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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2014 Metrosa Inc.

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nb ON THE ROAD Bolinas’ Ananda Brady relives life on the ‘hippie trail.’ p16

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Barn Raising Working to build a new Sebastopol library BY CLARK MITCHEL

L

ANTERN (Library Association for a New Techno-Current Regional Entity) was founded last year to spearhead a new library for Sebastopol. It includes seven board members who share this vision and a growing advisory board helping us meet our goal. As board members, we recognize that Sebastopol has outgrown its library. Even though the library was recently remodeled, it is overused and lacks facilities and technology to meet the needs of the future.

Building a new Sebastopol library will take many years. LANTERN envisions a new library of extraordinary beauty that functions effectively for all users and for a variety of functions. The citizens of Sebastopol and the West County will benefit from a design that attracts people and draws them into the building. The new library will meet the needs of a digitally dominated age. This library will, of course, be primarily an information source, an access to books, computers and media. The 21st-century library also has programs to educate and entertain us. The new library will also have quiet study areas that our current library lacks, and will serve as a meeting place and hub for finding and sharing knowledge. LANTERN is seeking input from all ages and fields to determine what the community will want from a new library. A design team will work with the city of Sebastopol to help create an initial plan so costs can be determined. We are considering a bond issue on the West County ballot to help pay for this new library. We are also seeking funding from foundations, companies and individuals, and government grants. We ask Sebastopol library users to let us know what they want from a new facility. We’re also looking for intellectual and financial assistance. Donations can be made at any Exchange Bank branch under the name LANTERN. Contact us at info@lanternlibrary.org Clark Mitchel is a Sebasopol resident and the co-chair of LANTERN. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

hasn’t outgrown the megabusiness interests that boosted him into the Assembly.

Drought Thoughts Whether it rains or not at this point, we Californians are in a drought. Nonetheless, you still see bright green grass and sprinklers watering away in the middle of the hot midday sun. Seems people either don’t want to believe we’re in a drought or they must have forgotten. The problem is that currently we are on the honor system, but the fact of the matter is that people are still wasting water, and a great deal of it. Don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying to not water your yard; just be more aware when the sprinklers come on and for how long, and turn them off when it rains. Watering your lawn really should not be this complicated. We are in this together and all need to do our part to save what water we do have. It’s going to get worse before it gets better with summer quickly approaching. So when you are out with the kids running in the sprinklers this summer, think to yourself: maybe I should buy a kiddie pool.

AUSTIN J. ROY Santa Rosa

Money and Politics When the votes are counted in early June, the most closely watched results in the North Bay will be for the state Assembly in District 10, which includes all of Marin County and much of Sonoma County. Right now, the incumbent, Marc Levine,

Levine has never given a satisfactory answer to a question asked by the Sacramento Bee last year, when he abstained from a final vote on whether to give the California Coastal Commission more teeth: “Why did Assemblyman Marc Levine take a walk on coastal protection?” He was in the same grim groove on an important bill for protecting farmworker union negotiations. Levine opted for “not voting” on the bill (SB 25) and earned a public thank-you from Western Growers. The big-agriculture group pointed out that—from its vantage point—“not voting” was as good as voting “no.” Now keep in mind: Levine was elected in 2012 with help from upwards of $250,000 spent by “independent expenditure committees” controlled by such agribusiness giants as Western Growers. Individual political ambition and principles often have an uneasy relationship. But what should matter is that communities are vulnerable, lives are at stake and the environment is at risk. With those values, I believe that Diana Conti is the best choice in the Assembly District 10 race. We need to be much better at safeguarding the health of our society. The best way to respond when politicians embrace the power of big corporate money is to strengthen the ability of the body politic to fight off such opportunistic infections.

NORMAN SOLOMON Director of the Instutute for Public Accuracy, Co-chair of the Coalition for Grassroots Progress, Inverness Park


THIS MODERN WORLD

Irrational Responses

By Tom Tomorrow

Go Boho

As a long time resident of Montgomery Village, I too have been outraged by the people displaying the offensive Hitler/ Obama comparison in front of the Montgomery Village post office (Letters, April 30). On two different occasions, I have expressed to them their rights to freedom of speech, but asked them if the Hitler mustache on a picture of Obama was really necessary. The response both times was so irrational I found it useless to converse any further. I was somewhat reluctant to even comment on this issue for not wanting to give any more attention to the people involved, but I think it’s important to expose them for what they really are: ignorant, hateful and racist.

JOHN RAPP Santa Rosa

Nicolas Grizzle’s “No Peeking” article, Laura Gonzalez’s Open Mic “Where Is the Outrage?” on Efren Carrillo, and Jonathan Greenberg’s news brief “Occupy Palm Drive Fizzles” (April 30) were by far the best articles in any publication on these two most important West County issues. May the renewed Bohemian continue to publish such excellent articles.

SHEPHERD BLISS

Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Napa Assemblywoman Mariko Yamada’s “Dining with Dogs” legislation passed the Assembly last week and is now under consideration in the Senate. The bill, AB 1965, would leave it to localities to decide whether dogs can join their owners in outdoor dining settings, a practice now outlawed under state health law. Several assembly members abstained, and the only “no” vote in the assembly came from Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego. To her animal-lovin’ credit, Gonzalez does support the Orca Welfare and Safety Act, which bans whale shows at Seaworld. But she’s still in the doghouse as far as we’re concerned.

Marin Development Environmental groups are sounding the alarm over a Marin County proposal to allow for more development on West Marin farms and ranches.

OH, FRACK An oil field in Kern County in California—that’s a lot of oil, pops!

Petroleum Politics California’s latest anti-fracking bill is tapping out BY TOM GOGOLA

A

state fracking law enacted last year to regulate the oil and gas extraction practice is now helping lawmakers dodge a new anti-fracking moratorium push.

Welcome to the well-oiled wheels of fossil-fuel politics in the Golden State. Sen. Holly Mitchell, D-Los Angeles, co-sponsored the bill to stop

fracking in the state, pending further environmental review. The bill is headed to a vote in the Senate appropriations committee May 19. But SB 4, a fracking bill signed into law last year, is providing cover to oppose the new measure for at least one committee member, Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens. His position appears to be finding favor: use the existing law as a pretext to oppose a renewed moratorium push. “Some of the more moderate

ones are taking that position,” says Teala Schaff, a spokeswoman for Sen. Noreen Evans, D-Santa Rosa, who supports the Mitchell moratorium. Mitchell’s bill, SB 1132, would enact a moratorium until there’s a “clear finding that it could be done safely and that there are regulations that ensure that it is done safely,” says spokesman Charles Stewart. They already tried that last year. Sen. Fran Pavley, ) 11

A series of hearings this week, starting May 14, will air concerns over Marin County’s local coastal plan, which could lift restrictions that limit new housing development on ag land on the largely undeveloped miracle that is West Marin. In a call-out to supporters, the local branch of the Sierra Club notes that amendments being offered by the county would “open almost two-thirds of the nonfederal land in the coastal zone to residential, commercial, and industrial development without any public input or right of appeal to the [state] Coastal Commission.” The new rules would also open the door for a limited expansion of housing for farm and ranch workers, another thorny issue in an area with some of the highest property values in the known universe and a dearth of farmworker housing.—Tom Gogola The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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D-Agoura Hills, introduced SB 4 in the last session as a bill that would have hit the pause button on the state’s limited hydraulic-extraction industry. But the state’s gas and oil lobby got that language extracted, and Gov. Jerry Brown signed it into law. Democrats have since characterized SB 4 as basically the “better than nothing” law. While SB 4 did enact some of the nation’s toughest fracking regs, it also provided language that would allow for an expansion of the practice, which uses pressurized water, sand and acid to bore through rock to get at previously unreachable reserves in the Monterey Shale formation. Anti-frackers say the law opened the door to a fracking boom, a door lawmakers are reluctant to close. “It allows for a green-light for fracking in the state,” says David Turnbull, campaigns director for Oil Change International. Nixing a fracking gold rush in a state that has only recent stepped back from the brink of insolvency was always a hard sell. The numbers are big all around. There are upwards of 15 billion gallons in the shale, with high-end promises gushing from the oil industry of 3 million new jobs and $25 billion in tax revenue. Environmental groups around the state had supported the Pavley bill because it offered the moratorium. When she yanked the moratorium language, they yanked their support. Despite growing opposition— and rising concerns about fracking’s potential to cause earthquakes—prospects for a moratorium appear to be running out of gas this time around, too. The two Republican members of the appropriations committee, Mimi Walters and Ted Gaines, have already signaled opposition. Walters received $33,500 from the fossil-fuel lobby in 2012, according to data provided by Oil Change. She opposed the Pavley bill last year (too much regulation!), and opposes the moratorium. Meanwhile, Lara abstained when the Mitchell bill came up for

a previous committee vote. Lara, who, according to Oil Change, accepted $17,300 from fossil-fuel interests in 2012, recently told the Los Angeles Times that he wanted to see how Pavley’s law played out before considering a moratorium. Lara did not respond to two emails seeking further comment. A spokesperson for committee chairman Sen. Kevin de León, D-Los Angeles, said the senator was studying the Mitchell bill and would not take a stand in advance of the May 19 vote. Sen. de León has received over $30,000 in contributions from the fossil-fuel lobby over eight years in the state Assembly and Senate, says Oil Change. Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, will support the Mitchell bill, says his spokesman. Sen. Alex Padilla, D-Pacoima, and Senate President pro Tempore Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, did not respond to emails and phone calls seeking comment. All of the Democrats on appropriations voted for the Pavley bill last year, as did Mitchell, who represents a low-income district of Los Angeles that sits atop the Inglewood Oil Field. “We supported Sen. Pavley’s bill, but just felt that we needed to go further,” says Mitchell’s spokesman. Evans also supported SB 4 after the moratorium language was stripped. “We have got to start somewhere,” Schaff says, adding that Evans has offered a bill of her own this year that slaps an extraction tax on the gas and oil industry. Assemblywoman Mariko Yamada, whose district comprises parts of Napa and Sonoma counties, says she is supporting Mitchell’s bill, but admits that it’s a “heavy lift because of the enactment of SB 4.” Gov. Brown promised unspecified amendments in a signing statement last year that would, he said, strengthen SB 4 to the liking of environmentalists. “Unless the amendment is, ‘We’re going to stop fracking,’ it’s not going to placate the environmental community,” says Turnbull. In any event, those promised amendments are nowhere to be seen this legislative session.


12 NORTH BAY BOH EMIAN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

BAY VIEW RESTAURANT & BAR – BODEGA BAY ESTA BLISH ED IN 1984

Traditional Italian and Local Seafood at Affordable Prices SERVING DINNER Wednesday–Sundays (Saturday Piano Bar) ~ Full Bar, Fireside Lounge, Outdoor Patio ~ Featuring Sonoma County Wines ~ Spectacular Sunset Views ~ Winemaker Dinner Series featured Monthly ~ Groups and Receptions Welcome

Inn at the Tides 800 Hwy One, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Bistro Ralph Bistro. $$. Classic and classy–bistro food at its best. Wine bar. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sun; brunch, Sun. 109 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.1380.

