Issuu on Google+

&DUULŹRWULDOGHOD\HGP 8 2VFDUSLFNVP 19 6KDNHVSHDUHIHVWP 20

%ŸV+HUH1RZ $SLDU\HQWKXVLDVWVKHOSSRŹLQDWRUVKDQJWRXJK LQIDFHRIFRORQ\FRŹDSVH GLVRUGHU3

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 26-MARCH 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Ŵ

WE I LL HALL WEILL H ALL at Sonoma State S Univer University rsity

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

A RARE RA RE ACOUS A C O U S TIC EVENIN G WITH W I TH

JASON MRAZ WITH W ITH VER VERY Y S SPECIAL PEC I A L GUES GU ES TS TS

RAINING JANE

71 Brookwood Ave., Santa Rosa 707.576.0861 Mon–Sat 10am–6pm, Sun 11am–4pm • www.wbu.com/santarosa

MARCH 16

Birdseed • Feeders • Birdbaths • Optics • Nature Gifts • Books

LIMITED TICKETS AVAILABLE

APRIL 10 TICKETS:: 1-866-955-6040 TICKETS

G GREEN MUSIC CENTER gmc gmc.sonoma.edu c.sonoma.edu

MasterCard and the MasterCard brand mark ar aree rregistered eg gistered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorpo Incorporated. orated. ©2014 MasterCard.

A HEALTHY HOME IS A SMOKE-FREE HOME As a reminder, as of January 2014, all multi-unit properties must be “smoke-free.� Most of us spend 90% of our time inside, so improving indoor air quality is essential.

Contact the Center for Well-Being for a free Healthy Homes Toolkit Or Register for a Smoking Cessation class today: tXXXOPSDBMXFMMCFJOHPSH

.EW9EAR .EW#ANINE(EALTH'OALS $100 off Boot Camp 3 Private Sessions for $

250SAVE$35)

Doggie Day Care 2nd Day FREE!A$VALUE exp. 3/31/2014

sYEARSTRAININGEXPERIENCE s/BEDIENCETRAININGTHENATURALWAY sACRESOFSAFE COUNTRYTRAININGGROUNDS s%XCEPTIONALFOR&EAR!GGRESSIONISSUES s3TRONGLEADERSHIPSKILLSTAUGHTFOROWNERS

707sWWWINCREDIBLECANINECOM

DRINK WINE, NOT WATER

TREAT FOR LOCALS 2 Complimentary Signature Flights 10% Off Select Wines Sundays, now through March 16 at J Vineyards & Winery* 11447 OLD REDWOOD HWY | HEALDSBURG 707.431. 5 43 0 | W W W. JWI N E .CO M 707.431.5430 WWW.JWINE.COM *Exclusive E xclusive to to residents resident s of of Lake, L ake , Marin, M arin , Mendocino, Mendocino, Napa, N apa , and a nd SSonoma onoma counties. counties. Valid Valid ID ID required. required. Reservations Reser vations recommended. re co m m e n d e d .

Ĺľ NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 26-MARCH 4, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Congratulations City of Petaluma For Making Multi-Unit Housing Smoke-Free

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 2 6-MARCH 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

4

Bohemian

COPPERFIELD’S COPPERFI IELD ’ S BOO BOOKS OK S MARCHH EVENT EVENTSS

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

Wednesday, March 5, 7pm

ROBERT MOSS

The Boy Who Died and Came Back: Adventures of a Dream Archaeologist in the Multiverse SEBASTOPOL

Thursday, March 6, 12:30pm

BRANDON SANDERSON

Words of Radiance (Stormlight Archive #2) SAN RAFAEL

Friday, March 14, 8pm

Editorial Team

DAVE BARRY

Nicolas Grizzle, Staff Writer /Special Issues Editor, ext. 200 Tom Gogola, Contributing Editor, ext. 106 Gary Brandt, Copy Editor, ext. 150 Charlie Swanson, Calendar Editor, ext. 203

You Can Date Boys When You’re Forty: Dave Barry on Parenting and Other Topics He Knows Very Little About MCNEAR’S MYSTIC, PETALUMA

SPECIAL SPECIAL EEVENT! VENT!

TICKETED EVENT: EVENT: Tickets Tickkets available available at at www www.mystictheatre.com .mystictheatre.com or aatt C Copperfield’s opperfield’s stor stores es or online at at www www.copperfieldsbooks.com/boxoffice. .copperfieldsbbooks.com/boxoffice.

Mercy Perez

Beasts: What Animals Can Teach Us about the Origins of Good and Evil

Sunday, March 16, 2pm

SEBASTOPOL

TUDOR ROSE ENGLISH TEA ROOM, SANTA ROSA

HIGH TEA WITH YIYUN LI Kinder Than Solitude

TICKETED EVENT: EVENT: Tickets Tickets available available in our stores stores or online at at www www.copperfieldsbooks.com. .copperfiieldsbooks.com.

Golden State

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

Thursday, March 20, 6pm

BICH MINH NGUYEN Pioneer Girl

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

Saturday, March 29, 7pm

HOPMONK TAVERN, SEBASTOPOL

The Rivalry Heard ‘Round the World: The Dodgers-Giants Feud from Coast to Coast

DOUGLAS STONE AND SHEILA HEEN CO-SPONSORED BY SOCO NEXUS AND COPPERFIELD’S BOOKS

Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well SOCO NEXUS, ROHNERT PARK

TICKETED TICKETE D EVENT EVENT:: Reserve Reserve your your spot at at www.soconexus.org www.soconexus.org

Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Lynda Rael, ext. 204

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

RENE DENFELD

Wednesday, March 12, 6pm

Senior Designer

Publisher

Sunday, March 9, 6pm

The Enchanted

Design Director Production Operations Coordinator

JEFFREY MOUSSAIEFF MASSON

MICHELLE RICHMOND

Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Dani Burlison, Richard von Busack, Leilani Clark, Jessica Dur Taylor, Robert Feuer, Gretchen Giles, Brooke Jackson, James Knight, Jacquelynne Ocaña, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

Kara Brown

Thursday, March 6, 7pm

Thursday, March 6, 6pm

Contributors

JOE KONTE SAN RAFAEL

SIGN UP today and save 10% off most purchases!

Check copperfieldsbooks.com for even more March events!

VISIT OUR STORES: S ORES: ST SSEBASTOPOL SEBA STOPOL • PPETALUMA ETALUMA • HEALD HHEALDSBURG SBURG • NAP NAPAA CALISTOGA MONTGOMERY VILLAGE RAFAEL CALI A STOGA • M O NTGOMERY VI ILL AGE • SSAN AN RA FAEL

COPPERFIELDSBOOKS.COM

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2014 Metrosa Inc.

Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.

OIL O IL CHANGE CHANGE SPECIAL SPECIAL PLUSA&2%%3EASONAL #HECK UP

$

With increased awareness of the environment and conservation, GTA delivers responsible, low impact repair alternatives.

)NSPECTIONINCLUDES sInspect Brakes s)NSPECT,IGHTS sInspect Tires sInspect Belts & Hoses s)NSPECT!LL&LUID,EVELS s0LUSx2OAD4EST

5% DISCOUNT on labor for Go Local Rewards Card holders

Shop supplies & taxes extra. Most cars/light trucks. Oil change includes up to 5qts of motor oil & new oil filter. Cannot combine with any other offer. Offer expires March 31, 2014.

A CLEAN APPROACH TO A DIRTY JOB

707.545.7076

nb nb CUTTLE-SQUID Santa San nta Ro Rosa sa outside artist Rick Rick Kite Kite i paints paints o utside at show concert Monday an art sho w and concer rt Mond ay night. nigh i ht.

This photo p to w pho was as tak taken en in S Santa anta Ro Rosa. s a. Submit your S u ubmit y o ur photo pho to to photos@bohemian.com pho t o s@bohemian.co m

‘They sent sent my my paperwork paperworrk to o the state, eexpecting xpecting th they hey w would ould call me me. e. I kno know w fr from rom eexperience xperiencee that’s not not go going ing g to happen. happen.’’ NE EWS WS P 8

Clemente’s Clem ente’s Wants Wants You You to to Find Find Them Them D I N ING P 11

Show S how M Me e th the he Honey Honey COV C O V E R STORY S T OR Y P15

Penn P enn an and d Teller Teller and and Tim Tim and an nd Vermeer Veermeer FIL LM M P21 Rhapsodies & Rants pp66 The P Paper aper p8 Dining p11 Wineries p14 Swirl S wirl p14

Cover Feature Feature p15 C Culture ulture Crush p18 Arts & Ideas p19 Stage S tage p20 Film p21

Music p22 Clubs & Concerts p23 Arts & Events p27 ClassiďŹ ed p31 Astrology A strology p31

501 BARHAM AVE SANTA ROSA 021ò)5,$0ò30á12:23(16$7 Certified Green Business

NO Payment for 3 months!

2499

greentechautomotive.com

Auto Loans

(APR)

as low as

1.90%

See website for details ‌

707/ 546-6000 , x8091

www.comfirstcu.org

áƒś

Here For Good! Guerneville•Healdsburg•Napa Sebastopol•Santa Rosa x2

5 NO R RTH TH B BAY A Y BO H E M IIA AN | FE BRU BR UARY A R Y 26– 26 –MA M A RC R CH 4, 201 2014 4 | BOH EMI E MI AN A N.COM .C O M

s&ULLSERVICEAUTOREPAIR s34!2CERTIFIEDSMOGSTATION s%NERGYEFFICIENTOPERATIONS s2EDUCE 2EUSE 2ECYCLE LEARNMORExGREENTECHAUTOMOTIVECOM

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UA RY 26 –MAR C H 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Watch Your Cart

Amazon just made it easier for the CIA to spy on Americans BY NORMAN SOLOMON

T

he world’s biggest online retailer, Amazon, keeps expanding. A few months ago, the company signed a $600 million contract with the Central Intelligence Agency to provide “cloud computing” services. An official statement from Amazon headquarters declared, “We look forward to a successful relationship with the CIA.”

Amazon maintains a humongous trove of detailed information about hundreds of millions of people. Are we to believe that the CIA and other intelligence agencies have no interest in Amazon’s data? Even at face value, Amazon’s “privacy notice” has loopholes big enough to fly a drone through. It reads: “We release account and other personal information when we believe release is appropriate to comply with the law; enforce or apply our Conditions of Use and other agreements; or protect the rights, property, or safety of Amazon.com, our users, or others.” Amazon now averages 162 million unique visitors to its site every month. Meanwhile, the CIA depends on gathering and analyzing data to serve U.S. military interventions overseas. During the last dozen years, the CIA has conducted ongoing drone strikes and covert lethal missions in many countries. At the same time, U.S. agencies like the CIA and NSA have flattened many of the previous obstacles to their worst Big Brother tendencies. Amazon is, potentially, much more vulnerable to public outrage and leverage than the typical firms that make a killing from contracts with the NSA or the CIA or the Pentagon. Every day, Amazon is depending on millions of customers to go online and buy products from its sites. As more people learn about its work with the CIA, Amazon could—and should—suffer consequences. Movement in that direction began with the Feb. 20 launch of a RootsAction.org petition addressed to Amazon’s founder and CEO Jeff Bezos: “We urge you to make a legally binding commitment to customers that Amazon will not provide customer data to the Central Intelligence Agency.” The people who run Amazon figured they could rake in big profits from the CIA without serious public blowback. We have an opportunity to prove them wrong. Norman Solomon is cofounder of RootsAction.org and founding director of the Institute for Public Accuracy. He lives in Marin County. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Respect the Performers

Saw the show last night in Sebastopol— amazing to see the iconic Sylvia Tyson in person, plus the talent of Cindy Cashdollar on pedal steel, lap steel and dobro. The Community Center was jammed. Not so fun was the boorish behavior of some audience members. After one song that had the dobro quieter in background, a woman yelled out “Up the dobro!” Puh-leeze! This isn’t your server in a restaurant. Then, too, many audiences members of a certain age left between sets, at around 10:30pm. Certainly we tire more easily as we get older, but come on! Respect the performers. Ms. Tyson is 73, yet graciously stayed after the final song. Would love to see these ladies again, together or separately.

BARRY Via online

Fox in the Henhouse The U.S. Department of Agriculture is still expanding the list of retailers carrying meat unfit for human consumption (about 8.7 million pounds shipped through 2013 by Rancho Feeding Corporation of Petaluma) to Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington, not to mention 970 locations in California alone

interests come into play only when large numbers of us get sick. Having the USDA protect consumers is like asking the fox to guard the henhouse.

The Obama administration should reallocate responsibility for all food safety to the Food and Drug Administration. In the meantime, each of us can assume responsibility for our own safety by switching to the rich variety of soy-based meat products.

STEVEN ALDERSON Santa Rosa

Love Conquers All Kudos to Leilani Clark for the article “A Better Discipline” (Jan. 22). It was well written and researched. The concept was news to me. I think it also could have general application in our professional and social lives. I’m paraphrasing the apostle Paul, but his assertion that charity (love) conquers all may be true.

CALVIN STEEVER Santa Rosa

Climate Change Is a Fact What are we doing about climate change in Sonoma County? Many of our citizens have been working admirablly to lower our county’s greenhouse gas emissions. However, we could be doing much more, and we must. What will help us accomplish that is a well thought-out and implemented county plan, one that brings the organizing capacities of our governmental and nongovernmental agencies more fully into the effort.

The recall comes in the wake of the USDA’s new “inspection” program that allows the meat industry to increase the speed of processing lines and replace federal inspectors with plant employees. According to USDA inspector general, this has resulted in partial failure to remove fecal matter, undigested food and other contaminants that may contain deadly E. coli and listeria bacteria.

We are given the opportunity to voice our suggestions on how the county should address climate change through Climate Action community workshops. The final public comment workshop is Feb. 27, 6pm, at the Sebastopol Grange.

Traditionally, the USDA has catered more to the interests and profitability of the meat industry than the health and safety of American consumers. Consumer

Sponsored by the Regional Climate Protection Authority (RCPA), the Climate Action 2020 initiative will develop a plan and implementation policy to lower

Rants

JOELLEN DENICOLA Sebastopol

supervisors get 1.4 percent raise to $181,292 per year —each

2

Santa Rosa Plaza ‘regrets’ kicking out group for wearing Andy Lopez shirts

adherents from taking oneway trips to Mars

Congrats on your recent Top Five: “Like uninspected meat is the worst thing in a hot pocket.” That really cracked me up, and I needed a good laugh. Maybe you should expand to top 10?

‘Ghostbusters’ writeractor Harold Ramis joins slimer in the afterlife. RIP.

Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

BLU E

5 X 10…

starting as low as $

35 per month

Casale. Man, what a week.

starting as low as $

80 per month

Outdoor Storage Outdoor Storage Systems S ystems & Indoor Indoor Furnishings F urnishings of 80% of 80% recycled r e c y c le d w wood ood and an d bamboo bamboo TThis his successful success f ul green gr e en business b usiness is is n now ow rready ea d y ffor or partnership par tner ship and/or and/or aquisition aq uisit ion n

4

5 RIP Devo guitarist Bob

10 X 10…

3205 Dutton Ave | 1435 Sebastopol Ave Santa Rosa | Locally Owned & Operated 707.546.0000 707.578.3299

3 Muslim leaders forbid

Hot Pockets

MIKE LADD

MOVE IN SPECIALS

JJOLA OL A

Productions P roductions

For For ccatalogs: a t alo g s: o ssend end $5 tto PO Box B ox PO

707.7 73 .4 8 6 6 707.773.4866 John Jo hn Ob Oberg erg OOwner/Designer wner/D es igner P.O. P .O. B Box ox 9 992, 92 , P Petaluma, etaluma, CA CA 9 94953 4953

AN

A

1 Sonoma County

AGLE CO BE

EE FF

The RCPA and our city councils need our input. Sonoma County is progressive in lowering its greenhouse gas emissions, but we could be doing more. For more information on Climate Action 2020, visit www.sctainfo.org/climate_action_2020.htm.

Top Five

S

greenhouse gas emissions for the county as a whole and within each city. In the fall, another round of public workshops will review the preliminary plan.

By Tom Tomorrow

TA R O SA,

C

FRESH ROASTED COFFEES HOME MADE PIES LIVE MUSIC 2–5 THURSDAYS 540 Larkfield Center, Santa Rosa 707.535.07 76 BLU EBE AGLECO FFEE.COM

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 26 –MA R CH 4, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

Paper THE

DOORS OPEN Community clinics like the Alliance Medical Center in Healdsburg are at the frontlines of the massive reorganization of healthcare and coverage.

Waiting Room Medi-Cal’s expanded eligibility gives coverage to more low-income Californians—eventually BY LEILANI CLARK

L

ike many Californians, late last year “Michelle,” a self-employed Santa Rosa resident (her name was changed to preserve her anonymity), found herself navigating the Covered California website in search of affordable health coverage. After a frustrating, confusing

and slow process filling in the required information, Michelle discovered, to her surprise, that she and her self-employed partner qualified for Medi-Cal, the state sponsored Medicaid program for low-income California residents, because of expanded income guidelines. The news turned out to be a blessing and a curse. “The Covered California site just sort of dropped me off,” explains

the 39-year-old mother of two. “They sent my paperwork to the state and then seemed to be expecting that the state would call me. I know from experience that that’s just not going to happen, or it’ll be months.” According to the California Department of Health Services, Medi-Cal currently provides services to more than 8 million residents. Under the expansion mandated by the ) 10

Wait for It . . .

