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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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Cover photo of Kelly Shu by Michael Amsler. Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.


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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Hunger Games Jared Huffman votes to cut food stamps BY ALICE CHAN

C

ongressman Jared Huffman made the wrong call when he helped to cut food stamps recently by voting yes on the Agricultural Act of 2014, the Farm Bill. Huffman should have known better. Last June, he participated in the “SNAP Food Stamp Challenge” for five days, to find out what it’s like to have just $4.50 a day to spend on food. On the first day of the effort, Huffman said, “I can already tell that [quality] protein and just about anything fresh are going to be casualties of a food-stamp diet.” Huffman endured the ordeal for a week. Imagine coping with it for 52 weeks a year. I had guessed that Huffman would vote no on the Farm Bill for two reasons: he had voted against cuts to food stamps in November, and he’d personally experienced what it was like to try to eat a healthy diet on a food-stamp allowance. But I called his Washington, D.C., office anyway, to state that I strongly opposed any further cuts to food stamp benefits, and urged that the cuts from November be restored. Instead, I was horrified to learn that Huffman had in fact voted for the Farm Bill, a measure that further reduced the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by $8 billion, worsening the damage done by $5 billion in cuts that were passed by the House just three months before. Unlike most Democrats from California in the House of Representatives, Huffman chose to vote for a bill that leaves hungry people even hungrier than they were last fall. Congressman Huffman issued a statement after his vote, soft-pedaling the damage that he helped to inflict. He said that the original bill called for $40 billion in cuts, so it was good that only $8 billion over 10 years was cut. Not good enough, I say. Huffman should have stood up and said, “It’s a disgrace that Congress would even consider cuts to basic nutrition programs in these times of record-breaking corporate profits,” and voted no.

Unsafe Soy

My wife and I are anti-GMO, and would caution readers of Mr. Alderson’s letter (Foxes in the Henhouse, Feb. 26), in that while it is important for all of us to be food safetyconscious, promoting soy as the safe alternative merely plays into the hands of the “soy fiefdoms” of Monsanto and DuPont. Non-GMO is the way to go—always!

WILL WALTON Cloverdale

Noise in Apple Town As a resident of this community, I am amazed by what businesses can get away with. For years, my neighborhood has suffered from unbearable and excessive noise generated in downtown Sebastopol. My husband and I chose to buy a house downtown because we love to live in the middle of this wonderful community, where we can reach everything by foot. Nevertheless, the ideal of Sebastopol as a people-friendly, green and attractive town has not been met for us.

Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

The Mayo Clinic notes that vegetarians are at lower risk for developing diabetes, another factor in heart disease. Indeed, an Oxford University study of 45,000 adults in last year’s American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that vegetarians were 32 percent less likely to suffer from heart disease. Moreover, researchers at California’s Loma Linda University, examining records of 70,000 patients, concluded last year that a vegetarian diet protects against colorectal and other types of cancer. It’s no wonder, then, that a 2012 Harvard University study of 120,000 people concluded that meat consumption raises the risk of death by heart disease or cancer. A more recent six-year study of 70,000 patients at Loma Linda found that vegetarians have a 12 percent lower risk of death. The good news: each of us can find our own fountain of youth by adopting a meat and dairy-free diet. An internet search on “vegan recipes” or “live vegan” provides ample resources.

LARRY ROGAWITZ Santa Rosa

SUSANNE TOLKSDORF Sebastopol

Sonoma County supervisors get raises (Top 5, Feb. 26), yet all our county library branches except Santa Rosa Central remain closed two days a week. (Whisper it: permanently?)

SCOTT GIFFORD Alice Chan is Co-Chair of the Coalition for Grassroots Progress and an elected delegate to the California State Democratic Central Committee. She lives in Sebastopol.

The article was prompted by a report in the American Medical Association’s Internal Medicine that a vegetarian diet lowers blood pressure, a key factor in the risk of heart failure and stroke.

Banana Republic Regarding Efren Carrillo (“Wait for It,” Feb. 26): just more proof that it is good to be politically connected in the California Banana Republic.

LAWRENCE GANT Via Facebook

Sebastopol

Vegans Live Longer This week’s Time magazine cites several reasons for vegetarians living longer.

Green Tips With all this recent rain, it may seem like we’ve averted the drought, but we have not. According to the California Department of Water Resources, the “calendar year 2013 closed as the driest


Rants

year in recorded history for many areas of California, and current conditions suggest no changes in sight for 2014.� Many of us have already put water conservation practices in place, and that’s great; reducing water usage is something everyone can do to care for this precious resource, and everything you do helps. We can all do our part to help ensure that we are conscientious stewards of our water. For more information on water-saving ideas, look at the websites of your local, state and federal water departments. They post updates and have links to other resources, too.

MICHELE ROCHA Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1 Marin’s David Shirk wins Oscar for visual effects in ‘Gravity.’ Heavy, man.

2 Gov. Jerry Brown

unwisely bashes California ‘potheads’ on ‘Meet the Press’

3 Novato accountant gets 14 months in prison for swindling $300,000 from Pearl Jam

4 Santa Rosa wants to tax

cell phones and, eventually, talking in general

5 Headless, eye-cancer cows: they’re not just for Halloween anymore

handmade gifts, ďŹ ne & fashion jewelry /.BJO4USFFU 4FCBTUPQPMt artisanafunctionalart.com


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

Paper THE

CRUEL AND UNUSUAL In 2011, a judge ruled that overcrowding in California prisons bordered on violating the Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Imagine No Prisons Activist Steve Martinot says locking people up is the wrong approach, and he’s not the only one BY LEILANI CLARK

F

or most people, the idea of abolishing prisons is right up there with colonizing Mars—a far-out concept torn straight from a science-fiction novel. But for writer and former labor union organizer Steve Martinot, the abolishment of prisons is the social justice issue of the 21st century.

“The first step towards creating a humane, egalitarian society would be eliminating the prison system and the prison ethic,” explains Martinot by phone from his home in Berkeley. Now 74 years old, the retired UC Berkeley and San Francisco State adjunct lecturer first became involved with the prison abolition movement after attending a Critical Resistance conference in the late ’90s. Founded by former

political prisoner and UC Santa Cruz professor Angela Davis, Critical Resistance takes as its mission dismantling the prisonindustrial complex. Like Thomas Paine, whose Common Sense inspired the American Revolution, Martinot turned to the pamphlet as the form through which to disseminate his argument about the prison system. He’ll be speaking on the ideas contained in “The Need to Abolish

the Prison System: An Ethical Indictment” on March 9 at the Glaser Center, sponsored by Racial Justice Allies and the Peace & Justice Center of Sonoma County. The pamphlet came about as Martinot heard people in the movement express dissatisfaction that there wasn’t a philosophical argument that made the “abolition of prison intelligible on an ethical basis.” “I’d been doing a lot of work on the structures of racialization in the United States, so I took the project on myself to see if I could provide an ethical and political argument on a philosophical basis for the abolition of prisons,” he explains. Considering that the U.S. Supreme Court described conditions in overcrowded California prisons as bordering on “cruel and unusual punishment,” Martinot may be on to something. In the 2011 ruling that directed California to address its prison overflow, Justice Anthony Kennedy described the situation thus: “A prison that deprives prisoners of basic sustenance, including adequate medical care, is incompatible with the concept of human dignity and has no place in civilized society.” California was required to reduce the prisoner population from 143,000 to 110,000. The verdict is still out on whether prison realignment, which sent lowerlevel offenders to local and county jails, where they often benefit from early release, has been successful in alleviating the strain on a prison system that was housing almost double its capacity. But for activists like Martinot, simply reorganizing the prison system, or reforming it through measures such as Proposition 36, the 2012 legislation that exempts nonviolent offenders in California from “three strikes” mandatory life sentences, is only a band-aid on an enormous bleeding wound. His ideas take as foundation books like Michelle Alexander’s eye-opening book published in 2012, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, which argues that the millions of African Americans locked up in prison represents the rebirth of a caste-like system, one that relegates these men and


‘Everybody who’s been involved in a victimless crime should be released today.’ “If you define crime as an act that someone commits that makes someone else suffer, then all of these people in prison for victimless crimes are, they themselves, the victim,” he says. “So even before you can ask how we can abolish the prison system, everybody who’s been involved in a victimless crime should be released today.” When Martinot speaks before a room of people, the reaction to his radical ideas about prison tends to be a collective silence, he says. “A nonresponse on a group level—from my teaching background— means I’ve hit on something very profound. That silence means that whatever response my argument is going to get, I’m not going to be there to see it, but it’s going to be there and it’s going to be real.” Steve Martinot speaks on prison abolition Sunday, March 9, at the Glaser Center. 547 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 1pm. Free. 707. 575. 8902.

Tagged

Even if you don’t smoke, your family can still be exposed to secondhand smoke in your home.

Sim Van der Ryn, California state architect under Gov. Jerry Brown in the 1970s, and a leading figure in the sustainable architecture movement, was “red-tagged” by Marin County building inspectors last year for a structure he was building on his Inverness property. At issue was a “detached accessory structure for living space,” under construction without a permit, says Christy Stanley, the codeenforcement officer on the case. But the county inspection— which followed a confidential civilian complaint against Van der Ryn—yielded “additional violations on the property,” says Stanley. Van der Ryn submitted new building applications in late January that would bring other structures up to snuff with county rules, after “a couple of rounds of inspections, both on-site and in our office,” says Stanley, a 25-year employee of the county. Van der Ryn modified the redtagged building and has “chosen to scale back some of the improvements to limit his permit exposure” on other structures, says Stanley. Van der Ryn tells the Bohemian that one red-tagged building was an attempt “to create affordable housing for some people who work here. Now those people are gone.” In Brown’s administration, “I was the state’s chief enforcement officer,” he says with a laugh as he defends the county’s codeenforcement mandate. “The county isn’t a villain, they are not the problem,” he says. “They have to do the investigation.” For now, Van der Ryn says he’s working to bring his properties into compliance, and that the real villain is the well-heeled NIMBYism of newcomers unfamiliar with local byways (i.e., the person who called the county on him last summer). “People can feel the change here,” he says.—Tom Gogola

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

Talk to your landlord about making the property 100% smoke-free. Assistance at no cost to you 707.575.6043 © 2011 California Department of Public Health

9 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

women to permanent secondclass status. “She’s really doing the exposure literature of what the ‘judicial machine’ is all about,” says Martinot. He mentions restorative justice—a movement that brings together the victim and the offender for dialogue, reparation and community dialogue—as one alternative to locking people up and throwing away the key. Another solution would be the immediate release of anyone currently in prison for what he calls a “victimless” crime. (According to Martinot, 70 percent of those currently incarcerated are in for victimless crimes like prostitution, drug possession and drug use.)


