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The

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Where is the Outrage?

In a Pickle

Killer Niacin

BY LAURA GONZALEZ

I had never before written a letter to the editor, but as my last letter expressed (“Mr. Pickle vs. Hitler,” April 23), the group protesting President Obama outside the Montgomery Village post office simply enraged me.

T

While I continue to feel sick to my stomach at the tasteless and ignorant comparison of President Obama to Hitler, I feel that my anger was misdirected at Montgomery Village.

Both the headline and the text of Nicholas Grizzle’s article (“Killer Corn,” April 16) are quite sensational and misleading. Grizzle states: “In the mid19th century, it was confirmed that corn was the cause of pellagra . . .” As he does go on to explain, it is the lack of niacin in a corn-based diet that causes the pellagra. Corn, eaten as part of a balanced, vitamin-rich diet, does not cause any diseases, and is not a “killer.”

The community must demand Efren Carrillo’s resignation he trial of the misogynistic, egotistical trainwreck that is Supervisor Efren Carrillo has finally come to an unsatisfactory end. Surprisingly, the Press Democrat and fellow Supervisor Shirlee Zane have called for his resignation. One can only hope that more elected officials and community leaders will also step up to the plate in the coming days. But I won’t hold my breath.

Why? Because we live in a society where a man in power, even a man of color, can behave as grossly as Efren Carrillo has behaved and still be accepted and supported and not have to feel any real consequences. I am outraged and feel betrayed that a fellow woman has lived through a nightmare, yet her assailant’s reputation and livelihood have been more valued than her safety. Where are our priorities? At one of the “Recall Carrillo” townhall meetings, I listened to a high school teacher wax eloquent about Carrillo, how inspiring he was to the teacher’s predominately Latino classes, what an “excellent role model” he was for them. A man arrested in his chonies and socks is a role model for our youth? What does that tell our young men (and women) about what is acceptable behavior? Somehow that does not disqualify him to serve as supervisor? Carrillo has had his day in court. All these months later, and he has basically admitted all that the woman accused him of last July: half naked, he climbed a fence in search of sex with a neighbor he barely knew, stood outside her bedroom window, tore off part of the screen and inserted his hand through the blinds. This is not a man who should remain an elected official. This is not a man worthy of our respect. Elected officials and community leaders: Let us know that you don’t condone this behavior. We need to hear your voices. Laura Gonzalez teaches at Windsor Middle School and serves on the Santa Rosa School Board. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

As I reached out to the staff at the Bohemian, I also reached out to Montgomery Village. They quickly responded, and very much feel as if their hands are tied. The Montgomery Village representative whom I communicated with also found the Obama-Hitler comparison extremely offensive and was sincerely apologetic that the families in our neighborhood had to see it. Because the group sets up in front of a government office, Montgomery Village can do nothing about it. Though Montgomery Village can’t make the change I want to see, I am still hopeful that as a community we can make this group realize that the sign is taking it too far. To everyone who has taken the time to read this: I hope that if you pass this group, you will take the time to stop, talk to them and let them know that our children should not have to be subjected to such ignorance. Be kind to them but speak up! To Montgomery Village: Invite the pickle back to dance already. We miss him and we need a lighter vibe in Montgomery Village these days.

TESS KOFOID Santa Rosa

MARL KAPNER San Anselmo

Welfare Cowboys It’s perversely ironic for rancher Cliven Bundy to excoriate poor people for collecting government subsidies while ripping off the federal government for a million dollars in grazing fees. But even if he were to pay up, Bundy and his fellow ranchers would still be living on government welfare. Livestock grazing is subsidized by federal agencies on 270 million acres of public land in 11 western states to the tune of nearly $300 million annually. Monthly grazing fees per cow and calf on private rangeland average $11.90, but corresponding fees on federal lands are set at a paltry $1.35. Even so, grazing subsidies are dwarfed by other government subsidies and the medical, environmental and other external costs imposed on society by animal agriculture. These extra costs have been estimated at $414 billion annually, or $3,600 per household. Each of us can make our $3,600 annual contribution to the common good by replacing animal products in our diet with a rich variety of grain, nut, and soy-based meat and dairy alternatives.

STEVE ALDERSON Santa Rosa

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Of Players and Pliny I could not help but notice that while Efren Carrillo was on the stand he emphasized his proclivities toward the Pliny the Elder brew by the lofted Russian River Brewery. Hmmm, was he looking for juror favor perhaps by the mere mention of this magical golden liquid? Or perhaps there is an ingredient within that holds magical powers over this E.C. the Younger. No matter what the outcome here, this will be a win-win for Sir Christopher Adrian and E.C. the Younger. Why? Because the delays in trial proceedings have allowed Efren Carrillo to attain full vesting for pension or retirement from the county of Sonoma. Yes, the world is but a stage, and we have all been played by these two. The wheels of justice turn

for those privileged few. The costs associated with this rogue politician will go on indefinitely.

P. C. SULLIVAN Santa Rosa

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Beef with Oysters I don’t eat much beef or many oysters, but [Cliven Bundy], the rangeland squatter on Nevada federal land, and the oyster squatter in Point Reyes (“Shuck Stops Here,” April 23) are just about identical to me. Both want to use federal land, even though they are not keeping the terms of their contracts. It’s like a Putin-style land-grab. And water-grab, too. Get rid of the bums.

DAVID WEINSTOCK Fairfax

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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The “Occupy Palm Drive Hospital” effort for a doctor-led takeover of the Sebastopol hospital’s management and emergency room faltered Monday as the hospital closed its doors. Nearly a hundred protesters and hospital staffers stood outside the facility, consoling one another, some in tears. Physicians abandoned the takeover because of liability issues related to serving patients in a closed, unlicensed facility. The fight over the future of Palm Drive shifted to reopening the 74-yearold facility. Now that the ER is closed, reopening would require a new license. Doctors and critics argue that it should never have been closed in the first place, saying the hospital board did not act to resolve its financial crisis soon enough.

HERE’S LOOKING AT YOU A jury found Supervisor Efren Carrillo not guilty of attempted peeking.

No Peeking

Details and ramifications of Carrillo’s not guilty verdict BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

I

f Sonoma County Supervisor Efren Carrillo’s misdemeanor peeking case has taught the public anything, it’s that there’s nothing illegal about a man showing up uninvited at a female neighbor’s house at 3:30am in his underwear, hoping to have sex with her, ripping her bedroom screen and sticking his hand inside, walking around her apartment to her back patio, returning to her front door 10 minutes later and announcing himself as a neighbor before leaving again and being apprehended by police who had been called by that same woman to look for a possible prowler—as long as he doesn’t look inside the house.

Shortly after a jury could not reach a verdict Monday afternoon on the misdemeanor charge of peeking, Carrillo was found not guilty on the lesser charge of

attempted peeking. After a drawn-out and much publicized case with more twists than a Cirque du Soleil show, Carrillo told reporters outside the

courtroom, “I would like to move on and put this behind me.” He has good reason to want that after taking the stand and describing himself as a “functioning alcoholic,” and admitting that he hoped to have sex with his neighbor at 3:30am, after his girlfriend had dropped him off from Space XXV, a downtown Santa Rosa nightclub, less than two hours prior. The fallout has already begun. His fellow supervisors have condemned his actions, and supervisor Shirlee Zane has called for his resignation. The public has showed its overwhelming ) 10

“People will die,” says Sebastopol businessman Dan Smith, a former hospital board member. He’s now a fierce critic of the facility’s management and board. His claim is echoed by locals who say they or family members would be dead today were it not for the facility. “They say that a small hospital can’t compete with Kaiser and Sutter,” Smith says. “But we can do it, by emulating what works.” Palm Drive was ranked fifth safest hospital in the country—and the safest hospital in California— according to the most recent Consumer Reports rating of mortality rates at 2,591 hospitals across the nation. Dr. Robert Powers, who has practiced in the area for 40 years, offered free healthcare to turnedaway ER patients on Monday. “This is a big loss for all of us,” Powers says. “Palm Drive really cared about its patients.” —Jonathan Greenberg

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Carrillo ( 9

“A ‘not guilty’ verdict does not mean innocent,” says Darling.

and supervisor Shirlee Zane has called for his resignation. The public has showed its overwhelming outrage on social media, and his political future, once on the fast track to higher office, is likely stunted. Despite all of this, Carrillo says he will not resign.

The Incident

The ‘What If’ Game But if Carrillo were to resign, who would take his place? It would be someone appointed by Gov. Jerry Brown, and if that happened before July, the position would then become open on the November ballot. Santa Rosa attorney and former U.S. congressman Doug Bosco, a close friend of both Brown and Carrillo, and a principal owner of the Press Democrat, might have the governor’s ear on this matter. “It seems to be that if Bosco were going to make a recommendation to Jerry Brown, Lisa Carreño would be a possibility,” says Alice Chan, a West County political activist who was a driving force behind the initial push for a recall against Carrillo. Carreño, a Santa Rosa attorney, is also on the Press Democrat’s editorial board. Former supervisor Eric Koenigshofer has also been mentioned as a possibility. Chan says she is still in contact with the people working on a recall effort, but says, “I’d be very surprised if there were a recall now,” citing the election year and funding issues. “I would be really, really surprised if he resigned,” she adds, citing the two years left in his term. “I doubt very much that he’d ever be reelected.” Meanwhile, a rally calling for his resignation is scheduled for April 30 in Santa Rosa’s Courthouse Square. Rosanne Darling, a former prosecutor who was representing the victim in the case, says her client was “disappointed” with the jury’s decision. “She was up against not just the justice system, but the political machine of Sonoma County,” she says. The victim, who was kept anonymous in this case, “has more than a host of civil options,” which have a twoyear statute of limitations.

The facts of this case do not paint a pretty portrait of the supervisor. In the early morning hours of July 13, Carrillo showed up at his female neighbor’s house, to her surprise, in his nowinfamous boxer-brief-and-crewsock ensemble. He admitted on the witness stand to tearing the screen of her bedroom window, which was open with the blinds closed, and putting his hand inside. Carrillo testified that he was “trying to get her attention.” Jane Doe testified that was wakened by a “tearing, ripping sound” at her bedroom window, which was open with the screen closed and blinds drawn. She called 911 at 3:40am and says she told the dispatch operator, “There was a man outside my door trying to break into my house.” She called again at 3:50am. The 911 call recordings were not played in court and have not been released, despite multiple requests from multiple media outlets, including the Bohemian. After calling 911, Doe hid in the kitchen, and she and two girlfriends, traveling nurses who were staying the night, armed themselves. “We all had butcher knives,” said Doe. When they heard a knock at the door a few minutes later, she asked who was there, to which Carrillo replied, “It’s your neighbor,” before asking if she wanted to have a drink with him. He says he identified himself by name, but she didn’t mention that in court. She says she only learned the man’s identify when police detained Carrillo on the street outside her apartment. When she saw Carrillo in his underwear detained by police, she told the court, “My heart sank into my stomach, and I felt sick.”

He Said, She Said Carrillo took the stand Thursday afternoon, saying he has a bigger problem with alcohol than he let on to officers. “At the time, I was accustomed to downplaying and minimalizing the struggle,” he testified. He checked

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Officers’ Testimony Santa Rosa police officer Timothy Doherty testified that the night of the incident he never suspected drugs being involved, though, considering the situation—a county supervisor caught in his underwear before dawn with only

13 a cell phone and two beers in his hands—he “thought there might be a mental illness.” Doherty followed Carrillo to his apartment to allow the supervisor to put some clothes on. He testified the apartment was “in shambles. It was a mess.” Santa Rosa police officer Chris Diaz was the first to make contact with Carrillo that morning, at 3:49am. He testified that the underwear-clad Carrillo approached him and said, “I think you might be looking for me.” When he identified himself, Diaz began recording his interview with Carrillo. That recording was played in court. “When I heard a man’s voice, I thought she was by herself. I left when I heard that,” Carrillo said on tape. He also said, “If I offended her or did anything wrong, I’m happy to go over there and apologize.” He cited his two previous interactions with Jane Doe and then conceded that, for this particular encounter, “I probably should have been wearing pants.” Diaz said that while Carrillo smelled slightly of alcohol and his eyes were glassy, in his opinion Carrillo “wasn’t even close” to what he would consider “drunk in public.” When asked why he did not perform a field sobriety test, Diaz said, “At that moment, I was investigating a possible prowler, not a DUI.”