Nicolas Grizzle

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UA RY 26 –MAR C H 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

8

In the continuing saga of what will surely be the basis for a Law & Order episode, 32-year-old Sonoma County supervisor Efren Carrillo’s trial on a misdemeanor peeking charge was delayed this week for a fifth time since his arrest seven months ago on July 13. This time, Judge Andria Richey pushed the March 7 trial date to April 18 due to a crowded court docket. Carrillo’s lawyer and the prosecution will meet Thursday with Judge Arnold Rosenfield in a closed-door session to try and work out a plea deal. Carrillo pled not guilty in December to the charge of peeking following his earlymorning arrest outside a Santa Rosa woman’s home, wearing only underwear and socks. The woman called 911 twice, and police arrived to find Carrillo, reportedly intoxicated, and a partially torn screen on the woman’s bedroom window. He was arrested on suspicion of burglary, and police said at the time that they suspected an attempted sexual assault. Carrillo checked himself into a 30-day treatment facility for alcohol abuse shortly thereafter. Meanwhile, an apologetic Carrillo returned to his post Aug. 20 after his fellow supervisors lambasted him at their July 30 meeting, and Santa Rosa police have yet to release recordings of the 911 calls of the incident. There has since been a call for his resignation, though those cries, led by West County activist Alice Chan, have since calmed down. No matter the outcome, Carrillo’s trial delays have pushed any resolution beyond the date his county pension vested on Jan. 5. Had he left county employment before that time, his pension benefits would have stopped accumulating and would have only been accessible after age 70, not age 50, as they are now. —Nicolas Grizzle

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

Ż

Covered CA Health Plan? Blue Shield, Anthem Blue Cross or Kaiser? Call or email if you don’t have an agent who is dedicated to helping you. Our Service gives you a FREE personal insurance coach in your corner to make sure you’re OK.

I WILL HELP YOU AVOID COSTLY MISTAKES

COVERING SONOMA COUNTY

Our FREE service saves you time and headaches dealing with your new Covered CA plan.

tIFMQXJUIJOTVSBODF   DPNQBOZQSPCMFNT tIFMQXJUIEFBEMJOFT   SFQPSUJOHBOEDIBOHFT t'3&&ZFBSSPVOEIFMQ t'3&&BQQMJDBUJPOIFMQ DANIEL KESSLER 707.544.8383

dankessler@healthplanlink.com

-JDt$PWFSFE$"$FSUJöFE"HFOU

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

Tues-Fri 7:30-6:00 321 Second Street

769-0162

Petaluma

HONDA TOYOT A M AZ DA NI S SAN SUBARU

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 26-MARCH 4, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Already have a

Medi-Cal ( 8

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 26 –MAR C H 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

10

WE BUY GOLD

Sell Local in Old Downtown Windsor 707.836.1840

VIETNAMESE CUISINE

BURSTING

with Flavor & Nutrition • GMO free beef • free range poultry • organic veggies & tofu

320 West 3rd St, Ste G Santa Rosa • 707.595.4447 www.phocrazy.biz

Affordable Health Care Act, roughly 1.4 million more state residents have become eligible. In Sonoma County, Michelle is one of 18,000 people who once had private insurance but can now get coverage through Medi-Cal. An additional 18,000 previously uninsured county residents are now eligible as well. So who qualifies? Whereas previously one had to be disabled, elderly, pregnant or living in extreme poverty, now all individuals and families at or below 138 percent of the federal poverty level can receive Medi-Cal benefits, according to the Partnership HealthPlan of California website. That translates to an income of $15,856 a year for a single adult and $32,499 for a family of four. Using the new modified adjusted gross income calculator, an applicant’s property and assets no longer determine eligibility, unless the applicant is over 65, disabled or living in a long-term care facility. As reporter Emily Bazar wrote in her “Ask Emily” Obamacare advice column at the Center for Health Reporting, this means that “coverage has been expanded to include ‘people of all stripes,’ from young adults and college students to single, older men.” The number of pending applications for Medi-Cal in Sonoma County is somewhere around 9,000, says Joy Thomas, communications and outreach manager for the Sonoma County Human Services Department. But until those are processed, it’s hard to tell just how many qualify under the expanded guidelines. Either way, Sonoma County has set the ambitious goal of enrolling 75 percent, or 13,500, of the 18,000 previously uninsured people by the end of 2014. Of course, the verdict is still out on how long those people will have to wait for their applications to see the light of day. Though the state claims that Medi-Cal is not only easier to qualify for but also comes with an improved, streamlined application process, Michelle says that after waiting

a few weeks to hear back about her application, she called the state to find out what was going on. She was told that her family’s information was in the system, but they didn’t know how long it was going to be before coverage was sorted out. In the meantime, an emergency medical condition forced the state to expedite Michelle’s application, and she was assigned coverage from a community clinic by Partnership HealthPlan. Eight weeks later, her partner still doesn’t have coverage. Thomas acknowledges that there is a backlog, as Human Services deals with the deluge of applicants. “We know that there are many people who have applied for Medi-Cal in recent months who are still waiting for their applications to be processed,” she says via email. “We’ve added a significant number of staff and expanded our service center, which is experiencing a record number of calls. We understand the urgency involved in getting people access to the healthcare they need.” It’s a point that’s reiterated by Kim Seamans, economic assistance division director for Sonoma County Human Services, who asks that people be patient as the department works through thousands of applications, the largest number ever processed at one time. Even with about 75 new staff members, the system is in overload, she says. Still, the Economic Assistance Division is participating in continued outreach events, including upcoming Covered California education and enrollment events to reach out to the Spanish-speaking population, a group with sluggish application numbers thus far. Seamans says the impact of expanded Medi-Cal provisions on the community should not be underestimated. “The [access to healthcare] is great for people who are eligible, because they’ll be able to choose or be assigned a medical home,” she explains. “They’ll get regular treatment for chronic conditions that they couldn’t get access to before. The hope is that the need for emergency care will be reduced.”

Logistically, that medical home would be one of the many community clinics in Sonoma County. Established to serve the low-income and uninsured, these clinics are at the frontlines of a massive reorganization of healthcare and coverage. Alliance Medical Center, with locations in Healdsburg and Windsor, has been in expansion mode since early fall when enrollment through Covered California first began, says development director Tresa Thomas Massiongale. Though it has yet to see a tidal wave of new patients, Massiongale says there has definitely been an “increase in folks accessing care here” and that they are seeing new people every day. “Community health center nurses, dentists and doctors are working at a fever pace all of the time,” she explains. What’s more, the work doesn’t stop once someone is enrolled in Medi-Cal. “The distinction is that there is a difference between healthcare and healthcare coverage,” Massiongale says. Purchasing or qualifying for healthcare—which provides access to the essential preventative care that can reduce costly health emergencies down the road—is just the first step. After that, the newly insured need to actually step through the doors of the clinic to access that care in a responsible, consistent manner, she explains. Once the state and county gets Michelle’s Medi-Cal coverage sorted out, she plans to petition for a return to Kaiser, where she has a primary doctor she likes and a medical home she trusts. And she’s learning to quiet that voice in the back of her mind telling her she should feel shame for seeking help from the state. “I had Medi-Cal when I was 20 and I got really bad care, but I’m smarter now,” she explains. “I know that if I get Kaiser they’ll treat me like any other Kaiser patient, so I don’t have to go to the clinic. But there’s definitely a stigma about it, and I feel it. I don’t think I’m really a poor person. I’m hoping that this is just because more people are qualifying for Medi-Cal, there won’t be such a stigma about it.”

FAMILY TIES Clemente Cittoni, his wife, Mary, and daughter, Joanne Cittoni Gonzalez, take a break from making pasta on their prep day, while grandson Joe Cittoni stays hard at work at Cittoni’s Authentic Italian Takeout.

Secret Stash

Tucked inside a Napa liquor store, Clemente’s Authentic Italian Takeout is a hidden gem BY BROOKE JACKSON

P

assing by the doorway to Val’s Liquors, the aroma of crushed basil and simmering meat draws in passersby like metal to a magnet. Through an ordering window, one can see the source of this heavenly scent: the Cittoni family at work in their kitchen, bringing a little piece of Italy to downtown Napa.

“Papa” Clemente Cittoni, a septuagenarian with a twinkle in his eye, emigrated from Lake Como, Italy, in 1959. Finding his way to Napa, he began working in the kitchen of the Depot restaurant under the tutelage of Teresa Tamburelli and her family. She shared the recipes for her signature malfatti, minestrone soup, pot roast, ravioli and much more. In 1974, Cittoni became a part owner of the restaurant and continued to work there, all the while perfecting the food and

gradually bringing in his family to work with him. His wife, Mary, sons Steve and Dino, and daughter Joanne joined him at the Depot for 30 years and put their stamp on the menu. In 2004, ownership changed, signaling an end to the Cittonis’ run at the restaurant. But the family set up an operation inside Val’s Liquors on Third Street, and they’ve created a mini dynasty in this unlikely spot. Clemente’s Authentic Italian Takeout is well known in the valley for its food. Everything is made

from secret recipes, and the menu is full of much-loved classics as well as lesser-known specialties. One such specialty is malfatti ($4.50 per dozen), which was invented by Teresa Tamburelli in 1925. According to legend, she was booked to serve a baseball team visiting from San Francisco and was out of ravioli, so she took the filling, rolled it into balls and boiled it, then served it with the house meat sauce. The dish was a huge success and continues to be one of the most ordered items on the menu. The raviolis and gnocchi ($4.50 per dozen) are handmade each day, then cooked to order and doused with rich, hearty sauce. The minestrone ($5) is thick, creamy and laden with vegetables (perhaps its velvety texture comes from Arborio rice, although the recipe is closely guarded). Classics like veal scallopini ($10.99) and chicken saute sec ($7.99) are seasoned to perfection with garlic and herbs before being covered with mushrooms. The pot roast ($9.99) attracts a following from the old Depot days—fork-tender with a gravy that begs to be sopped up with a hearty crust of bread. The Cittonis offer sour baguettes from Sciambra-Passini, another family-run operation with a long history in Napa. Besides sopping up the sauces, the baguettes are used in Clemente’s signature sandwiches like the Dino Jr. ($7.25), a kind of pizza pocket stuffed with cheese and sauce. (The scallopini or pot roast can also be ordered on a sandwich.) As for specials, the risotto alla milanese con funghi ($6.50) is a must-order special when available— creamy rice with a hint of saffron and earthy mushrooms that make the flavors hum. Clemente’s is a hidden gem, waiting to be discovered by foodies scouring for the “new”—it’s a rarity in the valley, and one worth seeking out.

Clemente’s Authentic Italian Takeout (inside Val’s Liquor), 1531 Third St., Napa. 707.224.2237.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 26 –MA R CH 4, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Will Bucquoy

Dining

11

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 26 –MAR C H 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12

th

5 Annual

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

m a rc h 1 0 -1 6 , 2 0 1 4

LUNCH

DINNER

$10 $15 $20

$19 $29 $39

Presented by SONOMA COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BOARD

S O N O MA CO U N T Y

historic landmark mansion. Seasonal menu and superior wine list. Dinner daily. 1001 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.4231.

Carmen’s Burger Bar

Monti’s Rotisserie & Bar California cuisine. $-$$.

American. $. Excellent and innovative burgers with a Mexican flair. Beef comes fresh daily from Pacific Market next door. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 1612 Terrace (in Town and Country center), Santa Rosa. 707.579.3663. 90 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1575.

Farmhouse Inn & Restaurant CaliforniaFrench. $$$$. A splurgeworthy, romantic inn with an extensive wine list and highly polished service. Dinner, ThursMon. 7871 River Rd, Forestville. 707.887.3300.

Hang Ah Dim Sum Chinese-dim sum. $. Low prices and good variety make it pleasing. Buffet-style quality and greasiness can be a letdown. Lunch and dinner daily. 2130 Armory Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7873.

JoJo Sushi Japanese. $-$$. Hip downtown eatery features fresh sushi, sashimi, teriyaki, and innovative specials. Lunch and dinner daily. 645 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8588.

Kirin Chinese. $$. Specializing in Mandarin, Szechuan and Peking styles. Kirin’s pot stickers are the best in Sonoma County. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner, Sun. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1957.

Larry Vito’s BBQ Smokehouse Barbecue. $-$$. Southern-style and slow-cooked from a chef who’s worked with Wolfgang Puck and Alice Waters. Zing! 6811 Laguna Park Way, Sebastopol. 707.575.3277.

Madrona Manor Eclectic California cuisine. $$$$. Romantic fine dining in grand

radish, snap peas, and charred japapeno vinigrette. Lunch, Thursday-Monday; dinner daily. 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.7222.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $.

Small plates and a few larger entrées with emphasis on house-roasted meats. Lunch and dinner daily. 714 Village Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4404.

Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle

Pub fare. $. Casual, homey place serving no-nonsense pub grub like shepherd’s pie. Lunch and dinner daily. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Peter Lowell’s California. $-$$. Casual, organic cuisine with a healthy twist. Italian-inspired cafe, deli, wine bar. All food offered as takeout. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7385 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.1077.

The Restaurant at Sonoma Mission Inn California cuisine. $$$. In this world-class spa setting sample Sonoma County-inspired dishes or an elegant traditional brunch. Dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 18140 Sonoma Hwy, Boyes Hot Springs. 707.939.2415.

Sonoma-Meritage Martini California-French. $$$. The menu, which changes daily, is well-rounded with plenty of options, thanks in no small part to the fresh seafood bar. Dinner daily. 165 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.9430.

Speakeasy Tapas-Asian. $-$$. Small plates with a large vegetarian selection and an Asian fusion-leaning menu. And they’re open until 2am! Dinner daily. 139 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; breakfast and lunch, Tues. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840.

Spoonbar Regional cuisine.

Copita Tequileria y Comida Mexican. $$.

$$. Chef Louis Maldonado’s market-driven menu includes such creative dishes as chickpea-crusted avocado, slow-cooked beef petite tender, and Spanish octopus with bonito brioche, daikon

California-inspired preparation of traditional Mexican fare, including spit-roasted chicken, homemade tamales and “eight-hour” carnitas. Some ingredients are sourced from the restaurant’s own organic

garden. Lunch and dinner daily. 739 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.7400. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona St, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

N A PA CO U N TY Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.4870. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6534 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037.

dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

BAY VIEW RESTAURANT & BAR – BODEGA BAY

La Toque Restaurant

ESTA BLISH ED IN 1984

Traditional Italian and Local Seafood at Affordable Prices

country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner daily. 975 First St, Napa. 707.266.3976.

French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Brannan’s Grill

Miguel’s Mexican-

California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Californian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Bounty Hunter Wine

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French Laundry Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Keller’s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gillwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and

SERVING DINNER Wednesday–Sundays (Saturday Piano Bar) ~ Full Bar, Fireside Lounge, Outdoor Patio ~ Featuring Sonoma County Wines ~ Spectacular Sunset Views ~ Winemaker Dinner Series featured Monthly ~ Groups and Receptions Welcome

Inn at the Tides 800 Hwy One, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Open O pe n ffor or o Lunch Luncchh

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Starting S tarting March March 5

Mon, M on , W Wed, ed, Thur, Thur, Fri Fri & Sat Sat • 111:30–2:00 1:30 –2:0 0 Sunday—Dinner Su nday— Dinner Only O n ly

SEARED S SEARE EA R E D steak steak sseafood eafood sm small a ll pla plates tes

Our O ur B Banquet a n qu e t Room R oo m

is a is available vailable for for co corporate rporate lunches lunches & llarge a rg e parties. p arties. C Call all for for rreservations! eservations! 1170 70 Petaluma Petaluma Blvd Blvd North Nor th • Petaluma Petaluma CA CA 94952 9 49 52

707.762.5997 70 7.762 . 5 9 97

Try T ry O Our ur Legendary Legendary Pizzas! Pizzzas! p e Taon! m o i es ct Aw r Sele B ee

$

unch B uf f e t Lunch Buffet 6 95 L Mon – Fri Mon–Fri 11–2pm 1 1––2pm

$ 95

Dinner nner Buffet Buffet 7 Di

Wed nights Wed nights 5–8pm 5 – 8pm Deliveries D eliveries aavailable vailable aall ll dday ay V isit www.mountainmikes.com www.mountainmikes.com fo nearest location location Visit forr nearest gluten g lu ten ffree r ee ccrust rus t av ailable available

13 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 26 –MA R CH 4, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Hilltop 1892 American.

dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 26 –MAR C H 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Claypool Cellars “They call me Mister Knowitall, I sup the aged wine.” Sup on Primus frontman’s Purple Pachyderm Pinot Noir and Rhone-style Fancí Blend in wine country’s cutest caboose, a must-see for rock and wine fans alike. 6761 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol. Open SaturdaySunday, 1–5pm. 707.861.9358. Hawley Winery Barrelfermented Viognier, kiwistyle Sauvignon Blanc, plus toothsome reds. Winemaker John Hawley helped to grow some of the big-name brands; now his sons have joined him in this small, Dry Creek Valley family business. 36 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 6pm; $5 fee. 707.473.9500. Joseph Phelps Freestone Vineyards Casual, airy space furnished in whitewashed country French theme, on the road to the coast. Sit down at long tables for tasting or have a picnic. Fogdog Pinot and Ovation Chardonnay will have you applauding. 12747 El Camino Bodega, Freestone. Daily, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.874.1010.