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

10

th

5 Annual

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Arrigoni’s Delicatessen & Cafe Deli. $. A perennial favorite with the downtown lunch crowd. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 701 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1297.

m a rc h 1 0 -1 6 , 2 0 1 4

LUNCH

DINNER

$10 $15 $20

$19 $29 $39

Presented by SONOMA COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BOARD

Baci Cafe & Wine Bar Italian $$-$$$. Creative Italian and Mediterranean fare in casual setting, with thoughtful wine list featuring local and Italian wines. Lunch, ThursSat; dinner, Thurs-Mon. 336 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8111.

Big Bottom Market Deli. $$. A stellar eatery in a modest storefront serving dual purposes: a market for local products, and an excellent comfort food and sandwich joint. Excellent biscuits and gravy, salads, cheeses, the works. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 16228 Main St, Guerneville. 707.604.7295.

Charcuterie French Mediterranean. $$. Intimate bistro has casual European wine-bar feel. Lunch and dinner daily. 335 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.7213. Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian. $. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner daily. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Highland Dell Lodge German-Californian. $$. Newly renovated, beautiful setting at the Russian River; locals’ nights Mon and Thurs. Dinner, Thurs-Tues; brunch, Sun. 21050 River Blvd, Monte Rio. 707.865.2300.

Hikuni Sushi Bar & Hibachi Japanese. $$$. Terrific teppanyaki plus a full sushi bar, tonkatsu, udon

and bento. Lunch and dinner daily. 4100 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.539.9188.

McNear’s Alehouse. $. Sports bar: barbecue, big appetizers, burgers. Lunch and dinner daily. 21 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Risibisi Italian. $$-$$$. An oasis of urbanity that will transport you to New York, Paris even. The menu keeps freshly seasonal and changes weekly. Lunch and dinner daily. 154 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.766.7600. Roberto’s Restaurant Italian. $$. Reliable home-style Italian cooking. Dinner, TuesSun. 4776 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0260.

Stout Brothers Pub & Restaurant Irish. $$. Atmospheric, if a little faux, but a great ploughman’s lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

The Villa Italian. $-$$. Spectacular views, superb service. Seafood, steak, poultry, seasonal specialties, pizza from wood-burning oven, patio dining. Open 7 days a week. 3901 Montgomery Drive, Santa Rosa 707.528.7755.

Volpi’s Restaurant Italian. $$-$$$$. Festive atmosphere teams with great traditional Italian dishes at one of county’s oldest eateries. Accordion in the speakeasy if you’re lucky. Dinner daily. 124 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.2371.

MARIN CO U N T Y Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh Thai food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some of the best fried bananas to be found. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner, Sun. (Cash only.)

809 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.458.8845.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; breakfast and lunch, Tues. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Cafe Reyes Pizza. $$. At the end of the main drag in West Marin’s quintessential small town sits a wood-fired oven serving piping pizzas of perfection. Beer and oysters can be had as well. Lunch and dinner, Wed–Sun. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.9493. Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195. Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch and dinner daily. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331. Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere.


Breakfast and lunch daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536.

SMALL BITES

Salito’s Crab House

Booze Clues

Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona St, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

N A PA CO U N TY Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza

Are you trying to pull a fast one, Prohibition Spirits? First of all, you’ve named your booze company after a law that forbids alcohol, and now you’re making bourbon, a uniquely Kentucky product, in Sonoma? It’s true, but fear not, bourbon aficionados—the spirit is born in Kentucky before being shipped to California and doublebarreled in Pinot Noir barrels from Schug Winery in Sonoma. As far as taste goes, it’s a spot-on, 100 proof bourbon, with hints of fruit unique to Northern California. There’s a rye with similar characteristics and a white corn whiskey that’s clear, perfect for mixing in drinks that require a certain color but beg for that brown liquor flavor. Hooker’s Reserve, as the whiskey line is called, is named after Union Civil War general Joseph Hooker, a feisty fighter who lived for a time in Sonoma. If he were alive today (and that would be pretty scary, actually), he’d probably stock his handcarved liquor cabinet with General’s Reserve 21-year bourbon. The Sonoma company says it “stumbled onto something fabulous” in an old rick house in Kentucky. “What the angels left behind was amazingly complex old bourbon that can stand up to any bourbon out there,” they say. Well, if it’s good enough for the general, it’s probably good enough for anyone. —Nicolas Grizzle

is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan.

Native Tuscan Francesco Torre handcrafts ‘‘ƒǯ•Ƥ‡•–‹‰”‡†‹‡–•‹–‘‘†‡” –ƒŽ‹ƒ…—‹•‹‡Ǥ

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$$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeax Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

The best of local farmers, fisherman and ranchers prepared to reflect Sonoma cuisine KenwoodRestaurant.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Bella Vineyards (WC) Specializing in Zinfandel, Bella Vineyards farms three vineyards in Sonoma County: Big River Ranch in Alexander Valley, and the Lily Hill Estate and Belle Canyon in Dry Creek Valley. 9711 W. Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 4:30pm. 866.572.3552.

Dutton Estate Winery Vineyard-designated Pinot, Chard, Syrah and Sauvignon Blanc. 8757 Green Valley Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11am–5pm. 707.829.9463.

Fort Ross Vineyard & Winery Pinot meets Pinotage at the edge of the continent. Take the turnoff to Meyers Grade Road and don’t look back. 15725 Meyers Grade Road, Jenner. Open daily, 10am–6pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.847.3460.

Karah Estate Vineyards Like a riddle bottled up in a mystery, it’s all but hidden in plain sight above the 101 freeway’s Cotati Grade. Impressive view; mixed bag of low-alcohol, low-priced Pinots from quirky winery. 1010 W. Railroad Ave., Cotati. Friday– Sunday 11am–5pm. $5 fee. 707.795-3030.

Larson Family Winery Barbecue wine alert! 23355 Millerick Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.938.3031. $

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5522 Mission M ission Circle, Ci rcle, Santa Sa nt a Rosa Rosa ((at at H Hwy w y 1122 & Mi Mission ssion B Blvd.) l v d .) 707swww.pamposhrestaurant.com 70 7     s w w w.pa mposh rest au ra nt.com

Occidental Road Cellars High-end clients like Schramsberg and RadioCoteau buy most of the Prathers’ grapes; just 5 percent are made into their own wine, and at a comparative “grower’s discount.� Chard, Pinot, and cool-climate Syrah at its very best. 2064 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Building 7, Sebastopol. By appointment, Saturday 1–4pm. 707.874.9470.

Old World Winery Meaning, a simpler time when grapes were trodden under bare foot and wine was made

the natural way? Yes. Fun fact: the small, family-owned winery was the original Williams-Selyem location. 850 River Road, Fulton. Thursday– Sunday 11am–5pm or by appointment. Tasting fee $5. 707.578.3148.

Preston Vineyards Ask many locals which is their favorite winery, more than a few will tell you they’re huge fans of quirky Preston. Limited picnicking facilities, organic vegetables and homemade bread for sale. On Sundays, the bread is fresh and the Italianstyle jug wine, Guadagni, flows. 9282 W. Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 4:30pm. 707.433.3372.

Sojourn Cellars Complex but lissome Sonoma Valley Cab is the star at comfortable tasting salon just off the Sonoma Plaza that’s as comfortable as a living room. No need to fear sit-down, appointment-only tastings; just focus on Sojourn’s lawn chair logo and relax. 141 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Complimentary tasting by appointment. 707.938.7212.

good-humored hospitality throughout. 1075 Buchli Station Road, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–4pm; tasting fee $5. 707.252.9065.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Eagle & Rose Estate (WC) Tours of this small winery are led either by the winery owner or the winemaker himself. 3000 St. Helena Hwy. N., Napa. By appointment. 707.965.9463.

Freemark Abbey In 1881, Josephine Tychson was the first woman to own and operate a winery in the valley. Enjoy the Cabs. 3022 St. Helena Hwy. N. (at Lodi Lane), St. Helena. Open daily, 10am-5pm. 800.963.9698.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

Two Amigos Wines

Patz & Hall In a Napa

One of the “Vino Brothers� is a famous television commercial actor, but they look alike in plastic nose and Groucho glasses disguises. Goofy theme and good wine. Vito’s Vino Bianco is a rich Roussanne; Guido’s Vino Rosso a successful California Sangiovese. 25 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Open daily, 11am– 6pm. 707.799.7946.

business park, this highlyregarded brand’s tasting room may look corporate-slick, but the spotlight is on the dirt farmers who make it all happen. Pinot and Chardonnay. 851 Napa Valley Corporate Way, Ste. A, Napa. Wednesday– Sunday, 10am–4pm. Seated tastings 10:30am, 1pm and 3pm. Tasting fee, $20–$40. 707.265.7700.

N A PA CO U N TY

Saintsbury A contrarian enterprise in the 1970s, now a hallowed hall of Carneros Pinot Noir. Visitors may linger under shade trees in fair weather or sit down for a serious tasting adjacent the office. 1500 Los Carneros Ave., Napa. Monday– Saturday, by appointment. 707.252.0592.

Bouchaine Vineyards Venerable producer of estategrown Burgundian style wine in the rustic wind-scraped hills of Carneros. Pinot Noir and Pinot Meuier with a coolclimate, cherry-skin crispness that nearly crunches in the mouth, and Chardonnay with a “mouth of butter.� Patio service in fair weather, cozy hearthside tasting in cooler days;

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars (WC) Their three estate-grown Cabs are among the most highly regarded in the world. 5766 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2020.


13

Bay View Restaurant & Bar AT THE INN AT THE TIDES

$

A red blend by any other name BY JAMES KNIGHT

When I reached for two samples of nationally distributed, nicely priced blends of Grenache, Syrah and Mourvèdre recently, I found that neither said a word about these grapes on its label, front or back. Worse, it’s just as well, since neither is likely to inspire one to saddle up with the Rhone Rangers. The good news is that, with a little more effort and not too much more money, plenty of exciting wines in this category can now be found. Unlike California’s popular “kitchen sinkâ€? blends of Cab, Zin, Syrah and other grapes, Rhone blends usually—but are not required to—conform to a formula traditional to France’s CĂ´tes du RhĂ´ne region. But the grapevines themselves are nothing new to California, as Napa winemaker Jillian Johnson (pictured) found while working for Bonny Doon. They used wine from a singular survivor in Lodi, a 137-year-old vineyard planted entirely to Cinsault, to punch up Le Cigare Volant and other blends. Now Johnson contracts four acres for her own label. The Onesta 2011 Lodi Cinsault ($29) is peppery, warmly imbued with plum and licorice, and is a real pleasure to drink. I expected Cline’s 2012 Cashmere ($21) to also be a pleasure to drink. From some of Cline’s heritage Contra Costa County vineyards, it’s light-bodied and soft, but smells older than its years and tastes a bit “rescued.â€? On the plus side, proceeds help support Living Beyond Breast Cancer. Francis Ford Coppola’s 2012 Chateau Red ($14) is a new addition to the winery’s Votre SantĂŠ line. More deeply colored and with stickier tannin, this hints at savory notes over black cherry fruit and is easy to drink, but seems to have been bullied into the bottle too early. So how do they do it back in “home, sweet Rhone?â€? Famille Perrin’s 2010 Les Sinards Châteauneuf-du-Pape ($35) comes from the folks behind Château de Beaucastel, partners also in Tablas Creek of Paso Robles. Dried fruits are drowned out by waves of Bergamot orange, leather, fermenting hay and assorted volatile aromas that sing from the glass. Medium-bodied, astringent, tensely herbal and cherry-fruited all at once, it’s heaps wilder than the California blends, but I just keep coming back to it. Perhaps some of our Rangers will pick up the trail here. The 17th annual Rhone Rangers Celebration of American Rhones runs April 5–6. Visit www.rhonerangers.org for schedule of events and locations.

