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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Monkeywrenching the Data Mines Join the revolution: ‘like’ everything BY D. BAUMAN

S

urveillance tools, however benign their beginning, will always be eventually used by those in power to suppress opposition. Few would have predicted, 20 years ago, that millions of Americans would willingly participate in the loss of their privacy and thereby, inevitably, their freedom. In the recent Bohemian interview with Andrew Keen, he says that what’s most needed is to teach the internet how to forget. There is another way to accomplish the same purpose: overwhelm the internet with contradictory data. The same “Like” button previously used to document our friends, our interests, our purchases, our travels, our political views—this same “Like” button can also be used to render all that data meaningless. Just “like” everything. Like things you hate. Like things you don’t know or care about. Like contradictory things. On a typical day, like the ACLU, Pat Robertson, Elizabeth Warren, the KKK, the NAACP, the Communist Party of America, white supremacist groups, Nuns on the Bus, Tea Party groups, real estate developments in states you’ll never live in, Edward Snowden, the pope, bullfighting, socialism, bunny rabbits, Vladimir Putin, gay pride, Ted Cruz, Wendy Davis, the EPA, wolves, the NRA, Obamacare, Michele Bachmann, vaccines, the Muslim Brotherhood, Israel, and don’t forget to like the NSA. Scroll through online news “liking” every article you see. Do Google searches of whatever keywords catch your eye in the daily news cycle, and like every hit that comes up. Anyone attempting to build a “profile” on you will find it impossible to filter real you from Mega-Like you. Also, tag everything. And tag it wrong. Misidentify everything you see. Every photo you see posted on Facebook, post a comment identifying the contents incorrectly. Pack your Facebook profile with hundreds of movie, book and TV show titles, all unrelated, none of which you actually watch or read. We cannot make the internet forget. But we can gorge the beast until it pukes. The NSA will not be able to expand fast enough to track all the additional information, and regardless, all the information will be worthless. Piss off advertisers. Like everything. D. Bauman has 25 years’ experience working in database management. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Waste Not, Want Not

I’ve been following Bea Johnson for a few years (“The Simple Life,” Oct. 9). This is one of the best articles on her admirable pursuits I’ve seen yet. Thanks again for sharing your lifestyle with us, Bea, especially in the face of rude and ignorant commentary by those who are too set in their wasting ways to consider adopting some zero-waste choices.

ADRIENNE HUTCHINSON Via online

Pioneer woman! This is awesome—I love my zero-waste lifestyle. Let’s get down to the basics. I feel the same way about my glass pantry, and, yes, the food should be the star. Simplicity in surroundings can be very helpful mentally and emotionally, but also in a very practical sense when it comes to cleaning.

JESSICA SILVA Via online

would have been the first thing I got rid of. Besides, I don’t think that “Pa Ingalls” had one. Hey Bea, you wanna save the planet? Jump in all the way; cut out the sugar, flour, etc. Do yourself a real favor and eat green. Then you will be saving more than just money. You will be saving you and your family’s health.

DAVID DALE Sonoma

Freeway to Nowhere? Thank you for printing such a wonderful article and making this important topic your front-page story (“Bypass Mayhem,” Oct. 2). You know Caltrans has really blown it when hundreds of ordinary citizens take to the streets, trees and wick drains. This rogue outfit is so outof-control, all over the state, that it has rolled over the oversight agencies and most elected officials. Because of the Willits protests, a Contra Costa legislator is moving a bill to rein in this greedy beast. Please continue coverage of grassroots actions.

PATRICIA KOVNER Laytonville

Great article! I’m so grateful that Bea has the courage to open up and share her story. I’ve learned so much from her over the years—she’s such an inspiration!

CHELSEA GALE Via online

At the beginning of the article “The Simple Life,” I was on board because my mom always said that if you can’t make the world better, don’t make it worse, and Bea Johnson certainly is trying to make things better. But when I continued on and read that she eats meat, I jumped off the bandwagon. Ms. Johnson certainly should know that the raising of cattle for human consumption is one of the biggest things that pollute our world. And what’s up with the television? That

Thank you, Ms. Dovey, for presenting the environmentalist’s perspective in your story concerning Caltrans’ actions in Little Lake Valley. Caltrans is like an abusive husband that has hurt and disrespected his woman (the earth) time and time again. Those who bow to authority will put up with it, but the people of California who value the natural resources of our bio-regions more than destructive business-asusual will continue to insist that a more appropriately scaled bypass be built. We need a bypass around Willits. Let’s build one that thoroughly addresses the congestion that we all can live with.

JEN BURNSTAD Boonville

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

Sat-Sun 11 am - 5 pm

By Tom Tomorrow

Tolay Lake Regional Park, Petaluma Lakeville Highway at Cannon Lane

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Pumpkin Patch Hay Rides with a Ranger Straw Maze Night Time Creatures Barn Farm Animals & Crafts Old Fashioned Games Great Food

Top Five

Crop Swap To deal with the tsunami of extra produce in Berkeley (“Want Some Figs?” Sept. 25), during the growing months, we have a once a week “crop swap.” You take your extra abundance, lay it out on tables and blankets, and then take a card from a pack of playing cards. When you start, aces get first dibs, then twos, etc. Once you’ve gone through, and everyone has had a chance to take one item/bunch, then it’s a free-for-all. Folks show up with fruit and veggies, but also eggs, honey, jams, fermented goodies, seeds and plant starts. It’s a great way to meet fellow gardeners, find a good home for surplus and get produce. Transition Berkeley organizes it. (And, yes, I would love some figs!)

CLAIRE B. COTTS

Berkeley

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

1 Dave Chappelle’s

hilarious ASL interpreters at the Wells Fargo Center

2

Santa Rosa sells AT&T building at nearly $2 million loss for a wine museum

3

Dan Peterson, architect and historian who moved Santa Rosa Post Office, R.I.P.