Paul Mathew Vineyards Sunny, corner tasting room in downtown Graton offering a singular expression of Valdiguié, progressively deeper and more aromatic Pinot Noir, and cushioned benches to sink into should you become lost in reverie as a result. 9060 Graton Road, Graton. Thursday– Sunday, 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.865.2505.

Quivira Winery Certified biodynamic producer that promotes creek stewardship and steelhead-salmon-habitat restoration. Dry Creek Zinfandel is a regular favorite; Mourvèdre and other Rhône varietals are outstanding. As the steelhead have lately rediscovered, Quivira is worth returning to year after year. 4900 Dry Creek

Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5pm. 800.292.8339.

Sebastiani The winery is charming and warm, with wines that are mostly straightforward, honest affairs. One of the best picnic areas around. 389 Fourth St. E., Sonoma. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.933.3230.

Thumbprint Cellars Vegan wines named Arousal, Threesome and Four Play; but it all started out innocently enough. Downtown lounge offers curvaceous bar, hookah-den-styled booth, and seasonal nosh. 102 Matheson St., Healdsburg. Open 11am to 6pm Sunday– Thursday, to 7pm Saturday. Tastings $5–$10; with food pairing, $10–$20. 707.433.2393.

Unti Vineyards Very friendly and casual with an emphasis on young Italianstyle wines. Yum. 4202 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment. 707.433.5590.

Wind Gap Wines Onetime vintner of big, opulent Pax Syrah refocuses on coolclimate locales that yield a more savory, European style. New tasting room at the Barlow, Sebastopol opens in late 2014; or by appointment. 707.887.9100.

N A PA CO U N TY Beaulieu Vineyard History in a glassful of dust– Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tastings $15–$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Corison Winery Winemaker Cathy Corison proudly describes herself as a “Cabernet chauvinist.” 987 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.0826.

Fantesca Estate & Winery (WC) Set on land that was the dowry gift when Charles Krug married in 1860, this estate winery specializing in Cab features a wine-aging cave built right into the side of Spring Mountain. 2920 Spring Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.968.9229.

Inglenook Vineyard What’s new at Inglenook? Very little. The iconic stone building, robed in green vines, appears exactly as it did in 1890. But that’s news, and all thanks to owner Francis Ford Coppola. Still living up to Gustave Niebaum’s dream of fine wine to rival France, the oncebeloved Inglenook is putting out the goods once again. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Reservations for tour and tasting ($50) recommended; none required for bistro and exhibits. 707.968.1161.

Patz & Hall In a Napa business park, this highlyregarded brand’s tasting room may look corporate-slick, but the spotlight is on the dirt farmers who make it all happen. Pinot and Chardonnay. 851 Napa Valley Corporate Way, Ste. A, Napa. Wednesday– Sunday, 10am–4pm. Seated tastings 10:30am, 1pm and 3pm. Tasting fee, $20–$40. 707.265.7700.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Liquid Gold In which we discover fabled land of Quivira—just where we saw it last BY JAMES KNIGHT

A

fter 10 years of publishing this wine column, we’ve learned at least one thing: we may never run out of wineries.

New brands have cropped up, while dozens of standbys have been transformed by new owners. There are some good wineries we’ve thoughtlessly driven past time and again. Allowing for hot topics like pairing turkey with wine, and the breaking news that rosé is perfect for springtime, there are still maybe 300 to 400 bodegas, brands and bottle shops yet to be discovered in Sonoma, Napa and Marin counties. And yet we’re coming back to this one little Dry Creek Valley winery for the fourth darned time. Writer Heather Irwin memorably launched this column with a visit to Quivira in February 2004, with the words: “It’s hard to get all snobby about tasting wine when you’ve got oyster juice dripping down your chin.” Returning two years later in a philosophical mood, she found that a sip of wine reflected time, place and the good intentions of the owners. In 2008, I reported that new owner Pete Kight had picked up the cow horn where the Wendts left off, continuing biodynamic farming practices while building a new garden and chicken coop. In the cellar, new winemaker Steven Canter, succeeding Gray Wann, who had continued a stylistic tradition initiated by Doug Nalle in the 1980s, introduced Acacia barrels to age Quivira’s signature Sauvignon Blanc without imparting strong oak aromas. Today, winemaker Hugh Chappelle says that looking a few years out in a crystal ball is part of the job. “The verdict’s still out on Picpoul,” he says of the winery’s continuing experimentation with Rhône varietals. Zinfandel remains Quivira’s mainstay out in the market, and Zin has made a comeback in the past decade among the scorning critics, says Chappelle. Now they’re asking how they could possibly have forgotten about this grape. Vineyard manager Ned Horton helps to determine when the grapes have the combination of lower potential alcohol and bright flavors they’re looking for; some blocks are picked up to a dozen different times. Still, the 2011 “Elusive” Dry Creek Valley ($34) is an outlier, a subtly fruity, savory Rhône-style blend from a cool vintage. Weather comes and goes, the blend of people, too. Quivira changes from year to year, becoming more itself all the time— maybe because it’s been run by people who prioritize the winery’s place in its environment over, say, big point scores, and allow it to stand on its own name. Anyway, it’s hard to get all snobby about wine when there are chickens scratching and clucking nearby. Quivira, 4900 W. Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5pm; tasting fee, $10. 707.431.8333.

15

Photos by Will Bucquoy

Sonoma County beekeeper April Lance shows off a healthy hive.

The e Hive e Mind Minders ders e Humans fly into into action to to help help bee beess ffollowing ollo o owing ep epic ic 200 2006 6 die-o die-off ff

A

pril Lance Laance iiss behin d the the wheel wheel behind of h er father’s father’s her old F o d pickup or Ford pickup,, ta lking h oneybeees aass th talking honeybees thee truck bo unces thr rough th bounces through thee Ale xander V alley en rroute oute Alexander Valley to White O ak vin neyard an d Oak vineyard and win ery ffor or a “hi ve di ve.” winery “hive dive.” It’ss a ccool It’ ool an and d ssunny unn ny d day ay in th thee valley v alley as as Lance Lance tells tells th tthee rrecent ecent and an d troublesome troublesome history histtory of thee honeybee th honeybee ((Apis (A Apis mellifera). m feera). mellif

She’s headed She’s headed d to to the the vineyard vineyard to to ch eck on two t ow tw ooden-box hi ves check wooden-box hives vin eyard proprietor p oprietor Bill Myers pr Myers vineyard h as set set up g loc al Ita lian has up,, usin using local Italian h oneybeess that that Lan ce br eeds honeybees Lance breeds an d sells. sells. H er bees, she she says says with and Her pride id , are are known k own ffor kn or th heir i gent l , le pride, their gentle, ccalm alm demeanor, demeanorr, and and are are raised raised in a ch emical-free en nv vironment at chemical-free environment h er place place aalong long th reek in her thee Dry C Creek H ealdsburg. Healdsburg. Lan ce offers offers m any intrig uing— Lance many intriguing— an d troubling—factoids troublling—factoids aabout bout and th oneybee y , in dustrious aapian pian thee h honeybee, industrious

pollinators in th eat ec olo ogical pollinators thee gr great ecological cycle of life liffe responsible responsible for for about about cycle one-third of the the food food humans humans one-third consume. Without Without the the honeybee, honeybee y , consume. she says, says, we’d we’d be eeating ating a diet, dieet, she basically, of oat oat gruel. basically, The bees b have been b again ai st The have up against the ropes ropes since since the the winter winter of the 2006–’07. That That year, yearr, commercial commerrcial 2006–’07. beekeepers ar ound th ounttry beekeepers around thee ccountry and abroad abroad faced faced an outbreak outbreak and rare ph enomenon known known n aass of a rare phenomenon “colony collapse collapse disorder” disorder” (CCD). (CCD). “colony Beekeepers would would go out out to to Beekeepers

BY TOM M GOGOLA

attend their honeybees, att end tto o th eir h on neybees, only only to to find hives and dead fin d ““empty empty hi ves an d de ad bees aall ll around,” around,” Lance Lance says. says. “There “There had dips before, but thee bees h ad been di ps bef o e, b or ut th had h ad overcome overcome it,” it,” she she says. says. “This “This was w as a massive massive collapse.” colllapse.” The The bee diree situation i i in i Thailand Thail ilan a d is is so so dir di that there aree reduced th at farmers farmers th ere ar reduced to to hand-pollinating produce. h and-pollinating th ttheir eir pr oduce. It h asn’t gotten gotten th at b ad in hasn’t that bad th United States, States, w here lots of thee United where rresearch esearch an dm on ney has has been and money po ured into into fig uring o ut poured figuring out ) 16 th cause of C CD. thee cause CCD.

NO R RTH TH BAY B A Y BO H E M IIA AN | FE BRU BR UARY A R Y 26– 26 –MA M A RC R CH 4, 201 2014 4 | BOH E MI AN A N.COM .C O M

FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UA RY 26 –MAR C H 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16 Bees ( 15 On Feb. 25, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said it would provide $3 million to Midwestern farmers and ranchers to help improve the health of bees. “Honeybee pollination supports an estimated $15 billion worth of agricultural production, including more than 130 fruits and vegetables that are the foundation of a nutritious diet,” says Ag secretary Tom Vilsack in a statement. “The future security of America’s food supply depends on healthy honeybees.”

Cause & Effects The USDA hosted a honeybee conference in 2012 and offered numerous interlocking explanations for the scourge of colony collapse disorder. A report from the conference noted that 10 million beehives had collapsed since the November 2006 collapse, at a cost to beekeepers of about $2 billion. During the peak of CCD, beekeepers were losing up to one-third of their bees (where the historical annual die-off rate is between 10 and 15 percent). The report noted that the phenomenon had tapered off by 2012, but that the fragility of the bees’ situation was such that any single determinant could kick the collapse into high gear. It identified drought as one such determinant. The “whys” of the collapse do not fit neatly into one convenient causality, which shouldn’t come as a surprise given the bee’s critical position as an enabler in the human food chain. The Environmental Protection Agency offered attendees of the conference a numbing rundown of the various factors that contributed to the 2006 beepocalypse, and it ain’t pretty: • The invasive varroa mite, a pest that enters the bee’s neck, bores holes in it, and eventually kills it • “New or emerging diseases” such as Israeli acute paralysis virus and the gut parasite Nosema • Pesticides applied to crops

and used for “in-hive insect or mite control” The EPA also cited “bee management stress” and “foraging habitat modification” as possible drivers, along with poor nutrition, drought and “migratory stress brought about by the increased need to move bee colonies long distance to provide pollination services.” Lance adds fungicides to the list and is also concerned (and convinced) that the advent of genetically modified organisms is playing a role in the honeybees’ dodgy health situation over the past decade or so.

Buzzin’ Along The bees are doing their part to try and survive the various postindustrial onslaughts they now face. Conscientious and a little neatfreaky, honeybees are hardwired to never die in the hive. “They keep the hives spotlessly clean,” says Lance. If a mouse should enter the hive, the bees will encase the rodent in their wax so it doesn’t befoul the living space. They have other interesting habits as well, like only pollinating one plant species at a time. If it’s Tuesday and the hive is pollinating daffodils, every bee is pollinating daffodils. At Myers’ vineyard, they seem to have been snacking on mustard ground cover in an adjacent field. (Grapes, in contrast, are windpollinated.) And though they are sometimes confused with the comparatively aggressive yellow jacket, which is a meat eater that can sting multiple times, honeybees are vegetarians that can only sting once, if at all. Bill Myers is waiting in the driveway as Lance pulls up to the vineyard. An industrious and bustling fellow in his own right, Myers is engaged in some light “biodynamic” vineyard practices here, which includes the bees, some olive trees and a raised-bed garden patch where he’ll grow tomatoes and other produce come springtime.

A TASTE OF HONEY Humans and bees alike enjoy the sweet spoils of the hive.

“He doesn’t make money from any of that,” says Lance, “but he does take good care of the bees.” Everyone gets suited up in the familiar beekeeper’s garb—the suits are white to keep the bees from thinking we’re bears—and Myers fills Lance in on the activity in his hives as she lights a smoker, which helps further calm the bees during the hive dive. There’s not much going on inside the first hive, which is made from stacked wooden boxes and filled with man-made honeycomb racks that the bees will use as a basis for their own industrious output of wax and honey. Lance and Myers pry off each of the stacked wooden boxes and perform some sanitizing maintenance on the hive that’s not hosting any bees by giving the wood a light burn with a propane torch. This hive isn’t working, Lance says, because of a lack of available pollen, which itself stems from a lack of available water in droughtstricken California. The other stack, well, it’s a veritable beehive of activity. Pollen-laden honeybees crowd the entranceway, and thousands of bees buzz about as the hive is

taken apart, cleaned and put back together. Lance spots the queen among her thousands of offspring, and great care is taken to ensure that she is returned to the hive after Lance and Myers finish the hive dive. The hexagon-shaped pockets are filled with honey, or with bee larvae. It’s a pretty amazing social structure. Honeybee hives are the ultimate matriarchal society—the large queen lives out her days surrounded by an all-male brood, whose lifespan is a frenzied four to six weeks. The queen lays about a thousand eggs a day and will “invite” various wild-eyed suitors into the hive in the springtime, who are known as “drones.” The drones don’t have a stinger; their entire purpose is to mate with the queen bee. The thousands of in-house bees—the brood—have a honey-do list, so to speak. Some of the brood are guards, who watch over the hive for yellow jackets or other unwelcome intruders; others are foragers, out in the world collecting pollen; and then there are scouts, who head out to see where the hot pockets of pollen are for the rest of the crew. All of

Are Y You o ou the e Beekeeper? ? It’ss the It’ the bimonthly bimonthly m meeting eeting of the Sonoma the Sonoma County County Beekeepers’ B eepers’ Beek Association A ssociation at th thee 4 4-H -H Cl Club ub in Rohnert R ohnert Park, Park, and and the the place place is is buzzing wake buz zing with aactivity. ctivity. In the the w ake thee 2006 C CCD outbreak, North of th CD o utbreak, N orth Bay flew Ba y beekeepers beekeepers fle w into into aaction, ction, and an d local local beekeeping beekeeping groups groups saw saw their new th eir ranks ranks eexplode xplode with w n ew members. m embers. Organizations Marin, O Or ganiization ti s in i M arin, i Napa and N apa an d Sonoma Sonoma ccounties ounties led public-education p ublic-education campaigns, cam mpaigns, started start ed monitoring monitoring naturally naturally occurring oc curring hives hives and and gave gave nervous nervous homeowners optionss oth other h omeowners option er than thee b they’d th an poisoning poisoning th bees th ey’d discovered had taken ssuddenly uddenly di scovered dh ad ta ken a liking that walnut tree their likin g to to th at w alnut tr ee on th eir property. pr operty. Kasha K asha Vincent Vincent is is co-owner co-owner Doug) (with her her husband, husband, Do D ug) of Beekind Beekin d in Sebastopol, Sebastopol, a store store that th at opened opened in 2004, just a couple couple before thee bi big crisis. of years years bef ore th ig bee cri sis. Ass beek beekeepers A eepers and and would-be would-be beekeepers gather beek eepers start tto og ather at thee 4-H, marvels th 4-H, Vincent Vincent m arrvels at the the growth interest among North gr owth in int erest am mong N orth

Bay Baay residents resideents in the the plight of the the honeybee. honeybee. The The Marin Marin beekeepers beekeepers group, group, she she says, says, had had eight members before b s bef ore 2006. “Now “Now it’s huge,” ge,” she she says. says. The The Sonoma ma group group was was a handful ul of bee loyalists, loyalists, now over ow it numbers numbers o ver 400, attendee 00, says says att endee Jim m Spencer. Spencer. A father-son ther-son team team is is chatting ng up the the sign-up sign up folks folks near near the the door, doorr, expressing becoming expressing interest interest in bec oming beekeepers. Others aree ssharing beekeeperrs. Oth ers ar haring information informatio on on swarm swarm locations locations in their and trading war their towns town w s an d tr ading w ar stories thee h health their stories aabout bo out th ealth of th eir hives. hives. There’s Ther e e’s even even a guy guy walking walking around around barefoot. bar a efoot. Kasha her store Kasha ssays ays h er st ore gets up to year to 500 ccalls allls a y ear from from terrified terrified homeowners, many homeowner e s, s m any of whom whom have have already thee bees on their already sprayed spr p ayed th their property property by by the the time time they they call call the the store. store. Now Now there there is is a network network beekeep pers who who will go an d of beekeepers and collect the the bees, as as an army army of bee collect friends has has spanned spanned out out across across friends the North North Bay Baay to to k eep an eye eye out out the keep for hives. hives. for She notes notes e th at California California has has She that protocols an d aapplications pplications ffor or protocols and agriibusin i ess e when when it wants wants t to to agribusiness deploy a particular particular pesticide or deploy fungicide, but but none none for for home home fungicide, use of pes ticides in urb an ar eas. use pesticides urban areas. “Individuaals are are not not monitored monitored at “Individuals all,” she she says. says. “We “W We tell tell th em, ‘Don’t ‘Don’t all,” them, spray, ccall all th eeper.’” spray, thee beek beekeeper.’” Doug Vincent Vincent got into into Doug beekeepin ng around around 1999, 1999, when when beekeeping he was was trying try ying to to figure figure out out why w hy he his vegetable vegetaable garden garden was was a bust. bust. his “Then it i dawned dawned d on me me that th hat what what “Then was lacking lack king was was pollinators,” pollinators,” I was he says. says. H dered a kit for for he Hee or ordered amateur beek b eepers, ““and and made made amateur beekeepers, every mistake mista s ke you you can can make,” make,” he he every says with a llaugh. augh. But But within a says few years years h went fr om h aving few hee went from having three, to to six, s to to 2255 hi ves, and and three, hives, before long lon ng he he and and his his wife wife had had before so much h oney th ey w ere sselling elling so honey they were the side s the road. road. it on the of the They opened op pened Beekind Beekind in They and saw saw th eir business business 2004 and their double every every e year year for for the the next next double years. “My “ y husband “M husband was was a six years. fisherm e an before before this,” this,” says says quiet fisherman Kasha. “Now “Now he he has has bee fever.” fever.” Kasha. g into into y our blood, “It just gets your blood,”” says Do ug g. says Doug.