Randy Caparoso

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here’s still plenty of loose talk in California about “Burgundianstyle� wine, but it’s the rare wine that’s billed as such right on the bottle. I found one that is, but it’s a Rhone-style blend— pithy comment on the state of Rhone varietals and blends in advance of the Rhone Rangers 17th annual tasting event.

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Traditional Italian Cuisine 29 DINNER MENU

Rhone Stranger


Michael Amsler

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14

Incredible, Edible Art

Exploring the cuisine of Asia with Sonoma County Restaurant Week oodie noun (informal) 1. A person with a particular interest in food; a gourmet. 2. The demographic for whom Sonoma County Restaurant Week was created.

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In this issue, we take a trip to Asia, showcasing the diversity of flavors of Sonoma County Restaurant Week, from Thailand, China, Vietnam and Japan, even adding American and French twists in places. At times the food and atmosphere at these restaurants feels so authentic, it’s like taking a mini vacation. One half expects to see Anthony Bourdain chatting with a fellow chef while a film crew awkwardly careens in for a close-up of glistening fat globules floating

atop a bowl of piping hot beef noodle soup. But, no, these places are all within reasonable driving distance, and the only cameras will probably be part of a smartphone, destined for Instagram. Hashtag delicious. Hashtag foodporn. Hashtag—OK, you get the picture. But there was a time when food wasn’t about “likes” but about taste and presentation. These restaurants are a prime example of that. Pongo’s Kitchen and Tap Room in Petaluma offers Thai-inspired plates and local brews; Eight, in Sebastopol, combines Cantonese, French and American styles for a unique Asian fusion flavor; Kettle’s in Santa Rosa brings Vietnamese cuisine to the table, including the messy and wonderful Vietnamese crepe; Iconic Santa Rosa Chinese restaurant Gary Chu’s is still a top-notch favorite;

and Windsor’s Ume makes elegant Japanese dishes that are as beautiful as they are tasty. By the end of the week, you might wish it were Sonoma County Restaurant Month, because there are far more prix fixe options at all three price points—$19, $29 and $39—than allotted meal times in the week. But, hey, take it as a challenge to try as many new places as possible, revisit some old favorites offering a good deal and make a list for next year’s event. As Mae West said, “Too much of a good thing can be wonderful.” Sonoma County Restaurant Week runs March 10–16. For more information and a full list of participating restaurants, visit www.sonomacountyrestaurantweek.org. —Nicolas Grizzle


Nicolas Grizzle

Gary Chu’s Chinese Cuisine Say the words “Chinese food,” and the name “Gary Chu” probably comes to mind. Chu’s flagship restaurant on Fifth Street in Santa Rosa wasn’t the first in the North Bay to serve wonton soup, spare ribs and chow mein, but it was the first to serve innovative California-style

Chinese cuisine, rather than plain old Chinese cooking. With his brother, Christopher, Gary crafted a stunning menu that includes steamed sea bass, rib eye steak, tea-smoked duck and lobster with scallions and ginger. These days, Christopher does most of the cooking at Gary Chu’s on Fifth,

customers what they want.” For those who demand authentic Chinese food, Chu goes out of his way to make dishes using ingredients like dry scallops and pork belly. “I don’t have secrets,” he says. “But I’ll tell you this, my Chinese cuisine is unique.” At his downtown restaurant, I enjoy the pork pot stickers doused with hot sauce. I then devour the fresh pea leaves sautéed in garlic, the imperial fried rice with pork and the seafood chow fun. For special occasions, I have made it a point to call in ahead of time and ask for Peking duck; a 24-hour notice is required, but it’s worth it. Tried and true, Gary Chu comes through. “I’m not retiring anytime soon,” he says. “I have kids in college, and, besides, I love doing what I do.”—Jonah Raskin Gary Chu’s Chinese Cuisine, 611 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. 707.526.5840.

We Eight the Whole Thing “Eight is a super-lucky number in Asian culture,” says general manager Michelle Speakes as she explains the genesis of Eight Cuisine & Wine, the latest culinary outpost from restaurateur Steven Zhao. “In Shanghai, if your car has a license plate number with three consecutive 8s, you’ll never get a ticket.” But it’s not just the lucky signifier—the numeral also represents the regions represented on the Eight Cuisine menu. The Sebastopol pan-Asian newcomer— it’s been in business about a year—offers classic Cantonese Chinese dishes (orange sesame chicken, pork spare-ribs) alongside Shanghai noodles and other French-classical dishes, prepared, as it were, with an Asian twist. Two chefs help Eight Cuisine hold down the span-Asian offerings, says Speakes. Michael Ly (shown) is the wok-master trained in classical Cantonese cooking. The other, Ryan McDonald is “a young white boy who’s worked with Scott Howard and others,” she says.

McDonald is responsible for what Speakes describes as the “elevated higher-end side of the menu,” whose tantalizing offerings include a grilled Australian lamb with red curry lentils, bacon, coconut milk, cauliflower and mint chutney. Duck confit is served with baby kale salad, carrots, honshimeji mushrooms, hearts of palm and mandarins. A filet mignon is served with Korean bulgogi sauce. There’s a burger, too, from Montana. That’s not quite in Asia, but the burger does feature Sriracha-based ketchup and Korean kimchi, along with the oldfashioned American fries (or your choice of a salad). The signature “Incredible Eight Cuisine Noodles” is a noteworthy and recommended option on the lunch menu (there’s also brown and jasmine rice, and the noodles are also offered as a side dish). Incredible, indeed: monstrously thick and chewy chow mein noodles are prepared very simply with minced garlic, basil and

Michael Amsler

Eight Cuisine & Wine

butter. Call it Asian-Italian, or call it whatever you want—just order it. A lunch plate called the Triple Green Jade features a basic, freshgreen-and-crunchy preparation of wok-fried snow peas, broccoli and green beans, cooked in a white wine sauce and featuring fried tofu rectangles peppered throughout the verdant victuals. It goes well with a side of noodles. A preliminary bowl of hot and sour soup reveals itself as a salty and jumbo portion of the classic Chinese offering, with a thick but never gummy broth. On a cold and rainy day in Northern California, it’s the perfect soul warmer. Speakes says everything at

Eight Cuisine is made fresh inhouse every day, with high-quality ingredients rounded up from a who’s who of local purveyors of note, including Andy’s Produce, Golden Gate Meat, Rosie’s Organic Chicken and others. The restaurant’s décor and general outlook wholly befits the casual elegance of Sebastopol itself: tablecloths are cream-colored, and service is all smiles and ease. “We don’t like stuffy service here,” says Speakes. “And we tried white tablecloths, but they were way too bright.”—Tom Gogola Eight Cuisine & Wine, 7501 Healdsburg Ave., Sebastopol. 707.823.8189.

) 16

15 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Tried and True Comes Through

while Gary slices fresh fish with the sharpest of knives at Osake, his popular Japanese restaurant near Montgomery Village. I first ate at his Chinese restaurant in the 1980s, when he greeted everyone who walked through the front door. Now, more than 30 years later, his hair is whiter, though he still has youthful energy, an infectious laugh and he’s as articulate as ever on the subject of food. “When I started out in this business, there was very little competition from other Asian restaurants,” he tells me. “Now, Thai and Vietnamese are all over the place, and we have to hustle more.” The other major challenge, he explains, was to balance the old with the new. “Almost everything we do, we do according to American taste buds,” he says. “Americans like things sweeter than the Chinese. I do my best to respect tradition, even as I give


Restaurant Week ( 15

Pho Real Kettles Vietnamese Bistro

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“It’s been quite a ride,â€? says Kettles Vietnamese Bistro owner Cat Do, who opened her Santa Rosa restaurant almost two years ago after bailing out on an accounting career. “I didn’t want to sit behind a desk all day,â€? says the 35-yearold Sonoma State University graduate. “I wanted to be my own boss.â€? Do, who moved to Santa Rosa from her hometown of San Diego 15 years ago, oversees a menu that spans Vietnamese food choices from classic pho to various curries and noodlebased lovelies, including specialty items such as the iron pot rice combo, a tantalizing offering of free-range chicken, pork sausages, barbecue pork and various things called “vegetables.â€? Spring and summer rolls and dumplings make their de rigueur appearance on the starters menu, which also features my all-time favorite Asian appetizer, sugar cane shrimp (chao tom), which is exactly that: minced shrimp grilled on sugar cane sticks. Do was busily putting together Kettles’ updated menu of vegan fare during my recent weekday visit. The crowd was heavy on lawyers and judges from nearby Sonoma County outposts of justice, along with various other worker bees out for a fresh and ďŹ lling lunch. The vegan-friendly update, says Do, came about after customers approached her asking for modiďŹ cations to dishes such as the bĂĄnh mĂŹ, which has a peppermayonnaise spread that’s off-limits to vegans. Nicolas Grizzle

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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The menu also notes, with pride, that Kettles’ dishes are 90 percent gluten free. “I noticed a lot of people approached us saying they are becoming more and more allergic to gluten as well,â€? says Do. “It’s been really fun to try and cater to this niche,â€? she says, adding that it’s “not fully emphasized in a lot of restaurants, at least not in Asian restaurants.â€? Another menu tweak that bespeaks the regional tongue: most dishes come with a suggested wine pairing. The bĂĄnh mĂŹ is a hit. The classic Vietnamese sandwich is loaded with pickled carrots and daikon, cucumber, fresh jalapenos, cilantro and soy, all served on a crunchy-chewy French baguette. I ordered it with barbecue pork (other options include braised beef oxtail and lemongrass tofu), and doused it with numerous mega-squirts of the blessedly hot Sriracha sauce, which appeared in a tableside condiment rack, as if in a dream. We passed on the suggested Barrique Chardonnay pairing, but the house-made limeade was a welcome accompaniment to the sandwich as we wept tears of hotsauce bliss while devouring the super-fresh sandwich. “We focus on a lot of things here,â€? Do says, “fresh, healthy and—I know it’s an abused word—natural ingredients that focus on good health.â€? By all means, keep up the abuse. —Tom Gogola Kettles Vietnamese Bistro, 1202 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3747.