Corks American. $$.

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The restaurant at Russian River Vineyards sits in a 19th-century farmhouse, with food, from chef Ruben Gomez, equally down-toearth. Comfort-food favorites are taken up a notch with attention to detail. Lunch and dinner daily. 5700 Hwy. 116, Forestville. 707.887.3344.

The Girl & the Fig

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CATE C AT E RING RING

135 FO 135 OURTH U RT H S TR TREET EE T SA ANTA N TA R O OSA SA 707.545.6900 7 0 7. 5 4 5 . 6 90 0 JACKSONSBARANDOVEN J AC K S O N S B A R A N DOV E N . CO COM M

Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

JoJo Sushi Japanese. $-$$. Hip downtown eatery features fresh sushi, sashimi, teriyaki, and innovative specials. Lunch and dinner daily. 645 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8588.

$-$$. Authentic and enriching Nepalese cuisine. As its name suggests, a culinary paradise. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1708 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.793.0300.

Sushi to Dai For Japanese. $$$. A temple of sushi cool. Regulars rave about the rolls, in particular the dragon roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. Two locations: 119 Fourth St, Railroad Square, Santa Rosa. 707.576.9309. 869 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.721.0392.

Tres Hombres Mexican. $-$$. Excellent food in Petaluma’s Theater District, and a fun place to hang before or after a flick. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.773.4500.

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$. Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Mombo’s Pizza Pizza. $. The crust is thin and the toppings eclectic. Delivery. Lunch and dinner daily. 1800 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.FAST. 560 Hwy 116 N, Sebastopol. 707.823.7492.

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Papa’s Taverna Greek. $$. Satisfying food in riverside setting. Sun afternoons, Greek dancing. Lunch and dinner, Fri-Sun; lunch, Wed-Thurs. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

WINE WINE WEDNESDAY W EDNESDAY Y every week every week at five five o n The The Drive Drive on

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$$. Smart décor, professional service, very solid wonton soup. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. 3080 Marlowe Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2911.

Shangri-La Nepalese.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677. Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great

summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast and lunch daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Dinner, TuesSun. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520. Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Thurs-Mon. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists with its fresh catches. A wide selection of nigiri, depending on what’s fresh. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, Fri-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.3620. Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential


Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.4870. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

13

SMALL BITES

North Bay James Beard Award Winners The North Bay picked up three James Beard Foundation Awards in New York City earlier this month. At the annual “Oscars of the food world,” Civil Eats was named “publication of the year.” The foodpolicy blog was founded by Penngrove’s sustainable food-media impresario Naomi Starkman. “The James Beard Foundation award for publication of the year proves that contentdriven, in-depth dialogue on food-systems issues matter,” Starkman wrote in a blog post about the award. “Civil Eats is a spark that ignited the food movement, and this award is for everyone who believes that storytelling can transform the world.” Until recently, the blog was volunteer-run. But a successful Kickstarter campaign netted $100,000, making it the most successful crowdfunding campaign ever for a news outlet. Starkman and editor-at-large Paula Crossfield hope to hire a D.C.-based reporter to cover food politics from where a lot of the action is. Meanwhile, Healdsburg’s SHED earned a Beard award for Best Restaurant Design in the “76 seats or more” category. I don’t think there is a better looking restaurant-market in the North Bay. And in Napa Valley, the Restaurant at Meadowood picked up an award for outstanding service. The food at St. Helena’s Meadowood gets most of the attention, but the front-of-the-house ninjas are something to behold too. Congratulations to all. For a Q&A with Naomi Starkman, go to the Boho Blog at Bohemian.com —Stett Holbrook

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and

Best Indian Restaurant Thank you for the votes. —Deep B., new owner

We had a full-on meal, eat till you burst! —Charlotte B. Very healthy and delicious. Overall, a great spot! —Sara B.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

House of Curry & Grill Indian & Nepalese Cuisine formerly Sizzling Tandoor

409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa

707.579.5999 houseofcurryandgrill.com


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N T Y Cotati Corner Fine Wines What a funky college town like Cotati needs in a wine shop is friendly, unpretentious, with a small but unique selection of under $20 wines. And that they have. Thursday tastings. 1818 La Plaza, Ste. 106, Cotati. Open Tuesday–Saturda; tastings, Thursday–Friday, 5–8pm. 707.793.9357.

Gamba Vineyards & Winery On Sundays, the vintage vinyl spins and the old vine Zin flows at this highly regarded but off-thebeaten track little cellar. 2912 Woolsey Road, Windsor. By appointment. 707.542.5892.

Little Vineyards All of

and Collier Falls. 4791 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Tasting rooms generally open daily from around 11am to 4:30pm. 707.433.0100. 707.431.7568.

Westwood Winery Wonky wine scientist crafts soil-driven wines of beguiling complexity from the promising Annadel Estate vineyard, on the western frontier of Sonoma Valley. Tucked away in historic downtown Sonoma, the handsomely furnished tasting salon is a casual setting for a serious sit-down tasting of food-friendly Pinot Noir and some of the most savory Rhône west of the Rhône. 11 E. Napa St., #3, Sonoma. Hours by appointment; tasting fee $10. 707.935.3246.

MARIN CO U N TY

the Little’s wines are made from their 15-acre estate vineyards, and they’re serious about their product. Zin and Syrah are stars here. 15188 Sonoma Hwy., Glen Ellen. By appointment. 707.996.2750.

Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001.

Ravenswood Winery

Point Reyes Vineyards

The winery motto is “No wimpy wines,” and they make strong, much-praised Zinfandels. A great place to learn that wine is supposed to be fun. 18701 Gehricke Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.933.2332.

Russian Hill Winery Simple tasting room, strong Pinots and Syrah, fantastic view. 4525 Slusser Road, Windsor. Open Thursday–Monday, 10am–5pm. 707.575.9428.

Timber Crest Farms Animal labels abound at Peterson Winery’s expanded tasting room adjacent the cellar. Is that a Jackalope, or is that just the Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel? Also on hand is Papapietro-Perry and the six Family Wineries of Dry Creek. Dashe Cellars crafts mainly powerful Zinfandels and other reds. At Kokomo Winery, it’s about the reds. Also look for Mietz Cellars, Lago di Merlo

The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

N A PA CO U N TY Chateau Boswell Winery (WC) This small, boutique winery is open by appointment only, selling most its wine directly via post to club members. 3468 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.963.5472.

Frog’s Leap Winery A good story is nearly as important as good wine; Frog’s Leap does a neat job on both. As you wind through the vineyard, the frog pond and the rustic 1884 winery, your tour guide finds bottles

along the way, like Easter eggs. Dry-farming, who knew, can produce a beverage more thirst-quenching than water. 8815 Conn Creek Road, Rutherford. Daily, 10am–4pm. Tastings, $20; tours Monday– Friday, $20. 707.963.4704.

Inglenook Vineyard What’s new at Inglenook? Very little. The iconic stone building, robed in green vines, appears exactly as it did in 1890. But that’s news, and all thanks to owner Francis Ford Coppola. Still living up to Gustave Niebaum’s dream of fine wine to rival France, the oncebeloved Inglenook is putting out the goods once again. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Reservations for tour and tasting ($50) recommended; none required for bistro and exhibits. 707.968.1161.

Jericho Canyon Vineyard Oh boy, boutique Napa Cab from celebrity consultant Michel Rolland and high-rollers who used to spend half the year in Hawaii? Well, yeah, but they’re super nice, work hard, and their wines are tops. Cab and Sauv Blanc. 3322 Old Lawley Toll Road, Calistoga. Tour and tasting by appointment only, $30. 707.942.9665.

Mumm Cuvée Napa Californian-style fizz factory, all barn and no chateau, offers a robust account of how the bubbles get in the bottle. Sparkling winetastings offered on the patio, or take it to the next level in plush love seats on the Oak Terrace. Sparkling red is novel; DVX Brut among the best in the valley. Photography gallery includes Ansel Adams prints and other exhibits. 8445 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–5pm daily. Tasting $6–$20; Oak Terrace $30. 707.967.7700.

Peju Province Vineyards Talented staff, terrific food pairings and fantastic Cab. 8466 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–6pm. 707.963.3600.

Asti Again Historic tasting room reopens for Alexander Valley Winegrowers weekend BY JAMES KNIGHT

L

ike a hitherto hidden room revealed in a dream, the tasting room at Asti Winery feels both familiar and long forgotten. If it seems familiar to me, that’s because I visited four-plus years ago when the former Italian Swiss Colony tasting room, reputed to have been California’s second most popular tourist attraction during its heyday, was briefly reopened as Cellar No. 8 before being left to its one sepulchral inhabitant: a marble bust of a dotager cradling a straw fiasco of wine, “His Last Love.”

This weekend, you won’t have to journey into the subconscious to sip wine in this time capsule of a tasting room, now hip by attrition, where the taps flowed with wines “mellowed in redwood” until it was shuttered decades ago. On Friday, May 16, Asti Winery hosts the 17th annual Alexander Valley Winegrowers open house (the Bohemian is a sponsor of this event). Pointing out freshly hewn, split-rail fencing and handsome new cellar doors, Asti Winery general manager Jeff Collins explains why the carefully restored facade of the 100-year-old cellar reads, “Golden State Extra Dry California Grand Prix Champagne.” “This is the first ‘bottle shock,’” Collins says. Long before that Paris tasting of 1976, there was the prestigious Wine Exposition of 1911 in Turin, Italy. When the French got wind that the Americans would be competing, a prominent Parisian journal scoffed, “California has produced wines fit only for German troopers.” They weren’t laughing when the California upstart took home the exposition’s Grand Prix prize. The Italian Swiss Agricultural Colony was founded in 1881 by Andrea Sbarbaro, a grocer from Genoa who became president of the Bank of Italy in San Francisco. “Sbarbaro was a marketing genius,” Collins says. As early as the 1890s, he was bringing trainloads of tourists up from San Francisco to taste wine and party by the Russian River. The parties on May 17 and 18 this year include barbecues, food trucks, photos booths and live music throughout Alexander Valley at participating wineries. Taste Alexander Valley, Saturday and Sunday, May 17–18, 11am–4pm; various locations. Weekend passes, $65 advance; $75 door. Opening celebration May 16, 5:30–8:30pm at Asti Winery, 26150 Asti Road, Cloverdale. Tickets $95 advance, at www.tastealexandervalley.org or 888.463.0207.


15 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Magical Mystery Tourist On the road with Ananda Brady

I

was having tea and Indian snacks with author Ananda Brady on a recent Saturday afternoon, talking with him about his life and his book, Odyssey: Ten Years on the Hippie Trail. We were sitting at an outside table in his compound, talking Buddhism and other spiritual matters, as one does in Bolinas.