17 NO R RTH TH BAY B A Y BO H E M IIA AN | FE BRU BR UARY A R Y 26– 26 –MA M A RC R CH 4, 201 2014 4 | BOH E MI AN A N.COM .C O M

them th em strive strive to to k keep eep th the he hi hive ve at a ccozy ozy 98 degr ees with h heat heat from from degrees their flap th eir wings, wings, which which fl ap aabout bout 200 times tim es a second. second. Thee hi hive-minded inhabitants Th ve-minded in nh give gi ve drones drones the the boot in winter, when it’ss just th thee queen w hen it’ queeen and her honey h er brood brood eating eating h on ney they’ve stashed th ey’ve sta shed aaway way thee comb—or, in th comb—orr, if thee hand th hand of a human human iiss involved, involved, ed drinking drinking sugar su water from bottle near thee w ater fr om a bott le n ear th entrance. entr ance. With W ith the the onset onset of sspring, pring, a new new queen is is born; the the hive hive splits splits in two, and thee old quee queen leaves tw o, an d th en le aves with her homeless broods h er brood. brood. These These h om meless br oods aree the ar the source source of the the swarms swarms that that North Bay N orth Ba ay residents residents will start March, inciting panic, tto o ssee ee in M arch, in citting p anic, usee of ffear ear and and indiscriminate indiscriminat a e us iinsecticides, in secticides, ti id Lance L Lance says. says. But B ut truthfully, truthfully, the the swarm swarm is is a dangerous ccomparatively omparatively less d angerous way way encounter tto o en counter bees, Lance Laance says. says. They have babies, Th ey don’t don’t h ave b abiies, honey honey protect, aree just or a hive hive to to pr otect, an aand d ar flying around looking fl ying ar ound lookin g ffor or a new new place hive-up. pl ace tto o hi ve-up.

Estate E st ate Jewelry Je welry STATE APPROVED SINCE 1988

250 Hrs Certification

Hello H eello el lo Gor G Gorgeous! orgeo eeouus!

Every other weekend Jan 18, 2014 to April 27, 2014 Cost: $2500 00 www.lifestreammassageschool.com 707.812.5120

SPRING BOOTY CAMP

Fast results for busy women

Mar 24 – Apr 18, 2014 Early registration discount still available! New Santa Rosa location added! Check it out online!

707.217.3795 70 7.2 17.3795 5

www.winecountrybootcamp.com w w w.wine c ountr ybootc amp.c om o

• Original Antique to Modern Designs • Wedding & Anniversary Bands • Locally Owned WE BUY YOUR GOLD & DIAMONDS

3387 87 Healdsbur H Healdsburg e a l dsburg Avenue Av enu Av en u e 1 bloc bblock lock N No North ort rth ooff th tthe he H He Healdsburg eald aldsburg sburg rg Plaza PPllaza za

7707.395.0855 707 07.3 .395 95.085 .0 8 5 5 www.shopDEJ.com w w w.shopDEJ ww.sh opDEJ EJ.c .com om SSan a n Francisc F Francisco r a ncisco & Healdsburg H e a lds l dsbu bu rg rg

NORTH NO OR TH B BAY A Y BOH EMI E MI A N | F FE EBRU BR UARY A R Y 26 2 6-MARCH - M AR C H 4, 20 0 114 4 | BO H E M I AN AN.COM .C O M

18

Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

S A N TA R O S A

Tattoos & Blues

A staple of Santa Rosa art and music culture for the last 23 years, Izzy’s Tattoos and Blues Festival once again brings together ink masters and music makers for three days of skin and sounds. Among the highlights at the festival are dozens of artists, bands like Snake Alley and even fire dancers. Dressing up (or down) in costume for this year’s ever-popular pirate theme could win prizes—or at least get some looks on the street, which is cool, too. The Tattoos and Blues Festival runs Feb. 28 to March 2, at the Flamingo Resort and Spa. 2777 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. Doors open Friday at noon. $20–$35. 707.545.8530.

N O VAT O

Bunny Business When the words “Playboy magazine” are uttered, the face that comes to mind is Hugh Hefner’s, the publication’s storied founder. But Hefner wasn’t alone when he started the company in 1953. In fact, he didn’t even come up with the name for the magazine. That honor belongs to Hef’s friend and co-investor Eldon Sellers. As well as naming the iconic Playboy, Sellers was a major factor in the early success of the company, investing and guiding the entrepreneurial avenues that led to Playboy’s astounding success. Now a North Bay resident, Sellers talks in person on the “Business of Playboy,” Friday, Feb. 28, at Loveable Rogue bookstore. 867 Grant Ave., Novato. 7pm. $7. 415.895.1081.

S A N TA R O S A

Men of Mambazo Formed in 1960, Ladysmith Black Mambazo is a world-renowned South African vocal chorus. With over 50 albums to their credit, the all-male choral group became a wellknown a cappella acts stemming from their involvement in Paul Simon’s 1986 album Graceland. Since that initial breakthrough, the group has gone on to earn multiple Grammy awards and platinum record sales. Their latest release, Always with Us, is a tribute to the late wife of the group’s vocal leader. Also acting as world ambassadors for mbube, a South African singing style, Ladysmith Black Mambazo return to the North Bay Tuesday, March 4, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $29–$39. 707.546.3600.

SA N R A FA E L

Memoir Master Back in 2008, author Kelly Corrigan rocketed into the spotlight with the release of her first bestselling memoir, which revolved around her and her father’s concurring bouts with cancer. Now Corrigan is back with another tale of trials and lessons gleaned in her new memoir, Glitter and Glue. Chronicling her time spent as a nanny when she was 24, the author, now 46, relates the experience to her relationship with her mother and their reconciliation after years of tension. Down-to-earth and easily accessible, Corrigan has been praised for her warmth and humor, which she shares when she reads from Glitter and Glue on Wednesday, March 5, at Angelico Hall, Dominican University. 50 Acacia Ave., San Rafael. 7pm. (Presented by Book Passage.) $32 includes signed book. 415.927.0960.

—Charlie Swanson

MALONE ALONE John Fogerty’s Fo ogerty’s e keyboardist keyboardist Bob Malone Malone plays p ays a solo pl solo sho show w March March 1 at A Andrews ndrews Hall in S Sonoma. o ma. S ono See ee C Concerts, oncerts, p23 p223

THE ENVELOPE, PLEASE . . . Ellen DeGeneres is all smiles in her debut as host of the Academy Awards.

The Oscar Goes To In an unpredictable year, all eyes turn to the Academy BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

f nothing else, the annual Academy Awards is good for two things: it finally signals the end of awards season, and it lets us play at guessing who will take home the trophies.

It’s a game many take part in almost instinctively, and while the more technical categories (I’m looking at you, sound mixing) mostly entail blind speculation, there’s no shortage of opinions about who should win in the big ones. These predictions seem to

show up everywhere, especially in the week leading up to the red carpet and envelope opening, and this newspaper is no exception. Best Actor Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club) Though fellow nominees Christian Bale (American Hustle), Bruce Dern (Nebraska), Leonardo DiCaprio (The Wolf of Wall Street) and Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave) are strong, all signs point to McConaughey taking this one by a mile. The Academy loves it when well-known and well-liked actors suddenly turn in such unexpected and fine performances, and McConaughy

here is unrecognizable in as cowboy-turned-drug-supplier Ron Woodroof, living with and fighting against AIDS. Best Actress Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine) This race is much closer and honestly could go to any of the nominees (Amy Adams, American Hustle; Sandra Bullock, Gravity; Judi Dench, Philomena; Meryl Streep, August: Osage County). Adams has been doing great stuff for years now, and somehow lost last year to Anne Hathaway (I mean, c’mon!), so she could see her work in American Hustle

rewarded. But it’s likely that Blanchett will walk away with it for her performance of a challenging role in Blue Jasmine. Best Original Screenplay Her (Spike Jonze) Tough year for nominees American Hustle (Eric Warren Singer, David O. Russell), Blue Jasmine (Woody Allen), Dallas Buyers Club (Craig Borten, Melisa Wallack) and Nebraska (Bob Nelson), because Spike Jonze has a slam dunk on this one. Best Director Gravity (Alfonso Cuarón) David O. Russell lost in 2011 and again last year with his universally loved Silver Linings Playbook, and though this year’s American Hustle is fine and entertaining, again, it’s not quite enough. Ditto for Martin Scorsese (The Wolf of Wall Street), who seems to specialize in largerthan-life films but received his statue semi-recently, back in 2007. That leaves little doubt that director Alfonso Cuarón will take home the trophy this year. Gravity goes for the gut right away, and had me literally ducking debris and gripping my seat tight every time actress Sandra Bullock blew out a hatch and held on for dear life. Best Picture 12 Years a Slave The list is pretty impressive: American Hustle, Captain Phillips, Dallas Buyers Club, Gravity, Her, Nebraska, Philomena and The Wolf of Wall Street. This was a year of accomplished films in wide-ranging genres, with sci-fi (Gravity), romance (Her) and even action (Captain Phillips). The Academy usually sides with historical dramas, and there are a few here, but none that makes so lasting an impact as 12 Years a Slave. This true story is heart-wrenching and emotionally consuming, and director Steve McQueen in top form. The 86th Annual Academy Awards airs Sunday, March 2, at 4pm on ABC.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 26 –MA R CH 4, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Arts Ideas

19

Stage Jenny Graham

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UA RY 26 –MAR C H 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

STAGE LEFT Sofia Jean Gomez and

Ron Menzel play radical artists in Lorraine Hansberry’s final play.

Day at the Theater Oregon’s Shakespeare Fest opens strong BY DAVID TEMPLETON

O

ne of Shakespeare’s very first plays, a reclaimed stage version of the Marx Brothers first Broadway hit, a revival of Lorraine Hansberry’s last play and Shakespeare’s own final play—these are the first four shows to kick off the current year-long Oregon Shakespeare Festival in the scenic mountain town of Ashland. The best of the bunch is Hansberry’s Sign in Sidney Brustein’s Window, certain to be the most hotly debated play of the spring season. Premiering in 1964, just months before Hansberry’s death from cancer, Brustein was critically savaged at the time, excoriated for trying to take on so many issues, for attempting to say

so much in a single play. I only wish more American plays could be accused of the same thing. Brilliantly acted by a firstrate cast and directed with unflinching passion by Juliette Carrillo, Brustein tells the story of Greenwich Village radicals struggling with their ideals in a world that sacrifices idealists to the fires of compromise. To say it bites off more than it (or the average audience member) can chew is an understatement. But Hansberry’s marvelously authentic dialogue and her ferocious drive to say everything in her heart while she still could, makes Brustein a messy but truly volcanic piece of theater. In his elegant shipwreck fantasy The Tempest, directed by Berkeley Rep’s Tony Taccone, Shakespeare was similarly saying goodbye to the theater, cramming in all of his final thoughts on life, humanity, love and art. Though Taccone brings some strong visual ideas to the stage—like bald ethereal dancers and a metal-winged spirit—the production feels strangely flat and recycled. As the shipwrecked sorcerer Prospero, Denis Arndt is oddly tentative and lifeless, and his speech is often mumbled and hard to hear. Comparatively, Shakespeare’s much earlier Comedy of Errors, directed by Kent Gash, is crackling with cleverness and sheer spirited fun. With the action set during the Harlem Renaissance, the story of two long-separated sets of identical twins is clever, funny, sexy and satisfying. The Cocoanuts, energetically directed by David Ivers, reassembles the Marx Brothers’ first big Broadway hit, reintroducing it to the stage with restored songs by Irving Berlin. The cast has the uncanny skill to both celebrate the timeless genius of Harpo, Chico, Groucho and Zeppo while at the same time playing with the material’s unavoidable datedness. The Oregon Shakespeare Festival runs Tuesday–Sunday through October. Times and prices vary. For information about the full lineup of shows, visit www.osfashland.org.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 26 –MA R CH 4, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Shane F. Kelly

Film

21

LENS FLAIR Graham Toms models for Tim Jenison’s reproduction of Vermeer’s

‘Music Lesson.’

Art Theory

New doc explores Vermeer’s technique BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

A

fter a career spent doing tricks designed to make people doubt their eyes, Penn and Teller have made the winning ‘Tim’s Vermeer.’

The film features inventor Tim Jenison testing a theory of what made Jan Vermeer (1632–1675), little known in his day, the most rhapsodized-about artist of the golden age of the Dutch Republic. As debunker-magicians, Penn and Teller have offered audiences mystification in the name of demystification, and here, a solution to the mystery of Vermeer—“a fathomless genius, now a fathomable one,” says narrator Penn Jillette (Teller directs). He’s a little wrong, yet the movie is right: it honors an artist’s labor and the inspiration that can’t be copied. Jenison read David Hockney’s Secret Knowledge and Vermeer’s Camera by historian Philip Steadman. Those books argue that Vermeer’s departure from rival painters may have been due to some optical advantage. Could he have utilized a camera obscura? Jenison took six years to backwards-engineer Vermeer’s Music Lesson. His obsession is remarkable—he learns to read Dutch, to grind lenses and to mix Vermeer’s famous lapis lazuli pigment. He builds a scrim in the shape of the nearby buildings that would have shadowed Vermeer’s north-facing window, and he talks his daughter into donning a head-brace to model for the painting’s female figure. Then he set to work. He tested the camera obscura theory, but got better results with lenses, a concave mirror and hand mirror on a stick. Using this equipment, a nonpainter—a dedicated, picky and observant nonpainter, certainly—created an impressive replica. The result is a very moving film, in video diary form, about Jenison’s mad, lonely effort—even as Jillette quips that “it’s like watching paint dry.” It also offers a convincing argument that Vermeer saw better than the unaided eye could have, through, for example, gradations of gray that the optic nerve can’t pick up. It’s a remarkable achievement. But a close look shows that the perfection of Vermeer’s original isn’t in Jenison’s amazingly hard work. You can tell the difference. The irreproducible element remains, even if you get everything else right. ‘Tim’s Vermeer’ is screening at Century Regency Cinema, 280 Smith Ranch Road, San Rafael. 415.479.2130.

HHonorable onor able

22/28 /28 – 33/6 /6

The T he W Wind ind Ri Rises se s

PPG13 G13

(10:15-1:00-3:45)-6:30-9:15 (10 :15-1: 00-3 : 45 ) -6 : 30-9 :15 The The 9:15 9 :15 show show isis presented pr esen t ed inin Japanese Japanese with wit h English English Subtitles S ub t i t le s

Omar NNRR ((11:00-1:15-3:30)-6:15-8:30 Omar 11: 00-1:15-3 : 30 ) -6 :15-8 : 30 Gloria G loria R (10:45-1:15-4:15)-7:00-9:30 (10 : 45-1:15- 4 :15 ) -7: 00-9 : 30 The M The Monuments onuments 10 : 30-1: 30- 4 : 00 ) -6 : 45-9 : 20 G13 ((10:30-1:30-4:00)-6:45-9:20 Men M en PPG13 Her H er

R 88:45pm : 4 5pm

August: A ugust : Osage Osage 3 : 00 ) County C ounty R ((3:00) Nebraska N ebraska

R 66:00pm : 00pm

Philomena P hilomena

R ((10:30-12:45) 10 : 30-12: 45 )

551 5 51 S Summerfield ummer field Road R oad S an t a R Santa Rosa osa 707.522.0719 707. 522 .0719 www.summerfieldcinemas.com w w w. summe r fie ldc ine mas .c om

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 26 –MAR C H 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

Music

MARCHIN’ IN Rhythmtown-Jive

return to the Mystic Theatre in Petaluma.