Questions Remain After reviewing the case, a few questions remain. Why wasn’t Carrillo’s cell phone data entered as evidence? Why didn’t the two women staying at Jane Doe’s house that night take the stand as witnesses? Perhaps a civil trial, which could be forthcoming, will reveal more details. “[Carrillo] was looking at a misdemeanor with a maximum of six months in jail,” says Darling, the victim’s attorney. “Was that ever going to make what he did right? Guilty or not guilty,” she adds, “what he admitted more than corroborated what Jane Doe said.” Calls to Carrillo’s and Hunt’s offices were not returned before deadline. An expanded version of this story appears at Bohemian.com.

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for a month after the incident. He told his defense attorney Chris Andrian there were two reasons why he went over to Jane Doe’s apartment at 3:30 that morning: “The fact that I was drinking” was one, and “I was hoping to rekindle some kind of relationship” was the other. He later admitted, under cross-examination, that he was basing his perception on two brief interactions. “My sense of ego,” “my sense of entitlement” and “my sense of arrogance made me think it was a good idea to go over to Jane Doe’s house,” Carrillo told the defense. “It was selfish,” he said. “It had nothing to do with Jane Doe, only with me.” He added, “There is no excuse.” Carrillo admitted during his testimony that he had damaged the screen on Jane Doe’s bedroom window. He says he didn’t tell officers at first, because he was “unwilling to admit I had done anything wrong.” Carrillo looked uncomfortable, emotional and shaken at times during cross-examination by Cody Hunt, a prosecutor with the Napa district attorney’s office assigned to the case by the state attorney general. He admitted to walking around to her back patio through the gate because he thought he saw a light shining through the sliding glass door, but maintained that he did not have a recollection of whether or not he looked into the apartment. He also admitted that he hoped to spark a sexual relationship with the woman, whom he called “very attractive,” even after being dropped off by his girlfriend from a nightclub about an hour and a half prior. When asked by Hunt, Carrillo stated that the same woman who dropped him off that night is still his girlfriend today, though she was not in court at the time of his testimony.

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Dining DONKEY POWER The agave for Efrain Nolasco’s artisinal mezcal is pressed the old-fashioned way in Oaxaca.

El Mescalero Santa Rosa’s Efrain Nolasco brings premium mezcal to the North Bay and beyond BY STETT HOLBROOK

W

hen America’s premium tequila boom hit in the late 1990s, Mexican distillers soon found themselves short of the spirit’s key ingredient: agave. The spiny succulent takes six to 14 years to reach maturity, and demand outstripped supply. In their search for agave, distillers from Jalisco, Nayarit and other tequila-producing states looked to Oaxaca. But when production of agave in the northern states

caught up, the distillers no longer needed Oaxacan agave, and the local market for it collapsed. When Santa Rosa’s Efrain Nolasco learned of the plight of his countrymen, he decided to help. Nolasco had emigrated to the United States from San Juan del Rio, a tiny town southwest of Oaxaca City, and he knew how hard life had become. Nolasco also knew how to make mezcal, the class of agave spirits that includes tequila. “I helped my dad make mezcal,” says Nolasco. “I know the step-bystep. So I decided to do something

to help my people.” Nolasco went into the mezcal business. But it was a long road. He works as a landscaper and didn’t know anything about the alcoholic beverage industries in Mexico and the United States. “I had to start at the bottom,” he says. It took him five years to bring his mezcal to market, but he did it. He even succeeded in getting his mezcal certified organic, the first to earn the designation. It’s available at Oliver’s, Pacific Market and Bottle Barn.

Mezcal production is much like wine. Different types of agave produce different qualities in mezcal. (Tequila is made with just one, blue agave). Soil, altitude and the skill of the maestro mescalero all factor into the final product. Sadly, the best-known mezcal is Gusano Rojo, an industrial, wormin-the-bottle abomination. But the real stuff is a thing of beauty. The spirits are typically made by hand in small villages. The hearts of the agave are roasted in stone-lined pits. The roasting gives mezcal its characteristic smokiness. Once roasted, the piñas are pressed on stone mills. Then the extract is fermented and distilled. Unlike many tequilas that age in oak barrels, the best mezcal I’ve tried doesn’t see any oak. It’s the spicy, smoky bite of the mezcal that comes through. Mezcal production is smaller and more artisinal than large-scale tequila distilleries. As such, it’s lesser known and not as widely available. That’s what makes Nolasco’s Benesin and San Juan del Rio brand mezcals a local treasure. At 92 proof, the Benesin brand has a slightly lower alcohol content. I sampled his standard Benesin and the Benesin mezcal de pechuga. Given the relatively high alcohol level, the mezcal is wonderfully smooth with smoky overtones and a pleasing, vegetal finish with hints of fennel. Skip the margarita. It shines by itself in a glass. Of the two, I like the mezcal de pechuga best. It’s made with a family recipe that includes fruit, flowers and chicken breasts. Yes, chicken. (Pechuga means “chicken breast.”) Nolasco’s family makes it for Dia de los Muertos. It doesn’t taste like chicken, but has a long finish that’s aromatic and rich. “It’s mystical,” he says. “We offer it to the gods, and we drink it with all our friends and family.” In a tasting organized by the New York Times in 2010 Benesin emerged as the best value. It costs about $40. TheFiftyBest.com, a product review site, awarded Benesin a double gold medal last year. Take that, tequila. For more info go to www.benesin.com.

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY

fresh ingredients and a full kids’ menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 701 Sonoma Mt Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.765.9800.

Cape Cod Fish & Chips

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly,

Fish and chips. $. A dingy hole in the wall–just like a real chippy! This popular lunch spot offers perfectly cooked fish and chips to eat in or take out. Open daily. 7530 Commerce Blvd, Cotati. 707.792.0982.

East West Cafe California cuisine. $$. All vegetarianfriendly. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 128 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2822.

Hamburger Ranch & Pasta Farm American. $. Old-fashioned, informal mom’n’-pop roadhouse. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 31195 N Redwood Hwy, Cloverdale. 707.894.5616.

Jennie Low’s Chinese. $-$$. Light, healthy, and tasty Cantonese, Mandarin, Hunan, and Szechuan home-style cooking. Great selection, including vegetarian fare, seafood, and noodles. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. Two locations: 140 Second St, Ste 120, Petaluma. 707.762.6888. Vintage Oaks Shopping Center, Rowland Ave, Novato. 415.892.8838.

plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Stout Brothers Pub & Restaurant Irish. $$. Atmospheric, if a little faux, but a great ploughman’s lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Thai Pot Thai. $$. A local favorite for authentic Thai recipes with pad Thai, curries, exotic appetizers and entrées. Lunch and dinner daily. 2478 W Third St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.9296. 6961 Sebastopol Ave (across from West America Bank), Sebastopol. 707.829.8889.

The Villa Italian. $-$$. Spectacular views, superb service. Seafood, steak, poultry, seasonal specialties, pizza from wood-burning oven, patio dining. Open 7 days a week. 3901 Montgomery Drive, Santa Rosa 707.528.7755.

Kirin Chinese. $$.

Vineyards Inn Spanish.

Specializing in Mandarin, Szechuan and Peking styles. Kirin’s pot stickers are the best in Sonoma County. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner, Sun. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1957.

$$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Thai. $$. Family-owned and operated with super-

MARIN CO U N T Y Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial

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Dining

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atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677. Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast and lunch daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536.

Thai House

VIETNAMESE CUISINE

BURSTING

with Flavor & Nutrition • GMO free beef • free range poultry • organic veggies & tofu

320 West 3rd St, Ste G Santa Rosa • 707.595.4447 www.phocrazy.biz

Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

) 16

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

unwind on the coast Happy Hour 3-5 Daily

Assorted Indian snacks, Mixed Platters $6 Samosas $3. All Bottled Beer $3

Authentic Indian Cuisine & select American Summer Fare

Bombay style Indian Chinese entrees also Open for Lunch & Dinner 11:30am–9pm

Sizzling Tandoor II 9960 HWY 1 s 707-865-0625

mour

ndulge in our weets Eclairs Lemon Curd Tarts Chocolate Fondant Full Catering Napoleons Menu Available

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Dining ( 15

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N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6534 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037. Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner daily. 975 First St, Napa. 707.266.3976.

Carpe Diem Wine Bar Californian. $-$$. Right in the heart of downtown Napa, Carpe Diem’s contemporary and innovative menu includes a variety of seasonal flatbreads, an ostrich burger, the famed short-rib sliders and much more Dinner daily. 1001 Second St., Napa. 707.224.0800.

Cindy Pawlycyn’s Wood Grill & Wine Bar American. $$-$$$. Classic American fare that stays up on current mainstays like crispy pork belly, braised short ribs and crab roll but doesn’t skimp on the burger. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Cole’s Chop House

Every weekend through May 3rd, 12 PM - 4 PM Don’t miss the Mobile Chef Showdowns through May 3rd. Discover your favorite wine and food pairing* with the specialties of local chefs and Chateau St. Jean wines. For more information, visit: www.ChateauStJean.com/chefshowdown *Wine and food prices vary.

© 2014 Chateau St. Jean, Kenwood, CA

American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

SMALL BITES

Taste of West County What if you got a cross-section of West County restaurants, purveyors and wineries together for an evening of outdoor dining in a postcard-perfect vineyard setting— what would that taste like? A lot like Taste of West County, a first-of-its-kind community event showcasing what makes western Sonoma County so delicious. The food and wine on tap for the event reads like a who’s who of the West County: Backyard, Boon, Corks, Forchetta/Bastoni, Fork Catering, French Garden, Patisserie Angelica, Peter Lowell’s, Redwood Hill Farm, Seaside Metal, Sub Zero Ice Cream, Village Bakery, Whole Foods, Burnside Road Vineyard, Claypool Cellars, Cobb Wines, Dutton Estate, Dutton-Goldfield, Hook & Ladder, Korbel, La Follette Wines, Miramar Estate, O’Connell Vineyards, Paul Mathew Vineyards, Red Car Winery, Russian River Vineyards and Sandole Wines. There will be raffle to win a wine cellar, and silent and live auctions with host Ziggy the Wine Gal. “Lots of people have been exposed to the wines and food of Napa and Sonoma, but we have many great food and wine producers right here in our backyard,” says event organizer Kira Martin. “I wanted to bring these people forward while raising money for important programs for our kids at the same time.” Taste of West County will be held at Sebastopol’s Vine Hill House May 18 from 2pm to 5pm. Tickets are $65 in advance and $75 at the door. Guests must be 21 and over. All proceeds will support arts and education programs at Sebastopol Charter School. (Disclosure: my kids go to the school). Sebastopol Charter School is a nonprofit public K–8 school that provides a Waldorfinspired education. The event is open to the public. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.tasteofwestcounty.org. —Stett Holbrook

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American

specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Wineries

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S O N OM A CO U N T Y

wine, as tastings are matched with specific food items. 9200 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Open daily, 10:30am–6:30pm. 707.933.5504.

Cline Cellars Great variety,

The Natural Process Alliance & Salinia Wine Co. A beige

easy on the wallet, and fun for the whole family: Pick out a gorgeous fruit bomb Zinfandel, have a picnic, feed the ravenous fish, and get historical at the California Missions Museum. Or just wrap your palate in Cashmere. 24737 Hwy. 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10am–6pm. 707.940.4000.

Dutcher Crossing Winery Barnlike room offers fireplace to warm the mitts on winter days; owner Debra Mathy leads monthly bike rides in better weather. Try the Maple Vineyard Zinfandel; ask the well-informed staff about the Penny Farthing bicycle. 8533 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily 11am– 5pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 866.431.2711.

Fort Ross Vineyard & Winery Pinot meets Pinotage at the edge of the continent. Take the turnoff to Meyers Grade Road and don’t look back. 15725 Meyers Grade Road, Jenner. Open daily, 10am–6pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.847.3460.

Kamen Estate Wines Key lines from screenwriter Robert Kamen’s features are available on T-shirts, packaged in film cans. Cabernet Sauvignon with intense red fruit flavor over inky tannins. Insert chase scene, destination: 111-B E. Napa St., Sonoma. Monday–Thursday, noon–6pm; Friday–Sunday, 11am–6pm. Tasting fees, $20 and $35. 707.938.7292.

Ledson Winery & Vineyards What warlock, many high-way travelers wondered, within those stone walls broods? Happily, Ledson’s wine-wizard is a Zinfandel zealot, making 10 from the zaftig grape. 7335 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.537.3810.

