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.924.5111.

School of Rock Part of the Rock Cinema series. Jun 4, 7pm. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa, 707.226.7372.

Food & Drink Fresh Starts Chef Event Sondra Bernstein, founder of the Girl & the Fig restaurant serves a three-course meal and shares her seasonalinspired culinary sensibilities. Jun 5, 6:30pm. $55. The Key Room, 1385 N. Hamilton Pkwy, Novato, 415.382.3363 x215.

Oysters + Pearls Jun 11, 6:30pm. $60. Rosso Rosticceria + Eventi, 1229 N. Dutton, Santa Rosa, 707-5261229.

Top Drink Cocktail competition with local mixologists benefiting the Napa Valley Museum. Jun 8, 2pm. $20-$30. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville, 707.944.0500.

Lectures Sizzling Scenes Susanne Lakin leads this workshop on writing that really cooks. Jun 8, 3pm. $5-

Songs for Health, Healing & Happiness Composer and instructor Susan Kay Gilbert conducts a workshop about songwriting as well as promoting and distributing ones work. Jun 7, 2pm. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma, 707.763.9801.

Stewards of Eden Cultural coordinator Ben Benson explores traditional Native American land management techniques and philosophies. Jun 6, 7pm. Free. Pepperwood Preserve, 3450 Franz Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.542.2080.

Readings Book Passage Jun 4, 7pm, “The Three” with Sarah Lotz. Jun 5, 7pm, “Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant” with Roz Chast. Jun 6, 7pm, “The 3-Day Reset” with Pooja Mottl. Jun 7, 7pm, “Carsick” with John Waters. Jun 8, 7pm, “The Untold” with Courtney Collins. Jun 9, 7pm, “Sundance” with David Fuller. Jun 10, 1pm, “The Keillor Reader” with Garrison Keillor. Jun 10, 7pm, “The Farm” with Tom Rob Smith. Jun 10, 7pm, “Knocking on Heaven’s Door” with Katy Butler. Jun 11, 7pm, “Good Hunting” with Jack Devine. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jun 5, 7pm, “Cinnamon and Gunpowder” with Eli Brown. Jun 11, 6pm, “The Truth about the Harry Quebert Affair” with Joel Dicker. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jun 8, 2pm, “Tibetan Peach Pie” with Tom Robbins. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Lincoln Theater Jun 9, 7pm, “The Keillor Reader” with Garrison Keillor, Presented by Copperfield’s Books. 100 California Dr, Yountville 707.226.8742.

Many Rivers Books & Tea Jun 5, 7pm, “The Columbine Effect” with Beth Winegarner. 130 S Main St, Sebastopol 707.829.8871.

Petaluma Library Jun 11, 11am, Summer Reading Program Kick-Off, Kids can come sign up for a summerlong reading program and see Randal Metz’s Puppet Company perform “Why Mosquitos Buzz.” 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma 707.763.9801.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books Jun 7, 12pm, Sister in Crime Showcase, Nine local mystery authors read. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Theater The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged)

Playhouse, 1637 Imola Ave, Napa, 707-255-5483.

Ladybug Girl & Bumblebee Boy: The Musical World premiere, adapted from the books by David Soman and Jacky Davis. Presented by Bay Area Children’s Theatre. Through Jun 8. $15-$20. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

The Marriage of Figaro The music of Mozart comes alive in this playful production of the classic opera. Through Jun 15. $9-$40. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.763.8920.

Other Desert Cities

The madcap comedy condenses all 37 Shakespeare plays into an irreverent 90 minutes. Through Jun 8. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

The Ross Valley Players present this 2012 Pulitzer Prize nominee for Best Drama that sees generations clash over politically explosive secrets. Through Jun 15. $15. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.456.9555.

E-i-E-i-Oy!

South Pacific

Vivian Straus presents her coming of age one-woman show Jun 7, 8pm. $25. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station, 415.663.1075.

Experiment #514 Guesthouse Walk-through performance that includes puppetry, soundstories, animations and oracles. A small group of guests takes a journey into and through a secret handmade world of oracular visions. Through Jun 14. $15-$20. the Imaginists, 461 Sebastopol Avenue, Santa Rosa, 707.528.7554.

Failure: A Love Story MTC closes their season with the West Coast premiere of the Philip Dawkins-penned story of the three Fail sisters aiming to find love before their time is up in 1920s Chicago. Jun 5-29. $37-$58. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

The Mountain Play Association kicks off their 101st season with the beloved musical presented at the outdoor theater on Mt. Tamalpais. Through Jun 15. $20$40. Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre, 801 Panoramic Hwy, Mill Valley.

Stages of the Russian River Opera Performed on the riverbank, this unusual and interactive opera plays with the boundaries of its environment. Jun 6-7. $75. Warnecke Ranch & Vineyards, Chalk Hill Road, Healdsburg, 510-205-4844.

Will I Ever Wear a Bikini Again? One woman show by Marilyn Kentz, aka “The Last Mommy Standing” returns. Jun 6, 8pm. $28. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

The Full Monty: The Musical ETC presents the fun and revealing Broadway show. Jun 6-29. $36. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Harvey Longtime Bay Area director Jennifer Ruygt takes on this popular play about an eccentric and his friend, Harvey, a six-foot-tall rabbit. Through Jun 9. Napa Valley

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 4-1 0, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Bring a sleeping bag for this overnight Docent-led experience. Registration is required. Jun 7, 6pm. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental, 707.524.9318.

$8. Flamingo Resort Hotel, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.8530.

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