Nicolas Grizzle

17

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Tucked away in an unassuming strip mall in Petaluma, Pongo’s bright, colorful interior creates a welcoming, tropical dining experience for its fresh Pan-Asian food. In fact, “fresh” and “local” are chef Pongo Pleinnikul’s keywords for inspiration at his eponymously named restaurant. In their quest for the freshest ingredients, Pleinnikul and his family planted a garden to supply the restaurant with homegrown vegetables and herbs, adding a just-picked freshness to the dishes. Pleinnikul also searches markets for the latest seasonal ingredients, coming up with cool and spicy combinations that include Thai, Vietnamese and even Mexican flavors. One recent special included pork belly, marinated overnight in sea salt and black pepper then pan-fried. “It’s like bacon on steroids,” Pleinnikul chuckles. Traditional Thai curries share the menu with creative fusion dishes, such as chicken satay wrap or barbecued beef with a chili lime sauce. Lettuce cups, soup bowls, rice dishes, burgers and all kinds of noodles round out the menu. The most popular menu item at the moment is Nick’s Special, created by Pleinnikul’s son, Nick. “He

®

was hungry, and pan-fried some noodles then added vegetables and topped it with our peanut sauce,” Pleinnikul says. “Now it has become the most ordered dish.” The peanut sauce is a velvety concoction made with houseroasted peanuts and coconut milk, adding an addictive richness to whatever it’s served with. The atmosphere at Pongo’s is cozy, though it gets pretty happening at times, especially Thursday nights when live music is featured. “We get bands that are local acts that folks know,” Pleinnikul says. Bands from Petaluma and Sonoma like Alec Fuhrman, the Messengers and Granular are a few of the acts coming up in the near future. Karaoke on Friday and Saturday nights is another popular draw. In keeping with the local theme, the taps are filled with beers from Sonoma and Marin, including 101 North Brewing and Lagunitas. A full complement of local wines rounds out the bar, giving diners lots of options to pair with the spicy food.—Brooke Jackson Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap, 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy., Petaluma. 707.765.9800. ) 18

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Quest for Freshness


Restaurant Week ( 17 Michael Amsler

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

18

Passion for the Ocean Ume Japanese Bistro Like a bright urchin glistening in a tidepool, Windsor’s Ume Japanese Bistro waits to be discovered by the curious ocean lover looking for the beauty of the natural world. The uni, delivered fresh from Fort Bragg, tastes as if it had been plucked from the rocks that morning. The creamy, oceanic richness overwhelms my senses as I struggle to find words to show my appreciation to chef Eduardo Tejeda for making this simple yet complexly flavored dish so perfectly. But words aren’t necessary—the veteran sushi chef knows everything I’m trying to say simply by reading my face. “Some customers come in and ask for something special, just for them,” he says. “I look at how they look at the fish. Reading the customers is a challenge, but that’s why it’s fun.” Tejeda has been a sushi chef for 21 years, five of them at Ume. The restaurant focuses on simplicity to achieve its elegant look, both on the plate and in the dining room. “It’s like a painting,” says Tejeda about the plating of his dishes. “I start with the background, then vocalize the colors.” And, as owner Kelly Shu chimes in, the visual aspect is a complement to the taste. Her husband, Chang Liow, is a certified sommelier, and Ume offers hand-selected sakes and wines to accompany their dishes,

which can rotate on a monthly basis. Shu says Ume’s style is at times experimental, thought it sticks mostly to classic sushi and sashimi, with “a twist to traditional Japanese dishes.” There are plenty of customers that don’t even look at the menu, “They say, ‘Just make me something,’” says Shu. Most are regulars, but some travel from as far away as Petaluma and Ukiah for the omakase, a dish that translates roughly to “trust the chef.” It’s a good bet that in a place like Ume that will be the best selection, even if it’s a complete surprise. Tejeda takes immense pride in his work. Having studied in San Francisco’s Japantown and being offered a job at Iron Chef Matsumoto’s eponymously named restaurant in Napa, he chooses to work closer to home, in Windsor. Tejeda says a key to the restaurant’s success is teamwork. He is quick to praise his fellow chefs, saying he teaches them as much as he can. “That makes the restaurant better,” he says. And, of course, all new dishes have to pass the Shu test. Restaurant week is a testing ground for dishes that have become menu staples, says Shu, and every dish on the tasting menu is a new, off-menu item.—Nicolas Grizzle Ume Japanese Bistro, 8710 Old Redwood Hwy., Windsor. 707.838.6700.


Crush C Cr Th week’s The week’s k’ events: eventts: a sselective electi l ti guide S A N TA R O S A

One Day A Alien

Composer, jazz pianist an Composer, and nd scholar Jon Jang has given musical voice to a silent history. Devoting his studies to Asian-American Asian-Ameerican music, Jang comes to the Santa Rosa Junior College on March 5 for a one-time perf ormancee that pays tribute to the many individuals and groups that shaped Chineseperformance American rrelations. elations. Dukee Ellington, the Shaoxing opera, Joni Mitchell and his own compositions highlight Jang’s eclectic concert selections. Earlie Earlier in the afternoon, Jang will present a talk on the ne Day American, One Da college campus titled “O “One Day Alien: Artists of Color Who Changed the National Anthem.”” Jang perf orms Mar ch 5, at Newman Au performs March Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino A ve Santa ve., Santa Rosa. Rosa 7pm. 7pm Free. Free. ee Ave.,

S A N TA R O S A

Girl Rock Doc

Celebrating this years International Celebrating International Women’s Women’s Day Day, local radio wild cards KWTF are screening the 2013 documentary film ‘T The Punk Singer.’ The fi ‘The film, directed by Sini Anderson, follows the rise and career career of outspoken innovator KKathleen athleen Hanna, Han lead singer of the punk band Bikini Kill dance-rock outfit outfi fit Le Tigre. Tigre. As As a leading vvoice in a newly empowered feminist and the dance-rock c, Hanna became the face fac of the “riot grrrl” movement. The movement in punk musi music, premiered emiered at a the South by Southwes Southwest music festival and garnered Punk Singerr pr wide-r anging acclaim for for its frank frank and challenging challengin look at Hanna’s lightning rod wide-ranging of a lif e. The Punk Singeer scr screens eens Friday Friday, y, Mar March ch 77, at the Arlene Francis Center. life. W. Sixth St., St., Santa Rosa. Rosa. 7pm. p $10. 99 W.

N O VAT O

Tomorrow’s T o omorrow’s Artists A Today

Twenty-foot mur Twenty-foot murals, als,, drawings draw wings that span two rrooms, oom installations that respond to the history of the spac ce itself—such ar space aree the w works in ‘Emerging Artists of the Bay Ar ea,’ the new w exhibit at the Marin Mu Area,’ Museum of Modern Art. Artists Justine Frischman nn,, Al Grumet,, Carl Carl Heywa Frischmann, Heyward, Phillip Hua and Jennifer KKaufman aufman ar oach as they ar aree as varied in appr approach aree in message, from found objects commenting on the t human condition to im imaginative musings on structure. structure. “Emerging “Emerging Artists A Area” opens o of the Bay Area” March 8, with a rreception eception at 5pm, and ru ns thr ough April 13 at the Marin Museum of runs through Modern Art,, 500 P alm Dr rive,, Novato. Wednesday–Friday, Wednesday– Palm Drive, 11am–4pm; Satur day–Sundayy, 11am– –5pm. Fr ee. 4415.506.0137. 15.506.01377. Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. Free.

O C C I D E N TA L

Stay Classy-cal, Classy y-cal, Occidental Occid

Vibrant and thoughtful, the Vibrant thhe Mir Miró ó Quartet ar aree an aacclaimed classical string ensemble who travel travel the world over, ove and are hailed as one of the mos alling and rrefined efined string quartets mostt enthr enthralling perf orming today our cur ren members performing today.. Formedd in 1995,, the ffour current of the Mir or over 220 years, Miróó Quartet have been together ffor interpr eting classic works works and composing with a ggrace and ease interpreting that def ers to their otherr rrole ole as instructors at the prestigious defers Butler School of Music. The Th he quartet is cur rently tou currently touring a captivating new pr ogram, including works works by Hayd program, Haydn and Schubert. They perf orm Saturday, Saturdayy, March M ch 8, at the Occidental Center for the Mar perform Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Court,, Occidental.. 8pm. $ $30. 707.874.9392.

—Charlie Swanson RIGHTEOUS BABE BA ABE Indie-music hero herro Ani DiFranco brings her singular alt-folk to the Uptown Theatre in Napa on March 8. See Concerts, p23.

NORTH NO R TH BAY B A Y BOHEMIAN BO H E M I A N | MARCH M ARC H 5-11, 5 - 1 1 , 20 2014 1 4 | BOH B BOHEMIAN.COM EMI AN . C O M

CULTURE C UL

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Arts Ideas Andrew Coppa

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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LONG LIVE THE QUEEN Comedian Lisa Lampanelli is headed to Broadway.

Dish It Out

Lisa Lampanelli talks about her new theatrical one-woman show BY CHARLIE SWANSON

S

he’s the “Queen of Mean,” a term of affection for one of the most successful insult comedians since Don Rickles practically invented the genre over 40 years ago. Known for her hilarious and politically incorrect viewpoint and uproarious jabs, Lisa Lampanelli conquered all as a comic, selling out iconic venues like Radio City Music Hall and

appearing in her own television specials. Then she faced an unexpected problem—there wasn’t any ground left to cover. “I had done it all,” Lampanelli says in a phone interview with the Bohemian. “Comedy-wise, it was like, ‘What else is there?’ I was going to retire.” After seeing Carrie Fisher’s onewoman show exploring personal issues with addiction, Lampanelli was inspired to turn her humor inward. “I thought, ‘That’s some story.’ I had stories like that,

history that a lot of other people go through.” And with that, Lampanelli’s new theatrical production, Fat Girl Interrupted, was conceived. Intimately set and intensely personal, Fat Girl Interrupted is a complete departure from Lampanelli’s well-known standup work. The show is currently touring as a developmental piece before its eventual Broadway debut. Lampanelli returns March 7 and 8 to the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts in Santa Rosa, where she

recorded her last HBO special. The road to this rich and revealing show began several years back, when Lampanelli had a fortuitous lunch meeting with prolific comedy writer Alan Zweibel (Saturday Night Live, It’s Garry Shandling’s Show). “It was at a Friars Club, one of those big round tables,” recounts Lampanelli. “As a total joke, I said to him we should do a show called Co-Dependence: The Musical. We kind of laughed about it, but he said, ‘If you’re serious, I would work with you. You’ve got a one-woman show in you.’” Propelled by Zweibel’s encouragement, Lampanelli turned her lifelong issues with food, men and body image into a show that is by turns funny and poignant. At the request of her agent, Lampanelli met with Broadway director John Rando, a Tony Award winner for his direction of the satirical farce Urinetown: The Musical. “We shared an agent, so at first I thought this guy’s just going to be some douchebag they’re trying to set me up with. But he’s the nicest, most capable guy in the world. Brilliant. I call him the gayest straight man I know, because he’s so caring and sensitive. It was the easiest decision I ever made.” The topics of the show are universal, Lampanelli says. “It’s something that doesn’t end till the day we die. I’m just trying to say, ‘Come on, don’t give up.’” If this is all sounding a little too Tony Robbins, fear not—Lampanelli is a professional comedian, after all. The Celebrity Apprentice bit is worth the ticket price alone, and the whole show runs with a comedic streak throughout. Lisa Lampanelli appears March 7 and 8, at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 7:30pm and 10pm shows both nights. $30–$35. 707.546.3600.