4

Jury trial for Max Wade, teen who stole Guy Fieri’s Lamborghini, underway now

5 Napa’s Tim Mathison

sets new world record with a 2,032-pound pumpkin

707-565-2041

sonomacountyparks.org

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Rants

Oct 19-20

Paper THE

STATE OF THE INDUSTRY Redwood and manzanita at the fenced east end of the Artesa-Sonoma property in Annapolis.

Chainsaw Wine Another winery wants to clearcut redwoods to plant vineyards—and this time, the courts might actually allow it BY ALASTAIR BLAND

T

here is no forest among the trees. That’s what state officials have said regarding a large stand of second-growth redwood and Douglas fir near Annapolis that a Spanish-owned winery has proposed to level and replace with grapevines and a winery.

The project, proposed by Artesa Vineyards & Winery, has been lumbering through the legal process for several years now, and to the dismay of Sonoma County environmentalists, it has progressed almost to the finish line. Now, the only roadblock still in the way is the lawsuit filed against the state by three conservation groups in June of 2012, and which will be heard

in the Sonoma County Superior Court this Friday. Three plaintiffs—the Center for Biological Diversity, the Redwood Chapter of the Sierra Club and the Friends of the Gualala River—allege that the state’s Department of Forestry and Fire Protection conducted its review while disregarding environmental protection laws. At the heart of the lawsuit is the project’s

Friends of the Gualala River

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 1 6 – 22, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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environmental impact report, required by state law for certain types of development projects. “Their report says that cutting down 154 acres of forest and converting it into vineyards will have no significant environmental impacts,” says Dave Jordan, a member of Friends of the Gualala River. But not all parties seem to agree about what actually constitutes “forest.” The trees in question include thousands of redwoods and other conifers, many between 50 and 80 feet tall. The plaintiffs argue that these trees are valuable because they provide habitat for wildlife, sequester carbon and limit soil erosion. But in August, the state attorney general’s office submitted a written rebuttal to the lawsuit, stating, “Petitioners are wrong. The project site is not a ‘redwood forest.’ . . . [I]t was completely harvested and converted to grazing and orchard. . . . Conifer timber is now just beginning to recapture the site.” State officials had not responded to a request for comment by press time. Sam Singer, a spokesman for Artesa who’s often hired by big-name clients to “soften” environmental crises—including the Chevron refinery fire in Richmond, the Cosco Busan oil spill in the San Francisco Bay and logging at the Bohemian Grove— says the winery plans to preserve two old-growth redwoods on the property, but that numerous 30- to 60-year-old trees will be removed. Singer says remnants of an aging apple orchard will also be replaced with vines. “But there aren’t forests here,” Singer says. He claims that locally based opponents have misrepresented the nature of the landscape, which is about due west of Geyserville some 20 miles. “This is agricultural land, and this is an agricultural project that will preserve and protect the environment,” Singer says. Justin Augustine, an attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity, tells the Bohemian that removing trees that absorb carbon dioxide will contribute to greenhouse gas production.

9

Earth’s Fate Do issues around climate change, social justice and threatened indigenous cultures keep you up at night, grinding your teeth, wondering what—if anything—can be done to remedy the current global crisis into which we continue to spiral? Or are you so overwhelmed with bad news that you’ve found yourself face down on the floor when you could be out taking tiny baby steps toward a better world? If you answer yes to either of these questions, the Bioneers Conference might be a good place to turn. Now in its 23rd year, the mega eco-social justicesustainability forum rolls into the Marin Center Oct. 18–20. This year’s conference features keynote speaker activist and UNICEF ambassador Danny Glover, and offers an array of workshops, forums and films highlighting proactive approaches to addressing the world’s complex issues. Events at the conference are jam-packed with information about youth leadership, gender awareness, community resilience, accessible healthcare, biomimicry, sustainable agriculture, progressive media, indigenous activism, medicinal herbs, education and more (whew!). Founders Kenny Ausubel and Nina Simons spend each year planning the event, which has brought leaders like Jane Goodall, Michael Pollan and Gloria Steinem to the stage. Attending this year, in addition to Glover, are local and international figures such as John A. Powell, Matthew Fox, Mona Polacca, Joanna Macy, Lynne Twist, and OAEC’s own Brock Dolman, among dozens of others. Rounded out with a Saturdaynight dance party, Bioneers provides a gateway into positive social change on Friday–Sunday, Oct. 18–20, at the Marin Center. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 9am–6pm daily. $75– $475. Visit www.bioneers.org for tickets.—Dani Burlison

LEARN TO THINK LIKE A

LAWYER Empire College School of Law has opened enrollment for its new Master of Legal Studies program, which gives North Bay students the opportunity to pursue diverse career opportunities through the acquisition of a foundational understanding of the legal system or as background for the Juris Doctor degree (i.e. dual enrollment).

Intro classes start November 4! 707-546-4000 www.empcol.edu 3035 Cleveland Ave.

Santa Rosa

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The project’s EIR, however, deemed this concern “less-thansignificant.” The same conclusion was made for potential impacts on air quality, water quality, cultural resources, geologic stability and aesthetic values. State planners considered, then rejected, alternative sites for Artesa’s project—but Jordan notes that they only looked at alternative forested sites. “Why didn’t they consider a nonforested site?” Jordan says. “That would have led to a different outcome. It’s almost as though their definition of the project wasn’t just planting Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes, but knocking down a forest in order to plant Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes.” Jordan points out that though the Artesa EIR recommends a 166-foot buffer between adjacent homes and the edge of the planned vineyard—a measure addressing potential harm from pesticide sprays—state officials have acknowledged that there is a house 87 feet from one edge of the project site. Jamie and Kathy Hall have lived here for more than three decades. “I basically moved up here to live in a forest,” Jamie Hall says, “and [their project] is going to destroy everything I came here for.” Conservationists celebrated a victory earlier this year when a 20,000-acre site called Preservation Ranch that had been proposed for a massive vineyard development project was sold to the Conservation Fund, a national land-protection organization. But the Artesa project has marked a turning point. It is the first redwoods-to-vineyards proposal requiring an EIR to be approved in California. Chris Poehlmann, president of Friends of the Gualala River, says that if Friday’s court date results in a precedent-setting win for the wine industry, much of the North Coast could become vulnerable to similar conversion. “If we lose, others will see that you can win these fights—that you can cut down timber and convert it into vineyards.”