The day was warm, the conversation sparkly. As we spoke, a green-hued hummingbird zipped into the picture, hovered over a box of sugar just inches from us. It seemed like an eternity before that hummingbird finally flitted off. It was a fitting metaphor. Brady lives up on the Big Mesa in Bolinas in a hand-hewn Gypsy-circus wagon he built

from the ground up, starting with the chassis from a 1955 Chevy pickup truck. The wagon is moveable but it hasn’t moved for years—15 years. “Too much grass growing around the wheels,” Brady said with a laugh. Brady has another out-building in the compound, the writing space where he put together his 570-page book. His book opens with a poetic tribute to Kerouac, and is deeply flavored with Beat spices. Odyssey is funny and free-wheeling in its prosody, wryly observed and rich with detail from a 10-year adventure in the 1970s that took Brady, roughly, from Kansas to California to Kansas to Kabul to Kathmandu to Costa Rica— and, eventually, back to California. His chapter on traveling through Afghanistan in the 1970s is especially poignant in our time of terrorism and war, but there’s no

undercurrent in Odyssey of “innocence lost.” These adventures were undertaken in the long, endless shadow of Vietnam. There’s always some innocence out there still waiting to be lost or regained, but Odyssey stands on its own as a historical document. Brady has entered the Babylon of the internet to publish and promote Odyssey; he had a smallpress publisher for the book, but the Amazon self-publishing system had lots of benefits, not the least of which is the author’s ability to flit in and out of the book like that hummingbird, making edits and savoring the memories of his long and winding road. You can buy a copy through Amazon and Barnes & Noble online, or go straight to the source and email Ananda at odysy68@gmail. For now, here’s an excerpt from the book’s opening chapter. —Tom Gogola ) 16


Ananda Brady ( 15

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16

CRETAN HOP Caves and boats in and around the Greek island of Crete in the 1970s.

The Zero—the Fool—the unnumbered card in the Tarot, representing the un-anchored point of view, the un-limited range of possibility, the un-classifiable one who—while lightly clutching a small bundle of possessions—is teetering merrily on the brink of a precipice. Twenty years old, 1966, leaving home, driving with my buddy Brad from Kansas to California in my ’56 Chevy: Gliding across the dark Mojave bedrock of prickly earth full of rattlesnakes and horned-toads, cactus flowers and tumbleweeds— our windows are down, it’s the middle of night, the glow from the sign atop a forty-foot pole that says simply and irresistibly ‘EAT’ looms in the distance. We slow and pull into the giant graveled truck-

stop parking field off the two-lane highway which is the old Route 66, roll up to a pump. “Thirty-six cents for regular! Damn, it’s expensive out here!” Cutting across the black soft night with its pungent wind blowing through our hair, singing along with “Wild Thing,” and “Paperback Writer” and “California Dreamin’” at the top of our lungs, we’re all exuberance at the approach of our destination. After a while we settle down, to listen to and inhale the magic desert air, to watch the shadows and silhouettes of the cactus, the yucca, the distant craggy bluffs in the faint moonlight. A pack of coyotes skit across the ribbon of asphalt in the far reach of our beams, to go skipping and yelping into the night.

The freeway takes us finally to its end, through the tunnel at Santa Monica at which point it transforms into the Pacific Coast Highway—I get my first glimpse of the Pacific Ocean; it stills my breath, lying vast and mighty in the graying dawn. Brad slows to a comfortable 35 so we can take it all in. We switch off the radio and glide quietly alongside the walls of the plunging palisades which capture and amplify the roaring hush of the sea. The briny air intoxicated me with love at first sight and as love will do, it filled me with a melancholy for somehow finding a way to claim it – to make this spellbinding coastline my own. I make it my own by finding a charming house in the sandy delta

of the Topanga Canyon Creek, a two-minute stroll alongside its waters to the Malibu beach. I had many housemates, but for a time they were four girls who happened to work as nude dancers up on Sunset Strip. Tina shared her love with my friend Jerry and me; we went to pick her up one night: Tina got into the van and was laughing about a new law that forbade totally nude dancing. “So now we have to wear a ‘snatch-patch!’ They gave me one, you wanna see it?” Of course! So she pulled up her skirt, and was absolutely naked underneath. “Oh no, I’m not!” and she proceeded to untie a fleshcolored thread behind her back, then she pulled off the tiniest and most invisible bikini bottom ever invented—a triangular shard of a


17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Thai House

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with Flavor & Nutrition nylon stocking, with actual pubic hair glued to it. “When I put this on, I’m decent! I’m legal!” It was the funniest thing we’d ever seen, and we couldn’t quit laughing. We made all kinds of jokes about the law checking for snatchpatches backstage, and the labor force it took to make them for all the girls. A new cottage industry: growing your pubic hair and selling it for extra cash! So, you see, we had good, clean fun, and I had it all going on, in a short time, through no planning of my own—just good luck. From my little home, I had all the action, all the ethos, pathos and eros that makes for great drama. In two years I rarely went out for entertainment because it all turned up right there under my roof.

It was a time of much soulsearching and discovery for myself and so many others, as though we were hatched like newborns from some galactic sorcerer’s cosmic incubator. Yes LSD, yes marijuana, yes hallucinations—but the genuine visions we also had came from the sincerity of our quests. After two years in the company of goddesses, wizards and just plain crazy people, this college kid from Kansas became filled with an overwhelming lunacy to hoof it around the world—with little money and no plan save a pledge to get to India someday, as I’d been infused with an obsession for India—from within—from the psychic medium of LSD. ) 18

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18 Ananda Brady ( 17 A rocky beginning: No cash in the bank. No fat on the bone. Sleep on the ground. Travel alone. Despair. How could I go on? I must go on, so even deeper into Mexico, the day all my money was stolen was the day the adventure kicked into full gear. Some snippets along the way: Earlier on this particular morning, living in a bamboo shack on a beach in Costa Rica, I’d eaten six or seven psychedelic mushrooms: I was stitching up a patchwork quilt for myself, sitting in the cool of a palm in front of our hut. Some erratic flurry of movement along the shoreline catches my eye, and striding toward me with great purpose is a posse of five men. Though they were in street clothes, I knew them instantly to be cops. I was comfortable and involved in my project, so I didn’t feel the urge to jump to attention or straighten my hair. They surround me. “What brings you fellows here?” I ask in my infinite innocence. One of them, obviously the chief—el jefe—gets straight to the point in his very good English, “You bring us here, and we know you have drugs!” I say, “Oh no, I’m sorry, I don’t, but if you need drugs, you should try the surfers.” “Don’t be funny! We know you have drugs, and we’ll find them, too!” I motion toward the cabin. “You should check around then, but I don’t think you’ll have any luck.” I haven’t dropped a stitch. I’m in that ultra-calm state you sometimes get into when you’re really stoned. My American travelbuddy Juaquin is missing all this. Like Luther Burbank he was, and was probably in his garden. The jefe’s henchmen have billy-clubs and mustaches, some with severely pockmarked faces, understandably angry at life. They’re poking around. They search through bags and boxes and go through pockets of our clothing hanging on a ropeline, rudely dropping them in a heap. “What’s this?!” peering into the half-empty, hundred-pound gunnysack of peanuts. “Peanuts.”

DHARMA LOVE Ananda and Cilla Brady circa 1984.

“Why do you have them?” We make peanut-butter to sell to the surfers, but I can’t tell them that—gainful enterprise is almost as illegal as drugs. “We like peanuts.” “Aha!” They’re sure they’ll find the drugs hidden here and dump the whole thing out onto the sand, disappointed at finding nothing. “Have some peanuts,” I say. On the table are some vegetables and a pile of mushrooms. They’re withered and full of the powerful hallucinogen psylocibin, which turns the stems indigo-blue as they’re drying. They don’t notice them, as they’re looking for “drugs.” I smile to myself. “Are you coming from San Jose?” I ask. “Yes, San Jose.” “Wow, that’s a long drive. You came all that way just for me?” “That’s right, Easy,” says the smart one, the plainly clothed capitan; by now he’s bemused and dubs me “Easy.” He squats down and chit-chats for awhile while the dumb ones mill about; when the

jefe gives the word, they depart. If he’d have given the word to club me and throw me to the sharks, they’d have done that. He called me Easy, I chuckled. I knew it was one of the boatmen who had called the law. They didn’t like us and were looking for a way to be rid of us. These cops could have planted anything they wanted or could have trumped up any charge. Hell, if they knew their stuff, they could have made a legitimate bust, with plenty of evidence, and a stoned hippie to boot. The smart one wasn’t quite smart enough—they were looking for coca-een, or mari-whanna; they didn’t know yet what was growing in their own backyard. Finally off the continental Americas via Icelandic Airways to Europe. I’m crossing the Strait of Gibraltar to Morocco: Our ferry cruises out onto high waters, an ocean-going vessel built to withstand the ferocious currents that surge in and out of the massive

bottleneck. We pass slowly by the majestic Gibraltar, the one I’d known all my life as the Prudential Insurance Company’s logo—Safe, as the Rock of Gibraltar! We kick into high gear as the waters deepen. Schools of dolphin leap alongside the bow of the ship, keeping pace and ready to dive for pieces of food that they know people will toss to them. I inhale the super-charged air between two continents and two seas, and gaze at the oncoming north shore of the mighty piece of Earth called Africa where millions of people live in states of primal exigency. I pick my way over the Atlas Mountains and out into the dunes of the Sahara. I’m invited to live with a family of Arabs who live in tents: One dark day in late morning, the whole bunch of us were holding forth inside the family tent. The flaps were pulled down tight and anchored with stones all the way around. On this day no


Some years later, on foot, deep into the untouristed heart of India: I threaded my way in the scorching heat amid endless toiling of motor workers, food vendors, bundle haulers, cart pushers, brick stackers, bare-footed women working the roads wearing saris and carrying loads of dirt and rubble in pans perched atop of their heads, and often with a baby riding on their hip. However I was the curiosity as I gave them a moment’s pause in their repetitive lives to gaze upon me in bewilderment as I passed by. I could read the questions on their faces: why wasn’t I, the white

American, ďŹ nely dressed and riding in a car? Why was I eating so poorly and sleeping beside the road? Why was I here in the ďŹ rst place? Indeed. Why was I, the rich American, poorer than they? Why had I been touched by this madness of the wandering mendicant? For what gain am I subjecting myself to all this misery? In my heart of hearts I know that it’s precisely this lack of normality that is permitting me to view these cross-sections of the world’s humanity. I’ve allowed myself to be stripped of all the defenses that keep me apart from it, and yet I’m not a part of it, but I’m seeing it as closely as I can, and meeting it on its own terms. At the end of the journey, ying out of Kathmandu, having had ten years of fantastic adventure and having met the woman who would be my wife and mother of our sons, I reect: Whatever our belief-systems may be, this god or that, or no god at all—we are each on our own. Our decisions make us the sole arbiter of our own fortune or fate, and we begin with ourselves and those around us. It’s up to each of us to do our honest best for others, and to do our best to be honest with ourselves. Ultimately, we will be compelled to our destinies by our level of mind, so if we can strive to reach for the highest—to simply recognize the indwelling sacred essence of all beings and all things—to follow the path of introspection that brings us to personal responsibility, to curiosity, amazement, gratitude and a deep appreciation of the miracle that is life—then we will be on the path of dharma, of universal truths. My understanding of enlightenment—that clichĂŠd and perhaps overworked term of the day—means to me above all that true happiness comes from the light of a caring heart, that the opened heart of love is the heart of all. It’s the doorway through which all else becomes possible, and like the seashore with its sand, the dharma road will never end.