Mayo Family Winery Excellent place to pair food with

warehouse and a clean-cut, UC Davis–trained winemaker belie the wild-eyed truth: Unusual, fruity “natural wine” as fresh as next Friday, bottled in stainless steel Kleen Kanteens. Ask for Hardy. 3350 Coffey Lane, Santa Rosa. Friday–Saturday, 10:30am– 6pm, or by appointment. 707.527.7063.

Repris Wines A new crew reignites a blast from the past at historic Moon Mountain Vineyard. A work in progress with fantastic views. 1700 Moon Mountain Road, Sonoma. By appointment only. 707.931.7701. Thomas George Estates Pinot pioneer Davis Bynum hung up the hose clamp and sold his estate, but the good wine still flows in remodeled tasting room featuring a long bar and vineyard videos. Russian River Chard, Pinot and Zin; sweet berry flavors and long-lasting finishes. Wine caves. 8075 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 11am–5pm, daily. Tasting fee, $15. 707.431.8031.

Trione Vineyards & Winery One-time owners of Geyser Peak Winery now wear all the different hats that a small winery requires. A popular stop along a well-liked cycling route, where you’re likely to be greeted with a glass of crisp Sauvignon Blanc, or Bubba the bulldog. 19550 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Thursday–Sunday, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee, $5–$15. 707.814.8100.

Westwood Winery Wonky wine scientist crafts soil-driven wines of beguiling complexity from the promising Annadel Estate vineyard, on the western frontier of Sonoma Valley. Tucked away in historic downtown Sonoma, the handsomely furnished tasting

salon is a casual setting for a serious sit-down tasting of food-friendly Pinot Noir and some of the most savory Rhône west of the Rhône. 11 E. Napa St., #3, Sonoma. Hours by appointment; tasting fee $10. 707.935.3246.

N A PA CO U N TY Adastra Wines To the stars! Or, a big old horse barn. Here is a Napa winery that’s organic, authentic and makes a wine that pairs great with mammoth. Tasting is conducted on the kitchen table, “the way it used to be.” 2545 Las Amigas Road, Napa. Tour and tasting by appointment, $25. 707.255.4818. Domaine Carneros Inspired by Taittinger’s Château de la Marquetterie of Champagne, this house of premium sparkling wine is a hard-to-miss landmark on the Carneros Highway. Enjoy a private Balcony Package for special occasions or taste sparkling and still wines paired with artisan cheese and caviar with the masses. Luxury bubbly Le Rêve offers a bouquet of hoary yeast and crème brûlée that just slips away like a dream. 1240 Duhig Road (at Highway 12/121), Napa. Wine flights $15; also available by the glass or bottle. Open 10am–5:45pm. 800.716.2788.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

A Booze Is Born

Sample quaffs by the quarter-ounce at Prohibition Spirits BY JAMES KNIGHT

W

hile visiting friends in San Francisco, Amy and Fred Groth of Colorado were told they absolutely must see Sonoma County. Good call; they loved it. “This place is just like Italy,” they exclaimed, recalling earlier travels. “Everyone’s making wine and cheese.” Typically, the next thing a couple might say to each other is, honey, what this place really needs is another winery. They did not. Instead they asked, “Where’s the limoncello?” At the time, according to Fred Groth, nobody in the U.S. was producing an artisanal version of the popular Italian aperitif, so they packed up and moved to Sonoma. Batches are made by rounding up a party of volunteers to hand-peel 3,500 pounds of fresh lemons, then soaking the zest in high-proof California brandy. “It’s the Tom Sawyer thing,” says Groth. “Oh, let’s paint the fences, that’ll be fun!” A sweet shot of lemon meringue pie in the nose, Limoncello di Sonoma ($25) was such a hit with cocktail makers that Sonoma’s Girl & the Fig restaurant asked if they would make a fig version. Brewed with herbs, FigCello di Sonoma ($25, $35) has shades of Jägermeister, but is something to savor in a signature “Fig Kiss.” They went on to add bourbon and rum to their lineup. Thanks to the Taste California Act, Prohibition Spirits now offers tasting flights at their “distillery and indigenous spirits lab,” located in a workaday warehouse across from Sonoma Skypark. Quarter-ounce pours are strictly measured, and due to antiquated state laws still on the books, visitors can’t purchase any grainbased spirits. It makes no sense, but grain and molasses basedspirits cannot be sold on-site but fruit-based liquor can. Groth says that they entered the red-hot whiskey market by chance, when a bourbon broker specializing in small lots stopped in with a tempting offer. The catch? It would still cost a good sum. Groth reached out to college buddies with whom he used to pitch in a few dollars to buy a handle of bourbon. They pitched in again; after a day on the phone, he’d raised $10,000. Although Hooker’s House bourbon is sourced from an undisclosed Kentucky producer, and Sugar Daddy rum comes from Jamaica and Guyana, the Groths have localized their product by finishing the booze in Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Zinfandel barrels. “We believe we’ve changed it to make it our own,” says Groth. They’ve also savvily referenced “Sugar Daddy” Adolph Spreckels and General Joseph Hooker, local historical personalities to whom somebody, at some point, also said, “You absolutely must got to Sonoma.” Prohibition Spirits, 21877 Eighth St. E., Sonoma. By appointment only; $20. 707.721.6390.

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Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

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The People’s Business

An A-to-Z guide to what our legislators have been up to in Sacramento BY TOM GOGOLA

F

ollowing their springtime Easter break, Sacramento lawmakers headed back to the capital city faced with an enormous number of bills to consider— around 1,900 at last count. The Bohemian thought it would be instructive to take a spin through the offerings now making their way through the legislative process, and highlight an A-to-Z sampling of what’s currently under consideration, with an emphasis on proposals of especial concern to the North Bay. Stay tuned to the Bohemian in coming weeks, as we’ll be following the progress of these bills, and any other that you’d like to contact us about.

B A

balone and other shellfish harvesting is a key and beloved California industry, and Assembly Member Wesley Chesbro, D-Santa Rosa, has introduced a joint resolution that aims to enhance state efforts at building a commercial aquaculture infrastructure—even as the fate of our local Drakes Bay Oyster Company seems sealed. Chesbro offers support for a clean, healthy marine environment that protects shellfish beds and provides “access to additional acreage for shellfish farming and restoration.” It also pushes for greater cooperation between industry, environmental, and federal and state officials to develop a permitting process that’s “efficient and economical for both shellfish restoration and commercial farming.” The resolution won’t do much to help Drakes Bay stay in business, but it sets the stage for future growth in the industry. (AJR-43)

icycle taxes sound like yet another way for Big Government to squeeze pennies from people just trying to make the earth a greener space by pedaling to the corner deli instead of firing up the Escalade. But there’s a fine public-policy rationale behind Concord Democratic senator Mark DeSaulnier’s proposal, which would open the door to localities to slap a point-of-sale tax on adult bicycle sales and use the money to fund and maintain bike trails. (SB 1183)

C

ampaign finance reform is one of those proDemocracy conceits that the U.S. Supreme Court has thrown under the bus, favoring a moneyis-speech approach to financing elections that favors deep pockets over empty ones. Citizens United gave undue power to corporations’ ability to influence elections, and the recent McCutcheon ruling dispensed with limits on how much cash Daddy Warbucks or his underworld Corporate Campaign Cabal can throw at a candidate. Growing public outrage over these supremely undemocratic moves is reflected in Assembly Member Bob Wieckowski’s resolution which puts fellow lawmakers on the spot by asking that they support his

resolution, which proposes the notion that Democracy is by, for and of the People. Radical thought, that. (HR 37)

D

ogs in outdoor restaurants, aka the “Fido Alfresco bill,” would undo a state ban on bringing your buddy into any part of a restaurant, including the outdoor dining area. That seemed a little extreme, no? Well, it’s a health-code deal, and you know how those people are, always counting bugs and stuff in the kitchen. But dogs are wagging their tails over a bill, offered by Assembly Member Mariko Yamada (D-Davis) which leaves it to localities to rule on dogs in al fresco settings. Cats are livid at the slight, but fear not, felines, we’ve got the American Cat Liberties Union on line one. Ferrets, we’re not so sure about you guys. (AB 1965)

E

lectric cars are coming just as fast as you can say “Get a horse, eco-freako,” but there are a whole host of logistical issues dogging the industry’s ascent, not the least of which are Big Oil efforts to stymie electric wheels in the name of the Global Death March of Oligarchic Delights. But let’s say you have an electric car and are moving into a new apartment. Congrats. Your landlord, he’s a Tea Party dude who thinks it’s his patriotic duty to resist befouling the world with those horridly quiet little machines of green. He’s even got a militia, fresh from the Bundy ranch. Well, too bad. A proposed bill from Al Muratsuchi, D-Torrance, would require your landlord to work with you, the

tenant, to establish an on-site charging station in the apartment complex. The catch is, tenants foot the bill. (AB 2565)

F

ish” is one of those words you used to see on the restaurant menu, and you’d say, “I’ll have the fish.” What kind of fish? Didn’t matter, you were ordering the fish. Restaurants are a lot more specific these days, but Big Grocery has a bad habit of mislabeling the monkfish—or did. Enhanced public awareness of the rampant mislabeling of fish came courtesy of a 2013 Oceana report and led to a push by Sen. Alex Padilla, D-Pacoima, to mandate accurate labeling of the fish at the grocer’s. It’s a great move: There are all sorts of fish out there, some tastier than others – and some more endangered or otherwise overfished than others.

G

MO labeling isn’t just something that’s being promoted on your bottle of Dr. Bronner’s soap. California voters rejected a 2012 push, Proposition 37, to require the labeling of genetically modified O’s, thanks for that, Big Ag. Now Sen. Noreen Evans, D-Santa Rosa, has taken up the call with another proposed GMOlabeling law. (SB1381)

H

ound dogs aren’t just the subject of an Elvis Presley song; there’s a legal designation set up by the state to differentiate between regular dogs and licensed hound dogs used to chase off bears or other beasts especially when said beast wanders onto ranchland in search of a BLM employee.

I

mmigration is this amazing thing that helped stand up the U.S.A. as it strode into “its century” (the 20th) and needed a whole bunch of new people to man the ramparts of industrial capitalism. These days, people come to this country because they think, wow, we have some pretty great stuff going on over here: Democracy, Philly cheesesteak sandwiches, Game of Thrones. What’s not to love? Then they get here, and Louie Gohmert wants to beat the crap out of them. Some do everything they can to assimilate, which includes paying taxes. A non-citizen can get a taxpayer ID number. But you can file your taxes like a good citizento-be and still find yourself on the receiving end of a deportation order. Assembly Member Luis Alejo, D-Watsonville, has offered a bill that would ask the feds to lay off on deporting tax-paying immigrants, regardless of their status. Buena suerte. (AB 2014)

J

uvenile justice is a big issue these days, as states grapple with progressive notions like “restorative justice” in an economic climate that often leaves young people of limited means with few options beyond Burger King or a life of crime. The “schools-to-prison pipeline” plagues lawmakers’ best efforts to undo or undermine that awful dynamic, and Assembly Member Nora Campos, D-San Jose, has offered an amendment to the state penal code that requires corrections officials, when seeking grant monies for jobtraining programs and the like, to include at-risk youth as a target population. (AB 1920)

K

lansmen of the Ku Klux variety won’t like it much, but 2014 marks the 60th Anniversary of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision that set the stage for desegregation in schools and universities. A resolution introduced by Assembly Member Shirley Weber, D-San Diego, reads, in part, “The United States Supreme Court’s decision became the legal impetus to school desegregation throughout the United States, and led to one of the most profound social movements in the history of the United States.” Tell it to the vicious “New Jim Crow” segregationists who are trying to turn that clock back. (ACR 140)

L

ow-income people get thirsty, too. And yet they are often faced with immense water bills that they can’t pay, or can only do so after a visit to the local payday lender. Assembly Member Yamada has offered a bill that would set up a low-income water-rate-assistance program to provide subsidies and water bill discounts. (AB 1434)

M

arijuana is very popular in California, sources say, but the state’s medical dispensary laws are a hodge-podge of bongspillage-messy whereby localities have created laws that don’t carry over into the next bud-unfriendly burg. So what’s good to go in Santa Rosa isn’t necessarily so in Santa Ana, almost 20 years after Proposition 215 was approved by California voters. Earlier this year, the conservative California League of Cities and the California Police Chiefs Association wisely dropped their longstanding opposition to a uniform set of dispensary regs throughout the state. Now Sen. Lou Correa, D-Anaheim, has introduced a bill offering a platform for statewide regulation. We have high hopes for its passage, which looks pretty good given the twin pillars of dope-hate have dropped their opposition.