Dining

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 1 6 – 22, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

10

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

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COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

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S O N O MA CO U N T Y Bistro Ralph Bistro. $$. Classic and classy–bistro food at its best. Wine bar. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sun; brunch, Sun. 109 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.1380.

Chinois Asian Bistro

Try T ry O Our ur L Legendary egendary Pizzas! Pizzzas!

Asian. $$. Pan-Asian cuisine done delicious. Happy hour tapas and cocktails weekdays. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 186 Windsor River Rd, Windsor. 707.838.4667.

Garden Court Cafe & Bakery American. $-$$.

p e Taon! m es o c ti Aw r Sele B ee

$

6 95 L Lunch unch B Buffet uf f e t Mon – Fri Mon–Fri 11–2pm 1 1––2pm

$ 95

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gluten g lu ten ffree r ee ccrust r us t aavailable v ailable

Wed nights Wed nights 5–8pm 5 – 8pm

Visit Visit www.mountainmikes.com www.mount ainmikes.com for for nearest nearest location location

Traditional diner food treated with utter respect; the quality ingredients make for sublime eating. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 13647 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.1565.

Jennie Low’s Chinese. $-$$. Light, healthy, and tasty Cantonese, Mandarin, Hunan, and Szechuan home-style cooking. Great selection, including vegetarian fare, seafood, and noodles. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. Two locations: 140 Second St, Ste 120, Petaluma. 707.762.6888. Vintage Oaks Shopping Center, Rowland Ave, Novato. 415.892.8838.

JhanThong BanBua

Award Winning Wines - Exceptional Cuisine

Book your holiday event at Corks Open 7 Days - Brunch - Lunch - Dinner Tasting Room Open Daily

5700 Hwy. 116 ‹707.887.3344 ‹Corks116.com

Thai. $-$$. Sophisticated and delicate Thai cuisine. Fresh ingredients, packed with flavor. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat-Sun. 2400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8048.

LoCoco’s Cucina Rustica Italian. $$-$$$. Authentic rustic-style Italian with a touch of Northern California, and a favorite with those in the know. Get the cannoli! Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner, Tues-Sun. 117 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.2227.

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly, plentiful staff at outstanding

and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Sizzling Tandoor Indian. $-$$. A Sonoma County legend for almost 20 years, and for good reason. Of the more than 100 menu choices, all are worthwhile. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.5999.

brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

MARIN CO U N T Y Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh

Thai Orchid Thai. $-$$. Rich Thai food made with crisp, fresh ingredients, reasonably priced. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 1005 Vine St, Healdsburg. 707.433.0515.

Thai food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some of the best fried bananas to be found. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner, Sun. (Cash only.) 809 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.458.8845.

The Villa Italian. $-$$.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle

Spectacular views, superb service. Seafood, steak, poultry, seasonal specialties, pizza from wood-burning oven, patio dining. Open 7 days a week. 3901 Montgomery Drive, Santa Rosa 707.528.7755.

American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; breakfast and lunch, Tues. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

West Side Bar & Grill Sports Bar. $$. Home of the almost-famous bacon cheeseburger. Seventeen beers on tap (wine list available). Fourteen flat screen televisions to watch all of the hottest sports events. Two great pool tables. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd # B8, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9453.

Willi’s Seafood & Raw Bar Seafood. $$. Delicious preparations of the freshest fish and shellfish. Lunch and dinner daily; dinner, Mon-Sat. 403 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.9191.

Willi’s Wine Bar Small plates/wine bar. $$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner daily. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$. Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat;

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Casa Mañana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Drake’s Beach Cafe

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

pretension. Dinner, TuesSun. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.

1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Station House Cafe

Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Thurs-Mon. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

The William Tell House American & Italian.

Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

$$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Hilltop 1892 American.

Yet Wah Chinese. $$.

$$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$.

M&G’s Burgers & Beverages American. $.

N A PA CO U N T Y

The ultimate in American cuisine. Crispy fries, good burgers and friendly locals chowing down. Lunch and dinner daily. 2017 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.454.0655.

All Seasons Californian.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6534 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037.

Mountain Home Inn

Bounty Hunter Wine

American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner daily. 975 First St, Napa. 707.266.3976.

$$-$$$. A Calistoga institution specializing in fresh, seasonal wine country cuisine. 1400 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. 707.942.9111.

Brannan’s Grill

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525.

California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Pier 15 American. $$. Fun,

Checkers California. $$.

tucked-away old-fashioned spot overlooking hidden harbor. Great place for breakfast at a bar, too. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121.

Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Sorella Caffe Italian.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As

$$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks

comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily.

11

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$.

French Laundry Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Keller’s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

EDD E SREesAtaFuOraOntD& P F i s h m a rL ke t R

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

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Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast,lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

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Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Wineries

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Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY

Healdsburg. By appointment only, Monday–Saturday (opening in the Barlow Center, late 2013). Tasting fee, $10. 707.433.4780.

Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tastings $15–$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Buena Vista “Our future

River Road Vineyards

Cuvaison Estate Wines

is our past” is the motto at this historic, remodeled and reinvigorated winery, founded 1857. Watch for character actors, taste Buena Vista Vinicultural Society favorites Zinfandel, sparkling wine and cream sherry—and look out for the crocodile. 18000 Old Winery Road, Sonoma. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee $10, Saturday tour $20. 800.926.1266.

Russian River Pinot for $18 at no-nonsense, solid producer. 5220 Ross Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only, Monday–Friday. 707.887.8130.

(WC) Producing some 65 percent of its product as Chardonnay, Cuvaison has a 22,000-square-foot cave. 4550 Silverado Trail N., Napa. By appointment. 707.942.6266.