Kevin Berne

ROPED IN Nicholas Rose and Jessa

Brie Moreno work out the kinks in MTC’s ‘Lasso of Truth.’

Knotty Games Bondage is truth in MTC’s super new Wonder Woman play BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

t’s a delightfully twisty idea: a semi-fictional story about a man whose pursuit of truth led him to invent an imaginary character. Throw in a little bondage and a three-way love story, and you have Lasso of Truth, Marin Theatre Company’s perceptive and proudly kinky premiere of Carson Kreitzer’s unforgettable new play. Directed with astonishing dexterity by Jasson Minadakis, Lasso is a kind of speculative origin story, offering a partially fabricated glimpse into the life of inventor William Marston, whose professional achievements included the invention of the lie detector and the creation of the first comic book superheroine, Wonder Woman. “Let me now praise the beauty of strong women!” exults Marston,

‘Lasso of Truth’ runs Tuesday–Sunday through March 16 at Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Times vary. $37–$53. 415.388.5208.

21 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Stage

called the Inventor (an excellent Nicholas Rose). A psychologist with a taste for sexual danger, he’s happily married to the Wife (Jessa Brie Moreno, absolutely sensational here). The textbook description of a strong woman, she is the chief breadwinner of the family. Most importantly, she also indulges her husband’s tastes for playful bondage games, an extension of his professional interest in domination and submission. The real Marston apparently did have a longtime polyamorous marriage that included his research assistant, here called the Amazon (Liz Sklar, sexy and electric). The play explores the idea that the women in the relationship might have had as much attraction to each other as Marston had for them, a realization that hits him hard when he discovers them engaging in their own bondage games—without him. Of course, by this time, crushed that his lie detector hadn’t transformed the world into the better place he imagined, Marston had already fused the best elements of his lovers into his one unforgettable comic character. The play would have had plenty of chewy material right there, but playwright Kreitzer throws in the Girl (Lauren English), a contemporary woman on a quest for the original Wonder Woman comic book, and the Guy (John Riedlinger), a collector who won’t part with it. Kreitzer uses these characters to explore the impact Wonder Woman has had on generations of girls who grew up idolizing her, and the feminist significance of the lasso-cracking Amazon comes out in these scenes, which start to make Lasso seem a bit stretched and overladen with ideas. Still, the pleasures of the play far outweigh the faults. Brilliantly executed, Lasso of Truth is as bold and original, as entertaining and groundbreaking, as the truth-telling Amazon who inspired it. Rating (out of 5): +++++

33/7 / 7 – 3/13 3 /13

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Nebraska R (11:15am) Nebraska (11:15am) Philomena P hilomena R (1(10:30am) 0 : 30am ) JJoin oin uuss oonn SSunday unday 33/9 / 9 at at 11pm pm and and Tuesday Tuesday 3/11 3 /11 at at 66:30pm : 30pm for for special special ppresentations r esen t at ions of of Lost L os t Illusions Illusions from f r om tthe he Bolshoi Bolshoi inin Moscow! Mo s c o w !

551 5 51 S Summerfield ummer field Road R oad S an t a R Santa Rosa osa 707.522.0719 707. 522 .0719 www.summerfieldcinemas.com w w w. summe r fie ldc ine mas .c om


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

22

Tim’s Vermeer

Film

A Penn & Teller Film

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WILD BLUE Joseph Gordon-Levitt voices Japanese fighter-plane engineer Jiro Horikoshi in

Miyazaki’s last film.

Plane Crazy Director Hiyao Miyazaki flies off into the sunset with ‘The Wind Rises’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

f anyone could make an appealing full-length animated film about a sliderule jockey, Hiyao Miyazaki (Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away) is that artist. The flaws in The Wind Rises, which has been announced as Miyazaki’s last film, weren’t in the conception. It’s a fictionalized biopic of engineer Jiro Horikoshi, who developed the A6M Zero fighter plane. As we see it here, this plane’s excellence was derived both from Jiro’s dreams and the directly observed biology of wings and bones. To Miyazaki’s credit, there are passing acknowledgements here of the selfdeception found wherever engineers toil. The problem at hand always outweighs the purpose of the finished project, and the next thing you know, there are dead bodies everywhere. Miyazaki could have easily anticipated that we, the grandchildren and nephews and nieces of the Zero’s many victims, would have commented on his choice of subject. It’s the carrying out of that story—the dull mechanics of it—that makes The Wind Rises Miyazaki’s least picture as well as his

last. And I’ll add that, like any of his fans, I don’t want this film to be his last. In the name of accessibility, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Emily Blunt have dubbed The Wind Rises for the American audience. While I didn’t see the dubbed version, it’s hard to imagine English dialogue improving what was already a staid and static account of an engineer’s life. The relevance of Jiro to Miyazaki is perhaps autobiographical (take a guess why Miyazaki would make a film about someone whose life consisted of sitting at a desk and trying to excel in his field). And the master’s hand is visible in the clip-worthy moment depicting the great quake of 1923, presented as a terrifying ocean-like roll of the land. The injuries from that great disaster become a premonition of the aerial war to come, and that’s thematically more interesting than the movie itself. Here was the first stage of the leveling of that green, pre-war Japan, the land Miyazaki knows, loves, misses and tries so hard to recreate in his incomparable jewel-box colors. ‘The Wind Rises’ is now screening in select theaters.


Aaron Borowitz, with the late Scott Shipper of Petaluma.

Rock Steady

Reggae rockers land in Santa Rosa’s newest watering hole BY JACQUELYNNE OCANA

O

n a recent weekday evening, only a couple of bar stools sit empty at Santa Rosa’s new Whiskey Tip bar in Roseland. Owner Justin Neuroth is in the kitchen, putting the ďŹ nal spices on a basket of signature Bacon Bombs for a buddy who helped him remodel what was once the old Gigas dive bar on Sebastopol Road. The renovated building is now full of swanky dĂŠcor and party functionality, ready for a summer packed with touring bands, DJhosted Sunday brunches and everything from karaoke to WFC ďŹ ghts. With over 90 varieties of whiskey, there is a lot of potential

Thrive play the Whiskey Tip on Saturday, March 8, at 8pm. $5. 1910 Sebastopol Road, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

AT THE HISTORIC NAPA VALLEY OPERA HOUSE

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23 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

UNRELENTING Thrive guitarist

Alex Geller

Music

for the Whiskey Tip to be the next great venue in Sonoma County. Outside, the 2,200-square-foot patio has murals by local graffiti artist Gabriel Adams, and opposite a beer bar, the stage is going up just in time for Santa Cruz reggae rockers Thrive to perform this Saturday night. Thrive continue to tour after releasing their second studio-length album, Relentless, in May. The record reached considerable heights on the iTunes reggae charts, which has helped make the band one of Northern California’s leading opener acts for reggae stars like Barrington Levy, Tarrus Riley and SOJA. Still, the band is hardworking and consistent about developing new material. “I’m in my home studio every day,â€? says lead vocalist and guitarist Aaron Borowitz. “When I’m traveling, I bring it with me.â€? Over the past year, Thrive’s evolving musical range is spearheading a unique style of California reggae, where pop, rock and R&B fuse with reggae’s skankin’ guitar riffs. “Those inuences are starting to shine as our group matures,â€? says Borowitz. The last few months brought drastic change for the band with the loss of their saxophone player, Petaluma native Scott Shipper. He was 29 when he died of cancer in December. “We respected Scott’s knowledge of music and his work ethic, not only with the band, but with his charity Unify to Thrive,â€? says Borowitz. What hasn’t changed, though, is the conscious lyricism of their music. Every verse exhales positivity. They sing about love and unity, and like the breeziness of their melodies, they delve just far enough into social injustice to keep it real without getting upset. Helping Thrive keep it classy is Hawaiian native Hirie, who plays island-sweet melodies on her ukulele. This could be the start of something great, and Lord knows Santa Rosa needs it.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

From the New World Saturday Mar 15, 8pm Sunday S unday Mar M ar 16, 16, 2pm 2pm t"UFIPSUúa: C t"UFIPSUúa: Concertino o certino ffor on or Orchestra O rchestra t&TDBMBOUFConcerto t& TDBMBOUF Conncerto ffor or Clarinet C larinet and and Strings Strings No. tt%WPřåk: %WPřåk: SSymphony ymphonny N o. 9 ((�New � World�) ld �) Ana Catalina Ramírez, clarinet ~ Norman Gamboa, conductor $ 15 Premium Seating; $10 General Admission Students always FREE (18 and under)

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SR HS Performing SRHS Per forming A Arts rts Au Auditorium d it o r i u m 1235 1 235 M Mendocino endocino Ave, Ave, Santa Santa Rosa Ro s a w w w.apsonoma.org 1.800.838.3006 1. 80 0. 838.30 06 www.apsonoma.org

Wed, Mar 5 10:15am– 12:40pm 7–10pm

Thur, Mar 6 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Mar 7 7–11pm

8:40–9:45am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther hosts MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK ‘N’ ROLL

Sat, Mar 8 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise CIRCLE ‘N’ SQUARES HOEDOWN

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Thrive WITH Hirie Jle*&0›EffeÆ/gd

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The Sticky Notes =i`*&(+›$*›SPACE JAZZ

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The AllwaysElvis Band

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLE & PAIRS Square Dance Club

Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Celebrating the Life of Ron Martin The Pulsators, Levi Lloyd and the 501 Band, the Detroit Disciples, the Alameda AllStars, the Sorentinos, Volker Strifler and many more perform to benefit the Ron Martin Memorial Foundation. Mar 9, 12pm. $10. Tradewinds, 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra Wynton Marsalis and company are back for another compelling performance. Mar 9, 8pm. $49-$89. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The MirĂł Quartet This dynamic quartet from the University of Texas faculty will perform works by Haydn, Dutilleux and Schubert. Mar 8, 8pm. $10-$30. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

MARIN COUNTY Alam Khan & Friends Khan brings his world music mastery to Marin. Mar 7, 8pm. $22-$32. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Michael McDonald McDonald is simply timeless. Mar 11, 8pm. $50-$90. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

NAPA COUNTY Ani DiFranco The “little folk singer� gives an expansive show. Jenny Scheinman opens. Mar 8, 8pm. $48. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Andrews Hall Mar 8, Black & White Jazz. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Aqus Cafe Mar 7, Sonoma Driftwood. Mar 8, Due Zighi Baci. First Wednesday of every month, Chamber Music. First Thursday of every month, Celtic Night. Second Wednesday of every month, Jazz Jam. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Coffee Catz Sat, 2pm, bluegrass jam. Mon, 6pm, open mic. First Wednesday of every month, Inner Piano Listenings with Jerry Green. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Dry Creek Kitchen Mar 10, Christian Foley-Beining and Tom Shader Duo. Mar 11, Susan Sutton and Piro Patton Duo. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Epicurean Connection Mar 6, the Crux. Mar 8, Adam Traum and Jack Hines. Mar 9, Heartache Sisters. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

French Garden Mar 7, Solid Air. Mar 8, Honey B and the Pollinators. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Green Music Center Mar 12, Trio Ariadne. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Heritage Public House Mar 8, Saffell. Wed, North Bay Blues Jam. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Mar 5, Gladkill. Mar 7, Sambada. Mar 8, Locura. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques & Guac. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Mar 8, Adam Ivey Trio with Marcus Shelby and Kendrick Freeman. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room Mar 5, the Gypsy Trio. Mar 6, the Jen Tucker Band. Mar 7, the Royal Deuces. Mar 8, Hand Me Down. Mar 9, the Sean Carscadden Trio. Mar 12, New Skye Band. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Mar 5, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. Mar 7, Phil Edwards. Mar 8, Frankye Kelly. Mar 10, Gypsy Cafe. Mar 12, Greg

Sun, Mar 9 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5–9:30pm Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, Mar 10 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:30pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Mar 11 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE with live drummers

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922

1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

BLUE SOUL East Bay blues singer Terrie Odabi brings the mojo March 6 to Osteria

Divino. See Clubs & Venues, p26.


25

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2014 Oscar Winner Best Documentary Film

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with Jini Reynolds

Marin Center’s intimate Showcase Theater on March 7. See Concerts, adjacent page.

TueĈ1EVĈĀTQĈ*VII

(IEXL'EJÂŞ with Karen Garber, Hospice Nurse

Hester. Sun, Kit Mariah’s Open Mic Night. Thurs, Susan Sutton Jazz Piano. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mavericks Mar 7, Mckenna Faith & the Cherry Road Gang. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Mystic Theatre Mar 7, Elephant Revival. Mar 8, Tommy Castro & the Painkillers. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Newman Auditorium Mar 5, Jon Jang. Mar 8, Mariachi Femenil Orgullo Mexicano. Mar 9, Adler Fellows. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Phoenix Theater Mar 7, Suffokate. Mar 8, Baeza. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Mar 9, D’GIIN. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Sat, This Is the Remix with Will Styles. Fri, Flaunt Fridays with DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sally Tomatoes Fri, live music. 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Mar 7, Kirk Whipple and Marilyn Morales. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Sprenger’s Tap Room Mar 8, the Has. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Stout Brothers

Wednesday, Dixie Giants. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Whiskey Tip Mar 6, the Voice. Mar 7, Blueshift. Mar 8, Thrive with Hirie. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

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Mar 8, David Correa & Cascada. 2727 Sulphur Springs Ave, St Helena. 707.251.8715.

Zodiacs Mar 5, Vintage Grass. Mar 7, Trebuchet. Mar 8, Chris Jeffries and friends. 256 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Mon, Open Mic with Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Redwood Cafe

Toad in the Hole Pub

Dance Palace

Mar 8, the Stylites. Second Sunday of every month, Ian Scherrer. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Mar 8, Perla Batalla. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Twin Oaks Tavern

Mar 7, Generation Esmerelda. Wed, Salsa and Bachata. Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Mar 7, Mr December. Mar 8, Buck Nickels and Loose Change. Every other Sunday, Blues and BBQ with the Blues Defenders. Every other Tuesday, Country Night with the Kick’n Country Girls. Every other

Invocation, prayer, meditation, and group

White Barn

Mar 7, Nothing to Lose. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079. Every other Sunday. through Mar 23, Irish Jam Session. Thurs, Open Mic. First Friday of every month, Dginn. Second Sunday of every month, trad Irish. Second Tuesday of every month, 9pm, Barnburners Poetry Slam. Second Wednesday of every month, Sound Kitchen. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

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Mar 7, Gloria Trevi. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Mar 5, Nate Lopez. Mar 6, Kevin Brennan. Mar 7, Old Soul Revue. Mar 12, Herb in Movement. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Quincy’s

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Club 101 Wed, 8:20pm, salsa dancing with lessons. 815 W Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.460.0101.

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Hopmonk Novato Mar 6, James

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Music ( 25

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Wed 3⠄5˜The Dixie Giants Thur 3⠄6˜Blues Karaoke with KRSH’s Bill Bowker & Razor Karaoke 7:30pm Fri 3⠄7˜Mr December plus 5 Cent Coffee and Josh Windmiller Sat 3⠄8˜Buck Nickels & Loose Change Sun 3⠄9˜Blues & BBQ with The Blues Defenders 5pm Tue 3⠄11˜Kickin’ Country Girls line dance instruction! 7pm

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Station House Cafe

Mar 5, Eddie Neon Band. Mar 6, Stymie & the Pimp Jones Love Orchestra. Mar 9, Gabe Diamond. Mar 11, Todos Santos. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Tues, Bluesday Piano Night. First Friday of every month, First Fridays with DJ Dans One. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

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Mar 8, the Easy Leaves. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Studio 55 Marin Mar 9, Setchko, Meese & Juniper. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Mon, Kimrea and Dreamdogs. Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Mar 7, Petty Theft. Mar 8, SambaDa with Afrofunk Experience. Mar 9, the Sticky Fingers Project. Mar 12, Tender Mercies. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Osteria Divino

Terrapin Crossroads

No Name Bar

Mar 5, Con Quimba. Mar 6, Terrie Odabi and Ken Cook. Mar 7, Eric Markowitz Trio. Mar 8, Joan Getz Quartet . Mar 9, J Kevin Durkin. Mar 11, Ken Cook. Mar 12, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

through Mar 19, Terrapin Family Band. Mar 7, the Easy Leaves. Mar 8, Go By Ocean. Mar 10, Mardi Gras House Party. Sun, Midnight North. Thurs, San Geronimo. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Travis Marina Second Sunday of every month, the Lonestar Retrobates. Fort Baker, Sausalito.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Mar 6, Ralph Woodson. Mar 7, Charles Wheel Band. Sun, DJ Night. Wed, Jumpstart. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Napa Valley Opera House Second Tuesday of every month, Cafe Theatre Comedy Series. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Pica Pica Maize Kitchen First Friday of every month, salsa dance party. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Silo’s Mar 6, Syria T Berry. Mar 7, Deluna. Mar 8, Ray Obiedo & Mistura Fina. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria Sun, James and Ted. Wed, Gentlemen of Jazz. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

Mar 5, Martha Crawford. Mar 6, Rusty String Express. Mar 11, James Moseley. Mar 12, the Machiavelvets. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Peri’s Silver Dollar Mon, acoustic open mic. Tues, John Varn and Tom Odetto. First Wednesday of every month, the Weissmen. Second Sunday of every month, Sexy Sunday: Women Rockers. First Thursday of every month, Burnsy’s Sugar Shack. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Covered CA

Smiley’s Mar 6, the Train Singer. Mar 7, Miles Ahead: A Tribute to Miles Davis. Mar 8, La Mandanga. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larry’s karaoke. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Nickel Rose

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Harman and Miles Schon. Mar 7, Dgiin. Mar 8, Stingrays. Mar 9, Dumpstaphunk. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

every month, Acoustic Guitar Showcase. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Mar 7, Gary Vogensen. Mar 8, Reckless In Vegas. Mar 9, San Geronimo with Jeremy D’Antonio. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Sun, salsa class. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello and Seth. First Wednesday of every month, Tangonero. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Sat, Ukulele Jam Session. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Second Wednesday of

Mira Beloved indie pop songwriter and vocalist plays in anticipation of her new album. Mar 6 at Brick & Mortar Music Hall.

Russian Circles Crushing Chicago metal trio marches to their own postrock beat. Mar 7 at Great American Music Hall.

Kris Bowers Quintet Up-and-coming jazz innovator performs from his ambitious debut album with all-star backing. Mar 9 at Yoshi’s S.F.

Diane Cluck Virginia-based singer-songwriter is amassing a wide following with her unique voice. Mar 10 at the Chapel.

Carsick Cars China’s favorite indie rock band plays a free early show as part of their current U.S. tour. Mar 11 at Amoeba Music.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


Arts Events Windsor Library, “Windsor Library Art Show,� with exhibits based on Elmer Rice’s play, Street Scene. 5pm. 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor. 707.838.1020.

Mar 7 Arts Guild of Sonoma, “Repo Show,� the annual green-themed exhibit of works from recycled sources. 7pm. $10. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115. Steele Lane Community Center, “Portrait Project� combines photo and art for portraits by 50 local artists. pm. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3282.

Mar 8 Gallery One, “Mixed Media Invitational,� exhibits by Tracy Bigelow Grisman, Gerald Huth, Joycenew Kelly and Judith Klausenstock. 5pm. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY Art Without Labels

Hammerfriar Gallery, Gordon Onslow Ford, John Anderson and Robert Percy exhibit their abstract work. 6pm. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600. Marin MOCA, “Emerging Artists of the Bay Area,� featuring five bright new talents. 5pm. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

Mar 9 Marin Society of Artists Gallery, “Rising Stars,� showcases and honors talented young artists. 3pm. Free. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561. Riverfront Art Gallery, “Showin on the River,� with photography from the Bay Area and beyond. 5pm. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART.

Mar 9 Occidental Center for the Arts, “Pointless Sisters Quilt Show� 2pm. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Frank P Doyle Library Fri, Mar 7, 1:45pm, Docent led tour expressing insights and inspirations of artists in the Doyle collection. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4614.