Heck, the police chiefs even helped write the bill. (SB 1262)

N

axolone: ever heard of it? There’s a reason why you haven’t—California pharmacies have been forbidden from dispensing the opioidoverdose medication to families of heroin addicts. While we appreciate that the preferred stupid-drug of choice in these parts is meth, heroin’s the sleeper in this unfortunate bid for bragging rights to which drug can ruin more lives. We’re all human, we’ve all read William S. Burroughs, and people still shoot their smack. When they do, it’s a problem. Naxolone is an effective way to save you from an overdose croak-out. Cut to the scene where John Travolta plunges a needle into Uma Thurman’s heart. The proposal by Assembly Member Richard Bloom, D-Santa Monica, is a far-less-draconian life-saving measure. It’s a pill. (AB 1535)

O

il and gas fracking is bad juju all around. Tap water that can turn into blue flame with a flick of a lighter? Are you fracking kidding? Antifracking forces are finding a home in Sacramento, where Holly Mitchell and Mark Leno, Democratic senators both, have offered a bill that would put a moratorium on the extraction practice, which, if you’ve been living under the Monterey Shale, uses vast amounts of fresh water on the way to marginally reducing the price of energy. Then there’s that whole bit where fracking has been causing earthquakes in Ohio. Nothing to worry about here . . . pffft. (SB 1132)

P

aid sick leave” sounds like a basic right that any worker should enjoy. Not so. Assembly Member Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, has a bill that compels employers to offer at least three days of paid leave for workers. By way of pushing back on the job-killing howls of opposition coming from the likes of the California Chamber of Commerce, Gonzalez says on her website that “providing

employees with paid sick leave could reduce healthcare costs by allowing workers and their family members time to visit a primary care physician to address an illness rather than rushing to an emergency room to seek care due to their fear of missing work.” (AB 1522)

Q

uick, what do you think is the most Cali-centric of all the “awareness weeks” on a vast roster that includes the Armenian Genocide and colorectal research? Oh, come now: it’s Compost Awareness Week, May 5–11!

R

everse mortgages can provide a chunk of cash to seniors, but the industry is growing faster than regulators can keep up, with vulture lenders circling in the post-subprime crash to push offers on seniors that sound great until you read fine print loaded with fees and other weird charges. The state is getting tough by putting in protections such as those offered in Riverside Democratic Assembly Member Jose Medina’s bill, which would “prohibit a lender from taking a reverse mortgage application or assessing any fees” until a week or more after a prospective reverse-mortgage applicant has come forward. It puts some much-needed brakes on a juggernaut that’s already seen more than a few buyer-beware stories. (AB 1700)

S

ugary drinks are one of those “nanny state” issues that folks like Sarah Palin like to tout out when they need a whip-dog for their antigovernment hysteria, itself grounded in a fantastical vision of apocalyptic Ayn Randian selfishness whereby “Don’t Tread on Me” extends to your right to a pair of wrecked kidneys. Former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg piqued the pituitary gland of the Palin Hordes when he banned the sale of massive vats of sugar-laden drinks, on ) 20

19 N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 3 0 -MAY 6, 2 0 14 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Assemblyman Tim Donnelly, the Tea Party GOP candidate for governor, has offered a bill to undo the the state-mandated designation, so any ol’ dog can go right ahead and chase a bear, so you can shoot it – in the name of sport. Sport-hunting bears and bobcats with hound dogs was banned in 2012. Just let it go, Tim. (AB 2205)

Bills ( 19

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20

Aordable Aordable Vaccination V accination C linics Clinics

ever y Sunday S unday a every 9: 30 –11: 3 0 am a 9:30–11:30am

Western W estern F Farm arm Center Center

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the grounds that the medical costs associated with high-fructose ďŹ zzie bevs wind up at the doorstep of taxpayers. A bill offered by Sen. Bill Monning, D-Carmel, would slap a label on sugary drinks warning of obesity and a host of rather unpleasant diseases. Everything in moderation – with an emphasis on the moderation, a concept lost on nanny-state hysterics. (SB 100)

T

‘

rafficking in Humans� spans a range of human behaviors under the state penal code, some more odious than others. Among other new penalties related to child sex-trafficking, an amendment to the code stiffens penalties for solicitation of prostitution by tossing a john in the county lockup for at least two days. Currently, there’s no mandatoryminimum sentence for solicitation, which can get you up to six months. The bill is sponsored by asenators Ted Lieu, Jerry Hill and Holly Mitchell, Democrats all. (SB 1388)

U

‘

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nsafe handgun� is either an oxymoron or a redundancy, depending on your view of the Second Amendment. Assembly Member Roger Dickinson, D-Sacramento, tends toward the latter view —he added altered semiautomatic pistols and single-shot pistols to a state roster of “unsafe handguns� that can’t be transferred between non-familial parties. The gun lobby is naturally not happy about this. (AB 1964)

V

iva la Hermana Estado! California and the Mexican state of Jalisco enjoy a sister-state relationship that’s been re-upped in a senate resolution offered by Sen. Ben Hueso, D-San Diego. Are you wondering how many Californians get deported from Jalisco each year? (SCR 82)

W

ine growers throughout California rejoice! We’re at the end of the state-sanctioned “Down to Earth� wine-celebrating month of April, where efforts are afoot to highlight the $61.5

billion industry. Speaking of your liver, April is also Alcohol Awareness Month, thanks to a resolution offered by Assembly Member Joan Buchanan (D-Livermore). (SCR 94, ACR 83)

X

-rated ďŹ lmmaking is a big industry in L.A., and setting aside the feminist argument against porn for the moment, can we agree that porn is not going anywhere? As such, we’d like our porn to be disease-free, thanks, and we’d like for actors in the industry to have worker-safety protections. L.A. porn actors have to slip a jimmy and if you want to open a porn studio in Petaluma, Assembly Member Isadore Hall, D-Compton, would extend the protections statewide. Her bill would also require regular testing for STDs. (AB 1576)

Y

ou really thought we’d get through this list without working in a mention of L.A. Clippers owner Donald Sterling? Well, check yourself before you wreck yourself. If you happen to see that dude skulking around at a game and feel compelled to give him a smack, Assembly Member Marc Levine, D-San Rafael, has a bill to ďŹ ne you up to $16,000 for fan-violence. (AB 2457)

Z

ip lines and bars were singled out in a recemt report by the state auditor’s office this year. which revealed that over $600,000 had been spent at the Veterans Home of California in Yountville on such frivolities, when the state has thousands of homeless vets on its streets. Assembly Member Yamada has offered a bill that would ramp up accountability at the California Deparment of Veterans Affairs, with an emphasis on regulating the outside-contracting services that led to the Yountville controversy. (AB 1580)

21

N A PA

P E TA L U M A

Monkee e Busines ss Business

Take T ake a e to the Streets Stree ets

He’s best known as a Monkee, He’s yet songwriter M ike Nesmith ’s Mike Nesmith’s rreputation eputation as a pprolific rolific and influential musici an and actor musician shows only the ti eer. tipp of his car career. He ’s been an aut hor, film pr oducer, He’s author, producer, dir ector and visio nary who helped director visionary launch MT V. Still, Still, his music MTV. endur es, and now w the 71-year-old endures, is on the rroad oad again. again. This week he rrolls olls into the Nor th Bay as part North of his “Movies of the Mind”” tour. tour. Nesmith look back on his 50-year lookss back car eer and perf orrms on May 1 at career performs the Napa Valley Valley Oper O Operaa House, 1030 Main SSt., t Napa 8ppm $40–$50. $40–$50 Napa. 8pm. 707.226.7372.

Since exploding explooding on the LLos os Angeles art scene a ffew ew years ago with his inspir ationaal str eet art, Morley has inspirational street released hi oou’re SStill till released hiss first book, If YYou’re Reading This, Thhis, There’s There’s SStill till TTime iime. P Part art ement and part bio, the artist state statement arily showcases his mur als book prima primarily murals s:: block letters spouting and poster posters: encouragin ng or thought-pr ovoking encouraging thought-provoking expressionss beside a black-and-white expressions he artist himself Presented image of th the himself.. Presented field’s Book s, Morley comes to by Copperfi Copperfield’s Books, es the Phoeni Phoenixx Theater on May 2 to shar shares his art and book and put up one of his Washington SSt., t., Petaluma. Petaluma. signs. 201 Washington 3pm Free. Free 707.762.3565. 7077 762 3565 3pm.

TROPIC WAVE SoCal surf band Aloha Radio play Sprenger’s Tap Room May 4. See Clubs & Venues, p28.

THE WEEK WEEK’S SE EVENTS: VE ENTS: A SELE SELECTIVE CTIVE E GUIDE HEALDSBURG

S A N TA R O S A

Transformer T rransformer

Beautiful Day Da ay

Writer W riter Michael P Pollan ollan is the intellectu intellectual ual ggodfather godf ather of the modern good good-ffood good-food m movement. His explor ations of ffood ood explorations a the human experience ar and aree unlikee a other any other.. Now the man behind The O Omnivor e’s Dilemma and other work workss Omnivore’s returns with his most conceptual returns c book yet. Cooked: culinary-based A Natur al History of TTransformation ransformation Natural e the classical elements of examines fi e, water fir eat fire, water,, air and earth with gr great reporting and rrecipes ecipes to boot. Standing Standing reporting a the intersection of cul ture and nature, nature, at culture Pollan appears in conversation with the thhe Pollan a d-winning NPR pr awar oducer Davia award-winning producer N SHED 25 North St., St Nelson May 3 at SHED, Healdsburg. 2pm. $10. 707.431.7433.

It had been a tr tradition adition in Santa San nta Rosa since the ’70s 70s,, but then the Day D Under ’70s, the Oaks open house at San ta Rosa Santa Junior College went on hiatus. hiatus.. It returned returned last year after ffour our years off To say that off.. To it was missed is an understa tement. Now understatement. the campus opens again thiss weekend with ffamily amily fun and educatio onal activities educational ffor or all.. Every department off e exhibits ers offers and demonstr ations, and lon g-standing demonstrations, long-standing activities like the Native Ame erican American dancers and planetarium sho ows ar shows aree perf ect ffor or introducing introducing the ev vent to a perfect event new gener ation of curious ki ds and generation kids adul ts alike. A Day Under thee Oaks Oaks adults happens on May 4 at the San nta Rosa Santa Junior College campus, 1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 10am to 4pm. Free. 1.800.564.SRJC.

—Charlie Swanson

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HORROR SHOW Narrow Way Stage Co.’s production of ‘Little Shop of Horrors’ is touching and harrowing.

LLOU OU GRAMM GRAMM

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Drama Detours

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Wed, Apr 30 10:15am– 12:40pm 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLE & PAIRS Square Dance Club

Thur, May 1 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, May 2 7–11pm

8:40–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts a WEST COAST SWING PARTY with Kelly, Edna & Dick

Sat, May 3 1–5pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise FOR THE LOVE OF SOUL with Isoke Femi SINGLE & PAIRS HOEDOWN

6–11pm

Sun, May 4 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5–9:30pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, May 5 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:30pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, May 6 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD Music and Dance

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922

1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

55/2 /2 – 55/8 /8

Honorable Honor able

Only L Only Lovers overs Left Leftt (11: 00-2: 00-5 : 00 ) -8 : 00 A live R (11:00-2:00-5:00)-8:00 Alive The T he R Railway ailway M Man an R

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551 S 551 Summerfield ummer field Road R oad Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707.522.0719 707. 522 .0719 www.summerfieldcinemas.com w w w. summe r fie ldc ine mas .c om

Two plays debut in off-the-beatenpath locales BY DAVID TEMPLETON

‘T

he seemingly most innocent and unlikely of places.”