Forchini Winery Handsome Italianate tasting room, proudly stocked with gold medal-bearing bottles and tributes to winery dogs past and present, a cozy space where conversation strikes up easily among visitors. Papa Nonno TuscanStyle Red. 5141 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Friday–Sunday, 11am–4:30pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.431.8886.

NEW N EW REVISED REVISED M MENU! EN U ! $ 99

8 LLunch unch Buffet Buf fet

OVER 30 OVER 30 IITEMS TEMS W WITH ITH SSALAD AL AD B BAR AR AND A ND MORE MO RE N NAAN A AN

Graton Ridge Cellars Formerly an apple shed beloved by regular customers who drove up to get juice and apples, this tasting room is clean and contemporary, with a bit of wine country art on the walls, and an apple dessert wine. The apples are not gone after all. 3561 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Sebastopol. Daily, 10am– 4:30pm. $10. 707.823.3040.

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409 4 0 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa os a 707.579.5999 70 7.579.5999 ccross ros s sstreet t re et 5th 5t h

Karah Estate Vineyards Like a riddle 3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

angez Bien! Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Mini Savory Croissant Tray Pissaladiere Crotini Full Catering Menu Available

bottled up in a mystery, it’s all but hidden in plain sight above the 101 freeway’s Cotati Grade. Impressive view; mixed bag of low-alcohol, low-priced Pinots from quirky winery. 1010 W. Railroad Ave., Cotati. Friday– Sunday 11am–5pm. $5 fee. 707.795-3030.

MacPhail Family Wines Anderson Valley vineyards were something of a new frontier when James MacPhail set out. Now partnered with Hess Collection, MacPhail makes Pinot to reminisce about with each sip. 851 Magnolia Drive,

Spann Vineyards Ninety percent of Spann wines are distributed out of state, leaving a little aside for this off-thePlaza tasting room. Malbec, Mourvedre and Mayacamas Cab; the take-home bargain is a $20 blend. Photography gallery adds visual interest. 111 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Open daily, noon–6pm. Tasting fee. 707.933.8343.

Vinoteca Vinify Wine Services is like a Russian doll of wineries within wineries making brands for still more clients. It’s in a generic industrial-park location, but with unique, single-vineyard wines from Frostwatch, Baker Lane, Bjornstad, Super Sonoman and others. 3358 Coffey Lane, Ste. C, Santa Rosa. Friday– Sunday 11am–5pm. $10 fee. 707.542.3292.

Wilson Winery Scenic setting and rustic-modern tasting room makes for an atmospheric, recommended visit. Single-vineyard Zinfandels, Cabernet Sauvignons, Cabernet Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah win awards for good reason— namely, even curmudgeons take one sip and turn into believers. 1960 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am to 5pm. Tastings are $5; $10 for reserves. 707.433.4355.

N A PA CO U N TY Beaulieu Vineyard History in a glassful of dust– Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship

Frenchie Winery Every winery has a story: this one goes “bow wow wow.” It’s really just a bulldog-themed shed set amid Raymond Vineyard’s biodynamic gardens. While dogs snooze inside their own private wine barrels, or cavort with others in the gated kennel, their humans can keep an eye on them via video link. 849 Zinfandel Lane, St. Helena. Daily, 10am–4pm. Tasting fees vary. 707.963.3141.

Jericho Canyon Vineyard Oh boy, boutique Napa Cab from celebrity consultant Michel Rolland and high-rollers who used to spend half the year in Hawaii? Well, yeah, but they’re super nice, work hard, and their wines are tops. Cab and Sauv Blanc. 3322 Old Lawley Toll Road, Calistoga. Tour and tasting by appointment only, $30. 707.942.9665.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Robert Biale Vineyards Was it the high scores that attracted the horde, or the excellence of the wine? It’s a chicken-and-egg type of question, but “Black Chicken” is neither chicken nor egg; it’s a bottle of Zinfandel. 4038 Big Ranch Road, Napa. By appointment daily, 10am– 4pm. Tasting fees $20–$35. 707.257.7555.

13

A label is born

BY JAMES KNIGHT

W

hen I first came across “Butternut,” a brand of Chardonnay said to satisfy the unabashed cravings of the oaky-butterbomb crowd, I assumed it was the contrivance of an experienced team of marketing professionals. How else to explain the explosion of dessert-themed, target-marketed wine labels except as the fruit of focus groups, spreadsheets, corporate trendmongers? To find out more about the process, I arrange to meet the West Coast representative of Nashville-based BNA Wine Group—who proves my assumptions wrong. I find Tony Leonardini on crutches in front of Ballentine Vineyards, where he makes some of his wines. A St. Helena local since his father purchased Whitehall Lane Winery in 1993, Leonardini worked for the family business after college before trying his hand at selling a barrel of his own wine. While deftly thieving a sample of 2012 Cab from the barrel, he explains that Butternut was born by felicitous accident. One evening while he was trying to think up a name for a batch of Chardonnay that had turned out funky—and going through four glasses of the stuff in the effort—his wife walked through the door with a box of CSA vegetables and complained, “I’m going to get tired of this—two weeks in a row of butternut squash!” In 2009 he sent half a pallet to a skeptical distributor in Nashville. The wine flew out the door, and he got a business partner. Now they’re making 50,000 cases and got picked up by Safeway, with no advertising. The 2011 “Butternut” California Chardonnay ($17.51) smells like heavily toasted oak, no doubt about it; I mean, four-alarm fire at the sawmill, overpowering even the sweet, buttery, caramel corn flavor. But Butternut fans dig it, and Leonardini hired a winemaking consultant to make sure it remains their perfect, after-work “melt away” wine. I would have gone with “firebug,” except that Leonardini’s quite the opposite: the volunteer firefighter is sporting a cast today because he recently sprained his ankle while rescuing a couple and their dogs from a fire across the street from his house. The 2010 “Volunteer” Cabernet Sauvignon ($30.90) is his most serious wine, a liquid German chocolate fruitcake of a wine, trending savory black olive with air. There’s a saline freshness that keeps the 2012 “Bandwagon” Monterey Unoaked Chardonnay ($17.51) lively through a lingering, peanut brittle and apple pie aftertaste. As for 2012 “Nanna’s Shortcake” Lodi Zinfandel ($17.51), a sweet and soft drizzle of raspberry syrup dignified by dark hints of clove, Leonardini says that he was just eating his favorite dessert while thinking up a new wine label. He stopped and asked himself, “Are you kidding me?” BNA Wine Group, St. Helena. 707.968.5172. www.bnawinegroup.com.