Through Mar 31, “Things That Laugh in the Night,� featuring the artwork of Michael Cheney. 111 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.775.3794.

Graton Gallery

Charles M Schulz Museum

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Mar 5-Jul 6, “From the Pen to the Comic Pages,� exhibits the evolution of the comic strip. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery Mar 12-May 13, “Jim Freed,� exhibit of the artist. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. Daily, 10am to 4:30pm. 707.827.3600.

Through Mar 30, “Small Works Show,� juried by Bob Nugent. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Through Mar 9, “Young Artists 2014,� an exhibit of student art from 10 local schools, and “Those Who Inspire,� work by art teacher Sandra Rose Novia. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Helen Putnam Community Room Through Mar 14, “Annual Library Show,� presented by the Petaluma Arts Association

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Mar 25, “Once Upon a Wetland,� art by Ane Carl Rovetta. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

ADAPTED BY EMILY MANN

Local Color Gallery Mar 11-Apr 14, “Air Bourne & Water Bourne,� featuring the art of Diane Majundar. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.875.2744.

March 7, 8, 13, 14, 15 at 8:00 PM March 8, 9, 15, 16 at 2:00 PM Burbank Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College 1501 Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa Campus

Mahoney Library Gallery Through Mar 13, “Investigation of Pen and Ink,� features art from Obie Bowman and Ross Grossman. SRJC, 680 Sonoma Mountain Parkway, Petaluma. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 9 to 1; Sat, 10 to 3. 707.778.3974.

THEATRE

SEASON 2013/2014

TICKETS ONLINE www.santarosa.edu/theatrearts TICKETS $10-$15 BOX OFFICE 707.527.4343 RECOMMENDED FOR AGE 14 AND ABOVE.

The Cherry Orchard is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

Norcal Modern Art Gallery Through Mar 9, “Welcome to Wonderland,� featuring the art of Grace Slick. 105 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8525.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Mar 16, “Form and Finish,� sculptures by Michael Cooper and John de Marchi. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

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Through Mar 16, “It’s All About the Music,� featuring tribute to Nelson Mandela. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

515 Ross Street, Brickyard Center Santa Rosa • (707) 542-5588

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Outdoor Storage Outdoor Storage Systems S ystems & Indoor Indoor Furnishings F urnishings

Redwood Cafe Through Mar 11, Sandra Jill Anfang presents acrylic paintings and collage. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

of 80% of 80% recycled r e c y c le d w wood ood an d bamboo bamboo and TThis his successful success f ul green gr e en business b usiness is is n now ow rready ea d y for for partnership par tner ship and/or and/or aquisit ion n aquisition

RiskPress Gallery Through Mar 26, “Funhouse: Works on Paper,� featuring Laura Postell and Grace Levine. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Rohnert ParkCotati Library Through Mar 15,

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At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

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Productions P roductions

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by Pamela Glasscock, 2013

Eggen & Lance Chapel, “Simple Healing,� with artist Sara Bell. 6:30pm. 1540 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3747.

ANTON CHEKHOV’S

and the Friends of the Library. Art by PAA members, special feature on artist Darold Graves. Reception, Mar 5 at 5pm. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. Mon and Thurs-Fri, 10 to 5; TuesWed, 10 to 8 707.763.9801.

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Mar 5

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

RECEPTIONS

27

SANTA ROSA JUNIOR COLLEGE THEATRE ARTS Presents

GRAND (RE)OPENING CELEBRATION Saturday, March 15 from 3–7pm To visit before March 15, please call first.

456 Tenth Street, Santa Rosa 707tcalabigallery.com


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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“Library Art Show,” showcases local artists. Reception, Mar 5 at 6pm. 6250 Lynne Conde Way, Rohnert Park. 707.584.9121.

SoCo Coffee Through Mar 31, “Ed Coletti Exhibit,” on display through the month of March. 1015 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.433.1660.

MARIN COUNTY Art by the Bay Weekend Gallery Through Mar 30, “Beyond Geometry,” paintings by Jon Langdon. 18856 Hwy 1, Marshall. 415.663.1006.

Art Works Downtown Through Mar 11, “A Moment in Time,” featuring the Impressionist work of Dorallen Davis. Through Mar 11, “Mystic Realms-Seascapes,” oceanic imagery by Tim Burns. Through Mar 11, “Super Symmetry,” with sculptures, paintings and photography by Russian artist Timur Yusupov. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Mar 8, “Artisans,” emerging and internationally known artists. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Through Mar 30, “Group Show,” new works by the gallery artists, including Martin Riveros Baxter and Anna Valdez. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Mar 23, “Igor Sazevich: Glancing Back–Stepping Forward,” a solo exhibition of the Inverness painter. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. WedMon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Mar 5-May 16, “California Dreamin,” includes art and sculpture by Bay Area foreignborn artists. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

MINE Art Gallery Through Mar 30, “vision/ color/love,” works by Nicole Cameron, Richard Dieterich, Sherry Petrini and Nick Wildermuth. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Mar 20, “Red,” is just that–all things red! 616

Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Museum Through Mar 23, “Thinking Outside the Bottle,” exploration of the artistic passions of the people behind the wine. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Paul Ogata With special guest David Vanavermaete. Presented by Marin Comedy Show. Mar 8, 8pm. $20-$25. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Avenue, Novato, 415.899.9883.

The Pump & Dump A parentally incorrect comedy show. Mar 5, 8pm. $22-$25. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.3850.

Sunday Funnies Family-friendly standup comedy supporting the Y’s outreach programs. Mar 9, 6pm. $5-$10. Sonoma County Family YMCA, 1111 College Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.545.9622, ext 12.

Dance Ailey II Under the artistic direction of Troy Powell, this company presents a repertory of timeless classics and thrilling new works. Mar 5, 8pm. $45$25. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Raven Dance Spectacular Brings together all styles of the dance community. Mar 8-9. $10-$20. 115 North St, Healdsburg 707.433.3145.

Film America the Beautiful 3: The Sexualization of Our Youth With the filmmaker in person. Mar 5, 6pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

Aqus Film Festival A night of shorts. Mar 9, 7pm. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma, 707.778.6060.

Carrie Part of the CultFilm Series, with Q&A by actor WIlliam Katt. Mar 6, 7pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa.

Femme: Women Healing the World With the filmmakers in person. Mar 6, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

Is the Man Who Is Tall Happy? Mar 8, 7pm. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa, 707.255.5445.

The Punk Singer Presented by KWTF, with DJ Jewsy spinning. Mar 7, 7pm. $10. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.528.3009.

Rebels with a Cause The film celebrates the people and passion that saved the coastal wonders that would become the Point Reyes National Seashore and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. Wed, Mar 5, 7pm. Free. Tam Valley Community Center, 203 Marin Ave, Mill Valley.

Shelly Shows Movies This month, Shelly shows “Silver Linings Playbook.” First Fri of every month, 7pm. Free. Community Presbyterian Church of Calistoga, 1407 Third St, Calistoga.

Sparks Special screening with Q&A by cast and crew including director Christopher Folino and actors William Katt and Clint Howard. Mar 7, 8pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa.

Vintage Film Series Mar 10, “The Rain Man.” 7pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Food & Drink Napa Valley Museum Annual Gala Celebrate and support the Napa Valley Museum. A Champagne reception and silent auction will be followed by dinner, dancing and a live auction. Mar 8, 5pm. Westin Verasa Hotel, 1314 McKinstry St, Napa.

Oysters & Loire Valley Wines Celebration Mar 10-14. Left Bank

Restaurant, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.927.3331.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Lectures Altered Book Workshop Instructed by Virginia Simpson-Magruder. Sun, Mar 9, 1pm. Marin MOCA, Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato, 415.506.0137.

Charles Best As part of the Marin Speaker Series. Through Mar 6, 8pm. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, 415.499.6800.

K Ruby Blume “City Chickens, Urban Goats, Backyard Bunnies” explores the benefits of urban livestock and how to integrate animals into a thriving garden. Mar 5, 7pm. Corte Madera Library, 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera, 707.924.6444.

Mysterious Lives of Owls Learn about local owls and their role in our ecosystem. Mar 8, 3pm. $10. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.527.9277.

Marin Green Drinks Dana Armanino discusses the Bay Area Green Business Program. Mar 11, 5:30pm. Free. Lotus Cuisine of India, 704 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.456.5808.

Paola Gianturco Part of the Speak to Me Lecture Series. Mar 11, 6:30pm. $69. Mill Valley Community Center, 180 Camino Alto, Mill Valley.

Redwood Writers Panel on Audiobooks Mar 9, 3pm. $5. Flamingo Resort Hotel, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.8530.

Science Buzz Cafe Feb 20, “The Role of Mutation in Evolution” with Philip Harriman, PhD; Mar 6, “Entrepreneurs, Money and Crowd Funding” with Rob Eyer, PhD; Mar 20, “Geological History of Planet Earth” with Richard Ely. First Thurs of every month, 7pm. through Mar 6. $5. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol, 707.824.2030.

Stan Grof Psychiatrist will explore observations from 50 years of consciousness research.

American Hero William Katt shows range in films old and new The career of veteran character actor William Katt spans over 40 years of television and film roles. Beginning with small one-off parts in iconic 1970s TV series like M*A*S*H* and Kojack, Katt first got noticed for his role in the 1976 cult classic horror film Carrie as actress Sissy Spacek’s prom date Tommy Ross. While things in that film turned out particularly bad for Katt’s character, the actor continued to excel in countless smaller roles. In 1981, Katt landed his most well-known role, in the titular part of The Greatest American Hero, a quirky superhero show that ran on TV for five seasons. Since then, Katt has remained active on television while appearing in small roles for independent films voiceover parts for animated fare. One of Katt’s most recent film roles, as the villainous Matanza in Sparks, finds him acting alongside other notable underground favorites Clint Howard (Apollo 13), Jake Busey (Starship Troopers) and Clancy Brown (The Shawshank Redemption). It’s a darkly humorous tale of superheroes that plays like a ’40s noir caper—with actual capes. This week, Katt takes questions from the audience for two nights at Santa Rosa’s Roxy Theater, first at a screening of Carrie as part of the theater’s Cult Film Series on March 6, and the next night alongside Howard, Busey and other cast and crew members for a special screening of Sparks, which runs throughout the week. Roxy Stadium 14, 85 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa. $10. 707.522.0330.— Charlie Swanson

Mar 8, 8pm. $12-$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

United Nations & Entrepreneurship Presented by Elizabeth Gore. Mar 6, 7pm. Free. Newman


Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4372.