That, according to the opening lines of Alan Menken and Howard Ashman’s Little Shop of Horrors, is where certain stories often take place. Fittingly, two noteworthy plays are currently being staged in unlikely, out-of-the-way places. Little Shop, presented by Narrow Way Stage Company (part of the Sonoma Theatre Alliance), unfolds at the Sonoma Community Center, not that out-of-the-way if you happen to live in Sonoma, but for those living in Petaluma or San Rafael, it can seem like a bit of a drive. First, it’s not that long of a drive; and second, in this case the drive is worth it. Directed by Chris Ginesi, with musical direction by Justin Pyne, the deliriously macabre musical

features catchy songs, a wacky Grand Guignol story line and an enormous talking plant that occasionally eats cast members. Seymour Krelborn (an excellent Matlock Zumsteg) is a hapless flower-shop worker, helplessly in love with the sweet but depressed Audrey (Nora Summers, exuding an aura of crushed dreams). The shop’s owner, Mr. Mushnik (Harry Duke, hilarious) is about to shut the failing business for good when Seymour unveils a plant he’s named the Audrey II, a “strange and interesting” curiosity that soon proves to be a major draw to the store. Only Seymour knows that the plant’s favorite food is human blood, and as it grows (and eventually starts talking, with voice by Butch Engle), the stage is set for a calamitous series of events, which prove to be as touching and heart-warming as they are horrific and hilarious. Concurrently, Marin Onstage is presenting Eugene O’Neill’s Moon for the Misbegotten in another “innocent and unlikely” place: the cafeteria at St. Vincent’s School for Boys in San Rafael. Director Ron Nash has cleverly turned the space into an intimate black-box environment, perfect for O’Neill’s bittersweet love story. Somewhat dated now, but still moving, the tale of ill-timed love on a desolate ranch absolutely soars on the brilliant performance of Caitlin Walraven as Josie. Secretly in love with the landlord (John Nahigian) of the farm she works on with her crusty father (Michael Walraven), Josie is a spectacular creation. In bringing her to life, Walraven delivers one of the most charming and heartbreaking performances of the year. Rating for each (out of 5): ++++ ‘Little Shop of Horror’ runs through May 4 at the Sonoma Community Center. 276 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Thursday–Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinee on Sunday. $20–$30. 707.938.4626. ‘Moon for the Misbegotten’ runs through May 4 at the Little Theater at St. Vincent’s. 1 St. Vincent’s Drive, San Rafael. Thursday–Saturday at 8pm; 3pm matinee on Sunday. $10–$18. 415.290.1433.

WINNER W IN NE R

FFILM ILM FESTIVAL FESTIVAL

FFILM ILM FESTIVAL FESTIVAL

SUNDANCE S UNDANC A E 2014

FFIPRESCI IPRESCI PR PRIZE IZE

CANNES C AN A NES 2013

OFFICIAL O FFICIAL S SELECTION E LECTION

TORONTO TO RONTO FFILM ILM FESTIVAL FESTIVAL 22013 013 3

“ EASILY THE

MOST SUSPENSEFUL”

AMERICAN FILM OF THE YEAR . -Gabe Toro, INDIEWIRE

BUSTER MOVE Buster Keaton did this without CG, but it’s still fun to see Spidey do it.

Mildly Amazing The webslinger is back, but with less zing

T

he Amazing Spider-Man 2 is a hard movie to unpack.

Peter Parker (Andrew Garfield) is the cowled hero of N.Y.C, but he lives humbly with his pesky aunt (Sally Field). He begins to learn that his parents were Silkwooded by the evil Osborn corporation; meanwhile he renews his friendship with the troubled young Osborn heir, Harry (Dane DeHaan, the film’s standout). Peter’s girlfriend, Gwen Stacy (Emma Stone), is getting fed up with Peter’s inability to show up on time. That’s when a monster made of electricity turns up to devastate the power grid. But Jamie Foxx’s characterization of Max Dillon, who becomes the villain Electro, isn’t much; he stumbles into the movie like Richard Pryor stumbled into Superman III. Maybe it’s just hard to identify with the problem of getting dunked in a tank full of mutated electric eels on your birthday. Max is written as an underappreciated nerd, and Foxx hams it with thick specs and a pocket protector as overstuffed as this plot. Peter Parker is an emotional wreck,

THRILLING, SPARE AND HEARTBREAKING.” “

BY RICHARD VON BUSACK an orphan thrice over, if you count Uncle Ben; when unmasked, he’s frequently in tears. For the love scenes, director Marc Webb was likely hoping for something as off-the-cuff as the banter between Tony and Pepper in the Iron Man films. It doesn’t work; when Peter isn’t blocked, he’s babbling. Despite the addition of a Dr. Girlfriend (“Felicia” played by Felicity Jones) for Osborn, the film’s real slowdown for romance is played between Peter and Harry. They’re walking around a carousel, skipping stones by the waterside, and asking each other searching questions: “I try not to think about it.” “How’s that working out for you?”—all this before the ultimate reveal that they, alas, can never be friends. The action sequences were thought out, anyway, expertly pre-vised and animated to turn Spider-Man every which way but inside-out. Show me a second where Spider-Man does the old Buster Keaton stunt of grabbing the end of a passing vehicle and flying away, and I’m happy. ‘The Amazing Spider-Man 2’ opens Friday, May 2, in wide release.

-William Goss, MSN MOVIES

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Film

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26

INDULGE YOUR SENSES Napa’s premier intimate concert venue, restaurant and private event space.

4.29 & 4.30

AN EVENING WITH

GRAHAM NASH 4.16

JAY FARRAR

5.20 & 5.21

SHAWN COLVIN & STEVE EARLE

SONGS & STORIES TOGETHER...

5.22

OF SON VOLT

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JOHN MAYALL

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5.1

MIKE NESMITH 5.7

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LYDIA PENSE & COLD BLOOD 5.9

KARLA BONOFF

DAR WILLIAMS PERFORMING "THE HONESTY ROOM"

6.6

TRISTAN PRETTYMAN 6.12

RED MOLLY 6.14

HAYES & BOB'S

"THE WORLD'S GREATEST LIVING SONGWRITERS OF ALL TIME"

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Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Casual Oakland rapper from Hieroglyphics crew has become a fan-favorite with his intense rhymes. May 2. $15. Chrome Lotus, 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5643.

Santa Rosa Symphony: Spring Rhapsody The Symphony ends their season with Stravinsky’s wildly vivid ballet, The Rite of Spring. May 3-5. $20-$80. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Straight No Chaser The unforgettable live act returns after their last SoldOut appearance in Santa Rosa two years ago. May 1, 8pm. $42-$52. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Teresa Tudury & Ira Marlowe Two masters of sharp, satirical songwriting together, up-close and personal. May 4, 7pm. $15-$18. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

MARIN COUNTY Michael Franti & Friends All-star benefit featuring members of RatDog, ALO and others. Apr 30, 8pm. $150. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

George Winston Grammy Award winning pianist with over 15 albums to his name, George Winston brings his stunning brand of solo piano back to Point Reyes. May 3, 8pm. $32-$34. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Wishbone Ash Classic rock band from England is back with new music and a new tour. May 5, 7pm. $28-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY It’s a Grand Night for Singers Vocalists from around Northern

California and beyond take turns onstage. Piano accompaniment by host Richard Evans. First Saturday of every month, 7pm. $15. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Graham Nash Two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee is legendary for his harmonies and passion. Through Apr 30, 8pm. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Toad the Wet Sprocket California jam band is back with new music by the original lineup. May 3, 8pm. $37-$47. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

VOENA: Voices of the Journey VOENA celebrates their 20th Anniversary with an historic concert of their most famous repertoire spanning two decades. May 4, 4pm. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters Fri, Sat, live music. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Annex Wine Bar Thurs-Sat, live music. 865 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.7779.

Aqus Cafe First Wednesday of every month, Chamber Music. First Thursday of every month, Celtic Night. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center May 2, Illumignarly. May 3, Sam Vega. Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Brixx Pizzeria May 3, Phony Abalone. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

Center for Spiritual Living Apr 30, Kirtan Concert with Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda. 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4543.

Chrome Lotus Fri, Sat, Live DJs. 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5643.

Coffee Catz May 4, Blues and R&B jam. Sat, 2pm, bluegrass jam. Mon, 6pm, open mic. First Tuesday of every month, Ukelele Jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

D’Argenzio Winery May 1, Bear’s Belly. 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.280.4658.

Epicurean Connection through May 30, Keady Phelan. May 3, Jack Wagner. May 4, Smooth Hound Smith. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Finley Community Center First Friday of every month, Larry Broderick Trio. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

First Presbyterian Church May 2, North Bay Sinfonietta. 1550 Pacific Ave, Santa Rosa.

Flamingo Lounge Fri, through May 31, live music. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden May 2, Solid Air. May 3, Bear’s Belly. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Friar Tuck’s Fri, DJ Night. Wed, Sat, karaoke. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.792.9847.

Gaia’s Garden First Sunday of every month, jazz jam. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Wed, Brainstorm EDM show. May 2-3, the English Beat. May 5, Jahdan Blakkamoore. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques & Guac. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg May 3, Gaea Schell Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jack London State Park May 4, Piano Club Spring Concert. 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Lagunitas Tap Room Apr 30, Nate Lopez. May 1,

27

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Main Street Station

707.829.7300 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 S E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE 230 P E TA L U M A A V E | SEBASTOPOL

May 4, Food Pantry Benefit with Bohemian Highway. Thurs, Susan Sutton Jazz Piano. Sun, Kit Mariah’s Open Mic Night. Mon, Gypsy Cafe. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN FRI F RI M MAY AY 2 & SAT SAT M MAY AY 3 SSOUL, OUL , REGGAE, REGGAE, POP POP AND AND PUNK PUNK

G 2 NIIG

Mc T’s Bullpen Thurs, 9pm, karaoke with Country Dan. Fri, DJ Alexander. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Murphy’s Irish Pub May 1, Amy Wigton Band. May 3, Andrew Freeman Band. through May 25, Vanguard Jazz Ensemble. May 6, Tommy Thomsen Band. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre May 2, Sarah Jarosz. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts May 2, Chris Webster & Nina Gerber. May 3-4, Occidental Community Choir Spring Concert. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater May 2, Planet Bass. May 3, Refuge. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe Apr 30, William Griffith. May 2, Moonlight Rodeo. May 3, Timber Ridge. May 4, the Thugz. May 7, KSUN Fundraiser. Thurs, Open Mic. First Tuesday of every month, Rock Overtime. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Resurrection Parish May 4, Cecilia Vocal Ensemble. 303 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa.

Rio Nido Roadhouse May 3, Tom Finn Band. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub May 2, Foxes in the Henhouse.

ENGLISH ENGLISH BE BEAT AT $30/DOORS $3 0 / DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

MON M ON M MAY AY 5

REGGAE R EGGAE | SOUL SOUL |FUNK | FU N K

MNE M NE SINGERS SINGERS S SERIES E R I ES W WITH ITH

JJAHDAN AHDAN B BLAKKAMOORE LAKK AMOORE $$10/ 10/ LLADIES ADIES $5 $5 B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

Trippy Dudes

FRI F RI M MAY AY 9

MASH M A SH UP UP | HIP HIP HOP HOP | REMIX R EM IX

Chris Robinson Brotherhood play Terrapin Crossroads

ZT TRIP RIP ((SONOMA SONOMA CO COUNTY U NT Y D DEBUT) E BUT) PLUS P LU S M MALARKEY AL ARKEY

$$15 15 G GARDEN ARDEN / $40 $40 ABBEY AB B E Y + G GARDEN A R D EN D OORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+ DOORS

SAT S AT M MAY AY 10 10

AFRO A FRO | WORLD WORLD | FUNK FU N K

LAGOS L AGOS ROOTZ ROOTZ

“Blessed Are the Trip Takers” is the message printed on the bottom inner sleeve of Phosphorescent Harvest, the new album due April 29 from vintage-rock collective the Chris Robinson Brotherhood.

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

MON M ON M MAY AY 1 12 2

REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL | HIP HIP HOP HOP

MONDAY M ONDAY NI NIGHT GHT E EDUTAINMENT DUTAINMENT W WITH ITH

DJJ JACQUES D JACQUES & D DJJ GUACAMOLE GUACAMOLE $$7/ 7/ LLADIES ADIES FFREE REE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

FRI F RI M MAY AY 16 16 & SAT SAT M MAY AY 1 17 7 TTRIBAL R IBAL | GYPSY GYPSY | WORLD WO R L D

COSMIK C OSLYMDDANCE IK CASBAH CAF AS BPAARHTY NTIIGGWHOTS! TRIBAL T RIBAL BELLY BELL ANCE AFTER TER PARTY

It’s a fitting statement, given that the group is foremost a free-flowing exploration of psychedelia and soul infused with philosophical tidings. Named after and fronted by the former Black Crowes sibling, the Brotherhood return with their third release since forming in 2011. Phosphorescent Harvest furthers the group’s focus on experimentation over confining pop standards, and again proves that Robinson and company are not out to shape their music for anyone but themselves. The new album is a kaleidoscopic take on roots music, with guitarist Neal Casal, keyboardist Adam MacDougall, drummer George Sluppick and bassist Mark Dutton joining Robinson in writing and performing. Together they create a cohesive blend of spacey freak folk, ambitious Americana and classic stomping California rock. The Chris Robinson Brotherhood kick off their U.S. tour in support of Phosphorescent Harvest with three nights, continuing through May 1, at Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Drive, San Rafael. 8pm. $35. —Charlie Swanson

$$20 20 ADV/$30 ADV/$30 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W W W. H O PM ONK .CO M BBook ookk yyour our

next ne x t eevent vent with with u us, s, u up p tto o2 250, 50, kkim@hopmonk.com im@hopmonk .com

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW “Rock ’n Roll Dance Party” May 3 JOHNNY ALLAIR AND PETE LIND 8:30 Sat

Sun

BEAR’S BELLY May 4 Original Americana 5:00 / No Cover

Fri

Rancho Debut!