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BNA Wine Group

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14

It Showed Up at My Doorstep. Winners of the Bohemian’s 2013 fall writing contest

Y

ou know the drill: pull the pile out of your mailbox, rifle through it, toss most of it in the recycling bin. And, if you’re like us, sigh a wistful reminder of when getting the mail used to mean actual surprises. Hey, we get it. There’s email, texting, Skype, Gchat, Facebook—none of this is new. But in the bulk-rate world of the physical mailbox, a genuine hand-addressed envelope or package inspires a special kind of wonder. That’s what we were counting on when we announced this year’s writing contest, in which readers sent us their mailing addresses and we, in turn, sent them random objects on which to base a 400-word piece of creative fiction. The response was overwhelming, and 146 people signed up, a new record for our annual writing contest. Turns out people love getting free stuff in the mail. Due to the huge response, shipping was delayed slightly, and then affected by a postage error—sorry, our fault—but eventually most everyone received a manila envelope with an object of inspiration inside. No two objects were the same, and contestants had only two rules: (1) to work the object into the story somehow, and (2) to use, in some way, the phrase “it showed up on my doorstep.” You, dear readers, did not disappoint. How could we forget the tales of “Nevermore and the Golden Coin,” of “magic sperm,” of “beloved Cheerios”? How could we forget the submission that was, uh, the same story submitted the year before? How could we forget phrases such as “Like an emblem for Liberace’s cat, it was sparkly and gay as all hell”? In the end, five stories out of 146 had to be chosen as winners, and believe us when we say it was not an easy decision. That’s why we’ve picked five honorable mention entries: Andy Covert, Thea Rhiannon, Brian Gellman, Lois Pearlman and Noah Hallett, thank you. Virtual silver medals to you all. Printed below are the five winning stories, by Don Stoddard, Amy Robinson, Diane Swan, Gabriella Buonassisi and Aloysius Beerheart. Each of the winners will receive a gift certificate to Copperfield’s Books. Please join them, and us, in a public reading and celebration on Thursday, Oct. 17, at Acre Coffee in Santa Rosa’s Montgomery Village. The whole soiree goes from 6pm to 7:30pm, all winning entries will be read and discussed, and it’s completely free. We’d love to see you. Without further ado, the winning stories! —Gabe Meline

15

Mass Remembrance

By Don Stoddard

By Amy Elizabeth Robinson

The fuse is lit, soon it will be over. I’ve never forgotten that night all those years ago. He had been gone so long, decades. I was sure he was dead. He was a likable guy, the kind of person you would do anything for. A smooth talker with a mesmerizing voice with so much to say about the world, and how it could be better. We were young, times were different. Things were wild, free, dangerous, radical. We were a small, inseparable group of social misfits. This is how we spent that summer. The talks started innocently enough, over coffee, listening as he spoke of the world and the things that weren’t working. He never said how, but we would fix it. We would know when it was time to act, time to make it right. Late that summer, we were gathered at his place, a small unadorned room. He served us his special tea, a deliciously bitter elixir with some definite side effects. He could always come up with a great story, but this night was going to be different. Different indeed. As the elixir kicked in, he removed his shirt to reveal a tattooed body like none I’d seen before or since. It was 3-D. He was covered in animals of all kinds, snakes, apes—yes, there were lions, tigers and bears—and creatures no man has ever seen or would hope to see. The animals were interwoven with geometric symbols, strange alien writings with colors so bright and vivid they could light up a room. Everything was dancing, pulsating hypnotically, as he told his tale and laughed. I saw a black panther begin to pace back and forth, becoming larger and larger until it leapt full-size from his chest right at me. I screamed, and woke alone in my room. I never saw him or any of the others again. Life went on. I worked, loved, grew older. Then it showed up on my doorstep: a package. In it was a beautiful, porcelain, black panther, crouched and ready to leap. I knew it was from him. He was alive. I broke it open to get my instructions. I knew the others would be getting theirs, too. We would be in sync, no matter how long it been. Things haven’t changed, maybe gotten worse. He was right. It was time. Hypnotized? Perhaps, for here I am watching the sparkle of the fuse waiting, waiting for the end.

I want a manicure. I want a new car. I want a chocolate caramel each time I check out at the grocery store. I want my life to be orderly. I want a garden with clipped hedges and bordered beds. I want a better shoe organizer. What I don’t want is to stand on my doorstep holding this goddamned blood-colored envelope, still damp with the feel of the priest’s fingers pressing it into my hand. I don’t want the feel of his fingers. I don’t want the feel of anyone’s fingers. I want dry bone-colored china in my cabinet and a polyester blanket to wrap around myself at the end of the day. The priest showed up at my doorstep. He wants me to remember. I don’t want to. Remember the men in your life, he says, a hiss at the back of his words. Remember God the Father above, His Son who came to save us. He pauses, snaking his neck to get a look into my eyes. Remember your father, dear, your very own, God rest his soul. The sky is flat-gray above us. A candy wrapper rustles by. I want a wrapped-up candy. What I don’t want is the stew of remembrance, mass or otherwise. I don’t want to pay these priests so they can store my rotten memories away in a gilded box, or burn them away to heaven. Wait . . . I want my life to be orderly. Wait, I say, just as he sighs and turns away. He has one foot still on the doorstep. I hold up a finger, rush into the dark hall, find my purse, dig out some bills, stuff them in the envelope. I hunch over, sticky flap brushing my cheek, and whisper. Fiercely. I give that envelope as many memories as I think it can hold. I straighten up, smooth my hair, seal the envelope and return to the door. The priest waits, eyes bright and greedy. I hold out the envelope. When he nods and tucks it into his robes, I am washed by the form and certainty he offers the world. I watch as he makes his way down the sidewalk for a while. Wait . . . I forgot to write my father’s name on there. The priest never gave me a pen. How will God know those memories are mine? I want to start over again. Wait, I call. It’s too late. He’s already gone. ) 16