Feel the Rhythm

Rhythmtown-Jive bring Mardi Gras to Petaluma BY ROBERT FEUER

I

f you can’t get to New Orleans for Mardi Gras, we’ll celebrate it here,” says Tim Eschliman, bandleader and self-described instigator of Rhythmtown-Jive. The band headlines a Fat Tuesday show at Petaluma’s Mystic Theater on March 4. Festivities begin at 5:45pm with a street parade, including drummers and horn players marching “up and down alleys,” he says, during an interview at his Petaluma home. True to tradition, revelers are invited to wear disguises, bring instruments and join in. Beads will be thrown and handkerchiefs waved. The parade continues onto the Mystic Theater’s dance floor, specially decorated for this event, where there’ll be a Mardi Gras

costume contest, drink specials and Louisiana-style food, such as gumbo and jambalaya. Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic open at 7pm, followed by Rhythmtown-Jive at 8:30pm. Eschliman’s piano- and hornbased six-piece band will bring a mélange of New Orleans sounds, like old-school R&B, Louis Armstrong jazz, funk, brass band, rumbas, maybe a little zydeco. He’ll handle electric bass and vocal duties, accompanied by singer Rahni Raines. Expect a blend of covers and originals, mostly written by Eschliman. He began these Mardi Gras happenings in 1992, at a friend’s San Francisco restaurant, later dubbing them Mambofests after the song “Mardi Gras Mambo.” “That was so much fun, we decided to do it every year,” he says. Rhythmtown-Jive has continued that tradition ever since, in Santa Rosa, Mill Valley (where they’re also performing this show on Feb. 28 at Sweetwater Music Hall) and Petaluma. Eschliman picked up on Motown and soul music in junior high school while growing up in Ohio. His long career has included working with Etta James at her Northern California appearances (including a show at a small Albany club with Leo Nocentelli) and traveling with her to Ashland for a few shows. “Some singers just pull it out of you. The whole room would just get sucked into a vortex, like a hurricane,” Eschliman says. Rhythmtown-Jive has three albums, including one containing six songs with Chuck Berry’s former piano man, Johnnie Johnson. Eschliman has also backed up Bo Diddley (who played a cigar-box guitar) and Big Joe Turner with Lee Allen, in San Francisco venues. He plays with Commander Cody at times and, along with Dan Hicks and others, cofounded the Christmas Jug Band, once described as “a momentary lapse of sanity.” Mardi Gras has reverberated through history since Medieval Europe. It’s a time for cutting loose before Lent’s severities. Rhythmtown-Jive play Tuesday, March 4, at the Mystic Theater. 23 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 7pm. $15. 707.765.2121.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY French Girls Rock band from Willits strikes it big with avant-garde music. Support by Major Powers and the Lo-Fi Symphony, the Other Band on Earth and Funktopus. Feb 28, 8pm. $10. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Ladysmith Black Mambazo Ladysmith Black Mambazo are the undisputed kings of mbube, South African a cappella singing. Mar 4, 8pm. $39-$29. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Bob Malone Keyboardist who plays regularly with John Fogarty in a solo show. Mar 1, 7:30pm. $20-$58. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Steve Gillette & Cindy Mangsen Famed Vermont folk duo beguile with traditional and contemporary music. Pocket Canyon Ramblers open. Feb 28, 7pm. $12. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

MARIN COUNTY BB King BB King is one of the most

renowned blues musicians of the past 60 years. Feb 26, 8pm. $120-$50. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Andrews Hall

An Evening of Cole Porter

Aqus Cafe

To celebrate the establishment of his new nonprofit, the Cole Porter Society, Marin County entertainer Noah Griffin will perform. Feb 28, 8pm. $50. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

NAPA COUNTY

SONOMA COUNTY Feb 28, Cynthia Tarr Band. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. Feb 28, Ain’t Misbehavin’. First Wednesday of every month, Chamber Music. Fourth Wednesday of every month, Bluegrass Jam. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Feb 27, Dune Rats. Tues, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Clint Black

Epicurean Connection

An intimate evening with the country music star. Mallary Hope opens. Feb 26, 8pm. $50$65. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Feb 27, T-Luke & the Tight Suits. Feb 28, 2 Friends. Mar 2, the Echoes. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Flamingo Lounge

It’s a Grand Night for Singers

Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. Tues, swing dancing with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Vocalists from around Northern California and beyond take turns onstage. Piano accompaniment by host Richard Evans. First Saturday of every month, 7pm. $15. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Jeff Bridges & the Abiders Actor, singer and songwriter Jeff Bridges blends country, rock and blues. Daughter and emerging songwriter Jessie Bridges opens. Feb 28, 7pm. $55-$100. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Prix Fixe Prix Fixe Sp ecial s Thur Specials Tues–Thur T ues –Th

$

15 pp 2-course 15 2-cou rse llunch u nch 29pppp 33-course -course dinner dinner

$

10 years 10 years strong! s t ro n g ! O r iginal Owners O w ne rs Original

NORTH N ORT H INDIAN INDI A N CUISINE C U ISINE

70 7.53 8 .33 6 7 707.538.3367 5522 M ission Circle, Ci rcle, Santa Sa nt a Rosa Ro s a Mission (at (a at H Hwy w y 12 & M Mission i ssion Blvd.) B l v d .)

www.pamposhrestaurant.com w w w.pa mposh rest au ra nt.com o

French Garden Feb 28, Bohemian Hwy. Mar 1, Maria Bija and Christian Foley-Beining. Mar 2, Kitka. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden First Sunday of every month, Jazz Jam. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Green Music Center Feb 27, Nicole Yarling and the SSU Jazz Ensemble. Mar 2, Midori with Santa ) Rosa Symphony

Imagine pampering yourself with a facial using safe and effective organic products

25

Mary Lia Skin Care

Esthetic Services in the Coastal Redwoods

I LIKED HIM BEST IN ‘TRON’ You want to hear him to talk about the rug tying

it all together, but Jeff Bridges has other fish to fry when he performs at the Lincoln Theatre in Yountville Feb. 28. See Concerts, above.

16660 Jennifer Drive Occidental • 707.486.8057 maryliaskincare.com

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 26 –MA R CH 4, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

Clubs & Venues

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 2 6-MARCH 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Ĺ´Ĺś

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Music yEvents yRestaurant

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW

DON FORBES AND RECKLESS Feb 28 Red-Dirt Rock 8:00 Fri

MonĈMar 3 10 Days Long

The Monthly Juice Cleanse

Sat

The Queen Rocks Out! Mar 1 LINDA IMPERIAL SPECIAL GUEST DAVID FREIBERG

8LYVĈ1EVĈÄ€TQĈ Invocation, prayer, meditation, and group readings

8:30 The Hot Club of San Francisco presents Mar 2 THE IVORY CLUB BOYS “A Tribute to Stuff Smith� 5:00 Fri 7 Let’s Ramble!

Silver Light 7TMVMX7EPSR

Sat

Silver Light Guidance SatĈ1EVĈĀTQĈ Kirtan

Astrud and the 'SWQMG'EVEZER BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT W W W.LYDIASORGANICS.COM

1435 N MCDOWELL BLVD 1&5"-6."t$"

707.792.5300

Sun

Mar

GARY VOGENSEN RUSTY GAUTHIER JOHN MAIN, GARY SILVA

8:00 / No Cover

No Travel Necessary! Mar 8 RECKLESS IN VEGAS

The Rat Pack Rocks Out 8:30

SAN GERONIMO Mar 9 Featuring JEREMY D’ANTONIO Sun

5:00 / No Cover

Mar 14 JIMI Z Fri

THE GOODTIME BAND 50’s to Now, and a Tribute to Patty Smyth 8:00 / No Cover Sat “Alive and Squeezing Tour� kickoff Mar 15 MAD MAGGIES AND THOSE DARNED ACCORDIANS 8:00 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Sonoma County’s Original Roadhouse Tavern

Shows: 21+ 8–10:30pm Great Food & Live Music

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin

DeLone 7:30pm

:HG)HE‡SP

Girls + Boys, Jill Cohn 7KXU)HE‡SP

Victoria George with Jesse Brewster )UL)HE‡SP‡UG$QQXDO

Mardi Gras Mambofest with Rhythmtown-Jive and Zydeco Flames and special guest Rahni Raines 6DW0DU‡SP

Robert Randolph and The Family Band 6XQ0DU‡SP

Jelly Bread 0RQ0DU‡SP

Moistboyz featuring Mickey Melchiondo (Dean Ween) from Ween with Qui :HG0DU‡SP

The Pump and Dump: A Parentally Incorrect Comedy Show and Night Out For Once )UL0DU‡SP

Petty Theft www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

Thur Feb 27˜Karaoke Party

with DJ Hewy Dawg

Fri Feb 28˜The Sorentinos plus Buzzy Martin

Sat Mar 1˜The Pulsators Sun Mar 5˜4x4 Singer/Songwriter Series Tue Mar 4˜Mardi Gras Party with

Gator Nation

Fri & Sat Nights: Rasta Dwight's BBQ! 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove

707.795.5118

twinoakstavernpenngrove.com

Music ( 33

25

Saturday, Mar 1

Wed, Feb 26 10:15am– 12:40pm 7–10pm Thur, Feb 27 7:15–10pm Fri, Feb 28 7:15–11pm Sat, Mar 1 1–5pm 7–11pm Sun, Mar 2 5–9:30pm Mon, Mar 3 7–9:30pm Tues, Mar 4 7:30–9pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLE & PAIRS Square Dance Club 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club 8:40–9:45am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther hosts a WEST COAST SWING PARTY 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise FOR THE LOVE OF SOUL with Isoke Femi Steve Luther hosts the TOM RIGNEY WITH FLAMBEAU 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE with live drummers

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 KEY MASTER Dazzling pianist Tien Hsieh plays the Pt. Reyes Dance Palace

March 2. See Clubs & Venues, p26. Youth Orchestra. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Hermann Sons Hall Mar 1, Choppin Broccoli. 860 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9962.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Feb 26, Mr Kitt. Feb 28, Steve Pile & Lazyman. Mar 1, Hillstomp. Mar 5, Gladkill. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Feb 28, Aqua Velvets. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Lagunitas Tap Room Feb 26, Steep Ravine. Feb 27, Girls + Boys. Feb 28, JimBo Trout. Mar 1, Jeffrey Halford. Mar 2, the Grain. Mar 5, the Gypsy Trio. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Feb 26, Bruce Halbohm. Feb 28, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. Mar 1, Jess Petty. Mar 3, Gypsy Cafe. Mar 5, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. Sun, Kit Mariah’s Open Mic Night. Thurs, Susan Sutton Jazz Piano. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Feb 27, Dan Martin and Norma

Rocksteady. Feb 28, Davidjohn Quartet. Mar 1, Andrew Freeman Band. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Sally Tomatoes

Mystic Theatre

Feb 26, Closet Bakers. Feb 27, Molly Konzen. Feb 28, DJ Lazyboy. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Mar 1, Marcia Ball. Mar 4, Mardi Gras Mambofest with Rhythmtown-Jive. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Raven Theater Mar 1-2, Philharmonia Healdsburg. 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Redwood Cafe Feb 26, Sound Kitchen. Fourth Friday of every month, Reggae at the Redwood. Mar 1, David M’ore Band. First Sunday of every month, Organix Guitar. First Tuesday of every month, Rock Overtime. Thurs, Open Mic. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Mar 1, the Thugz. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Feb 28, Hired Guns. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

DON’T FORGET‌WE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNear’s Dining House "REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER 3!4s0-$//23s NEW ORLEANS BLUES/ROCK

MARCIA BALL

45%s0-$//23s FAT TUESDAY MAMBOFEST

23RD ANNUAL

MARDI GRAS MAMBOFEST WITH

RHYTHMTOWN-JIVE

AND ANDRE THIERRY & ZYDECO &2)s0-$//23s FOLK/BLUEGRASS

MAGIC

ELEPHANT REVIVAL PLUS T SISTERS 3!4s0-$//23s BLUES/ROCK

TOMMY CASTRO & THE PAINKILLERS 3!4s0-$//23s JAZZ/FUNK

GALACTIC

PLUS BRUSHY

ONE STRING

.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

7

WWWMCNEARSCOM

Fri, live music. 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Stout Brothers

Tradewinds Feb 26, Elvis and the Flashbacks. Mon, Blues Defenders Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Twin Oaks Tavern Feb 28, the Sorentinos. Mar 1, the Pulsators. Mar 4, Gator Nation. Every other Wednesday, Dixie Giants. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

707.829.7300 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 2 30 P E TA L U M A A VE | S SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

J_fnk`d\j1JleÆK_li/gd&=i`&JXk0gd

K_li›=\Y).›POP, HIP HOP

Tori Bratton =i`›=\Y)/›ROCK & ROLL, BLUES

Twice as Good JXkÂ&#x203A;DXi(Â&#x203A;8D<I@:8E8

Bootleg Honeys =i`Â&#x203A;DXi.Â&#x203A;8CK<IE8K@M<IF:B

BlueShift JXkÂ&#x203A;DXi/Â&#x203A;HYBRID REGGAE/ROCK

Thrive WITH Hirie

Whiskey Tip Feb 27, Tori Bratton. Feb 28, Twice As Good. Mar 1, Bootleg Honeys. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

JleÂ&#x203A;DXi0Â&#x203A;EffeĂ&#x2020;/gd ?FLJ<&K<:?EF&EL;@J:F

I ySunday Bumps WITH

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Feb 26, Cyrille Aimee and Diego

) 26

10 DJs

K_liÂ&#x203A;DXi(*Â&#x203A;BLUES, ROCK & SOUL

The Sticky Notes

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN WED W ED FEB FEB 26 BASS B A SS | TRAP TR AP | EDM ED M

BRAINSTORM BR AINSTORM W WITH ITH M MR. R. K KITT ITT $$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

FRII FE FR FEB B2 28 8

ROCK R O CK

ALL A LL T THINGS HINGS MUST MUST PASS PASS THE T HE 2 2ND ND A ANNUAL NNUAL

GEORGE HARRISON GEORGE HARRISON B IRTHDAY BASH BASH BIRTHDAY $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 7PM/21+ 7PM /21+

SAT S AT M MAR AR 1

IINDIE NDIE | FFOLK OLK | ROCK R O CK

HILLSTOMP H ILLSTOMP

$$13/DOORS 13/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

WED W ED M MAR AR 5

BASS B A SS | TRAP TR AP | EDM ED M

BRAINSTORM BR AINSTORM W WITH ITH

GLADKILL + S GLADKILL SUGARPILL UGARPILL L FOUNDATIONS F OUNDATIONS TOUR TOUR

$$10 10 ADV/$15 ADV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

SAT S AT M MAR AR 7

SSAMBA AMBA | AFRO AFRO | FUNK FU N K

SAMBADA SA MBADA

$$12 12 ADV/$15 ADV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W W W. H O PM ONK .CO M BBook ookk yyour our

n e x t eevent vent with with u s, u p tto o2 50, kkim@hopmonk.com im@hopmonk .com next us, up 250,

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MA R CH 4, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Tom Rigney with Flambeau

Music ( 25 Figueiredo. Feb 27, Adrian Legg. Feb 28, Pete Seeger Tribute Night. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

CHOIR MEMBERS MUST COMMIT TO 5 REHEARSALS AND 3 PERFORMANCES Rehearsals:

ssss |  0Location:

Community Baptist Church, 3ONOMA!VENUE 3ANTA2OSA Evening Concerts:

Santa Rosa3AT-AY Healdsburg . . .4HUR*UNE

Coolfoot and the Right Time. Sat, Ukulele Jam Session. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

NAPA COUNTY

Feb 28, Wizards of Wonderland. Mar 2, 4pm, Tien Hsieh. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Fenix

Station House Cafe

Dance Palace

Feb 27, Utopian Dreams. Feb 28, Volker Strifler Band. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Mar 2, Paul Knight and friends. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

Mar 1, Walking Spanish and Saffell. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Feb 27, Orquesta la Clave del Blanco. Feb 28, the Cheeseballs.842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Feb 27, Willie Waldman Project. Feb 28, Mardi Gras with Gator Nation and the Pulsators. Mar 1, Danny Click. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club Feb 26, Warrior King. Feb 27, Fruition. Feb 28, Wonderbread 5. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091. Feb 26, Katz and Mano Meet the Dragon. Feb 27, Eugene Huggins. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

First Mate Quartet. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Fri, Walking Spanish. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feb 27, Chrisy Ynne and Danny Uzi. Feb 28, Savannah Blu. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

No Name Bar

Studio 55 Marin

Sweetwater Music Hall Feb 26, Girls + Boys. Feb 27, Victoria George. Feb 28, Mardi Gras Mambofest with Rhythmtown-Jive. Mar 1, Robert Randolph & the Family Band. Mar 2, Jelly Bread. Mar 3, Moistboyz with Qui. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant Feb 28, STR8 UP. Mar 1, Jinx Jones. Sun, DJ Night. Wed, Jumpstart. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Hydro Grill Sun, 7pm, Swing Seven. First Saturday of every month, AlwaysElvis. Fri, Sat, blues. 1403 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9777.

Lincoln Theater Mar 1, 7pm, the Silverado Pickups. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Molinari Caffe Thurs, Open Mic. 815 Main St, Napa. 707.927.3623.

Rainbow Room Sun, salsa Sundays. Fri, Sat, 10pm, DJ dancing. 806 Fourth St, Napa. 707.252.4471.

Terrapin Crossroads

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Feb 27, San Geronimo. Sun, Midnight North, Chris Hague. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. Wed, Terrapin Family Band, Rusty String Express. Thurs,

Feb 27, Michael Belair. Feb 28, Dysphunctional Species. Mar 1, Robert Hollywood Jenkins. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Osteria Divino Feb 26, Jonathan Poretz. Feb 27, Passion Habanera. Feb 28, David Jeffrey Jazz Fourtet. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

Feb 26, Mike Lassiter. Mar 2, Lauren Ashley. Mar 5, Martha Crawford. Mar 4, Swing Fever. Feb 27, C-JAM. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Rancho Nicasio Feb 28, Dan Forbes and Reckless. Mar 1, Linda Imperial. Mar 2, the Ivory Club Boys. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse

Point of View #18

2014 Program, Harriet Tubman: Bound for the Promised Land

Led by composer, bassist, and educator, Marcus Shelby, the choir will be created from the diverse demographics of Sonoma County using music as a unifying force. Participation is FREE!

by Robert McChesney, 1997

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MAR C H 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

We are happy to announce the new location of our galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;456 10th St., Santa Rosa, CA. Our doors have not re-opened yet but please stay tuned for our upcoming opening date!