TOM FINCH GROUP May 9 Funky Dance Grooves 8:00 Sat

May 10

EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE & JUNK PARLOR This is not Americana! 8:00

 SUNDAY, MAY 11 

Mother’s Day Brunch Buffet 10AM–3PM ALSO SERVING Mother’s Day Dinner 5PM–8PM

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND MIRACLE MULE May 24 Swampy Tonk 8:30 Sat

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri, Flaunt Fridays with DJ Stevie B. Sat, This Is the Remix with Will Styles. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

HTS!

May 3, Hilary Marckx. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Sally Tomatoes

May 2, Bach in Church & Chamber with ) the Sonoma Bach

May 3, the Pulsators. Wed, North Bay Blues Jam.

Saturday Afternoon Club

BBQS ON THE LAWN!

MAY 25 THE BLUES BROADS MAY 26 A BEATLE-Q WITH

THE SUN KINGS

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

28

Gate Musi s at 3, c at 4

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

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Steep Ravine. May 2, Jason Bodlovich. May 3, Saffell. May 4, the Grain. May 7, Victor & Penny. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 3 0 -MAY 6, 2 0 14 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Shows: 21+

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin

DeLone 7:30pm

:HG$SUÂ&#x2021;SP

Michael Franti & Friends All Star Benefit featuring

Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Original Roadhouse Tavern

Great Food & Live Music Wed Apr 30Â&#x2DC;LUGNhENUGNpm

Dixie Giants

Thur May 1Â&#x2DC;LhEE2/

Karaoke Party with Scott Razor Fri May 2Â&#x2DC;Lh11pm

Members of RatDog, ALO & More

Thurs, Casa Rasta. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann and guests. Sun, Church on Sundays. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa.

6XQ0D\Â&#x2021;SP :HG0D\Â&#x2021;SP

Boris Garcia

Bohemian Highway Sat May 3Â&#x2DC;LhEE2/

The Fall Risk

Sun May 4Â&#x2DC;IhLpm

Blues and BBQ with the

Stax City plus Luv Planet FhH2/ Mon May 5Â&#x2DC;IhL2/

Cinco de Mayo Party! T Luke and the Tight Suits plus Bern Man Free taco bar & drink specials!

May 3, Bonnie Brooks. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Society: Culture House

Jam meets Americana with The Thugz

Lazyman plus Morgan Hegvin

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

6DW0D\Â&#x2021;SP

The Sorentinos

plus Doug Blumer and

Choir. 430 10th St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.8436.

Pride & Joy Davey Pattison's GAMMA+

7KXU0D\Â&#x2021;SP

with Josh McIntosh & Rattlesnakes in the Garden )UL0D\Â&#x2021;SP

The Headhunters

featuring Mike Clark and Bill Summers with J Boogie 6DW0D\Â&#x2021;SP

The Unauthorized Rolling Stones

Plus on Fri & Sat Nights:

6XQ0D\Â&#x2021;SP

Rasta Dwight's BBQ!

It's a Beautiful Day

5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove

707.795.5118

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley

twinoakstavernpenngrove.com

CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thurs, Dj Tazzy Taz. Thurs, 7pm, Thursday Night Blues Jam. Sat, live music. Wed, Open Mic Comedy. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room May 2, the Del-Novas. May 3, David Carter. May 4, Aloha Radio. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

St Andrew Presbyterian Church May 4, Bach in Church & Chamber with the Sonoma Bach Choir. 16290 Arnold Dr, Sonoma.

St Vincent de Paul Church May 5, Winifred Baker Chorale Concert. 35 Liberty St, Petaluma.

Stout Brothers

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

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Music ( 27

28

Apr 30, Steve Pile. May 1, Disclaimer. May 3, Batacha. May 7, Marshall House Project. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

The Sunflower Center May 2, Fantuzzi. May 3, Baraka Moon. May 4, John Wubbenhorst and friends. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Toad in the Hole Pub

SONGS IN HER HEAD Austin singer-songwriter

Sarah Jarosz plays the Mystic Theatre in Petaluma on May 2. See Clubs & Venues, p27.

5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Vino di Amore May 1, Steve Winkle. May 2, the Rains. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

Whiskey Tip May 2, Walking Spanish. May 3, the Blues Pirates. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Zodiacs Apr 30, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bunchovus. May 1, Choppin Broccoli. May 3, Darryl Anders~AgapĂŠSoul. May 7, Dusty Green Bones Band. 256 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre

Night. Wed, Rock and R&B Jam. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato May 1, Oranguhtango. May 2, SambaDĂ&#x192;. May 3, the Thugz. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Marin Center Showcase Theatre May 4, Performing Arts Academy of Marin Annual Conservatory Showcase. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Marin Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Memorial Auditorium May 4, Neil Bergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;104 Years of Broadwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; revue. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

May 1, Mariah Parkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Indo Latin Jazz Ensemble. May 3, Tom Rigney & Flambeau. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Nickel Rose

First Sunday of every month, Marshall House Project. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds

Dance Palace

May 1, Talley Up!. May 2, Petty Theft. First Friday of every month, First Fridays Reggae. May 3, Rue 66. May 4, the Groovemeisters. May 7, Tommy Odetto Group. First Sunday of every month, 19 Broadway Good Time Band. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Tues, Bluesday Piano Night. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Thurs, DJ Dave. Mon, Blues Defenders Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Open Mic. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Twin Oaks Tavern May 2, the Sorentinos. May 3, Lazyman. Sun, Blues and BBQ with the Blues Defenders. May 5, T Luke and the Tight Suits. Every other Wednesday, Dixie Giants. Every other Tuesday, Country Night with the Kickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;n Country Girls.

May 1, Mike and Ruthie & the Old Way. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Fenix May 1, Message of Love. May 3, Rodney Gregory Band. May 4, Monica Pasqual & the Handsome Brunettes. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub May 5, One of Many. Sat, DJ

Mon, Wed-Sun, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

19 Broadway Club

No Name Bar Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Mon, Kimrea and Dreamdogs. Tues, 8:30pm, open

mic with Damir. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Apr 30, C-JAM. May 1, John Hoy. May 4, Sony Holland. May 6, Swing Fever. May 7, Passion Habanera. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar May 2, Free Peoples. First Sunday of every month, Blues Jam. Mon, acoustic open mic. Tues, John Varn and Tom Odetto. First Wednesday of every month, the Weissmen. First Thursday of every month, Burnsyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sugar Shack. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio May 3, Johnny Allair. May 4, Bears Belly. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

San Domenico School May 4, Marin Music Chest 2014 Scholarship Winners Concert. 1500 Butterfield Rd, San Anselmo.

Sausalito Cruising Club Mon, Blue Monday Jam Session. 300 Napa St, Sausalito.

month, AlwaysElvis. Sun, 7pm, Swing Seven. Fri, Sat, blues. 1403 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9777.

Terrapin Crossroads

May 4, St. Helena Community Band. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. 707.968.1161.

Apr 30, Terrapin Family Band. Apr 30-May 1, Chris Robinson Brotherhood. May 1, San Geronimo. May 2, Terrapin AllStars. through May 31, Go By Ocean. May 5, Terrapin Family Bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fabulous Fiesta House Party. May 6-7, John Kadlecik and the Terrapin Family Band. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Sun, Midnight North. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Inglenook

Molinari Caffe Thurs, Open Mic. 815 Main St, Napa. 707.927.3623.

Napa Valley Opera House May 1, Mike Nesmith. May 7, Asleep at the Wheel. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

True North Pizza

Rainbow Room

Tues-Sun, live music. 638 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 4154531238.

Sun, salsa Sundays. Fri, Sat, 10pm, DJ dancing. 806 Fourth St, Napa. 707.252.4471.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant May 1, Ralph Woodson. May 2, the Charles Wheal Band. May 3, Marshall Law Band. through May 25, DJ Aurelio. Sun, DJ Night. Wed, Jumpstart. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Hydro Grill First Saturday of every

29 N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 3 0 -MAY 6, 2 0 14 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Davey Pattison. May 7, Boris Garcia. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s May 1, Scott Pullman. May 2, Suspects of Soul. May 3, Tribe of the Red Horse. May 4, NVJS tribute to Ray Brown. May 7, Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Idol try outs. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria

Showtimes: Sunâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thur 8pm / Fri & Sat 9pm =i`,&)Â&#x203A;$,Â&#x203A;ROCK/AMERICANA

Walking Spanish JXk,&*Â&#x203A;$*Â&#x203A;ROCK, FUNK & SOUL

The Blues Pirates =i`,&0Â&#x203A;$.Â&#x203A;GET LIT CALI SPRUNG TOUR

Legendary General Smiley, Ragga Lox, I-Triniti, I-Riddim Band FEAT Janel Healy & special guest

JXk,&('Â&#x203A;$*Â&#x203A;ROCK

Brubaker =i`,&(-Â&#x203A;$*Â&#x203A;ROCK

Kingsborough JXk,&(.Â&#x203A;$*Â&#x203A;ROCK

Breakaway Patriot =i`,&)*Â&#x203A;$*Â&#x203A;BLUES

The Blues Defenders JXk,&)+Â&#x203A;$*Â&#x203A;ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ROLL

The AllwaysElvis Band

Apr 30, Trio SoleĂĄ. Every other Sunday, James and Ted. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

Sausalito Seahorse May 1, Judy Hall Quartet. May 2, Seahorse Rodeo with Chris Haugen. May 3, Generation Esmeralda. May 5, no:carrier. Sun, live salsa music. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello and Seth. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Apr 30, Samurai Wolf. May 1, Danny Uzilevsky. May 2, Liz Pisco. May 4, Todos Santos. May 7, Ring of Truth Trio. Sat, Ukulele Jam Session. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apr 30, Midnight on the Water. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

St Raphaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Catholic Church May 2, Winifred Baker Chorale Concert. 1004 Fifth Ave, San Rafael.

Station House Cafe May 4, Paul Knight and his Cajun friends. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Sweetwater Music Hall May 2, Pride and Joy. May 4,

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Alan Parsons Live Project Alan Parsons Project frontman performs his conceptual symphonic rock music. May 1 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SF.

Mono

Fantuzzi with "To Life!" )ULÂ&#x2021;/DWLQ5HJJDH$IUR)XQN 8pm | $$GYDQFH$'RRU

Baraka Moon

(Stephen Kent, Sukhawat Ali Khan) 6DWÂ&#x2021;(FVWDWLF6XIL'DQFH*URRYHV 8pm | $$GYDQFH$'RRU

John Wubbenhorst & Friends

6XQÂ&#x2021;,QGLDQ)ODYRUHG:RUOG0XVLF SP| $'RQDWLRQ

4*/$&t-*7&.64*$/*()54":&"3

TALLEY UP! FEATURING JIM TALLEY Fri May

2

PETTY THEFT

4'TBXBSEXJOOJOH5PN1FUUZ5SJCVUF

9pm | $17 ADV / $20 DOS

I Break Horses

Sun May

Eight-piece band from Oakland plays blend of 1950s- style Cumbia and dance music. May 3 at Brick & Mortar Music Hall.

Atomic Bomb! All-star lineup features David Byrne, Alexis Taylor (Hot Chip), Pat Mahoney (LCD Soundsystem) and others performing music of William Onyeabor. May 6 at Warfield.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Sat May

RUEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;66 & LOS SHIMMY SHAKERS 'SFODI:F:F#VSMFTRVFUXBOH 

La Misa Negra

1

9pm | Free

Japanese four-piece instrumental rock makes for transcendent experience. May 2 at Great American Music Hall.