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The Black Panther

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 1 6 – 22, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Ms. Lily Broach

Tiny Archer

I was extruded from a plastic vacuform machine in Hong Kong in MCMLXXXIV. I was affixed to my first bosom in ’LXXXV; that of an eccentric Chinese grandmother, voted out of the mahjong club for taking up chewing tobacco when the group agreed to quit smoking during games. She was so distraught that, even though I was a gift from her eldest daughter, any reminders of that fateful day were put on the curb. Fortunately, my sidewalk stay lasted all of 10 minutes, when Patricia picked me up as a lucky token. She wore me everyday to her first job as dishwasher at Denny’s. I was the only piece of jewelry that held up in the steamy room, never fading, scratching or rusting. I was as persistent as she proved to be, until she got promoted to server and tossed the dishwashing apron in the trash with me pinned to it. Eric/a, sever at Denny’s by day, drag queen by night, greedily rescued me. I was just what she needed to keep her left bra strap from showing when she wore the one-shoulder sarong in the ever-popular Hawaiian encore she performed at the Moose Lodge on alternating Saturday nights. One night, in a fit of passion, Eric/a flung her arms wide for her final curtsey, popping me off her shoulder into the lap of Cecilia. Blinking twice, looking left then right, Cilly, as she called herself, clasped the broach to her chest in delight. Providence was shining on her in the entity of me, a lily broach, just what Cilly needed to adorn her sweater for piano lessons with Wilber tomorrow. He might pay attention to her instead of the piano lesson with me adorning her flat bosom. It was Wilber who disappointed her, not me. But she unpinned me from the gray cotton sweater, putting me in the CVS bag along with other discards, to donate to the shelter for its monthly jumble sale. I don’t honestly remember how I showed up at your doorstep. My hunch is, I got rejected from the costume-jewelry section, tossed in the not-surehow-to-price pile and ended up in the $5 grab bag with a seed necklace with a broken clasp, a saggy bracelet whose elastic was stretched out, and a plastic watch with no battery. But I assure you, my dear, you will enjoy me. I’m eternal, plastic.

A Tiny Archer showed up at my doorstep the other day. With nary a word he drew an arrow from his quiver and promptly put it through the thick head of a partially articulated Schwarzenegger action figure, leaving a sharp point protruding from the back of Arnold’s prematurely orange scalp. “Tiny Archer!” I exclaimed. “You have just dispatched a former governor of California and beloved B-movie star!” “I’m off to Chico to star in The Adventures of Robin Hood,” calmly replied the archer, “and I have to eliminate any possible competition.” I correctly pointed out to the archer that while he was indeed in Technicolor, he was a bit late to star in a movie that wrapped up in 1938. This didn’t seem to bother him at all. I asked him if he also planned to eliminate Errol Flynn, but he said that his next target was Olivia de Havilland, since he intended to play Maid Marian. It became apparent that the archer was off his meds, so I offered to brew him some Tiger Tea, which he gladly accepted. By the third cup, he had settled down a bit, so we discussed the motion picture arts and archers in popular media. I asked him if he was familiar with the comic book character the Green Arrow. With a disgusted look he said that he would never associate with anyone whose secret identity was Oliver Queen. I had to agree with him there. It would be like creating a hockey team for San Francisco and naming them the Spiders. It grew late, and the Tiny Archer was running out of topics of conversation. He was beginning to repeat stories from earlier in the evening, and it was decided that he should be on his way. I offered to give him bus fare to Chico, but he said that a ticket to Oroville would be enough, and that he would take public transit from there to his eventual destination in Bidwell Park. He wanted to make the detour so that he could visit the Oroville sites where O. J. Simpson starred in his very first movie. I found this to be a strange request, but knowing the archer, it probably made perfect sense to him. He packed some extra Tiger Tea into his quiver for later use at various stops during the long journey. And with that he found himself Gone with the Wind.

By Diane Swan

By Aloysius Beerheart

17

By Gabriella Buonassisi

I demand to be seen. I will not hesitate to pound my fists on this door until they are bruised and bloody, or shout until my voice is hoarse. Do you know how much it costs to come up here? Do you even realize how far it is? I am not as fortunate as yourself to have magical beasts of burden to transport me across the globe. I am here to discuss my son, Stanley. Stanley Wellington. My Stanley has been exceptionally good this year. I assure you I keep precise track of these sorts of things. How can you, Sir, in good conscience not reward: • All A’s on his report card • First place in the science fair • Lead in the school musical • Winner of the regional under-12 chess tournament • Starting third baseman in Little League • Leading rebounder for the school basketball team • Church choir soloist • Eagle Scout • Senior citizen center volunteer • Junior Recycler of the Year Award winner And then this . . . this thing shows up on my doorstep. Well, chimneystep or treestep I suppose would be more accurate, but I am not in the business of making up words. Why on earth would you think a wind-up, pastel purple bunny would be appropriate for a 12-year-old boy? And at this time of year? Was this some kind of cruel joke or bizarre statement? No, this I can only chalk up to a very real, very large lapse in mental capacity. Did you even read the letter he wrote you asking for a mountain bike? Maybe this is a wake-up call for you to slow down. I am sure your job is extremely stressful. Could you not delegate more responsibility to your, ah, diminutive associates? Listen, none of us is getting any younger, and it is well documented that as one ages, the brain simply does not function as it used to. Perhaps a holiday would be in order. The Caymans really are lovely in January. Yet the fact remains that you cheated my Stanley, and I will not tolerate it. I am prepared to stay here for as long as it takes you to make this right. I have hot cider and am covered from head to toe in Versatech gear. I can wait all night. I can wait until next year’s list is prepared if I have to.