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one went out; a ďŹ erce sandstorm was howling across the land and threatening to rip our encampment to shreds. We held fast though the structure was bending and straining at the ropes. I felt a kinship, as with sailors at sea; we were at the mercy of the whims of mighty forces, our only measure of security being the sturdiness of our tossing craft. I could see how the fundamental shape of these desert dwellings had evolved; they are low-slung and aerodynamic with no vertical surfaces to catch the wind. We were lulled by the quiet bleating of our herd which had positioned itself on the lee side of the tent, huddled down in a tight cluster. Inside we were cozy, a family gathering mixed with tension and excitement. A closeness fueled by adrenaline held us all in high spirits. We sipped tea, covering our glasses with one hand as a steady rain of powdery sand sifted over and around us. The women had foreseen this big wind coming, and had brought in an extra load of brush the day before. Mingled with the din of the storm, we became aware of another sound, one so familiar yet so out of place as to send a shock of apprehension through us all—an engine was idling just outside the tent. DjiLaLĂ­ struggled with the ap, its bottom edges now buried and weighted down with heavy drifts. The headlights from a jeep were sending two dim and dusty beams toward us—the Erfoud police were here, for me.


Crush

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The week’s events: a selective guide

FA I R FA X

Three Ways to Save

In 2013, Deb Hubsmith was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. The 44-year-old founder of Safe Routes to School National Partnership and the Marin County Bicycle Coalition recently underwent a bone marrow transplant at Stanford Medical Center and is expected to recover. Of course her medical bills threaten to be a debilitating expense, so the community is stepping up with a multi-venue benefit in Fairfax on May 16 featuring 15 bands at three popular clubs. All proceeds are going to help Hubsmith in her time of recovery. The benefit shows take place on Friday, May 16, at 19 Broadway Club (19 Broadway Blvd., Fairfax), the Sleeping Lady (23 Broadway Blvd., Fairfax) and Peri’s Silver Dollar (29 Broadway Blvd., Fairfax). 8pm. $20.

S A N TA R O S A

What’s the Deal?

His name is synonymous with comedy, and for the last three decades Jerry Seinfeld has dominated the worlds of standup and sitcom television with sharp observational humor. Recently, the comedian has also moved into the world of the web with his popular online series “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” where the classic auto enthusiast takes his funny friends out to jabber over java. Seinfeld is also still active onstage, and this week he brings his acclaimed standup back to the North Bay with two shows on Friday, May 16, at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 7pm and 10pm. $78–$128. 707.546.3600.

YOUNTVILLE

Seeing Red

Acclaimed for their award-winning level of performance, the Napa Valley Youth Symphony is a nationally recognized ensemble of some of the area’s brightest young musicians. The NVYS plays Carnegie Hall next month, but to get there, they’re going to need more than practice. This week, the NVYS holds their Red Gala event to raise funds and send the talented group to New York City. Local winetastings, food and silent auction items start off the evening, followed by a concert featuring all three ensembles in the Youth Symphony. The Red Gala takes place Saturday, May 17, at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Drive, Yountville. 5pm. $25–$50 for concert only; $150 for Red Gala event. 707.226.8742.

HEALDSBURG/CLOVERDALE

Two Days in the Valley

This weekend, more than two dozen Alexander Valley wineries are hosting an array of events, and one ticket gets you access to it all. The 17th annual Taste Alexander Valley weekend includes live entertainment, special private parties, after-hours events and breakfasts with winegrowers to augment two days of casual fun in the lush 22-mile valley. The Taste Alexander Valley festivities happen on Saturday and Sunday, May 17–18, throughout the Healdsburg and Cloverdale region. 11am–4pm. $65–$75 for weekend passes. 1.888.463.0207.

—Charlie Swanson

LOVE LIFE Teri Nunn and Berlin keep the ’80s alive May 16 at Petaluma’s Mystic Theatre. See Concerts, p25.


‘ZAPATA–BLACK AND BLUE’ Nick Mancillas, art teacher at Piner High in Santa Rosa, elevates cardboard into currency.

Making a Buck Artist Nick Mancillas creates ‘artistic alchemy’ from trash BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

T

o most people, flattened cardboard boxes are worthless. Which is precisely why Nick Mancillas turns them into canvases, and then into currency. “One of my goals is to give value to the valueless,” says Mancillas, who forages the cardboard from dumpsters and then creates mixed-media collages of the famous men (mostly presidents)

whose stoic faces appear on our money. “I’m interested in a sort of artistic alchemy.” Reflecting both our obsession with money and our disposable society, the Cardboard Currency collection will be part of a show called “Follow the Money” opening May 23 at the new Chroma Gallery on South A Street in Santa Rosa. “I’m not painting on top of cardboard because I’m poor,” explains Mancillas, who’s taught art at Piner High School for 20 years, “but because it’s a throw-

away material, the vernacular of the common people. And yet each box has a whole story behind it.” Often, the box’s original purpose is reflected in the title of the piece, as in George Washington Mushrooms and Two Buck Jefferson, which features Thomas Jefferson (of the somewhat rare two-dollar bill) on a box of Charles Shaw (of the beloved “TwoBuck Chuck”). Created from the ephemeral papers of Mancilla’s life, the pieces are also deeply personal: he cuts up and creates

collages out of his own TSA reports, newspapers, food package labels and even photocopied Benjamins. Reflecting what Mancillas calls the “economic colonialism” of our continent, he’s also painted the less familiar (and even female!) faces of Canadian and Mexican currency, including a diptych of Queen Elizabeth, who appears on Canada’s $20 bill, and Juana Inés de la Cruz, a poet and nun who graces the 200 peso bill. “I paint them backwards, to reflect the backwards nature of our economic reality,” he says, “and because I don’t want to be thought of as a forger.” Though he’d been making art his whole life, about seven years ago his two adolescent daughters inspired him to up the ante. “I realized that I couldn’t control them,” explains Mancillas, “but I could show them what it looks like to pursue your dreams.” For Mancillas, that meant earning an MFA in a low residency program at the Art Institute of Boston and booking shows in San Francisco and Sacramento. “I’m extremely grateful for the chance to show my art in my hometown of Santa Rosa,” he says. Given the ubiquity of plastic credit cards, “these are nostalgic images now,” notes Mancillas, who is forthcoming about his own economic duress—a couple of houses lost to banks and two daughters in college. His art, then, is ultimately about finding value where we least expect it. “If I could transform a turd into a gold nugget, and make it worth something to someone, I would.” Nick Mancillas’ ‘Cardboard Currency’ runs May 23–June 12 at Chroma Gallery, 312 S. A St., Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051. For more info, visit nickmancillas.com.

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Arts Ideas

21


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22 55/16 /16 – 5/22 5 / 22

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Summerfield Su mmer field 551 S 551 Summerfield ummer field Road R oad Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707.522.0719 707. 522 .0719 www.summerfieldcinemas.com w w w. summe r fie ldc ine mas .c om

BALI HAI Randy Nazarian as Luther Billis and Lily Tung Crystal as Bloody Mary succumb to the tropic heat in ‘South Pacific.’

‘South Pacific’ via Mt. Tam The 101st Mountain Play stages the beloved musical BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

do get asked about airplanes—a lot!”

Linda Dunn, who is directing South Pacific for the 101st annual Mountain Play—on Marin County’s Mt. Tamalpais— laughs loudly and warmly when the airplane question is brought up. The last time South Pacific was staged in the massive, 3,000-seat Cushing Amphitheater, a nowlegendary production, it included a thrilling fly-over by a squadron of WWII-era planes. So of course, with South Pacific returning to the mountain, that’s what everybody, it seems, wants to know: Will there be airplanes? “What I tell everyone,” Dunn replies cagily, “is, ‘You’ll just have to come and see, won’t you?’” Beneath the planes-or-noplanes question is another. How does a director avoid disappointing audience members who fondly remember a previous

production without repeating what was done before? “I think,” Dunn replies, “when something is really good about a production, you certainly can decide to keep it—but you have to bring a fresh approach to it. The way I approach South Pacific is quite a bit different. My idea is to move the show from the Broadway stage into more of a living history context.” Using the massive canvas available to her in such an enormous setting, Dunn has created a working, fully populated military installation, in which the action of the play will take place amid all the day-to-day activity that really would have been going on in such an environment. “The set is very open,” she says. “There’s always something happening around the edges. It’s been a wonderful challenge for the actors.” South Pacific is Rodgers and

Hammerstein’s 1949 adaptation of James Michener’s bestselling Tales of the South Pacific. The play was a huge success when it first appeared, despite the rather enormous risks the playwrights took in adapting Michener’s book. The play confronts racism directly, and has a less than reverent view of the way military bases operated during the Great War. But that realism touched people, and years later, the story of nurses and marines on an island base in the Pacific can still pack a wallop. And packed with recognizable tunes, the musical also still gets audiences humming along. Dunn’s cast, a mix of Mountain Play regulars and a number of first-timers, includes Taylor Chalker as nurse Nellie Forbush, Randy Nazarian as the comically scheming petty officer Luther Billis, Tyler Costin as the lovestruck Lt. Cable, Mia Klenk as Liat, the focus of Cable’s attentions, and Peter Vilkin as Emile, the expatriate Frenchman who catches Nellie’s eye. “Oh, and we’ve also got Jim Dunn as Captain Bracket,” says Dunn. “There’s an interesting little twist.” Jim Dunn, it should be noted, is not only the ex-husband of Linda, but until 2013 was the artistic director of the Mountain Play. For the previous 30 years, he personally helmed all of the Mountain Plays, including two of those legendary productions of South Pacific. Linda Dunn is only the second woman to direct a Mountain Play. She follows Michelle Swanson, who directed A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum a whopping 36 years ago. “I hope,” she says, “after this year, that all changes. There’s no reason a lot more women shouldn’t get the chance to work up there.” ‘South Pacific’ runs Sundays, May 18– June 15 (and one Saturday, June 7), at the Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre. 801 Panoramic Hwy., Mill Valley. 2pm. $20–$40. 415.383.1100


++++ ++++ ++++ ++++ TIME OUT

EMPIRE

THE TELEGRAPH

CINEVUE

SPELLBINDING, SEDUCTIVE, HEARTBREAKING, EXPLOSIVE

AND FLAT-OUT THRILLING.

TOM HARDY S DEEPLY FELT

PERFORMANCE IS PURE WIZARDRY.

A POWERHOUSE OF SUSPENSE”

AND FIERCE EMOTION.

A BRAVURA PERFORMANCE,

TIGHT AS A VISE.

DUNE BUGGY Alejandro Jodorowsky’s vision lives on. Sort of.

TOM HARDY IS PERFECT.