Swedish solo artist Maria LindĂŠn delivers sophomore album with new electronic soundscape. May 2 at the Independent.

Thur May

& TOM FINCH +JNT#EBZ#BTI

3

9pm | $10

BROADWAY GOOD TIME BAND 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8pm

THE GROOVEMEISTERS

9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12pm

6pm & 9pm | Free

THE HAPPYS/ ONE OF MANY ORANGUHTANGO 9pm | Free

Wed May

7

TOMMY ODETTO GROUP 9pm | Free

FEATURING HENRY MOSER, TOMMY

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;MAHONEY & NICK deRYS 9pm | Free

9

6

SPDLCMVFT

OCCIDENTAL JOEJFHSVOHF 

Fri May

Tues May

Thur May

8

FIRST FRIDAYS REGGAE NIGHT WITH BROKEN SILENCE SOUND

9pm | Free

0QFO.JDX%FSFL4NJUIFWFSZ.POEBZ]QN'SFF

'"*3'"9t#30"%8":$0.t

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 3 0 -MAY 6, 2 0 14 | B O H E M I A N.COM

30

Arts Events Galleries

637 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2424.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery

RECEPTIONS May 2

Book and Lyrics by Eric Idle Music by John Du Prez and Eric Idle

April 25, 26, 30, May 1, 2, 3 at 8PM April 26, 27, May 3 at 2PM plus Day Under the Oaks: May 4 at 3PM Burbank Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College 1501 Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa Campus TICKETS ONLINE www.santarosa.edu/theatrearts TICKETS $10-$18 BOX OFFICE 707.527.4343 Recommended for Age 10 and up. Some adult references, revealing costumes & brief strong language.

Monty Python’s Spamalot is presented through special arrangement with Theatrical Rights Worldwide. www.theatricalrights.com

Arts Guild of Sonoma, “Cheap But Grand,” affordable works by guild artists, and featuring the surreal art of Christine MacDonald and the multi-media pieces of Pat Biggs. 6pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

Through May 13, “Jim Freed,” exhibit of the artist. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. Daily, 10am to 4:30pm. 707.827.3600.

Finley Community Center

of the gallery, exhibits artists including Chester Arnold, Warren Bellows and others. 405 East D St, Petaluma. 707.778.2238.

Occidental Center for the Arts May 7-18, “Salmon Creek Art Exhibit” 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Through May 15, “Fresh Reflections,” exhibits works by the Art Heaven group, with special guest Michele Hoting. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Riverfront Art Gallery

May 3

Frank P Doyle Library

Gallery 300, “Beings That We Love,” benefit art exhibit for the Sonoma Humane Society. 4pm. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.332.1212.

Fri, May 2, 1:45pm, Docent led tour expressing insights and inspirations of artists in the Doyle collection. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4614.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

HWY 12 Art Gallery, “Ruben Morancy Solo Exhibit” presents the abstract artists dynmic and colorful works. 5pm. 147 East Spain St, Sonoma.

Through Jun 30, “A Gem-Small Works,” features the work of Else Gonella, Lori Mole, Helen Moreda, Alan Plisskin, and Joanne Tepper. Reception, May 10 at 5pm. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

May 4

Graton Gallery

RiskPress Gallery, “Who Cares,” exhibits new works by Mike Koftinow and Chris Collette. 4pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol.

Through May 11, “Out of Our Minds,” featuring works by Susan Ball and Rik Olson, with guest artists Phil Wright, Mayr McLean and Rhen Benson displaying “Pierce Ranch Reflections.” 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Headlands Center for the Arts, “Graduate Fellows Exhibition,” shows works from the center’s resident artists with guest curator Xiaoyu Weng. Noon. Bldg 944, Fort Barry, Sausalito. 415.331.2787.

SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery Through May 31, “Inaugural Group Exhibition,” celebrates Calabi Gallery’s reopening after relocating from Petaluma to Santa Rosa. 456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Corrick’s Through May 1, “Sonoma County Art Trails April Exhibit,” features woodworker Michael Palace and painter Nicole Ours.

Gallery One

Hammerfriar Gallery Through May 4, Gordon Onslow Ford, John Anderson and Robert Percy exhibit their abstract work. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Apr 30-Jun 22, “Metal Arts Exhibit,” shows functional and decorative art with metal. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Healdsburg Museum Through May 4, “Sonoma County and the Civil War,” artifacts from the 1860s. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. TuesSun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

IceHouse Gallery Through May 17, “Landscapes,” the inaugural opening show

Through May 4, “Showin’ on the River,” with photography from the Bay Area and beyond. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Through May 3, “Ready or Not (Here We Come)” shows emerging teen artists. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Seishin Studio & Gallery Through Jun 22, “Hitsohii (Similar),” features two artists–Shoji Uemura and Ken Matsumoto–working under similar influences of East and West. Reception, May 31 at 6pm. 360 A St, Santa Rosa.

Sonoma County Museum Through May 4, “Camellia Has Fallen,” the first US exhibit featuring contemporary Korean artists’ reflections on the Jeju uprising. Through Jun 1, “Precious Cargo,” exhibition of California Indian cradle baskets. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Towers Gallery Through Jun 26, “California on My Mind,” featuring painter Henry White. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. Thurs-Mon 10am to 7pm. 707.894.4229.

University Art Gallery Through May 10, “BFA Exhibition,” with works by Lindsey Vargas, Patrick Cass, Justin Ringlein and others. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY Aroma Cafe May 4-Jul 4, “Reflections On

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the Arts’ Graduate Fellows yearlong residency program shows through June 8. See Receptions, adjacent page.

Water,” photo exhibit benefits the Gallinas Creek Watershed. 1122 Fourth St, San Rafael.

by Richard Dieterich and Jennie Strobel. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

Eva D’Luscious. $40-$80. 544 Martin Ave, Rohnert Park 707.799.7653.

Art by the Bay Weekend Gallery

Toby’s Gallery

19 Broadway Club

May 1-31, “In My Varied Career,” exhibits the works of Richard Blair. Reception, May 10 at 2pm. May 1-31, “Painting West Marin,” exhibits the work of Kathleen Goodwin. 2pm. 11250 Hwy 1, Point Reyes Station.

Apr 30, 8pm, Salsa Night with LaTiDo. 19 Broadway, Fairfax 415.459.1091.

Through Jun 1, “Inspired by Books,” presents works by Pamela Paulsrud, Tim Graveson, Zea Morvitz and Camille Esposito–all inspired by books. 18856 Hwy 1, Marshall. 415.663.1006.

Bolinas Museum Through Jun 1, “The Ceiling of Our Day,” features Bay Area artist Walter Kitundu combining mechanical wizardry and a passion for birdlife. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Gallery Bergelli Through May 15, “Group Show,” featuring works buy Marco Farias, Santiago Garcia, Jeff Faust and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Arts in April Through Apr 30, “Napa Valley Arts in April 2014,” a monthlong celebration of art and wine with exhibitions and festivities throughout the region. For a full lineup, visit www.visitnapavalley.com/ artsinapril. various locations, Napa.

Comedy

Gallery Route One

Rodney Carrington

Through May 4, “The Vickisa Experience,” features mixed media and found objects from different artists. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

The multitalented comedian, actor and writer whose comedy albums have sold over 3 million copies brings his comedy to Sonoma County. May 4, 8pm. $39-$45. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Marin Community Foundation Through May 16, “California Dreamin’,” includes art and sculpture by Bay Area foreignborn artists. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through May 24, “Altered Book/Book Arts Show,” displays literal inspired works from over 100 artists. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

MINE Art Gallery Through Jun 1, “Core Elements,” exhibits sculptures

Flying Leap Improv Ensemble Improv comedy that tickles the the mind and touches the heart. May 3, 8pm. $10$15. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Dance iCandy Pole Dance Studio May 3, 1pm, Burlesque Workshop, Learn burlesque basics and stage performing from Cabaret de Caliente’s

SoCo Dance Theater Concert An eclectic array of dance pieces, including “Donna Anna Study,” inspired by Mozart’s “Don Giovanni.” May 2-4, $15$20. Evert B Person Theatre, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

if you can Based on the DreamWorks Motion Picture

The Musical May 9–25

Book by TERRENCE McNally

Events

Music by MARC SHAIMAN

Cinco de Mayo Party

Directed by GENE ABRAVAYA

Salsa competition, drink specials and Latin Jazz with the Batacha Quartet. May 2, 5pm. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Day Under The Oaks The open house and educational fair features exhibits and activities for the whole family. May 4, 10am. Free. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 1.800.564.SRJC.

Great Russian River Race 4th annual canoe and kayak race on the Russian River benefits Russian Riverkeeper. Free Race Party with music by Cahoots and Church Marching Band, a Water Conservation Fair, food, beer, wine and kids activities. May 3, 11am. Free. Healdsburg Veteran’s Memorial Beach, 13839 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg.

Help Me Get Plastered! Help Sonoma/Petaluma State Historic Parks Association raise funds to replaster the Petaluma Adobe with live music, food and ) silent auction. May

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Lyrics by SCOTT WITTMAN and MARC SHAIMAN

Music Direction by JANIS WILSON Choreography by MICHELLA SNIDER Costume Design by PAMELA ENZ Based on the life of Frank Abagnale Jr., who, in the mid 1960s, at the ripe old age of seventeen, impersonated not only an Airline Pilot, but a Doctor and a Lawyer as well, all the while traveling the world and passing bad checks for more than one million dollars. In constant pursuit—Agent Carl Hanratty of the FBI, who was determined to catch him. This musical version of the 2002 DreamWorks film starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks and Christopher Walken, pulls out all the stops with flashy Las Vegas style production numbers, jazz and blues tunes, and a book that explores all the depth of the movie.

Don't miss this Northern California Premiere

Spreckels Performing Arts Center 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park

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‘COLLECTIVE DISTURBANCES’ Work by artists in the Headlands Center for

Catch me

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5, 6pm. $40-$45. Lagunitas Tap Room, 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Israel in Marin Learn about the country and culture of Israel and enjoy arts & crafts, food and live music. May 4, 11:30am. Free. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Ignite Your Mind A day of Jewish educational with engaging and entertaining sessions accessible to all. May 4, 1pm. Free. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

CHARLIE MUSSELWHITE JOSHUA REDMAN ELVIN BISHOP JOHN SANTOS GUY DAVIS RON CARTER BILL CHARLAP RENEE ROSNES BOBBY HUTCHERSON PONCHO SANCHEZ MARC CARY CLAUDIA VILLELA MADS TOLLING MARCUS SHELBY HJF FREEDOM CHOIR AND MANY MORE!

Jet Set to Rio Embark upon a vintage aviation experience and travel back to a 60’s themed Carnival. May 2, 6:30pm. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

Korean Stab Binding Class The book binding technique is taught by Emily Marks. May 3, 1pm. $20-$25. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

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The gallery extends their “Inaugural Group Exhibition” with this springtime festival in honor of International Workers Day. May 1, 5pm. Calabi Gallery, 456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa. 707.781.7070.

May Day March & Rally In celebration of International Workers’ Day, the March will proceed downtown to Courthouse Square. May 1, 4pm. Roseland Plaza, 665 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Mombo’s 2 Mombo’s Family fundraising bike ride starts at either Mombo’s Pizza locations, ends with free pizza at both locations and benefits Sebastopol Union School District and the Santa Rosa Charter School for the Arts. May 3, 10:30am. Mombo’s Pizza, 1800 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa; 560 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. www.mombospizza.com.

Morley Presented by Copperfield’s Books, the Los Angeles-based street artist who specializes in bold, typographic posters erects one of his signs at the Phoenix. May 2, 3pm.

Free. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Ping Pong & Right Brain Exploration Table Tennis takes on a whole new light. Mon, 7:30pm. through May 26. $15/month. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Rites of Spring Party

archival footage, animation and rock opera elements. Thurs, May 1, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Food & Drink

Town party at the Bear Valley picnic area with Kathleen Goodwin and Richard Blair celebrating the publication of their new books on the Point Reyes Lighthouse, with a history of the Point Reyes area. May 4, 11am. Free. Pt Reyes National Seashore, Bear Valley Road, Olema.

Cinco de Mayo Festival and Tamale Cookoff

Sounds of Healing Workshop

Luncheon hosted by Jean Charles Boisset to benefit Pets Lifeline. May 2, 11:30am. $85. Buena Vista Winery, 18000 Old Winery Rd, Sonoma. 800.926.1266.

Explore how sound can contribute to healing mind, body and spirit. May 3, 9:30am. Free. Welcome Grange Hall, 3275 Hagen Rd, Napa. 707.255.6881.