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18

Local Lit

Spotlighting recent local authors’ work BY DANI BURLISON, LEILANI CLARK, NICOLAS GRIZZLE, TARA KAVEH AND GABE MELINE

Santa Rosa–based psychotherapist Jo Lauer applies her knowledge of the human psyche to a new genre in ‘Best Laid Plans: A Cozy Mystery’ (CreateSpace; $11.69). Her story begins with Jenny Pond, an exfelon who “hadn’t planned to kill anyone, but fate has a lousy sense of humor.” Jenny meets Shalese, a blue-collar social worker from Detroit, and the two fall in love as they work together at the First Step, a recovery house in San Francisco. Things go afoul when Florence, a wealthy benefactress with a particularly unsavory history, comes along, forcing the relocation of the recovery house to Santa Rosa. Like Orange Is the New Black for the wine country set, the book’s characters—mostly women who’ve spent time in jail for various offenses—only get deeper into mystery and adventure after the big move.—L.C.

Reading stories about a town that used to be famous for making cigars gives a whole new appreciation for the handrolled tobacco sticks favored by mobsters, businessmen and Cuban dictators alike. Santa Rosa author Emilio GonzalezLlanes’ ‘Cigar City Stories: Tales of Old Ybor City’ (iUniverse; $9.95) is a small but robust first-person account of the city outside of Tampa, Fla., which became a haven for Cuban, Italian and Spanish immigrants with a knack for rolling cigars. Before machine-rolled cigars become commonplace in the 1950s and ’60s, cigars were all rolled by hand. Ybor City was demolished in the 1960s to make way for urban gentrification, but the memories in Cigar City Stories create a visual, vibrant image of diverse life in the city. Whether the smell of a cigar induces salivation or an urge to vomit, Cigar City Stories is a reminder of the history and personality of one of the most luxurious methods of slow suicide.—N.G. Long revered as a site of archaeological mastery, the ancient Toltec city of Teotihuacán sees a gazillion visitors annually (give or take a bazillion). Though many seek out the 2,000-year-

old pyramids in order to simply cross another cool destination off their bucket lists, others view Teotihuacán as a serious power destination that brings all sorts of healing. ‘Dreaming Heaven’ (Agape Media International; $24.95) is the story of one group’s experience with the healing powers of this ancient site. An accompanying guidebook and workbook to the documentary of the same name, Dreaming Heaven is authored by the four guides featured in the film, including Bodega Bay’s Francis Rico, and gives step-by-step instructions to transform life circumstances in 12 short weeks. The book not only comes with the 76-minute DVD, but links to free inspirational downloads as well. That’s a lot of Toltec magic in one package!— D.B. The Napa Valley of yore was very different from the winesoaked, spa-laden tourist playground it’s become today. Last year, the Napa Valley Historical Ecology Atlas by Robin Grossinger explored the changes in the ecology of the valley over a span of centuries.

Now ‘Run of the Mill: A True Life, Napa Adventure,’ by Dona Stanley Bakker ($13.95; Pastime Publications), explores an older way of life in the same region, with a focus on five years of the author’s childhood spent living at the historic Bale Grist Mill north of St. Helena. Built circa 1841 by Dr. Edward Turner Bale, the mill ceased operation around 1879, when it was run out of business by larger commercial mill operations in San Francisco and Vallejo. Bakker lived there between 1959 and 1964, after her grandparents were hired on as caretakers, and her book serves both as a celebration of times past and a reminder that every piece of land has hidden, and often fascinating, history.—L.C.

Marin County’s Raymond Welch has worked in the energy industry for 30 years, and his first novel, ‘A Change in the Weather’ (Ice Cap Publishing; $14.99), illustrates his imaginative world of social and political fallout in the face of abrupt climate change. The thriller follows the Russell family during the 10th anniversary of the disappearance of the polar ice cap in 2028. In the story, each family member does what he or she thinks is right in an America of the future that struggles to hold its democratic and Christian values during the wake-up worldwide disaster. The Arctic ice caps have

In her debut collection of poetry, Sonoma’s Lisa Summers explores the seasons and contradictions found within the West’s topographic and emotional terrain. ‘Star Thistle and Other Poems’ (FMRL; $12.95) grapples, too, with altered landscapes. A native of the Bay Area, Summers reflects her first-hand experience of witnessing our local environment transform. In “House Finches,” Summers writes: “The only traces of the old farm / its rich soil was buried alive / by sidewalks, roads and houses / are the anise weeds that burst forth / from the memory of good earth / in the last open field.” Drawing on mythology—Kuan Yin, Aphrodite, Eros—Summers explores the psyche, often bringing the reader back to the great vast ocean for a breath of fresh air.—D.B. Baseball fans know Amy G as the in-game reporter for the San Francisco Giants, but Petaluma locals know her as the Casa Grande grad who turned her passion for sports into the

world’s best job: hanging around the dugout and talking to Matt Cain, Pablo Sandoval, Hunter Pence and the rest of the greats in orange and black. Written for kids, ‘Smarty Marty’s Got Game’ (Cameron + Company; $17.95) is the first book by Amy G (still lives in Petaluma, real last name Gutierrez)—a simple story of an older sister passing on the contagious love of baseball to her younger brother during a day at the ballpark. Because of trademark issues, illustrator Adam McCauley doesn’t use Giants logos in his vibrant fullpage images, but the panda hats, garlic-fries stands and giant Coke bottle make it more than evident which team is playing. (Jon Miller’s trademark call “It is outta here!” makes a key appearance.) Of particular interest is the book’s emphasis on scoring the game by hand, something of a forgotten art that might be lost on younger readers—and that, frankly, one sees more frequently over in Oakland. But if Gutierrez’s book reaches its intended audience, there’s no question there’ll be a future audience of scorers for “the greatest game in the world.” —G.M. Gracianna Winery in Healdsburg is named for co-owner Trini Amador’s great-grandmother Gracianna Lasaga. She also provides the title of Amador’s first book, ‘Gracianna’ (Greenleaf Book Group Press; $24.95), out this fall. Combining fact with fiction, Amador—who works as a principal at BHC Consulting