Sci-Fi’s Father

Was ‘Dune’ the greatest movie never made? BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he inspirational quality of the documentary Jodorowsky’s Dune is immaterial to the potential of the half-made movie it disinters. That inspiration transcends the tunnel-vision of some of the critics thrilled by a film that might have beat their beloved Star Wars to the screen by a few years. Now the storyboards by French cartoonist Moebius can be animated, and this mad psychedelic project can be anatomized. The mystical filmmaker, 85-year-old Alejandro Jodorowsky, who’d been tripping out elite viewers with midnight cinema such as El Topo and The Magic Mountain, describes how he and producer Michel Seydoux tried to adapt Frank Herbert’s bestseller a corrupt interplanetary empire. The team of “warriors” they assembled included the star for the project, Jodorowsky’s own son, who was put through two years of martial arts training. Dan O’Bannon, the FX artist on John Carpenter’s Dark Star, sold his possessions and came to live in Paris to work on Dune. British illustrator Chris

Foss drew living spaceships with the dapples and stripes of scorpionfish. H. R. Giger, the father of Alien’s xenomorph, created several terrifying fortresses, bristling with spears and teeth. And Jodorowsky set off after a cast that would include Orson Welles, Mick Jagger and Salvador Dali. Dune was an early meeting of the minds who created the sciencefiction film wave to come. With his obsessions about virgin birth and messianic sacrifice, could Jodorowsky have reached audiences on the wowlevel of visuals alone? David Lynch’s version—a better movie than director Frank Pavich’s documentary claims it is—didn’t succeed on that merit. I’m as inspired as anyone by Jodorowsky’s passion, but it’s chafing to hear Dune described as “the greatest movie never made.” For a story on the composer of Jodorowsky’s Dune soundtrack, see the Bohemian’s music blog, City Sound Inertia, at Bohemian.com. ‘Jodorowsky’s Dune’ is now screening at Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

LockeTheMovie

EXCLUSIVE E XCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT ENGAGEMENT

SSTARTS TARTS FRIDAY, FRIDAY, M MAY AY 1166

SANTA RO R ROSA SA Summerfield Summerfi field Cinemas (707) 52 522-0330 22 0330 22-0330

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Film

A DRIVE TO PERFECTION


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24

Music

CYMBOLISM Drummer Scott

Amendola’s songwriting takes center stage on new album.

Pucker Up More innovation from HunterAmendola duo

BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

A

fter 21 years, it’s the drummer’s turn.

A year after releasing an album of the guitarist’s compositions, Bay Area jazz and funk duo Charlie Hunter and Scott Amendola’s new album, Pucker, is comprised entirely of tunes written by Amendola. Those in the know know that Hunter, playing custom, sevenstring guitars, and Amendola, on a four-piece drum kit, don’t hire other musicians to play at their gigs—it’s just the guitarist and drummer up there, filling the void. It may sound like a bassist, rhythm guitarist and percussionist occupy the stage with them, but no, it’s just two extremely talented musicians who’ve been playing together since Lollapalooza was new. “For me, making a record is about writing music,” Amendola says in a video about Pucker.

“When you’re younger, what you’re listening to and what you’re aspiring to musically, that evolves over time.” But for a group whose music evolves so quickly, what does one call an evolution of evolution? Supevolution? Sounds delicious. Amendola’s grandfather, the jazz guitarist Tony Gottuso, also penned a tune on the record. When he and Hunter first started playing together, Amendola says, “I was kind of into guitar players of the day, and he was like, ‘Yeah, that’s cool, but check this out.’ And he puts in this record and he plays this track and I go, ‘Yeah, that’s my grandfather.’” It was a song called “Satan Takes a Holiday,” by John Cali and Tony Gottuso, from Pioneers of the Jazz Guitar. For “Scott’s Tune,” his grandfather’s composition for the new record, the duo decided to break it down from a large band orchestration to their own signature style. It sounds, fittingly, like a pioneering composition played by a pioneering duo— quickly identifiable as their own. At live performances, first timers needn’t be alarmed upon hearing so much sound from such a sparse stage. There are no backing tracks and no lip-sync tricks (it’s all instrumental). There won’t be any dancing or theatrics to distract from the music—the two guys will likely remain seated the entire time—but the concert won’t feel boring. They might play a cover or two, but be aware that the night will consist mostly, if not entirely, of original compositions. A tip on instrumental music: song titles are hard to remember with nary a word to jog the memory. Just sit back and enjoy it. Buy a record or two at the end of the show and hope for the best. Charlie Hunter and Scott Amendola play May 20 at Hopmonk. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8pm. $20. 707.829.7300; and May 21 at Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $20– $22. 415.388.1100.


Concerts Clubs & SONOMA COUNTY Venues

May 17, Jimmy Gallagher Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Berlin Legendary LA electro-pop group, best known for “Take My Breath Away,� performs hits new and old. May 16, 8:30pm. $26-$29. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Cynthia Carr & the Carrtunes Glen Ellen favorites who play everything from doo-wop to the Grateful Dead appear as part of the Sundown Music series. May 15, 5pm. Free. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Lauren Murphy & Joanne Rand The acclaimed songwriters appear in the newly remodeled space. May 15, 8pm. $10. C14 Contemporary Arts, 6780 Depot St, Ste 100, Sebastopol. 707.827.3020.

MARIN COUNTY FOG Featuring Brian Melvin and Jeff Chimenti, the group plays their album release show. May 15, 8pm. $15. Fenix, 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Harmony Sweepstakes A Cappella Festival The premier American showcase for vocal harmony music. May 17, 8pm. $32-$60. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

NAPA COUNTY Gregg Allman The Allman brother shares music from his new album as well as his classic hits. May 21-22, 8pm. $66-$94. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Shawn Colvin & Steve Earle The two esteemed artists share the stage for two nights of song swapping, duets, storytelling and stellar guitar playing. May 20-21, 8pm. $65-$75. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters May 16, Solid Air. May 17, Christian Foley-Beining Trio. May 18, Seamus Duffy. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Annex Wine Bar Thurs-Sat, live music. 865 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.7779.

Aqus Cafe May 16, Acoustimatics. May 17, Dirty Red Barn. May 18, Gary Vogensen’s Sunday Ramble. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center May 16, Virgil Shaw, Dave Dondero and Joel Robinow. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Hotel Healdsburg

Lagunitas Tap Room May 14, JimBo Trout. May 15, Phony Abalone. May 16, Levi Lloyd. May 17, Vintage Grass. May 18, Blue Diamond Fillups. May 21, the Deadlies. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776. May 17, Wendy Dewitt. Sun, Kit Mariah’s Open Mic Night. Mon, Gypsy Cafe. Thurs, Susan Sutton Jazz Piano. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501. May 16, DJ Sameo. May 17, Wiley’s Coyotes. Sun, DJ Prodkt. Tues, Thurs, 9pm, karaoke with Country Dan. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

May 16, Masterpiece. May 17, Funk Shway. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

May 17, the pickPocket Ensemble. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

French Garden

Phoenix Theater

May 17, New Skye. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

May 16, John Brazell. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Hopmonk Sebastopol May 16-17, Electric Vardo Tribal Fest. May 20, Charlie Hunter and Scott Amendola. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques & Guac. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. Wed, Brainstorm EDM show. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma May 16, the Hellhounds.

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May 15, J Boog. May 17, Les Filles Rouges Burlesque. May 21, the Green. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts

May 17, Santa Rosa Symphony Youth Orchestra. May 18, Richard Goode. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

16

Thur May

BENEFIT FOR DEB HUBSMITH

9pm | Free

Flamingo Lounge

Green Music Center

Fri May

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Mystic Theatre

May 17, the New Horizon Band. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

SEAN LEAHY, JOSH CLARK (TEA LEAF GREEN), JEFF MILLER (NEW MONSOON), KATE GAFFNEY AND MORE 9pm | $10

Mc T’s Bullpen

Epicurean Connection

Glaser Center

MARBLE MOUTH FEATURING

9pm | Free

May 17, Spyglass. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162. May 15, Kyle Martin. May 16, Z and the Benders. through May 30, Keady Phelan. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

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Main Street Station

May 15, JayDub & Dino. May 16, Mark Larson Trio. May 17, the Perfect Crime. through May 25, Vanguard Jazz Ensemble. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Brixx Pizzeria

25

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Breakaway Patriot Sun 5/18›$5›12–7PM›6 DJS

Redwood Cafe May 16, Jose Arnulfo. May 17, Rhythm Rangers. Thurs, Open Mic. Second Wednesday of every month, Sound Kitchen. Third Monday of every month, Neil Buckley Octet. Third Wednesday of every month, Prairie Sun. Third Sunday of every month, Gold Coast Jazz Band. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Shuck & Jive Backyard Oyster BBQ Day Party

The Rocks Bar & Lounge

=i`,&*'›ROCK ‘N’ ROLL

Fri, Flaunt Fridays with DJ Stevie B. Sat, This Is the Remix with Will Styles. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592. )

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The Blues Defenders JXk,&)+›ROCK ‘N’ ROLL

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Sunday Bumps Day Party K_li,&)0›ROCK ‘N’ ROLL

The Freeway Revival Johnny Tsunami

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

May 17, Dan Martin. May 18, Jon Gonzales. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.


Music ( 25

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26 Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin

DeLone 7:30pm

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Jason Crosby & Friends

featuring Reed Mathis and Cochrane McMillan from Tea Leaf Green with The Loyal Scam )UL0D\‡SP

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Stu Allen and Mars Hotel 6XQ0D\‡SP

CHARLIE MUSSELWHITE JOSHUA REDMAN ELVIN BISHOP JOHN SANTOS GUY DAVIS

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Charlie Hunter & Scott Amendola 7KXU0D\‡SP

Tab Benoit

with Jimmy Leslie )UL0D\‡SP

Black Uhuru

RON CARTER BILL CHARLAP RENEE ROSNES BOBBY HUTCHERSON PONCHO SANCHEZ MARC CARY CLAUDIA VILLELA MADS TOLLING MARCUS SHELBY HJF FREEDOM CHOIR AND MANY MORE!