707tcalabigallery.com

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

The Fresh & Onlys S.F. staple rock their garage-folk sound with heart. Feb 26 at Brick and Mortar Music Hall.

Bob Mould Hardcore legend and HĂźsker DĂź frontman celebrates the 25th anniversary of his first solo album. Feb 27 at Great American Music Hall.

Com Truise The DJ and producer gets funky with his stylized synths. Feb 27 at Mezzanine.

Feb 27, James Moseley. Feb 28, the Incubators. Mar 1, Firewheel. Sun, salsa class. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello and Seth. First Wednesday of every month, Tangonero. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Dr. Dog

Sleeping Lady

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Feb 26, Rory McNamara and Ring of Truth. Feb 27, Tommy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mahoney. Feb 28, Biambuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Groove Room. Feb 28, Fenton

Rich and fun folk rock band from Philly never fail to impress. Mar 1 at the Warfield.

Will Downing Sophisticated soul man tours in support of his new album. Mar 2 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s S.F.

Galleries s

Sebastopol Gallery

RECEPTIONS RE CEPTIONS Mar 1 Art Without Labels Labels,, “Things That Laugh in eaturing the Night,” ffeaturing the artwork of Michael Cheney.. 4pm. Cheney 111 KKentucky entucky SSt, t, Petaluma. 707.775.3794. P etaluma. 707 7.775.3794. . Graton Gallery,, “Small Gr aton Gallery Works Show,” W orks Show w,,” juried by Bob Nugent. 2pm. Graton Graton. 9048 Gr aton Rd, Gr aton. 707.829.8912. 707 7..829.8912.

Cheney. artwork of Michael Cheney. 111 Kentucky Kentucky St, St, Petaluma. Petaluma. 707.775.3794. 7077..775.3794.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Mar 2, “School Through Projects,” Pr ojects,” ffollow ollow the Peanuts Peanuts through gang as they struggle thr ough a typical school year with original comic strips. Through Through Apr 27, 277, “Starry, “Starryy, SStarry tarry Night,” ffeaturing eaturing Peanuts Peanuts characters characters Through under the night sky. sky. Thr ough Aug 11, “Heartbreak “Heartbreak in Peanuts,” P eanuts,” over 70 comic strips ffocusing ocusing on lost love. 2301 Hardies Har dies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 707.579.4452. to 5. 707 7..579.4452.

Graton Gallery

RiskPress Gallery,, RiskPr ess Gallery Works “Funhouse: W orks Paper,” on P aper,” ffeaturing eaturing Lauraa Postell Laur Postell and Grace Gr ace Levine. 5pm. Healdsburgg A Ave, 7345 Healdsbur ve, Sebastopol. No phone.

Through Thr ough Mar 30, 30 “Small Small W Works orks Show,” Show w,,” juried by Bob Nugent. Rd, Graton. 9048 Graton Graton R 10:30 TTues-Sun, ues-Sun, u 10:3 to 6. 707.829.8912. 707 7..829.8912.

Mar 4

Through Through Mar 1, “Flaskss of “Flask Fiction,” sculptures sculp by Bella Feldman. 132 Healdsburg. Mill St, St, Ste Ste 101, Healdsbur g. 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. TTues-Fri, ues-Fri, u 707.473.9600. 707 7..4473.9600. 7

O’Hanlon Center ffor O’Hanlon or the Arts, Arts, “Red,” is just that–all things rred! ed! Ave, 616 Throckmorton Throckmorton A ve, Valley. Mill V alley. 4415.388.4331. 115.388.4331.

Mar 5 Helen Putnam Room,, Community Room art by PAA PA AA members, special ffeature eature on Darold Graves. artist Dar old Gr aves. Reception, Mar 5 at Petaluma Library, 5pm. P etaluma Libr aryy, Fairgrounds Dr,, 100 Fair grounds Dr Petaluma. 707.763.9801. P etaluma. 707 7.7 . 63.9801.

Rohnert ParkCotati Library Rohnert P Park-Cotati ark-Cotati Library, “Library Libr ary, “Libr ary Art Show,” Show w,,” showcases local artists. 6pm. 6250 Lynne Lynne Way, Conde W ayy, Rohnert Park. 707.584.9121. P ark. 707 7..584.9121.

SONOMA COUNT COUNTY TY Arlene F Francis rancis r Centerr Mar 1, “dis/connect: “dis/connect: the Rite of LLove ove LLost,” ost ” showcases ost, photogr aphyy, paintings and photography, perf ormance art ffocused ocused on performance the experience of love and loss. 99 Sixth SSt, t, Santa Rosa. 707 7..528.3009. 707.528.3009.

Hammerfr Hammerfriar Gallery

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Mar 9, “Young Through “YYoung o Artists 2014,” an exhibit of student art from from 10 local schools, and Inspire,” “Those Who Inspir e,” work by art teacher Sandra Sandra Rose Novia. Healdsburg. Daily, 130 Plaza SSt, t, Healdsbur g. Daily y, 707.431.1970. 11 to 6. 707 7..431.1970.

Healdsburg g Museum Through May 4, “Sonoma Through County & the Civil War,” War,” artifacts from artif acts fr om the 1860s. 221 Matheson SSt, t, Healdsburg. Healdsburg. TTuesuesu Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325. 7077..431.3325.

Helen Putnam Community Room Feb 28-Mar 14, ““Annual A Annual Libr Library ary Show,” Show w,,” presented presented by the Petaluma P etaluma Arts Association Association Library. and the Friends of the Libr aryy. PAA Art by P AA members, special Darold ffeature eature on artist Dar old Graves. Petaluma Library, Gr aves. P etaluma Libr aryy, 100 Fairgrounds Petaluma. Fair grounds Dr, Dr, P etaluma. Mon and Thurs-Fri, 10 to 5; TuesTuesu Wed, 707.763.9801. W ed, 10 to 8 707 7.7 . 63.9801.

Art Without Labels

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center

Mar 1-31, 1-31, “Things That Laugh in the Night,” ffeaturing eaturing the

Through Mar 25, “Once Upon Through a Wetland,” Wetland,” art by Ane Carl Carl

Rovetta. 900 Sanford Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277. 7077..5277..92777.

Mahoney Library Gallery Through Mar 13, “Investigation Through Pen of P en and Ink,” ffeatures eatures art from fr om Obie Bowman and Ross Grossman. Gr ossman. SRJC, 680 Sonoma Parkway, Petaluma. Mountain P arkwayy, P etaluma etaluma. Mon-Thurs, Mon-TThurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 9 to 1; Sat, 10 to 3. 707.778.3974. 7077.77 . 8.397744.

Norcal Modern Art Gallery Through Mar 9, “W Through “Welcome elcome to Wonderland,” W onderland,” ffeaturing eaturing the art Grace of Gr ace Slick. 105 Fourth SSt, t, 707.544.8525. Santa Rosa. 707 7.544.8525. .

Petaluma Arts Center Mar 2, 12:30pm, SStudio tudio tour Cooper.. Carpools with Michael Cooper Carpools travel PAC will tr avel from from the P AC and travel tr avel to Cooper’s Cooper ’s Sebastopol studio. $50-$65. 5. Through Through Mar 16, “Form and Finish,” sculptures sculptures by Michael ael Cooper andd John de Marchi. archi. 230 Lakeville keville St St at East Washington, shington, Petaluma. ma. 707.762.5600. 7077.7 . 62.5600.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Mar 16, “It Through “It’s ’s All About the Music,” featuring featuring tribute to Nelson Mandela. 20 Fourth St, St, Petaluma. P etaluma. Wed-Sat, Wed-Sat, 10 to 4;; Sun, noon to 3;; tours by appointment Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398. on Mon-Tuues. 707 7..778.4398.

Redwood Cafe Through Mar 11, Sandr Through Sandraa Jill Anfang presents Anf ang pr esents acrylic 8240 paintings and collage. 82 40 Hwy, Old Redwood Hwy y, Cotati. 707.795.7868. 707 7..795.7868.

RiskPress Gallery Mar 1-26, 1-26, “Funhouse: Works Works on Paper,” P aper,” ffeaturing eaturing Laura Laura Postell Postell Grace and Gr ace Levine. 7345 Healdsburg Healdsburg Ave, Ave, Sebastopol.

Rohnert Park-Cotati Library Mar 44-15, -15, “Libr “Library ary Art Show Show,” w,,” showcases local artists. Way, 6250 LLynne ynne Conde W ayy, Park. 707.584.9121. Rohnert P ark. 707 7..584.9121.

Russian River Art Gallery Through Feb 28, “Love Through “Love Is in Air,” the Air ,” with all the artists at the Russian River Gallery sharing the love. 16357 Main Daily, SSt, t, Guerneville. Daily y, 10 to 6. 707.869.9099. 707 7..869.9099.

27

Through Apr 4, “Ready or Not,” Through a teen exhibition. 282 S High SSt, t, Sebastopol. TTues-Fri, ues-Fri, u 10 to 4; 707.829.4797. Sat, 1 to 4. 707 7.829.4 . 7977. Through Mar 1, ““A Through A Fashion wearable SStatement,” tatement,” wear able art. 150 N Main SSt, t, Sebastopol. Open daily, 707.829.7200. daily y, 11 to 6. 707 7..829.7200.

SoCo Coffee Mar 11-31, 31, “Ed Coletti Exhibit,” through on display thr ough the month March. of Mar ch. 1015 Fourth SSt, t, Santa 707.433.1660. Rosa. 707 7..433.1660.

Sonoma Valley Va alley Museum of Art Through Mar 2, “Site & Sense,” Through architecture the ar chitecture of Aidlin Broadway, Darling Design. 551 Br oadwayy, Wed-Sun, Sonoma. W ed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA. 707 7.939.SVMA. .

STILL ST TILL LIFE WITH ALOE W Work ork o b byy A Anna n V nna Valdez aldez (sho a (shown) wn) d Martin Riveros Riveros Baxter is on disp play at Gallery and display Berrgelli. See See Galleries, below. below. Bergelli.

Sonoma Valley Va alley Museum of Art Mar 1, 11am, “Imagined workshop S Spaces,” ” a work kshop h that th t gives a new way of looking at plans unmade with SF artist Markoff.. $50-$60. 551 Nicole Markoff Broadway, Wed-Sun, ed-Sun, Br oadwayy, Sonoma. W 707.939.SVMA. 11 to 5. 707 7.939.SVMA. .

Gallery Ga allery Bergelli Feb 26-Mar 30, “Gr “Group oup Show Show,” w,” , new w works works by the gallery artists, artis sts, including Martin Riveros Rive eros Baxter and Anna Valdez. Ave, V alddez. 483 Magnolia A ve, Larkspur. Lark kspur. 415.945.9454. 4115.945.9454.

Gallery Ga allery Route One

MARIN COUNT COUNTYY Art by the Bay Weekend W e eekend Gallery Through Mar 30, “Beyond Through Geometry,” Geometry y,,” ppaintings g byy Jon Langdon. 18856 Hwy 1, Marshall. 4415.663.1006. 115.663.1006.

Art W Works orks o Downtown Thr Through ough Feb 28, paintings by Jeremy Morgan. Through Jer emy Mor gan. Thr ough Mar 11, ““A A Moment in TTime,” ime,” ffeaturing eaturing Impressionist the Impr essionist work of Dorallen Through Dor allen Davis. Thr ough Mar 11, “Mystic Realms-Seascapes,” oceanic imagery by TTim im Through Burns. Thr ough Mar 11, “Super sculptures, es, SSymmetry,” ymmetryy,,” with sculptur photography paintings i ti andd photogr h t aphy h by b Russian artist TTimur imur YYusupov. usupov. Rafael. 1337 Fourth SSt,t, San Raf ael. TTuesuuesSat, 10 to 5. 4415.451.8119. 115.451.8119.

Bolinas Museum Mar 1, 10am, Satur Saturday day Morning Workshop, Art W orkshop, with Janis Creative YYerington. erington. e Cr eative fun ffor or all ages. $15-$20. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 4415.868.0330. 15.868.0330. 1

El Elsewhere h G ll Gallery Through Mar 1, 1828 Sir Fr Through Francis ancis Drake Fairfax. Daily, Dr ake Blvd, Fairf ax. Daily y, 11 to 6. 4415.526.2855. 115.526.2855.

Falkirk F alkirk a Cultural Center Through Mar 8, ““Artisans,” Through A Artisans,” emerging emer ging and internationally known artists. 1408 Mission Ave, Rafael. A ve, San Raf ael. 4415.485.3438. 115.485.3438.

Through Through o Mar 23, “Igor Sazevich: Glancing Back–Stepping Glan ncing Back–S tepping Forward,” For w d,” a solo exhibition of war painter.. 11101 the Inverness painter Hwyy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Station. WedWedMon, Mon n 11 to 5. n, 5 415.663.1347. 415.663. 15 1 663 1347.

Ma Marin arin Community Foundation F ou o undation Marr 5-May 16, “C “California alifornia Dreamin,” Dr eaamin,” includes art and sculpture Area scul lpture by Bay Ar ea fforeignoreignHamilton bornn artists. 5 Hamil ton Landing, Lan ding, SSte te 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, Mon n-Fri, 9 to 5.

MINE MI INE Art Gallery Through Through o Mar 30, “vision/ color/love,” workss by Nicole colo or/love,” work Richardd Dieterich, CCameron, am meron, on Richar Dieterich Sherry Petrini She rry P etrini and Nick Wildermuth. Francis Wild dermuth. 1820 Sir Fr ancis Drake Dr akke Blvd, Fairfax. Fairfax.

O’H O’Hanlon Hanlon Center forr the Arts Through Through o Mar 20, “Red,” is just that–all that t–all things rred! ed! Throckmorton 616 Thr ockmorton Ave, Ave, Mill Valley. V alleyy. Tues-Sat, Tuues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. app ointment. 415.388.4331. 4115.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley San Valley a Community Com mmunity Center Through Through o Feb 28, 6350 Sir Francis Drake Fr an ncis Dr ake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888. Ger o onimo. 4115.488.8888.

Seager Sea ager Gray Gallery Through Through o Mar 2, “Andrew “Andrew Hayes: Volumes,” exploration ation V oluumes,” a tactile explor Ave, of sspace. pace. 23 Sunnyside A ve, Mill Valley. V alleyy. TTues-Sat; uues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat,

11 to 7; Su Sun, un, 12 to 5. 4415.384.8288. 115.384.8288.

NAPA N APA COUNT COUNTYY Downtown Downt town Napa Through Jan 1, Through “Metamorphosis,” “Metamo orphosis,” outdoor sculpturee exhibit with selfsculptur guided tour. tour. Main and Third Third streets, str eets, Napa. N

Molinari Molina ari Caffe Through Feb 28, “Like/Shar Through “Like/Share: e: Photography,” Cell Phone Phonne Photogr aphyy,,” images captured c captur ed with telephone cameras. telephon ne camer as. 815 Main SSt, t, Napa. Napa. 707.927.3623. 7077..9277..3623.

Napa V Valley alley a Museum Through Mar 23, “Thinking Through Outside the Bottle,” exploration exploration artistic of the ar rtistic passions of the people behind b the wine. 55 Presidents Circle, esidennts Cir Pr cle, YYountville. oountville. TTues-Sun, uues-Sunn, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500. 707 7..944.0500.

Comedy C Co omedy dy Comedy Comed dy Night Presenteed by Active Presented Active 20-30 20-30 Club 656. 656 6. Every other Tues, Tuues, Free. 8:30pm. Fr ee. Sally Tomatoes, Tomatoes, o Valley alley House Dr, 1100 V Dr, Rohnert Park, 7077..665.0260. P ark, 707.665.0260.

The Pu Pump ump & Dump A par parentally enttally incorrect incorrect comedy show.. Mar $22-$25. show Maar 5, 8pm. $22 -$25. SSweetwater weetwaater Music Hall, Ave, 19 Corte Madera Madera A ve, Mill Valley, V alleyy, 4415.388.3850. 115.388.3850.

Slip-Goose Slip-G Goose Monkey Improvissed comedic theater Improvised fly. games on o the fly y. Last Thurs monthly at 77.. Free. Free. Aqus Petaluma, CCafe, afe, 189 9 H SSt, t, P etaluma, 707.778.6060. 707 7..778.6 6060.