Work That Reconnects Constance Washburn builds motivation, creativity, courage and solidarity for the transition to a sustainable human culture. Tues, 7pm. through May 20. Pt Reyes Presbyterian Church, 11445 Shoreline Hwy, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1349.

Film Film Fest Petaluma Short films from around the world in an all-day event. May 3, 2pm. $10-$25. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives Film points to genetically modified foods and the connection to rising disease in the US. Screens with Karen Hudson from GMO Free Sonoma County. May 2, 7:30pm. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

The Magic Flute The film of the San Francisco Opera Production presents Mozarts classic in an educational event. May 3, 1pm. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Super Duper Alice Cooper The first ever “Doc Opera,” this new film explores the legendary Alice Cooper through

With dance performances, activities and tamales to taste and judge. May 4, 11am. $50. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Tailwags & Handbags

Lectures Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group For family members giving care to an elder with Alzhiemer’s or dementia. First Thurs of every month, 3pm. Rianda House Senior Center, 1475 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.5502.

Ask a Historian Research Advisory Council tackles tough questions posed by moderator, first Sun monthly at 2:30. First Sun of every month. Free. Napa County Historical Society, Goodman Library, 1219 First St, Napa. 707.224.1739.

Is It Dyslexia? Informational seminar that will shine new light on helping correct the debilitating effects of dyslexia. May 3, 2pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Mnemonic Salon with Anne Scott Storytelling event centered around the “feminine wisdom for life.” May 4, 7pm. Free. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Money Mind Training Wake up your financial life with this series of evening lectures presented by Spencer Sherman. Tues, 6pm. through May 13. $108. Frank P Doyle Library, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4614.

Monte Leach

Zentangle Petaluma Arts Association presents artist McCall Miller’s presentation on the unique style of art. May 6, 7:30pm. United Church of Christ, 825 Middlefield Dr, Petaluma.

during the day long event. 964 Pearl St, Napa.

Penry Park May 3, 12pm, “Lulu & Pip” with Stephanie Rausser, Nina Gruener and Jess Brown. 226 Kentucky St, Petaluma.

Readers’ Books Apr 30, 7pm, “Snacks” with Marcy Smothers. May 3, California Bookstore Day. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.939.1779.

SHED

Readings Aqus Cafe May 5, 6:30pm, Rivertown Poets Reading, Featured readers include Carol Wade Lundberg and Gregory Mahrer. An open mic follows. Mondays, 9:30am, Storytelling with Phaedra. 189 H St, Petaluma 707.778.6060.

Book Passage Apr 30, 7pm, Book Passage Poetry Night. May 1, 7pm, “How About Never--Is Never Good for You?: My Life in Cartoons” with Bob Mankoff. May 2, 7pm, “Troika” with Adam Pelzman. May 3, California Bookstore Day, All-day literary event with appearances by authors Dave Eggers, Katherine Applegate & Michael Grant. May 4, 4pm, “What Are You Waiting For?” with Kristen Moeller. May 4, 7pm, Write On Mamas. May 5, 7pm, Sixteen Rivers Publishing Readings with Beverly Burch & Murray Silverstein. May 6, 7pm, “The Bear” with Claire Cameron. May 7, 7pm, “All the Light We Cannot See” with Anthony Doerr. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books May 3, California Bookstore Day, All store locations will host activities and readings to celebrate. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books May 1, 4pm, “Timmy Failure #2” with Stephan Pastis. May 2, 7pm, “Afterparty” with Daryl Gregory. May 7, 3pm, “This One Summer” with Jillian and Mariko Tamaki. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Napa Bookmine May 2, 6pm, First Friday Night Write!. May 3, California Bookstore Day, Special edition books, bookmarks, and other literary swag will be available

May 3, 2pm, Michael Pollen in Conversation, The author talks with Davia Nelson about his new book, Cooked: The Natural History of Transformation. $10. 25 North St, Healdsburg 707.431.7433.

Theater Alexander & the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day The classic children’s story is presented live on stage by TheatreworksUSA. May 3, 3pm. $12-$17. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels Con men make a living by swindling rich women. Based on 1988 film starring Steve Martin and Michael Caine. Presented by Lucky Penny Productions and 6th St Playhouse. Fri-Sun through May 4. $25-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Feelin’ Fracked A play (about Earth Day). FriSat through May 10. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Fences A former Negro League homerun king is now a garbage collector trying to come to terms with his disappointment. Through May 11. $37-$53. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Five Women Wearing the Same Dress Five reluctant bridesmaids and a male usher hide out in a bedroom during an elaborate Southern wedding. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through May 11. $10. Studio Theatre, College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

Lilith, the Night Demon Lilith, the bawdy alternate

Jewish story of creation, a magical folk opera by instrumentalists Veretski Pass in collaboration with San Francisco Choral Artists. May 1, 7:30pm. $30-$39. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

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“If the Christ or Buddha Returned Today, Would You Recognize Him?” May 2, 8pm. Free. Open Secret, 923 C St, San Rafael. 415.457.4191.

Little Shop of Horrors The cult classic musical about a skid-row florist and his hungry plant is newly imagined by Narrow Way Stage Company. Through May 4. $30. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

A Moon for the Misbegotten Eugene O’Neill’s classic love story is presented by Marin OnStage. Through May 4. $10$18. The Little Theater at St. Vincent’s, 1 St Vincent Dr, San Rafael.

Mother Jones in Heaven MSW is pleased to share the California premiere of Si Kahn’s musical tribute. Through May 11. $25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Noises Off The hilarious theatrical farce is presented by the Raven Players. Through May 11. $20$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.6335.

Spamalot CH C A L I S TO TOGA HIGH SC HOOL PA ART DEP ARTMENT

Monty Python’s musical is presented by the SRJC Theater Arts and directed by esteemed instructor Reed Martin. Through May 4. $10-$18. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

T Y R O N E SO R R EN T I N O O PEN I N G OPENING MAY M AY 2 7PM 7 PM RUNNING RUN NING TTHROUGH HROU G JUNE JU NE

Thoroughly Modern Millie Young Millie Dillmount has just moved to the city in search of a new life for herself. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through May 25. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Wit A staged reading from the Sonoma Readers Theater. Through Apr 30, 7pm. $14. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of April 30

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dear Astrologer: We Aries people have an intense ďŹ re burning inside us. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an honor and a privilege. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lucky to be animated with such a generous share of the big energy that gives life to all of nature. But sometimes the ďŹ re gets too wild and strong for us. We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t manage it. It gets out of our control. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m feeling lately. These beloved ďŹ&#x201A;ames that normally move me and excite me are now the very thing thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s making me crazy. What to do?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Aries.â&#x20AC;? Dear Aries: Learn from what ďŹ reďŹ ghters do to ďŹ ght forest ďŹ res. They use digging tools to create wide strips of dirt around the ďŹ re, removing all the ďŹ&#x201A;ammable brush and wood debris. When the ďŹ re reaches this path, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deprived of fuel. Close your eyes and visualize that scene. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;My personal philosophy is not to undertake a project unless it is manifestly important and nearly impossible.â&#x20AC;? So said Taurus-born Edwin Land, the man who invented the Polaroid camera. I have a feeling these might be useful words for you to live by between your birthday in 2014 and your birthday in 2015. In the coming 12 months, you will have the potential of homing in on a dream that will fuel your passions for years. It may seem to be nearly impossible, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exactly what will excite you about it so muchâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and keep you going for as long as it takes to actually accomplish.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) I wish there was a way you could play around with construction equipment for a few hours. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love it if you could get behind the wheel of a bulldozer and ďŹ&#x201A;atten a small hill. It would be good for you to use an excavator to destroy a decrepit old shed or clear some land of stumps and dead trees. Metaphorically speaking, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the kind of work you need to do in your inner landscape: move around big, heavy stuff; demolish outworn structures; reshape the real estate to make way for new building projects. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

In the Transformers movies, Optimus Prime is a giant extraterrestrial warrior robot. His body contains an array of weapons that he uses for righteous causes, like protecting Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creatures. His character is voiced by actor Peter Cullen. Cullen has also worked extensively for another entertainment franchise, Winnie the Pooh. He does the vocals for Eeyore, a gloomy donkey who writes poetry and has a pink ribbon tied in a bow on his tail. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make Cullen your role model for now. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping this will inspire you to get the Eeyore side of your personality to work together with the Optimus Prime part of you. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that you say? You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have an Optimus Prime part of you? Well, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Eeyore might say, but I say different.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Do you ďŹ nally understand that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to imitate the stress-addled workaholics and self-wounding overachievers in order to be as proďŹ cient as they are? Are you coming to see that if you want to ďŹ x, heal and change the world around you, you have to ďŹ x, heal and change yourself? Is it becoming clear that if you hope to gain more power to shape the institutions youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re part of, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to strengthen your power over yourself? Are you ready to see that if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to reach the next level of success, you must dissolve some of your fears of success? VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beauty is the purgation of superďŹ&#x201A;uities,â&#x20AC;? said Michelangelo. Do you agree? Could you make your life more marvelous by giving up some of your trivial pursuits? Would you become more attractive if you got rid of one of your unimportant desires? Is it possible youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d experience more lyrical grace if you sloughed off your irrelevant worries? I suggest you meditate on questions like these, Virgo. According to my interpretation of the astrological omens, experiencing beauty is not a luxury right now, but rather a necessity. For the sake of your mental, physical and spiritual health, you need to be in its presence as much as possible. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty sure God wants you to be rich. Or at least richer. And I know for a fact that I want you to be richer. What about you? Do you want to be wealthier? Or at least a bit more

ďŹ&#x201A;ush? Or would you rather dodge the spiritual tests youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have to face if you became a money magnet? Would you prefer to go about your daily affairs without having to deal with the increased responsibilities and obligations that would come with a bigger income? I suspect you will soon receive fresh evidence about these matters. How you respond will determine whether or not youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to take advantage of new ďŹ nancial opportunities that are becoming available.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21) The U.S. military budget this year is $633 billion. In comparison, the United Nationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; peacekeeping budget is $7.8 billion. So my country will spend 81 times more to wage war than the U.N. will spend to make peace. I would prefer it if the ratio were reversed, but my opinion carries no weight. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible, though, that I might be able to convince you Scorpios, at least in the short run, to place a greater emphasis on cultivating cooperation and harmony than on being swept up in aggression and conďŹ&#x201A;ict. You might be tempted to get riled up over and over again in the coming weeks, but I think that would lead you astray from living the good life.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Actor Matthew McConaughey prides himself on his willingness to learn from his mistakes and failures. A few years ago he collected and read all the negative reviews that critics had ever written about his work in ďŹ lms. It was â&#x20AC;&#x153;an interesting kind of experiment,â&#x20AC;? he told Yahoo News. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was some really good constructive criticism.â&#x20AC;? According to my reading of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, now would be an excellent time for you to try an experiment comparable to McConaugheyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Be brave! CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dear Oracle: I might be hallucinating, but recently I swear my pet iguana has been getting turned on whenever I disrobe in front of it. My naked body seems to incite it to strut around and make guttural hissing sounds and basically act like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing a mating dance. Is it me, or is the planets? I think my iguana is a Capricorn like me.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Captivating Capricorn.â&#x20AC;? Dear Capricorn: Only on rare occasions have I seen you Capricorns exude such high levels of animal magnetism as you are now. Be careful where you point that stuff! I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be shocked if a wide variety of creatures ďŹ nds you extra alluring. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat like you love yourself,â&#x20AC;? advises author Tara Stiles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Move like you love yourself. Speak like you love yourself. Act like you love yourself.â&#x20AC;? Those four prescriptions should be top priorities for you, Aquarius. Right now, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to treat your beautiful organism with even a hint of carelessness. You need to upgrade the respect and compassion and reverence you give yourself. So please breathe like you love yourself. Sleep and dream like you love yourself. Think like you love yourself. Make love like you love yourself.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

If blindfolded, most people canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell the difference between Pepsi and Coca-Cola. But I bet you could, at least this week. Odds are good that you will also be adept at distinguishing between genuine promises and fakes ones. And you will always know when people are fooling themselves. No one will be able to trick you into believing in hype, lies or nonsense. Why? Because these days you are unusually perceptive and sensitive and discerning. This might on occasion be a problem, of course, since you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to enjoy the comfort and consolation that illusions can offer. But mostly it will be an asset, providing you with a huge tactical advantage and lots of good material for jokes.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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