Jamaican Reggae Legends 6DW0D\‡SP

Rich Robinson

From The Black Crowes

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub May 16, Greenhouse. May 17, New Skye. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts May 16, Steel Swingin’ with Paul Anastasio and friends. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Stout Brothers May 14, Cork Pullers. May 15, Jess Young. May 21, Bros. Gadjo. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

The Blue Heron Restaurant & Bar

Wed 5⠄14˜Frankie

Shows: 21+ 8–11pm Great Food & Live Music

Boots and the

County Line plus Kyle Martin Band

Thur 5⠄15 ˜Karaoke Party with Huey Dawg Fri 5⠄16 ˜The Mighty Groove Sat 5⠄17 ˜Miracle Mule Sun 5⠄18 ˜Blues and BBQ with 5–8pm

The Soulshine Band

Tue 5⠄20 ˜Levi’s Workshop with Levi Lloyd Wed 5⠄21 ˜The Dixie Giants 8–10:30pm Fri3⠄20 & Sat Nights: Rasta BBQ! Thu  ˜Karaoke PartyDwight's with

DJ Redwood Hewy Dawg!Hwy, Penngrove 5745 Old

707.795.5118

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George’s Nightclub Wed, Rock and R&B Jam. Sat, DJ Night. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato May 15, Uphill Both Ways. May 16, Black Salt Tone. May 17, Afrofunk Experience. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Tradewinds Mon, Blues Defenders Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878. May 14, Frankie Boots & the County Line. May 16, the Mighty Groove. May 17, Miracle Mule. Sun, Blues and BBQ with the Blues Defenders. Every other Tuesday, Country Night with the Kick’n Country Girls. Every other Wednesday, Dixie Giants. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Vino di Amore May 15, Bruce Halbohm. May 16, Vernelle Anders and Tim Hagerty. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

Panama Hotel Restaurant May 14, Del Sol. May 15, Lip Sticks. May 18, Planet Loop. May 20, Swing Fever. May 21, Dave Getz. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Mon, Wed-Sun, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

19 Broadway Club

Rancho Nicasio

May 15, Marble Mouth. May 16, Benefit for Deb Hubsmith. May 17, RonKat & Katdelic. May 18, Erika Alstrom. May 21, Junk Parlor. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

May 16, the Steve Judkin Band. May 18, Todos Santos. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church May 18, Marin Music Chest’s Young Artists Concert. 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley.

Toad in the Hole Pub Third Sunday of every month, Hand Me Down. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

May 18, Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. May 20, Michael Fecskes. May 21, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

May 16, Benefit for Deb Hubsmith. May 17, La Mandanga. May 18, Dysphunctional Species. Mon, acoustic open mic. Tues, John Varn and Tommy Odetto. Third Wednesday of every month, Elvis Johnson Soul Review. Third Thursday of every month, Burnsy’s Sugar Shack. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Nickel Rose

Osteria Divino May 14, J Kevin Durkin. May 15, Jay Sanders Trio. May 16, James Henry & Hands on Fire. May 17, Joan Getz Quartet.

Sausalito Seahorse May 15, Patrick Fitzgerald. May 16, College of Marin Dance Band with Tony Lindsay and Juke Joint. May 17, Beautiful Losers. Sun, live salsa music. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with

San Francisco’s City Guide

Yoni Wolf Rock and hip-hop frontman who founded indie band Why? plays a solo set. May 15 at Bottom of the Hill.

Red Fang

Whiskey Tip

Metal group out of Portland, Ore., tour in support of third album. May 16 at Slim’s.

May 16, Kingsborough. May 17, Breakaway Patriot. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Cassandra Wilson

Zodiacs

Documentary Film “I AM�

May 16, Kevin Russell. May 17, Revolver. May 18, Amber Morris Student Showcase. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

May 18, Brandon Butler and Probable Cause. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Twin Oaks Tavern Sonoma County’s Original Roadhouse Tavern

Fenix

May 14, the Rivereens. May 15, Second Line. May 16, Sycamore Slough String Band. May 17, Dysphunctional Species. May 21, Bobby Vega. 256 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre May 15, Steep Ravine. May 17, Danny Click and the Hell Yeahs!. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Jazz musician and vocalist celebrates 20-year anniversary of her landmark “Blue Light ‘Til Dawn.� May 16-17 at Yoshi’s SF.

The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger Sean Lennon and Charlotte Kemp Muhl present their boldest psychedelic rock yet. May 20 at the Great American Music Hall.

Damien Jurado Seattle songwriter specializes in somber scenarios. May 20 at the Independent.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


Marcello and Seth. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Sweetwater Music Hall May 14, Jason Crosby and friends. May 16, Wonderbread 5. May 17, Stu Allen and Mars Hotel. May 18, Dirty Cello. May 21, Charlie Hunter and Scott Amendola. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads May 14, Terrapin Family Band. May 15, San Geronimo. May 16, Tea Leaf Trio. May 20, San Geronimo. May 21, Mark Karan and the Terrapin Family Band. May 17, Go by Ocean. Sun, Midnight North. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY City Winery Napa May 14-15, Richard Thompson. May 16, Allen Toussaint. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant May 16, David M’Ore Band. May 17, the Sorry Lot. Sun, DJ Aurelio. Wed, Jumpstart. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

FARM at Carneros Inn May 14-15, Dan Daniels Trio. May 21, Whiskey & Honey Trio. 4048 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 888.400.9000.

Lincoln Theater May 17, Napa Valley Youth Symphony Red Gala. May 18-19, Symphony Napa Valley: Lollipops Concert. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Silo’s May 15, Michael Belair. May 18, And That’s the News. May 21, Silo’s Sing a Song. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria May 14, Trio Soleá. May 15, Tommy Hill & the Rumba Tribe. May 16, Tony Macaroni Trio. May 17, Nicky DePaola. May 18, Collaboration. May 21, James and Ted. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

Shawn & Steve Two master songwriters share the stage in Napa She’s an enduring contemporary folk songwriter praised for her poignancy and emotional range; he’s a legendary Nashville songwriter, author and poet whose songs have been recorded by the likes of Johnny Cash and Willie Nelson. Shawn Colvin (shown) is best known for the single “Sunny Came Home,” from her platinum-selling album A Few Small Repairs. Since entering the mainstream, Colvin has continued to craft bittersweet and cathartic albums and recently published a memoir that’s as candid as her music. Steve Earle moved to Nashville at age 19, after following Townes Van Zandt around Texas. He was a consummate songwriter, penning songs for other artists before releasing his own records in the mid-’80s. Earle is recognized for establishing the “new country” sound, though his catalog is a diverse array of alt-country, roots rock and hard rock. This May, Colvin and Earle, longtime friends and mutual admirers, are touring together for a special run of shows. “Stories and Songs” showcases the two performing duets and trade-off on their most popular works, as well as favorites from of their folk and country contemporaries. Shawn Colvin and Steve Earle perform on Tuesday and Wednesday, May 20–21, at City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St., Napa. $65–$75. 8pm. 707.262.7372. —Charlie Swanson

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

May 16, Benefit for Deb Hubsmith. May 18, Namely Us. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, open mic with Simon Costa. Sat, Ukulele Jam Session. Second Wednesday of every month, Acoustic Guitar Showcase. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

27


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

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May 16 THE STEVE JUDKINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAND Fri

Sun

FEATURING STEVE BARBIERI, MIKE HENDERSON, & JOHN ALLAIR Rancho 8:00 Debut!

May 18 TODOS SANTOS WITH WENDY FITZ

A Harmonious Excursion 5:00 / No Cover Sat MIRACLE MULE May 24 Swampy Tonk 8:30

BBQS ON THE LAWN!

3, Gates att 4 Music a

MAY 25 THE BLUES BROADS MAY 26 A BEATLE-Q WITH THE SUN KINGS

FORD BLUES BAND May 30 WITH PATRICK FORD AND VOLKER STRIFLER 8:00 Sat May 31 FROBECK Fri

Tour Kickoff

Original Funk, R&B and Rock 8:30

TERRY HAGGERTY AND Jun 1 M OBY GRAPEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JERRY MILLER Sun

Classic Songs/ Hot Guitars 7:00

FATHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY BBQ ON THE LAWN! T CASTRO AND THE OMMY Jun 15 PAINKILLERS SPECIAL GUESTS KEITH

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Sun

Arts Events Galleries

CROSSAN AND NANCY WRIGHT Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

RECEPTIONS Sebastopol Center for the Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art at the Source Preview Exhibitionâ&#x20AC;? features work from artists participating in the upcoming Art at the Source open studios weekends. 6pm. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

May 16 Dennis Rae Fine Art, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ELEMENTAL,â&#x20AC;? new works by Bernard Weston and Ronald Jermyn are drawn from their inspiration of nature and a place of inner peace and strength. 5:30pm. 1359 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3350.

May 17 Hammerfriar Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;1000 Tiny Cuts,â&#x20AC;? Graton artist Claude Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s installation highlights the gallery wide exhibit featuring 17 Bay Area artists. 6pm. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600.

70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 707.829.7300 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE 2 30 P E TA L U M A A VE | S

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

May 18

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN WED W ED M MAY AY 1 14 4

Marin Society of Artists Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Visions,â&#x20AC;? juried exhibit displays work in all media by MSA members. 2pm. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

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$$20 20 ADV/$25 ADV/$25 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

SUN SU N MAY MAY 18 18

SONOMA COUNTY

COMEDY C OMEDY

COMEDY C OMEDY OPEN OPEN MIC M IC

Arts Guild of Sonoma

((EVERY EVERY 3RD 3RD SUNDAY) SUNDAY)

Through May 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cheap but Grand,â&#x20AC;? affordable works by guild artists, and featuring the surreal art of Christine MacDonald and the multimedia pieces of Pat Biggs. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 7PM/21+ 7PM /21+

MON M ON MAY MAY 1 19 9

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CHARLIE H CHARLIE HUNTER UNTER AN AND D SCOTT S COTT A AMENDOLA MENDOLA $$17 17 ADV/$20 ADV/$20 /DOORS / DOORS 7PM/21+ 7PM /21+

WED W ED M MAY AY 2 21 1

Hair Extensions and Color Expert

Lynnette Irish

BackStreet Gallery

DUBSTEP D UBS TEP | WEST WES T COAST COA S T | GLITCH G L I TC H

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EMISSIONS E MISSIONS DECOMP DECOMP

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at the at th e B Barlow a r l ow 707.861.3476 70 7.8 . 61 . 34 3 76

5pm. Art Alley off South A St, Santa Rosa. Sat, 11am to 5pm.

Calabi Gallery

May 15

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

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Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Through May 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winter Fruit,â&#x20AC;? Michele Bottaroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art celebrates our winter crops and the hope that comes with spring. Reception, May 23 at

Through May 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inaugural Group Exhibition,â&#x20AC;? celebrates Calabi Galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reopening after relocating from Petaluma to Santa Rosa. 456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Jul 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;From the Pen to the Comic Pages,â&#x20AC;? exhibits the evolution of the comic strip. Through Aug 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heartbreak in Peanuts,â&#x20AC;? over 70 comic strips focusing on lost love. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Jul 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Electric Visions,â&#x20AC;? showcases Richard Fungâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photography. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Finley Community Center Through May 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fresh Reflections,â&#x20AC;? exhibits works by the Art Heaven group, with special guest Michele Hoting. May 20-Jun 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art at the Source Preview Exhibition,â&#x20AC;? features work from artists participating in the upcoming Art at the Source open studios weekends. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Fulton X Gallery Through Jun 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evolution Revolution,â&#x20AC;? juried exhibit reflects the evolution of all things organic and man-made. Reception, May 10 at 6pm. 1200 River Rd, Fulton.

Gallery One

presents mixed media by Marylu Downing and Barbara Hoffman. Reception, May 17 at 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Jun 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Metal Arts Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? shows functional and decorative art with metal. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

HWY 12 Art Gallery Through May 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ruben Morancy Solo Exhibitâ&#x20AC;? presents the abstract artists dynamic and colorful works. 147 East Spain St., Sonoma.