) 28

NO R RTH TH BAY B A Y BO H E M IIA AN | FE BRU BR UARY A R Y 26– 26 –MA M A RC R CH 4, 201 2014 4 | BOH E MI AN A N.COM .C O M

Arts s E Even Events ven nts

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

NORTH NOR R TH B BAY A Y BOH E MI A N | FE EBRU BR UARY A R Y 26– 26 –MAR M ARCH C H 4, 20 114 4 | BO H E M I AN AN.COM .C O M

28 A E

( 27

Tuesday Nig Tuesday Night ght Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with est tablished established comics and up-a nd-comers. up-and-comers. TTues ues u at 8. $15-$2 20. 142 $15-$20. Thr ockmorton Th heatre, Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Thr ockmorton nA ve, Mill Throckmorton Ave, V alleyy, 4415.383.9600. 115.383.96 600. Valley,

Dance Danc ce Monroe Danc Dance ce Hall Wednesdays, Sing Wednesdays, Singles gles and P Pairs airs Squar ub. ThursdaysSquaree Dance Clu Club. Sundays, Cir cles ‘‘n n Squar es Circles Squares 0 W College Dance Club. 1400 A ve, Santa Rosa 707 7707.529.5450. 7.529.5450. . Ave,

Terrapin T errapin e Cro Crossroads ossroads Mar 1, 6pm, Salsaa Della Soul & Gr ammy P artyy, da ancing with Grammy Party, dancing music fr om P acific Mambo from Pacific Or chestra. 100 YYacht a Club Dr acht Orchestra. Dr,, San Raf ael. Rafael.

Wells W ells e Fargo Fa argo Center C Mar 5, 8pm, Aileyy II, Under the artistic dir ecttion of TTroy roy direction P owell, this comp pany pr esents Powell, company presents a rrepertory epertory of tim meless classics timeless and thrilling new work s. $45works. $25. 50 Mark W est Springs Rd, West Santa Rosa 707 7..546.3600. 707.546.3600.

Events Even nts Across the Su Summer ummer Sky Feb 28-Mar 2. SR SRJC RJC Planetarium, Larkk Hall 2001, Ave, 1502 Mendocino A ve, Santa 707.527.4465. Rosa, 707 7..5277..446 65.

The Business s of Playboy Mag gazine Magazine One of the incorp incorporators porators when the iconic magazine m launched in 1953 1953,, Eldon Sellers shar es his experi ences on shares experiences th entr the t epreneurrial i l aspects t entrepreneurial of such an undertaking. undertaking. Feb 28, 7pm. $7 7. LLoveable oveaable Rogue $7. Book store, 867 G rant A ve, Bookstore, Grant Ave, Novato, 4415.895.1081. 15.895. 1 1 1081.

Cameo Caba Cabaret aret The Spirit of Mar Mardi d Gr di Gras as comes to the CCameo. ameo. Ma ar 4, 5:30pm. Mar $20. Cameo Cameo Cine ma, 1340 Main Cinema, SSt, t, SStt Helena, 707 7..963.3946. 707.963.3946.

Electricity F Forum o orum A discussion on tthe he choices of electricity supplie ers that will suppliers become availablee this spring. Mar 4, 7pm. Fr ee. Congr egation Free. Congregation Shomr ei TTorah, or o ah, 26 600 Bennett Shomrei 2600 V alley Rd, Santa Rosa, R Valley 707 7..578.5519. 707.578.5519.

KOWS Comm Community munity Radio F undrraiser Fundraiser A dance party ffeaturing eaaturing

the Rotten TTomatoes oomatoes and a Wilson-Hukill Blues Revue Revue and benef iting KKOWS OWS rradio adioo station. benefiting Feb 28, 7pm. $10-$20 0. Sally $10-$20. TTomatoes, oomatoes, 1100 V alleyy House Valley Dr ark, 707 7..6 665.0260. Dr,, Rohnert P Park, 707.665.0260.

Awards Night at the Lark L

Napa V Valley alley a Marathon & Exp po Expo

Awards Night in Sonoma County

Celebrating the mar Celebrating marathons ath hons of Northern CCalifornia, alifornia, the Expo explor es and com mpares explores compares experiences among thee mar athons of Lake TTahoe, aahoe, Big marathons Sur and others. Race ha appens happens on Mar 2 at 7am and ta akes takes place along Silverado Silverado Trail, Trail, from from CCalistoga, alistoga, to the ffinish inish line at Vintage High School in Napa. Feb 28-Mar 2. Napa V aalley Mar riott Valley Marriott Hotel, 3425 Solano A vee, Napa. Ave,

Stargazing, suspense and Stargazing, surprises with the awards awards screen. live on the big scr een. Mar 2, Rialto 4:30pm. $25. Rial to Cinemas, Cinemas, Sebastoopol, 6868 McKinley SSt, t, Sebastopol, 707.525.4840. 707 7.525.4840. .

The Open W Way ay a

Hollywood Comes to St Helena

Hosted by Cory Bright Bright. t. Feb 27 27, 7, 7pm. $10. Open Secr Secret, ett, 923 C SSt, t, San Rafael, Rafael, 4415.457.4191. 115.4577..441191.

Tattoos T attoos a & Blues F estival e Festival Body d artt meets t live li m music. usic. i Feb 28-Mar 2. $20-$3 35. $20-$35. Flamingo Resort Hote el, Hotel, 2777 Fourth St, St, Santa Rosa, 707 7..545.8530. 707.545.8530.

Field T rrips Trips Afternoon Comm Community munity Service

Hollywood glam in Lark Larkspur, spuur, screen. live in HD on the big scr eenn. Theater, Mar 2, 4pm. $55. Lark Thea ater, Ave, Larkspur, 549 Magnolia A ve, Lark spuur, 4415.924.5111. 115.924.5111.

D Decoding di Deepak D k Tiburon Film Society presents Tiburon preseents documentary. this spiritual documentary y. Free. Model Mar 4, 6pm. Fr ee. Bay Mod el Bridgeway, Visitor Center, Center, 2100 Bridge ewayy, Sausalito, 4415.332.3871. 115.332.3871.

Mar 2. CCameo ameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St, SStt Helena, 707.963.3946. 707 7.963.3946. .

If Y You ou o Build It With the ffilmmakers ilmmakers in per person. rson rson. Rafael Mar 2, 7pm. Smith Raf ael Film F Center,, 1118 Fourth St, Center St, San Rafael, Raf ael, 4415.454.1222. 115.454.1222.

Inequality for All The awar award-winning d-winning documentary ffollows ollows fformer orm mer US labor secretary secretary Robert lookss to rraise Reich as he look aise awareness country’ss awar eness of the country’ widening economic gap. FFeb eb 27, Free. Point Reyes 27 7, 5:30pm. Fr ee. P oint Rey yes Books, Reyes Book s, 11315 Hwyy 1, Pt Rey yes SStation, tation, 4415.663.1542. 115.663.1542.

Participate in center Participate rrestoration estoration pr ojects. First F W ed projects. Wed of every month. Richa rdson Richardson Bay Audubon Center 3376 6 Center,, 37 Gr eenwood Beach Rd,, TTiburon, iburon, Greenwood 4415.388.2524. 15.388.252 1 4.

Jesus Christ Supers Superstar star

French F rench r Garden F Farm a arm Tour T our o

Thought-provoking one-h Thought-provoking one-hour our exploring PBS documentary explorin ng ethical the medical, legal and ethi cal end-of-lifee implications of end-of-lif issues. Mar 2. Burlingame Hall, 252 W Spain SSt, t, Sonoma.

Join Dan Smith ffor or pr practical a actical tips on gr owing your own o growing gar den. First Sat of ev very garden. every month. Fr ee. Fr ench Gar G den Free. French Garden ry Rid dge Rd, Farm, 11031 Cher Cherry Ridge Sebastopol, 707 7..824.2030. 707.824.2030.

Film America the Bea Beautiful autiful 3 ation of 3:: The Sexualiza Sexualization Our Y o outh Youth With the ffilmmaker ilmmaker inn person. Mar 5, 6pm. Smith Raf fael Film Rafael CCenter, Center t , 1118 Fourth F th SSt, t, San t, S Raf ael, 4415.454.1222. 15.454. 1 1222. Rafael,

Anatomy of a Murder M Part of the Spring 201 Part 20144 schedule. Feb 28, 7pm. 7pm m. $5-$7. $5-$77. Sonoma Film Institute e, Institute, W arren Auditorium, SS SU, Warren SSU, 1801 E Cotati A ve, Roh hnert Ave, Rohnert P ark, 707 7..664.2606. Park, 707.664.2606.

With members of the cast Smith in person. Mar 1, 2pm. Smit th Rafael Raf ael Film Center, Center, 1118 Fourth Fourth Rafael, SSt, t, San Raf ael, 4415.454.1222. 15.454. 1 12222.

The Last Chapter

More Than Honey The ffilm ilm explor explores es the phenomenon of colony disorder seekss to collapse disor der and seek perilous ffind ind answers to this perilou us 27, condition. Feb 27 7, 6:30pm. $10-$12. Andrews Andrews Hall, Sonoma Sonnoma Center,, 27 276 Community Center 6 E Napa N SSt,t, Sonoma.

Napa V Valley alley a Acade Academy emy Telecast Awards T e elecast Viewing i i Party Watch W atch a the awards awards while ove overr 20 of Napa valley’s ffinest inest rrestaurants estauurants provide treats paired pr ovide tasty tr eats pair ed with w current library Mar cur rent and libr ary wines. Ma ar 2, Theater,r, 500 First 5pm. $125. The Theater 707.259.1600. SSt,t, Napa, 707 7.259. . .11600.

Rebels with a Cause e The ffilm ilm celebr celebrates ates the peo people ople

and passion that saved the coastal wonders that would Point become the P oint Reyes Seashoree an and National Seashor National the Golden Gate Nati Recreation Area. Recr eation Ar ea. Fri, Wed, Feb 28, 7pm and W ed Free. Mar 5, 7pm. Fr ee. TTam a am Valley Center, V alley Community Ce Ave, Valley. 203 Marin A ve, Mill V

CRITIC’S CRITIC’ S CHO CHOICE OICE

Food F ood & o Drink CabFest CabF Fest e Explore the many ffacets Explore acets of CCabernet’s abernet’s complexity and $185. mystique. Feb 28-Mar 2. $18 85. Lincoln Theater, Theater, 100 California Californnia Dr,, YYountville, 707.226.8742. Dr ountville, o 707 7..226.877442.

Democratic Party Crab Feed Feed e Mixing politics and crab crab for for over oveer a quarter century. centuryy. Feb 28, 5pm. 5pm. Veterans $50. V eter e ans Memorial Building, Buildinng, 1351 Maple Ave, Ave, v Santa Rosa.

Dine Out A benef benefit it for for Mentor Me Petaluma. in P etaluma. Feb 26, 5pm. Petaluma Risibisi, 154 P etaluma Blvd N, N Petaluma, 707.766.7600. P etaluma, 707 7.7 . 66.7600.

An Evening of Paleo Cuisine Michelle Tam, Tam, a author of “Nom m Nom Paleo,” Paleo,” and Chris Kresser, Kresser, Paleo author of “Your “YYoour Personal Personal P aleo Code,” ffeature Code, eature rrecipes ecipes and ways to tailor the ideal Paleo Paleoo diet. Feb 28, 5:30pm. Book Passage, Blvd,, P assage, 51 TTamal aamal Vista Blvd Madera, Corte Mader a, 4415.927.0960. 15.927 1 7..0960.

Fat F at T a Tuesday uesday Bubbles, beads, and a cr crawfish awfish i boil. Mar 4, 6pm. 1313 Main SSt, t, 707.258.1313. Napa, 707 7.258. . 1313.

Fire Up with Firehou Firehouse use Chef Marvin Blandon n Part of the Fr Part Fresh esh Starts Starts celebrated Chef Events,, the celebr ated ffirehouse irehouse chef ignites your love of cooking. Feb 27, 277, Center, 6:30pm. $55. Next KKey ey Cente er, Hamilton 1385 N Hamil ton Pkwy, Pkwyy, Novato, Novaato, 4415.382.3363, 115.382.3363, ext 211.

Library W Weekend eekend e An al alternative ternative to the Barrel Barrel TTastings, aastings, enjoy a selection off from library wines fr om the libr ary along current 1-2. with cur rent rreleases. eleases. Mar 1-2. Dutton-Goldfield Winery, $20. Dutton-Goldf ield Winer ryy, Gravenstein 3100 Gr avenstein Hwy N, S b t l 707.827.3600. Sebastopol, 7077..827 8277.3600. .3600

Lectures s Balance Method Workshop W o orkshop Feb 26, 6pm. Fr Free. ee. Sonoma Vallejo allejo Body Balance, 210 V

People Power P

KOWS K OWS wants wants to to rreach each oout ut to to Sonoma Sonoma m County Countty In th thee “Kingdom “K ingdom off Oc Occidental,” cidental,” on dio station reigns reign e s ssupreme. upreme. onee ra radio Founded F ounded by by fformer ormer ra radio adio executive executive Phili Philip p Tymon, K Tymon, KOWS OWS Ra Radio dio be began egan lif lifee aabove bove thee popular th popular Howard’s Howard’s Cafe Cafe in downtown downtown Occidental Oc cidental before before securing securring its o own wn dig digss on onee block away away with an antenna anteenna belting belting out out an eclectic mix of music and an nd opinion from from the the ccover over of a Douglas Douglas fir tree. tree. Though Th ough the the station streams sttreams live live over over the the internet, intern et, the the ability ability of the th he locally locally produced produced radio ra dio community community to reach reach the the area area via via FM FM airwaves airw i aves is is still ill greatly greatly restricted. restricted. i d As As a pioneer pion eer in the the recent recent “lo “low ow po power” wer” broadcast broadcast movement, m ovement, KOWS KOWS 107.3 107.33 only only extends extends onair to th thee imm immediate ediate ssurroundings urrroundings of its West W eest C County ounty rregion, egion, b but u th ut that at ccould ould ch change ange thiss y thi year ear with pl plans ans to eexpand xpand ccoverage overage throughout thr oughout m most ost of S Sonoma on noma C County, ounty, fr from om Occidental Oc cidental to Santa Santa Rosa Rossa and and down down to Cotati. C otati. The The pr problem oblem iiss th tthey ey ccan’t an’t do it aalone. lone. On F Feb. eb. 28, KOWS KOWS h hosts o a ben osts benefit efit cconcert oncert to raise raise th thee fun funds ds necessary necessary to make make thi thiss dream d dr eam off F FM M eexpansion xpansion n a rreality. ealit l y. Th The he d dance ance party p arty kicks kicks off when when th thee W Wilson-Hukill ilson-Hukill Blues Blues Revue R evue open the the evening, evening, followed followed b by y th thee classic cl assic rock rock gr grooves ooves of the t e Rotten th Rotten Tomatoes. Tomatoes. There’s Th ere’s also also a buffet buffet and and full b bar, arr, aalong long with a silent auction auction and and raffl raffle, ffle, aall ll to support support KOWS’ K OWS’ ambitious ambitious eff effort. ortt. Thee blues, Th blues, rock rock an and d food food o d dance ance p party arty ta takes kes place pl ace F Friday, riday, F Feb. eb. 28, at Sally Sally Tomatoes, Tomatoes, 1100 Valley Valley House House Dri Drive, ve, R Rohnert ohnert P Park. ark. 7pm. $10–$20. 707.665.9472.—Charlie 707.665.9472.—Charlie Swanson Swanson

St, St, Ste Ste C, Petaluma, Petaluma, 707.658.2599. 7077..658.2599.

10 Avenue Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, Rafael, 415.499.6800. 4115.499.6800.

Charles Best

City Chickens, Urban Goats, Backyard Bunnies

Part of the Marin Speaker Series. Part Center’s Mar 3-6, 3-6, 8pm. Marin Center ’s Veterans V eterans Memorial Auditorium,

Exploree the benefits Explor benefits of

Healing Foods Basics Connect the dots between health, food and community. Feb 27, 6pm. $10-$35. Ceres Community Project, 7351 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.8295.

iPhoneography Workshop All aspects of iPhone photography, presented by Gail Pierce. Feb 26, 6pm. $75. Studio 333, 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito, 415.331.8272.

Marbled Paper Made Easy Artist Diana Liebe demystifies the marbling process. Mar 4, 7:30pm. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma, 707.762.5600.

The Middle East & Coming Changes Jonathon Whooley ponders how recent conflicts and historical trajectories in the Middle East will take shape over the long term. Feb 27, 7:30pm. $5. Ingram Hall, First Presbyterian Church, 1550 Pacific Ave, Santa Rosa.

Science Buzz Cafe Mar 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Body Awareness in the Brainâ&#x20AC;? with Ann Bishop. First Tues of every month, 7pm. through Mar 4. $5. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma, 707.778.6060.

Sonoma Women: Life in Mexican California Drs Rose Marie Beebe and Robert Senkewicz of Santa Clara University speak on women in Mexican California. Feb 27, 7pm. $7-$10. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1500.

Thinking Like a Naturalist Take your birding and nature study to the next level. Feb 26, 7pm. $8. Sonoma Valley Veterans Memorial Building, 126 First St W, Sonoma.

Aqus Cafe Mar 3, Rivertown Poets, Featuring poets Nancy Wakeman and Kate Godsey, followed by open mic readings. Mondays, 9:30am, Storytelling with Phaedra. 189 H St, Petaluma 707.778.6060.