Angelico Hall Mar 5, 7pm, “Glitter and Glue: A Memoir” with Kelly Corrigan. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

Book Passage Mar 5, 7pm, “She: A Celebration of Greatness in Every Woman” with Mary Anne Radmacher and Liz Kalloch. Mar 6, 7pm, an evening of readings with Roger Housden and Ellen Bass. Mar 7, 7pm, “The Boy Who Died and Came Back: Adventures of a Dream Archaeologist in the Multiverse” with Robert Moss. Mar 8, 7pm, “Buyer’s Remorse” with Roy Mash. Mar 9, 7pm, “The Bumpy Road to Collaboration” with Carole Levy. Mar 10, 7pm, “The Enchanted” with Rene Denfeld. Mar 11, 7pm, “An Unnecessary Woman” with Rabih Alameddine. Mar 12, 7pm, “A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain” with Adrianne Harun. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Mar 6, 6pm, “Golden State” with Michelle Richmond. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Mar 5, 7pm, “The Boy Who Died and Came Back: Adventures of a Dream Archaeologist in the Multiverse” with Robert Moss. Mar 6, 7pm, “Beasts” with Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Open Secret Mar 6, 7pm, “Lessons in Courage” with Oscar MiroQuesada. 923 C St, San Rafael 415.457.4191.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Church Mar 8, 7:30pm, “Snowy Tower: Parzival and the Wet, Black Branch of Language” with Martin Shaw. Mar 9, 3pm, David Mitchell and Susanna Solomon. Free. 11445 Shoreline Hwy, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1349.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books Mar 6, “Words of Radiance” with Brandon Sanderson. 850 Fourth Street, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Mar 6, 2pm, “Infidels Abroad” with John Painter. 167 High St, Sebastopol 707.829.2440.

Sonoma Community Center Mar 10, 7:30pm, “The People’s Advocate” with Danny Sheehan. $15. 276 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.579.2787.

Theater Bay Area Playback Theatre Improv theater from audience suggestions. Mar 8, 8pm. $10$18. Open Secret, 923 C St, San Rafael, 415.457.4191.

Boeing Boeing Self-styled Parisian lothario Bernard entertains his female cohorts with frequent “layovers” in this 1960s French farce. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Mar 9. $15$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.

The Cherry Orchard Anton Chekov’s masterful tragicomedy, starring veteran Broadway actor Craig Mason and directed by Leslie McCauley. Thurs-Sun through Mar 16. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Footloose A Throckmorton Youth Performers production of the explosive movie musical. FriSun through Mar 16. $14-$18. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

James & the Giant Peach Presented by Masque Unit Theatre Company. Mar 8-9, 1 and 3pm. $8. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, 415.499.6800.

Lasso of Truth World premiere of this story detailing the origin of Wonder Woman through her creator, William Moulton Marston. Times vary. Tues-Sun through Mar 16. $37-$53. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

Lisa Lampanelli: Fat Girl Interrupted “The Queen of Mean” reveals the woman behind the comic in her first theatrical production. Mar 7, 7:30 and 10pm and Mar 8, 7:30 and 10pm. $30-$35. Wells Fargo

Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

Mercy Watson to the Rescue Mercy is not just a pig, she’s a porcine wonder! Presented by Bay Area Children’s Theatre. Sat-Sun, 10:30am and 12:30pm. through Mar 16. $15$20. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

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Sid the Science Kid Live! Based on the PBS kids TV series. Mar 12, 6:30pm. $16$21. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

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She Kills Monsters A pseudo-violent comedy adventure of identity, fantasy and killing monsters by Qui Nguyen and directed by Paul Draper. Mar 5-8. $10-$17. Ives Hall room 119, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Snow White & Rose Red

SONOMA & MARIN COUNTIES

GREENLIGHT ALTERNATIVES

707.484.8921

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THROUGH MARCH

For young audiences, and the young at heart. Fri-Sun through Mar 16. $5. Steele Lane Community Center, 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa, 707.543.3282.

SSU Vagina Monlogues Sonoma State students perform Eve Ensler’s “The Vagina Monologues,” based on stories from a variety of women. Mar 6-8, 7pm. $5-$15. Cooperage, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

The Taming of the Shrew A Wild West take on Shakespeare’s classic tale of a courtship gone wrong. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Mar 16. $10. College of Marin Kentfield Campus, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

The Wizard of Oz This spectacular Broadwaystyle production recreates all the vivid wonder of the beloved American classic. FriSun through Mar 16. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville, 707.226.8742.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

FE AT U R I N G :

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29 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of March 5

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Are you between jobs? Between romantic partners? Between secure foundations and clear mandates and reasons to get up each morning? Probably at least one of the above. Foggy whirlwinds may be your intimate companions. Being up-in-the-air could be your customary vantage point. During your stay in this weird vacationland, please abstain from making conclusions about its implications for your value as a human being. Remember these words from author Terry Braverman: â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is important to detach our sense of self-worth from transitional circumstances, and maintain perspective on who we are by enhancing our sense of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;self-mirth.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Whimsy and levity can be your salvation, Aries. Lucky ďŹ&#x201A;ux should be your mantra. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) The renowned cellist Yo Yo Ma once came to the home of computer pioneer Steve Jobs and performed a private concert. Jobs was deeply touched, and told Ma, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your playing is the best argument Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever heard for the existence of God, because I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really believe a human alone can do this.â&#x20AC;? Judging from the current astrological omens, Taurus, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m guessing you will soon experience an equivalent phenomenon: a transcendent expression of love or beauty that moves you to suspect that magic is afoot. Even if you are an atheist, you are likely to feel the primal shiver that comes from having a close brush with enchantment.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20)

In my dream, I was leading a pep rally for a stadium full of Geminis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your intensity brings you great pleasure,â&#x20AC;? I told them over the public address system. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You seek the company of people who love you to be inspired. You must be appreciated for your enthusiasm, never shamed. Your drive for excellence doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stress you out, it relaxes you. I hereby give you license to laugh even louder and sing even stronger and think even smarter.â&#x20AC;? By now the crowd was cheering and I was bellowing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not cool to be cool,â&#x20AC;? I exulted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cool to be burning with a white-hot lust for life. You are rising to the next octave. You are playing harder than you have ever played.â&#x20AC;?

CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;My old paintings no longer interest me,â&#x20AC;? said the proliďŹ c artist Pablo Picasso when he was 79 years old. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m much more curious about those I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t done yet.â&#x20AC;? I realize it might be controversial for me to suggest that you adopt a similar perspective, Cancerian. After all, you are renowned for being a connoisseur of old stories and past glories. One of your specialties is to keep memories alive and vibrant by feeding them with your generous love. To be clear, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean that you should apologize for or repress those aptitudes. But for nowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;say, the next three weeksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I invite you to turn your attention toward the exciting things you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t done yet.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) I recommend that you sleep with a special someone whose dreams youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to blend with yours. And when I say â&#x20AC;&#x153;sleep with,â&#x20AC;? I mean it literally; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a euphemism for â&#x20AC;&#x153;having sex with.â&#x20AC;? To be clear: making love with this person is ďŹ ne if thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what you both want. But my main point is that you will draw unexpected beneďŹ ts from lying next to this companion as you both wander through the dreamtime. Being in your altered states together will give you inspiration you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get any other way. You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be sharing information on a conscious level, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exactly the purpose: to be transformed together by whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ&#x201A;owing back and forth between your deeper minds. For extra credit, collaborate on incubating a dream. Read this: http://tinyurl.com/dreamincubation. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;One chord is ďŹ ne,â&#x20AC;? said rock musician Lou Reed about his no-frills approach to writing songs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two chords are pushing it. Three chords and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re into jazz.â&#x20AC;? I recommend his perspective to you in the coming weeks, Virgo. Your detail-oriented appreciation of lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complexity is one of your ďŹ nest qualities, but every once in a whileâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;like nowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you can thrive by stripping down to the basics. This will be especially true about your approach to intimate relationships. For the time being, just assume that cultivating simplicity will generate the blessings you need most.

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) You Librans havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t received enough gifts, goodies and compliments lately. For reasons I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t discern, you have been deprived of your rightful share. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not fair! What can you do to rectify this imbalance in the cosmic ledger? How can you enhance your ability to attract the treats you deserve? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important that we solve this riddle, since you are entering a phase when your wants and needs will expand and deepen. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I can offer: I hereby authorize you to do whatever it takes to entice everyone into showering you with bounties, boons and bonuses. To jumpstart this process, shower yourself with bounties, boons and bonuses. SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The art of living is more like wrestling than dancing,â&#x20AC;? wrote the Roman philosopher Marcus Aurelius more than 1,800 years ago. Is that true for you, Scorpio? Do you experience more strenuous struggle and grunting exertion than frisky exuberance? Even if thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s usually the case, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m guessing that in the coming weeks your default mode should be more akin to dancing than wrestling. The cosmos has decided to grant you a grace periodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;on one condition, that is: you must agree to experiment more freely and have more fun that you normally allow yourself.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) For the itch you are experiencing, neither chamomile nor aloe vera will bring you relief. Nor would over-thecounter medications like calamine lotion. No, Sagittarius, your itch isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t caused by something as tangible as a rash or hives, and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be soothed by any obvious healing agent. It is, shall we say, more in the realm of a soul itchâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a prickly tickle that is hard to diagnose, let alone treat. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m guessing that there may be just one effective cure: become as still and quiet and empty as you possibly can, and then invite your Future Self to scratch it for you.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) The world is awash in bright, shiny nonsense. Every day we wade through a glare of misinformation and lazy delusions and irrelevant data. It can be hard to locate the few speciďŹ c insights and ideas that are actually useful and stimulating. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the bad news, Capricorn. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the good news: You now have an enhanced ability to ferret out nuggets of data that can actually empower you. You are a magnet for the invigorating truths you really need most. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

If you come up with an original invention, apply for a patent immediately. If you think of a bright idea, put it to work as soon as possible. If you ďŹ gure out crucial clues that everyone else seems blind to, dispel the general ignorance as quickly as you can. This is a perfect moment for radical pragmatism carried out with expeditious savvy. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a time when you should naively hope for the best with dreamy nonchalance. For the sake of your mental health and for the good of your extended family, be crisp, direct and forceful.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

In the 1997 ďŹ lm Austin Powers, International Man of Mystery, the lead character announces that â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dangerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is my middle name.â&#x20AC;? Ever since, real people in the U.K. have been legally making â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dangerâ&#x20AC;? their middle name with surprising regularity. I think it would be smart fun for you Pisceans to add an innovative element to your identity in the coming days, maybe even a new middle name. But I recommend that you go in a different direction than â&#x20AC;&#x153;Danger.â&#x20AC;? A more suitable name might be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Changer,â&#x20AC;? to indicate youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready to eagerly embrace change. Or how about â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ranger,â&#x20AC;? to express a heightened desire to rove and gallivant?

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žų NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 5-11, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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