IceHouse Gallery Through May 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? the inaugural opening show of the gallery, exhibits artists including Chester Arnold, Warren Bellows and others. 405 East D St, Petaluma. 707.778.2238.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Jun 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Treescapes,â&#x20AC;? exhibits the paintings and prints of artist Green Greenwald. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jun 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Surfaces,â&#x20AC;? exhibits three sculptors Michael Hannon, Kari Minnick and Pam Morris. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through May 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Salmon Creek Art Exhibitâ&#x20AC;? May 20Jul 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Images of Sonoma County,â&#x20AC;?juried photography exhibit. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Gem-Small Works,â&#x20AC;? features the work of Else Gonella, Lori Mole, Helen Moreda, Alan Plisskin and Joanne Tepper. Reception, May 10 at 5pm. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

RiskPress Gallery

Gallery 300 Through May 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beings That We Love,â&#x20AC;? benefit art exhibit for the Sonoma Humane Society. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Through Jul 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Abundance: The Promise of Spring,â&#x20AC;? featuring Robert Benson, Karen Spratt and other fine artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Graton Gallery

Seishin Studio & Gallery

Through Jun 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Water,â&#x20AC;?

Through Jun 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hitsohii

Through May 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who Cares,â&#x20AC;? exhibits new works by Mike Koftinow and Chris Collette. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery


Through Jun 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Precious Cargo,â&#x20AC;? exhibition of California Indian cradle baskets. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Towers Gallery Through Jun 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;California on My Mind,â&#x20AC;? featuring painter Henry White. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. Thurs-Mon, 10am to 7pm. 707.894.4229.

Upstairs Art Gallery Through May 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonoma County Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? exhibiting pastel paintings from artist Jan Thomas. Reception, May 10 at 3pm. 306 Center Ave, Healdsburg. Sun-Thurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

MARIN COUNTY Aroma Cafe Through Jul 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reflections on Water,â&#x20AC;? photo exhibit benefits the Gallinas Creek Watershed. 1122 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Art by the Bay Weekend Gallery

Through Jun 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Graduate Fellows Exhibition,â&#x20AC;? shows works from the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resident artists with guest curator Xiaoyu Weng. Bldg 944, Fort Barry, Sausalito. Sun-Fri, noon to 4. 415.331.2787.

Marin Community Foundation Through May 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;California Dreaminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;,â&#x20AC;? includes art and sculpture by Bay Area foreignborn artists. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5. Through May 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Altered Book/Book Arts Show,â&#x20AC;? displays literal inspired works from over 100 artists. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

MINE Art Gallery Through Jun 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Core Elements,â&#x20AC;? exhibits sculptures by Richard Dieterich and Jennie Strobel. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts Through May 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;On Paper, of Paper,â&#x20AC;? celebrates all things paper. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

Bolinas Museum

Tobyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gallery

Gallery Bergelli Through May 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Group Show,â&#x20AC;? featuring works buy Marco Farias, Santiago Garcia, Jeff Faust and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Jun 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Visual Poetry/Disappearing Act,â&#x20AC;? Geraldine LiaBraatenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photography explores words becoming images, while two artists highlight our role in species extinction. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Through May 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring Art Show,â&#x20AC;? local artists of every media exhibit their work. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888. Through May 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In My Varied Career,â&#x20AC;? exhibits the works of Richard Blair. Through May 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Painting West Marin,â&#x20AC;? exhibits the work of Kathleen Goodwin. 11250 Hwy 1, Point Reyes Station.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Jul 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sophont in Action,â&#x20AC;? DesirĂŠe Holmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art mixes New Age and sci-fi. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Jessup Cellars Through Jun 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neil Young Series,â&#x20AC;? Grammy award winning art director Jenice Heoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhibit of original rock-and-roll paintings. 6740 Washington St, Yountville. Daily, 10am-6pm 707.944.5620.

29

Jerry Seinfeld The standup legend performs two shows in one night. May 16, 7 and 10pm. $78-$128. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The Bad Aunties SF improv comedy troupe appears with special guests. May 16, 8pm. $20-$25. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Marin MOCA

Through Jun 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inspired by Books,â&#x20AC;? presents works by Pamela Paulsrud, Tim Graveson, Zea Morvitz and Camille Espositoâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;all inspired by books. 18856 Hwy 1, Marshall. 415.663.1006. Through Jun 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ceiling of Our Day,â&#x20AC;? features Bay Area artist Walter Kitundu combining mechanical wizardry and a passion for birdlife. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Comedy

Dance Bubbly Burlesque May 15, 8pm, Bubbly Burlesque, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somewhere Beyond the Seaâ&#x20AC;? includes tastings from Iron Horse Vineyards and the Oyster Girls. May 15. 8pm. $10-$20. Christyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the Squre, 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa 707.528.8565.

Petaluma Veterans Memorial Auditorium May 17, 1:30 and 5:30pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Twelve Dancing Princesses,â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien Center of the Arts presents the full-length ballet based on Grimm fairy tale. $20-$25. 1094 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma.

Events Festival Musical de Primavera 2014 The festival features the best well-known musicians from various Latin America countries and the Caribbean, including Tito Nieves from Puerto Rico and Grupo Rana from Guatemala. May 18, 10am. $25-$30. Marin Fairgrounds, Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael.

THE ATRE, NAPA Wed. W ed. M May ay 21 21 & TThur hur M May ay 2 22 2

Tom Rigney with Flambeau

GREGG G REGG AL ALLMAN LMAN

Saturday, May 17

FFri. r i. M May ay 23 23

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLE & PAIRS Square Dance Club 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise CIRCLES Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, May 16 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:30pm North Bay Country Dance Society/ CONTRA DANCE Sat, May 17 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm REDWOOD EMPIRE MODEL RAILROADERS 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm Steve Luther DJ presents an Evening with TOM RIGNEY WITH FLAMBEAU Sun, May 18 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, May 19 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, May 20 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD Music and Dance Wed, May 14 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:40pm 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Thur, May 15 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

PAT BENATAR PAT BENATAR & NEIL N EIL GI GIRALDO RALDO Mon. M on. May May 26 26

HUGH H UGH LAURIE LAURIE

with wi th THE THE COPPER COPPER BOTTOM BOT TOM BAND BAND

FFri. ri. July July 11 11

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TTHE HE VOICE VOICE OF OF FOREIGNER FO REIG N ER SSun. un. July July 2 20 0

KENNY K ENNY LOGGINS LOGGINS

with wi th SSpecial pecial Gu Guest est B BLUE LUE SSKY K Y RIDERS RIDER S

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KENNY W KENNY WAYNE AYNE SHEPHERD B AND SHEPHERD BAND FFri. r i. A Aug ug 1

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TTHE HE DAN DAN BAND BAND SSat. at. Sept Sept 27 27

DAVE MASONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAVE MASONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TTRAFFIC RAFFIC JAM JAM 11350 350 Third Third St, St, Napa Napa | 7707.259.0123 07.259.0123

www.uptowntheatrenapa.com w w w.uptowntheatrenapa.com

Tune into Los Manos de AztlĂĄn by Emmanuel Catarino Montoya, 1989

Sonoma County Museum

Headlands Center for the Arts

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Swingin' with Sinatraâ&#x20AC;?

5FOUI4U 4BOUB3PTBt5VFo4BUo 707tcalabigallery.com

Northern California Special Olympics Three hundred athletes from nine counties compete in swimming, tennis and track and field. May 17, 9am. Terra Linda High School, 320 Nova Albion Way, San Rafael. 415.272.9733.

Return to Lafferty: This Land is Your Land Fundraiser to re-open the historic ranch atop Sonoma Mountain to the public features music from Solid Air and Lafferty photo gallery. May 20, )

31

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

Hosted by: Hosted by: S teve Jaxon-Vicario Jaxon-Vicario Steve Saturday S aturday nights nights 6pm 6 pm to to 8pm 8pm

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

(Similar),â&#x20AC;? features two artists, Shoji Uemura and Ken Matsumoto, working under the influences of East and West. Reception, May 31 at 6pm. 360 A St, Santa Rosa.


ŵŲ

9th Annual

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Mendocino Film Festival

May 29 - June 1, 2014 Film screenings and special events throughout Mendocino County

more than 30 films and filmmakers

a film lover’s weekend in Paradise www.MendocinoFilmFestival.org facebook.com/MendocinoFilmFestival • 707-937-0171

Joan Baez ᭌ Los Lobos ᭌ Indigo Girls

Jackie Greene ᭌ Darlene Love ᭌ Playing For Change Garth Hudson (The Band/The Last Waltz) featuring Sister Maud HUDSON Tim O’Brien & Darrell Scott ᭌ Rodney Crowell

Beausoleil avec Michael Doucet ᭍ The Wood Brothers ᭍ Amy Helm Tom Paxton ᭍ Paper Bird ᭍ The Blues Broads ᭍ Joe Pug ᭍ The Duhks Eliza Gilkyson ᭍ Mary Gauthier ᭍ Poor Man’s Whiskey ᭍ Wavy Gravy David Luning ᭌ Patchy Sanders ᭌ Spark & Whisper ᭌ Perfect Crime Bootleg Honeys ᭌ Rhythm Rangers ᭌ Highway Poets ᭌ MORE

AT BEAUTIFUL BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE Tickets & Info. 415-256-8499 (Inticketing) katewolfmusicfestival.com


A E

( 29

Spreckels Always the Best Performing Arts Center

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

5:30pm. $20-$25. Lagunitas Tap Room, 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

RUN (Rise Up Now!) Forum District Supervisor Mike McGuire and political coach Frieda Edgette present the skills and tools needed to become a leader in our community. May 17, 9am. $15$25. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Field Trips Birding on the Sonoma Coast Explore birds of the Sonoma Coast near the mouth of the Russian River. Registration is required. May 18, 9am. $10$20. Goat Rock State Beach, Hwy 1, Jenner.

Film Documented Journalist turned filmmaker Jose Antonio Vargas appears live for Q&A following his documentary on being an undocumented American. May 18, 1pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Vintage Film Series â&#x20AC;&#x153;After the Thin Man,â&#x20AC;? is widely considered the best in the Thin Man series. Mon, May 19, 7pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Wavy Gravy Birthday Benefit The Wavy Gravy Movie: Saint Misbehavinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; screens with Wavy in attendance for the poet, clown and activistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 78th birthday. May 16, 6:30pm. $10-$99. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Food & Drink The Art of Eating: Vintage Country Picnic Featuring the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest

The Big Reveal Journalist shares his undocumented story Pulitzer Prizeâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas stunned the world in 2011 when he revealed that he was an undocumented immigrant in a New York Times Magazine essay. Vargas came to the U.S. from the Philippines when he was 12, and was raised in Mountain View by his grandparents. No one in his family ever obtained the proper papers to grant him permanent residence. After graduating from San Francisco State University, Vargas began a career in journalism that took him to New York, Washington, D.C., and elsewhere. For 15 years, Vargas worked, paid taxes and kept his status a secret. Produced and directed by Vargas, the ďŹ lm Documented follows the aftermath of his immigration-status outing in 2011, and how he has dedicated himself to opening up the dialogue regarding the estimated 11 million other undocumented Americans living and working in the country. The ďŹ lm also follows him on a personal journey to reconnect with a mother heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not seen in 20 years. Documented opens in limited release this month and makes its North Bay debut May 16 at Rialto Cinemas in Sebastopol. On Sunday, May 18, Vargas will be on hand for a Q&A session after the 1pm showing. 6868 Mckinley Ave., Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Charlie Swanson

food and beverage, an MFK Fisher exhibit, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wine is Lifeâ&#x20AC;?, silent & live auctions and nature displays. May 18, 12:30pm. $150. Bouverie Preserve, 13935 Hwy 12, Glen Ellen.