Book Passage Feb 26, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153; Sex After . . .: Women Share How Intimacy Changes as Life Changesâ&#x20AC;? with Iris Krasnow. Feb 27, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marriage Meetings for Lasting Loveâ&#x20AC;? with Marcia Naomi Berger. Mar 1, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Last Conquistadorâ&#x20AC;? with Michael Elias. Mar 2, 1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dancing Through It: My Life in the Balletâ&#x20AC;? with Jennifer Ringer. Mar 3, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Golum & the Jinniâ&#x20AC;? with Helene Wecker. Mar 5, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;She: A Celebration of Greatness in Every Womanâ&#x20AC;? with Mary Anne Radmacher & Liz Kalloch. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Feb 26, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pizza Dough: 100 Delicious, Unexpected Recipesâ&#x20AC;? with Gabi Moskowitz. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Mar 5, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Boy Who Died and Came Back: Adventures of a Dream Archaeologist in the Multiverseâ&#x20AC;? with Robert Moss. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Green Music Center Mar 4, 7pm, Gillian Conoley and Todd Melicker, presented by Writers at Sonoma, the authors share their poetry. Free. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Guerneville Library Mar 1, 2pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Captain and Mr Shrodeâ&#x20AC;? with Tony Johnson. 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville 707.869.9004.

Redwoods Presbyterian Church Feb 28, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Lies Across the Waterâ&#x20AC;? with Stephen Kimber. $10. 110 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur.

Readings Theater Boeing Boeing Angelico Hall Mar 5, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glitter and Glue: A Memoirâ&#x20AC;? with Kelly Corrigan. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

Self-styled Parisian lothario Bernard entertains his female cohorts with frequent â&#x20AC;&#x153;layoversâ&#x20AC;? in this 1960s French farce. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and

29

Sun, 2pm. through Mar 9. $15$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.

An Evening of Short Plays Marin OnStage is presenting short stories of women from past ages with a special trio of theatrical heart stoppers in celebration of the holiday. Through Mar 2. $12-$18. The Little Theater at St. Vincentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 1 St Vincent Dr, San Rafael.

Lasso of Truth World premiere of this story detailing the origin of Wonder Woman through her creator, William Moulton Marston. Times vary. Tues-Sun through Mar 16. $37-$53. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

Readerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theatre One act plays directed by Richard Edwards include: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wandaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Visitâ&#x20AC;? by Christopher Durang; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crab Cakesâ&#x20AC;? by Joan Lipken; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life Sandwich of the Almost Old: A Play About Becoming Well Agedâ&#x20AC;? by Sashana Kane Procter; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let Us Now Praise Famous Menâ&#x20AC;? by James Agee. Wed, Feb 26, 7pm and Sat, Mar 1, 11am. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville, 707.869.9004.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nina, just a note of signiďŹ cant appreciation for your leadership, thoughtfulness and terriďŹ c client serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;quite unusual. The value added you and your colleagues have provided is very substantial, and, as I said, greatly appreciated.â&#x20AC;? Â&#x2030;$IBSMFT'(SFFOF &YFDVUJWF%JSFDUPS 5IF$FEBSTPG.BSJO 0OQBQFS IFBMUIDBSFJTEFTDSJCFEVTJOHUFSNTMJLFDPQBZT  EFEVDUJCMFT OFUXPSLT BOEBENJOJTUSBUPST"U'JMJDF XF VOEFSTUBOEZPVSCFOFĂśUTQSPHSBNNFBOTNPSFUPZPVS FNQMPZFFTBOEUIBUUIFCFOFĂśUTUIFZSFDFJWFJNQBDUUIFJSMJWFT FWFSZEBZÂ&#x2030;IFBEUPUPF CPEZBOENJOE

She Kills Monsters A pseudo-violent comedy adventure of identity, fantasy and killing monsters by Qui Nguyen and directed by Paul Draper. Mar 5-8. $10-$17. Ives Hall room 119, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Nina H. Gardner, J.D. 415.717.8583tOJOB!ĂśMJDFDPN

*GZPVSFMPPLJOHUPUBLFZPVSFNQMPZFFCFOFĂśUTQSPHSBNCFZPOE UIFUSBEJUJPOBM 'JMJDFJTUIFCSPLFSZPVWFCFFOMPPLJOHGPS0VS DSFBUJWFTPMVUJPOTBOETUSPOHDBSSJFSSFMBUJPOTIJQTXJMMBMMPXZPV UPFYQBOEZPVSCFOFĂśUTUPDPWFSXIBUTSFBMMZJNQPSUBOUJOZPVS FNQMPZFFTMJWFT 'FFMUIFCFOFĂśUTPG'JMJDF5IFZSFBMMBSPVOEZPV

-JDFOTF(tĂśMJDFDPN

The Taming of the Shrew A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wild Westâ&#x20AC;? take on Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classic tale of a courtship gone wrong. Fri-Sat, 8pm. through Mar 15. $10. College of Marin Kentfield Campus, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t m Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss iss The The Driveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Driveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest n ewest s segment egment o on n craft c raft b beer eer

THE DRIVE THE DRIVE BREW B REW HA HA HA HA every Thursday every Thursday at 5 5pm pm we w e ttaste, aste, we we laugh, laugh, we we llearn! earn! 3T TO O6 6,, WEEKDAY WEEKDAY AF AFTERNOONS FTERNOONS FTERNOONS ON O N 1350 135 350 AM KSRO KSRO //JAXONDRIVE JAX A XONDRIVE O ND RIVE Please Pl ease taste taste responsibly. responsibly.

To become To become a Drive Drive sponsor sponsor contact co n t a c t C athy R a t to a athy. ratto@yahoo.com Cathy Ratto att c cathy.ratto@yahoo.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MA R CH 4, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

urban livestock and learn how to integrate animals into a thriving garden with author K Ruby Blume. Mar 5, 7pm. Corte Madera Library, 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera, 707.924.6444.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 26-MARCH 4, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

žŲ

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS

GET ON TO GET OFF

Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

> Personal Service > Everyday low prices > Widest selection of edibles > Bonus for new members & referrals > Discounts for seniors and veterans WEEKDAYS 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7; WEEKENDS 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 Highway 101 at Steele Lane 2425 Cleveland Ave, Suite 175

707.526.2800

Try For Free

707-583-0075

E^][r=k'AZgrZ;Zkma K^Ze<Zk^K^Ze=h\mhkl +-(0LZ_^O^kb_b\Zmbhg MhmZeer<hg_b]^gmbZe

O]ddEYl[` Any Local Price

JnZebmr B=<Zk]l

707.541.7016

8492 Gravenstein Hwy, Cotati

=hpgmhpgLZgmZKhlZ30-*.maLm9>Lm

thepeacepipesmokeshop.com

www.GREEN215.com

Ayurvedic

Indian Head Massage neck and shoulders

The #1 social network for men who like men

Peacepipe

622 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa

1.707.568.0420

â&#x20AC;˘ improves mobility in

More local numbers: 1.800.777.8000 Ahora en EspaĂąol /18+

17 years strong in Sonoma County

â&#x20AC;˘ relief from tension headaches,

eyestrain, and sinusitis

ON SITE MASSAGE AVAILABLE

Margery Smith 707.536.1797

707.795.3420

Hey Sonoma County! Caregiver Compassion Group is back and delivering to your door.

415.289.1111

BOHEMIAN

PLACE AN AD: Phone: 707.527.1200, Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:30pm Fax: 707.527.1288 | Email: sales@bohemian.com

?8E;PA@D Â&#x2019;QO`^S\b`g^OW\bW\U Â&#x2019;aSWa[WQ`Sb`]TWb Â&#x2019;ab`cQbc`OZe]`Y Â&#x2019;abcQQ]Q]\Q`SbS Â&#x2019;UcbbS`QZSO\W\U Â&#x2019;`]]TW\U

4/@E3AB@3AB=@/B7=< 1=<AB@C1B7=< %% &"&' 4O`ESab1]\ab`Q][ 8W[9S\\SRg1 /:WQS\aS%&$&'

Win Free Stuff

g

bohemian.com/northbay/free Stuff Employment

Exceptional Massage Therapists Wanted For new and very busy Massage Envy Spa in Novato. Be part of our Vision for a better world through our hands. Email resume to: massageenvynovato@yahoo.com

$$$ Cash for clothes $$$ Cash paid for used menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing. 707.773.7776. serrensclosetpetaluma.com

g Adult Massage

A Wild Irish Rose Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please call before 11pm. No calls from blocked phone #. Kara, 415.233.2769.

gg Psychics

PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER

Phone Entertainment

GET ON TO GET OFF

Madame Lisa. Truly gifted The #1 Social Network for adviser for all problems. men who like men! 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit Try For Free! 707.583.0075 convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

&

Alternative Health Well-Being

g Chiropractic

Relax!

Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 14 yrs. experience. 707.542.6856

Healing Bodywork Deep Swedish, Reiki Bodywork. Therapeutic. Experienced professional CMT. $50 Hour Special. Santa Rosa. Edward. 415.378.0740.

g Healing & Bodywork

Bearhands4u Massage for men, Sebastopol. Mature, strong, professional. 707.799.0637. Days, evenings, weekends $60/hr. Outcalls available.

A Safe Place To Be Real

g Massage & Relaxation

Great Massage By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883.

Full Body Sensual Massage With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

Holistic tantric masseuse/surrogate. Unhurried, private, heartfelt. First time client disJoy Massage count. Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat. Please call after 10:30am. 707.793.2232. 707.774.4732.

A Provider of Pleasure "Your pleasure, my business." Women, men, couples,..by a gentleman. Since 1991. Aft/eve appts. 707.799.4467(C) or 707.535.0511 (L) Jimmy.

Erotic Sensual Massage with Ayla

g Professional Medical

SUBUTEX/ SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxy, Roxy, Norco, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal!

Private estate studio in Sebastopol and Kenwood Shower Available 707.332.9370

Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

A Finer Touch!

B-12 SHOTS HAPPY HOUR!

Swedish massage by friendly masseur, Jack. CMT. 415.235.2590. Body electric. Out calls only. Central Marin.

g Psychics

Thriving in the Aquarian Age "If you are going to go down the river of life, you might as well have a paddle!" www.sonomaseer.com or 707.KEY.STAR

SPIRITUAL

Connections

Finding inspiration & connecting with your community

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

THURSDAYS, 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6PM Only $20 (20% off) WALK-INS ONLY For energy, immunity, fatigue, anxiety. Also MIC for weight loss and detox.

Naturopathic Wellness Center Dr. Dana Michaels ND & Dr. Moses Goldberg ND 175 Concourse Blvd.

707.284.9200

Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of February 26

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) The battles youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been waging these last 10 months have been worthy of you. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tested your mettle and grown your courage. But I suspect that your relationship with these battles is due for a shift. In the future they may not serve you as well as they have up until now. At the very least you will need to alter your strategy and tactics. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also possible that now is the time to leave them behind entirelyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to graduate from them and search for a new cause that will activate the next phase of your evolution as an enlightened warrior. What do you think? TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life is like Sanskrit read to a pony,â&#x20AC;? said Lou Reed. That might be an accurate assessment for most people much of the time, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think it will be true for you in the coming days. On the contrary, you will have a special capacity to make contact and establish connection. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard of dog whisperers and ghost whisperers? You will be like an all-purpose, jack-of-all-trades whispererâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;able to commune and communicate with nervous creatures and alien life forms and pretty much everything else. If anyone can get a pony to understand Sanskrit, it will be you.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20)

Does Kim Kardashian tweak and groom her baby daughterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyebrows? They look pretty amazing, after allâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;elegant, neat, perfectly shaped. What do you think, Gemini? Ha! I was just messing with you. I was checking to see if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re susceptible to getting distracted by meaningless ďŹ&#x201A;uff like celebrity kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; grooming habits. The cosmic truth of the matter is that you should be laser-focused on the epic possibilities that your destiny is bringing to your attention. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to reframe your life story. How? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my suggestion: See yourself as being on a mythic quest to discover and fully express your soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s code.

CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22) The 19th-century American folk hero known as Wild Bill Hickok was born James Butler Hickok. At various times in his life he was a scout for the army, a lawman for violent frontier towns, a professional gambler and a performer in Buffalo Billâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wild West Show. Women found him charismatic, and he once killed an attacking bear with a knife. He had a brother Lorenzo who came to be known as Tame Bill Hickok. In contrast to Wild Bill, Tame Bill was quiet, gentle and cautious. He lived an uneventful life as a wagon master, and children loved him. Right now, Cancerian, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m meditating on how Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to see your inner Wild Bill come out to play for a while, even as your inner Tame Bill takes some time off.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I was a love poet,â&#x20AC;? writes Rudy Francisco, addressing a lover, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d write about how you have the audacity to be beautiful even on days when everything around you is ugly.â&#x20AC;? I suspect you have that kind of audacity right now, Leo. In fact, I bet the ugliness you encounter will actually incite you to amplify the gorgeous charisma youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re radiating. The sheer volume of lyrical soulfulness that pours out of you will have so much healing power that you may even make the ugly stuff less ugly. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m betting that you will lift up everything you touch, nudging it in the direction of grace and elegance and charm. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;You miss 100 percent of the shots you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take,â&#x20AC;? says hockey great Wayne Gretzky. In other words, you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be timid about shooting the puck toward the goal. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about whether you have enough skill or conďŹ dence or luck. Just take the damn shot. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never score if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shoot. Or so the theory goes. But an event in a recent pro hockey game showed thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an exception to the rule. A New York player named Chris Kreider was guiding the puck with his stick as he skated toward the Minnesota teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goalie. But when Kreider cocked and swung his stick, he missed the puck entirely. He whiffed. And yet the puck kept sliding slowly along all by itself. It somehow ďŹ&#x201A;ummoxed the goalie, sneaking past him right into the net. Goal! New rule: you miss only 99.9 percent of the shots you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take. I believe you will soon beneďŹ t from this loophole, Virgo.

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) If you are the type of person who wears gloves when you throw snowballs, Germans would call you

Handschuhschneeballwerfer. They use the same word as slang to mean â&#x20AC;&#x153;coward.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping that in the coming days you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t display any behavior that would justify you being called a Handschuhschneeballwerfer. You need to bring a raw, direct, straightforward attitude to everything you do. You shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rely on any buffers, surrogates or intermediaries. Metaphorically speaking, make sure that nothing comes between your bare hands and the pure snow.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

In his song â&#x20AC;&#x153;4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy),â&#x20AC;? Bruce Springsteen mentions a disappointing development. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That waitress I was seeing lost her desire for me,â&#x20AC;? he sings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She said she wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t set herself on ďŹ re for me anymore.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m assuming nothing like that has happened to you recently, Scorpio. Just the opposite: I bet there are attractive creatures out there who would set themselves on ďŹ re for you. If for some reason this isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t true, ďŹ x the problem! You have a cosmic mandate to be incomparably irresistible.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some people say home is where you come from,â&#x20AC;? says a character in Katie Kacvinskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel Awaken. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a place you need to ďŹ nd, like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scattered and you pick pieces of it up along the way.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an idea I invite you to act on in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. It will be an excellent time to discover more about where you belong and who you belong with. And the best way to do that is to be aggressive as you search far and wide for clues, even in seemingly unlikely places that maybe you would never guess contain scraps of home.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) What words bring the most points in the game of Scrabble? Expert Christopher Swenson says that among the top scorers are â&#x20AC;&#x153;piezoelectricalâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;ubiquitarianismâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;assuming favorable placements on the board that bring double letter and triple word scores. The ďŹ rst word can potentially net 1,107 points, and the second 1,053. There are metaphorical clues here, Capricorn, for how you might achieve maximum success in the next phase of the game of life. You should be well-informed about the rules, including their unusual corollaries and loopholes. Be ready to call on expert help and specialized knowledge. Assume that your luck will be greatest if you are willing to plan nonstandard gambits and try bold tricks. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

Sorry to report that you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t win the lottery this week. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also unlikely that you will score an unrecognized Rembrandt painting for a few dollars at a thrift store or discover that you have inherited a chinchilla farm in Peru or stumble upon a stash of gold coins halfburied in the woods. On the other hand, you may get provocative clues about how you could increase your cash ďŹ&#x201A;ow. To ensure you will notice those clues when they arrive, drop your expectations about where they might come from.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20) Avery, a character in Anne Michaelsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; novel The Winter Vault, has a unique way of seeing. When he arrives in a place for the ďŹ rst time, he â&#x20AC;&#x153;makes room for it in his heart.â&#x20AC;? He â&#x20AC;&#x153;lets himself be alteredâ&#x20AC;? by it. At one point in the story he visits an old Nubian city in Egypt and is overwhelmed by its exotic beauty. Its brightly colored houses are like â&#x20AC;&#x153;shouts of joy,â&#x20AC;? like â&#x20AC;&#x153;gardens springing up in the sand after a rainfall.â&#x20AC;? After drinking in the sights, he marvels, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will take all my life to learn what I have seen today.â&#x20AC;? Everything I just described is akin to experiences you could have in the coming weeks, Pisces. Can you make room in your heart for the dazzle? Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žų NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 26-MARCH 4, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Classifieds

FREE WILL

Say Cheese Hard to find & unique cheeses, sourced locally and from around the world. Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gourmet cheese departments offers the best selections of artisan cheeses in the county. Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for a locally produced artisan cheese or something from the old world, our vast selection is bound to make you smile. Redwood hill Farm Cameo Goat Cheese Pictured.

%'"De`_jA`Z_eC`RUDR_eRC`dR#)%$&$! | &%'64`eReZ2gV_fV4`eReZ(*&*&!"| &'!>`_eVTZe`4V_eVcDR_eRC`dR&$(("#$


NBB1409