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Eating for Wellness Workshop with raw food chef and instructor Stephanie Burton. May 17, 10am. $68. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.579.2787.

Russian Food Festival Delicious food, Russian crafts and many novel boutique items as well as docent led tours of Saints Peter and Paul Russian Orthodox Church. May 17-18, 10am. Free. Saints Peter and Paul Russian Orthodox Church, 850 St Olga Ct., Santa Rosa. 707.584.4092.

Lectures Katherine Boyle The literary agent in a behindthe-scenes chat. May 15, 7pm. $10. Petaluma Community Center, 320 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma.

Joshua Mohr The writer speaks on the intersection of plot and character, presented by Redwood Writers. May 18, 3pm. $8. Flamingo Resort Hotel, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

April Owens The founder of Sustainable Urban Natives speaks on creating biodiversity in our urban landscapes. As part of the California Native Plant Society. May 20, 7:30pm. Luther Burbank Art and Garden Center, 2050 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa.

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Readings Book Passage May 14, 7pm, “The Year She Left Us” with Kathryn Ma. May 15, 7pm, “The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P” with Adelle Waldman. May 16, 7pm, “The Noble Hustle” with Colson Whitehead. May 17, 7pm, “The Horse Lover” with Alan Day. May 17, 7pm, “Writing from the Senses” with Laura Deutsch. May 18, 2pm, “I’m Your Man” with Sylvie Simmons. May 18, 7pm, “After Her” with Joyce Maynard. May 19, 7pm, “Casebook” with Mona Simpson, In conversation with Yiyun Li. May 20, 7pm,

“Dorothea Lange” with Elizabeth Partridge. May 21, 7pm, “Struck by Genius” with Jason Padgett. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books May 14, 6pm, “50 Children” with Steven Pressman. May 17, 7pm, Write On, Mamas!. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books May 16, 7pm, “Thunderstruck and Other Stories” with Elizabeth McCracken. May 20, 4pm, “Boundless” with Ken Oppel. May 21, 7pm, “The Serpent of Venice” with Christopher Moore. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books May 17, 7pm, “Don’t Shoot Me...I’m Just the Real Estate Agent!” with Cari Lynn Pace. May 21, 7pm, “The Kill Switch” with James Rollins. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Tudor Rose Tea May 18, 2pm, “Casebook” with Mona Simpson, Part of Copperfield’s Books High Tea event series. 733 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

Theater Anything Goes Cole Porter’s classic musical comedy is presented by Roustabout Theater. Through May 18. $16-$26. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Catch Me If You Can The Broadway musical inspired from the true events of conman Frank Abignale Jr and the FBI agent determined to catch him gets its Northern California premiere. Through May 25. $22-$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged) The madcap comedy condenses all 37 Shakespeare plays into an irreverent 90 minutes. May 16-Jun 8. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Other Desert Cities The Ross Valley Players

present this 2012 Pulitzer Prize nominee for best drama that sees generations clash over politically explosive secrets. May 16-Jun 15. $15. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Painting Churches M and G Productions offers this witty and rambunctious play. May 15-25. $20-$25. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Passport to the Plays A short play festival featuring six works selected through the Redwood Writers Play Contest. May 15-25. $15-$25. Studio Theatre, Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

South Pacific The Mountain Play Association kicks off their 101st season with the beloved musical presented at the outdoor theater on Mt. Tamalpais. May 18-Jun 15. $20-$40. Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre, 801 Panoramic Hwy, Mill Valley.

Thoroughly Modern Millie Young Millie Dillmount has just moved to the city in search of a new life for herself. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through May 25. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

We Are Monsters Dance Palace Kids Musical Theatre group presents this funny new musical filled with quirky characters. May 16-18. $5-$10. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Wretch Like Me The Bohemian’s own David Templeton presents his new one-man show as he prepares to take it to the world-famous Edinburgh Fringe Festival in Scotland. May 21, 7pm. $15. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of May 14

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) When the path ahead divides in two, Aries, I am hoping you can work some magic that will allow you to take both ways at once. If you do master this riddle, if you can creatively ďŹ gure out how to split yourself without doing any harm, I have a strong suspicion that the two paths will once again come together no later than Aug. 1, possibly before. But due to a curious quirk in the laws of life, the two forks will never again converge if you follow just one of them now. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) I see you as having more in common with a marathon runner than a speed racer. Your best qualities tend to emerge when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re committed to a process that takes a while to unfold. Learning to pace yourself is a crucial life lesson. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how you get attuned to your bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signals and master the art of caring for your physical needs. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also how you come to understand that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important not to compare yourself constantly to the progress other people are making. Having said all that, Taurus, I want to recommend a temporary exception to the rule. Just for now, it may make sense for you to run fast for a short time.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) If you ďŹ&#x201A;ing handfuls of zucchini seeds on the ground of a vacant lot today, you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect neat rows of ripe cucumbers to be growing in your backyard in a couple of weeks. Even if you ďŹ&#x201A;ing zucchini seeds in your backyard today, you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect straight rows of cucumbers to be growing there by June 1. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get even more precise here. If you carefully plant zucchini seeds in neat rows in your backyard today, you should not expect ripe cucumbers to sprout by August. But hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the kicker: If you carefully plant cucumbers seeds in your backyard today, and weed them and water them as they grow, you can indeed expect ripe cucumbers by August. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we want the rewards of being loved,â&#x20AC;? says cartoonist Tim Kreider, â&#x20AC;&#x153;we have to submit to the mortifying ordeal of being known.â&#x20AC;? How are you doing with this tradeoff, Cancerian? Being a Crab myself, I know we are sometimes inclined to hide who we really are. We have mixed feelings about becoming vulnerable and available enough to be fully known by others. We might even choose to live without the love we crave so as to prop up the illusion of strength that comes from being mysterious, from concealing our depths. The coming weeks will be a good time for you to revisit this conundrum.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a piece of art on the moon: a ceramic disk inscribed with six drawings by noted American artists. It was carried on the landing module of the Apollo 12 mission, which delivered two astronauts to the lunar surface in November 1969. One of the artists, Leo maverick Andy Warhol, drew the image of a stylized penis, similar to what you might see on the wall of a public restroom. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was being the terrible bad boy,â&#x20AC;? the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organizer said about Warholâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contribution. You know me, Leo. I usually love playful acts of rebellion. But in the coming weeks, I advise against taking Warholâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approach. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re called on to add your self-expression to a big undertaking, tilt in the direction of sincerity and reverence and dignity. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) The planet we live on is in constant transformation. Nothing ever stays the same. To succeed, let alone survive, we need to acclimate ourselves to the relentless forward motion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He not busy being born is busy dying,â&#x20AC;? was Bob Dylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way of framing our challenge. How are you doing with this aspect of life, Virgo? Do you hate it but deal with it grudgingly? Tolerate it and aspire to be a master of it someday? Whatever your current attitude is, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here to tell you that in the coming months you could become much more comfortable with the ceaseless ďŹ&#x201A;owâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and even learn to enjoy it. Are you ready to begin? LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like sweet disorder,â&#x20AC;? said English author Vita Sackville-West, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but it has to be judiciously arranged.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your theme for the week, Libra. Please respect how precise a formulation this is. Plain old ordinary disorder will not provide you with the epiphanies and

breakthroughs you deserve and need. The disorder must be sweet. If it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make you feel at least a little excited and more in love with life, avoid it. The disorder must also be judiciously arranged. What that means is that it canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be loud or vulgar or profane. Rather, it must have wit and style and a hint of crazy wisdom.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

I have three sets of questions for you, Scorpio. First, are you anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s muse? Is there a person who draws inspiration from the way you live? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my second query: Are you strong medicine for anyone? Are you the source of riddles that confound and intrigue them, compelling them to outgrow their narrow perspectives? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my third inquiry: Are you anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teacher? Are you an inďŹ&#x201A;uence that educates someone about the meaning of life? If you do play any of these roles, Scorpio, they are about to heat up and transform. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t currently serve at least one of these functions, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good chance you will start to soon.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) According to my reading of the astrological omens, you should draw inspiration from this Chinese proverb: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Never do anything standing that you can do sitting, or anything sitting that you can do lying down.â&#x20AC;? In other words, Sagittarius, you need extra downtime. So please say no to any inďŹ&#x201A;uence that says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do it now! Be maniacally efďŹ cient! Multitask as if your life depended on it! The more active you are the more successful you will be!â&#x20AC;? Instead, give yourself ample opportunity to play and daydream and ruminate. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) The main character in Raymond Chandlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pulp ďŹ ction novel Farewell, My Lovely is detective Philip Marlowe. At one point Marlowe says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I needed a drink, I needed a lot of life insurance, I needed a vacation, I needed a home in the country. What I had was a coat, a hat and a gun.â&#x20AC;? In accordance with your astrological omens, Capricorn, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m asking you to ďŹ gure out how you might be like Marlowe. Are there differences between what you think you need and what you actually have? If so, now is an excellent time to launch initiatives to ďŹ x the discrepancies. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a slightly better chance than usual that you will have a whirlwind affair with a Bollywood movie star whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on vacation. The odds are also higher than normal that you will receive a tempting invitation from a secret admirer or meet the soul twin you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know you were searching for or get an accidental text message from a stranger who turns out to be the reincarnation of your beloved from a previous lifetime. But the likelihood of all those scenarios pales in comparison to the possibility that you will learn big secrets about how to make yourself even more lovable than you already are.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Author Eva Dane deďŹ nes writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s block as what happens â&#x20AC;&#x153;when your imaginary friends stop talking to you.â&#x20AC;? I suspect that something like this has been happening for you lately, Piscesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not a writer. What I mean is that some of the most reliable and sympathetic voices in your head have grown quiet: ancestors, dear friends who are no longer in your life, ex-lovers you still have feelings for, former teachers who have remained a strong presence in your imagination, animals you once cared for who have departed and maybe even some good, old-fashioned spirits and angels. Where did they go? What happened to them? I suspect they are merely taking a break. They may have thought it wise to let you fend for yourself for a while. But donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry. They will be back soon.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žš NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 14-20, 20 14 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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