Winters has penned the life of Timothy Jacobson, nicknamed “the Omaha Kid,” a crossover sports superstar with an unlikely combination of skills: baseball and tennis. After a successful baseball career, the Kid goes on to compete in the U.S. Open and does very well, and finds himself a superstar almost overnight. But his romantic life doesn’t always fare as well as his swinging sports career. Using many California cities as a setting, Winters chronicles the Kid’s life through the later half of the 20th century. Using the natural drama of sports to build anxiety, the same feeling translates into the Kid’s love life. Will he strike out in love? Or will he, ahem, hit a home run?—N.G. doing brand strategy and insights development—takes World War II and the Nazi occupation of Europe as his novel’s backdrop. Gracianna, a Basque woman who dreams of going to America but is stymied after the escalation of the war, finds herself in a fight to the death after discovering that her sister has been forced into labor at Auschwitz. Summoning all of her courage, she attempts to free her sister and learns about her own strength in the process.—L.C.

‘The Adventures of the Omaha Kid’ (Buffalo Publishing Company of the Napa Valley; $12.99) has sports, celebrity, wine and, of course, romance. St. Helena author Nathaniel Robert

When Jack London’s Glen Ellen Wolf House caught fire in August 1913, little did London fans realize that the root causes of the incident would remain an unanswerable question over the following hundred years. Sonoma County resident and SSU professor Jonah Raskin attempts to unravel the mystery of what circumstances led the 15,000-square-foot house to its demise with his new chapbook ‘Burning Down the House: Jack London and the 1913 WolfHouse Fire’ (Clone; $5). Raskin interviewed over two dozen people for the chapbook, including local historians, ) 20

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completely melted and rainfall patterns change around the world. As agriculture fails, and the international economy collapses, terrorism surges—and while the Russell family struggles to fight for what they believe is right, their ideas could not be more in conflict.—T.K.

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A MUST-SEE MOVIE!

– ROGER HICKEY,

Local Lit ( 19 park docents and writer-historian Kevin Starr about thefire, addressing several hypotheses in Burning Down the House. Arson,combustion or an act of self-destruction, the Wolf House fire continues to fascinate and baffle all these years later.—D.B.

From Robert Reich, former US Secretary of Labor, comes a humorous and enlightening exposé on America’s widening income gap.

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‘Tales of Jack the Ripper’ (Word Horde; $15.99), the latest anthology from Petaluma’s Ross E. Lockhart (editor of The Book of Cthulu), marks the 125th anniversary of the Whitechapel slayings. Although the mystery of Jack the Ripper has captured the public’s imagination for over a century—as it is, we don’t know jack about Jack—what we know for certain is that he was a cold-blooded murderer of women. Lockhart’s anthology pulls together 17 stories and two poems from distinct voices in dark fantasy and horror such as Laird Barron, Ramsey Campbell, Ennis Drake and others. Each story illustrates a unique part of Jack the Ripper’s story in varying locales, from his childhood and personal life to those of his victims. Overall, the collection is a unique exploration of the legacy of Jack the Ripper from the point of view of authors of completely different backgrounds, each holding his own vision of the legend.—T.K.

Katy Byrne began writing “hairballs,” her word for the dark things that we hold in until they metastasize, when she was single and lonely. Part diary entry, part philosophical musing, ‘The Courage to Speak Up: Getting Your Hairballs Out’ (Langmarc Publishing; $16.95) gathers Byrne’s thoughts into book form. A licensed psychotherapist, radio personality and animal rights activist, the Sonoma County resident has poured onto paper her thoughts on love, anger, fear of sex, aging, overeating, the importance of neighbors, friendship, judgment, holidays, money anxiety, the difficulty of moving, family stress, living simply and losing a beloved pet (in her case, a cat named Einstein). The book is interactive by way of three reflection questions included at the end of the chapter, which allows readers to discover—and let go of—their own hairballs.—L.C. Say you’re an upright bass player. What if you were asked to perform music for one of your least favorite people? In Sebastopol author Bill Amatneek’s case, that’d be a gig offer playing for president George W. Bush, as chronicled in ‘Acoustic Stories: Pickin’ for the Prez and Other Unamplified Tales’ (Vineyard Press; $27). “This was a moral decision,” Amatneek writes, “to entertain or not entertain an immoral man.

21

HEAR IT FOR YOURSELF . . . AT THE BOHEMIAN’S ANNUAL

Michael Rinaldini’s ‘Daoist Practice Journal: Come Laugh with Me’ (CreateSpace; $11.98) sheds a light on walking the Taoist path from the author’s unique perspective. A former surfer turned Taoist, in The Daoist Practice Journal, Rinaldini, a Sebastopol resident, compiles journal entries written over the past 20 years. Each entry explains a different aspect of his spiritual journey, from surrendering to his beloved waves to the beauty in a simple cup of tea. The entries include selections from ancient writings in addition to current

masters of the Way, and informs readers of the different Taoist practices available for study and practice, covering topics like meditation, qigong, the value of silence and solitude and much more.—T.K.

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I wanted to pass it up, but I also wanted to play it.” In the end, Amatneek plays the gig anyway, adding another chapter to a jampacked book of memorable bass playing jobs. Growing up in a household on Bleecker Street that hosted legends like Pete Seeger and Paul Robeson, Amatneek went on to accompany the likes of Jerry Garcia, Bill Monroe, Peter Rowan, and Peter, Paul & Mary (whom Amatneek still clearly carries a torch for). All those stories are here, as are anecdotes of helping Bob Dylan find the stage in Philadelphia, being sung “Happy Birthday” to by Dionne Warwick, interviewing Aretha Franklin in San Francisco, playing a jazz funeral in New Orleans and many others. Overall, Amatneek’s tone is conversational and not boastful, and places the reader into the action of a life well lived in music.—G.M.

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Ralph Milton Ingols was a guidance counselor at St. Helena High School for over 30 years, and, as you can imagine, he has many stories to tell about student and faculty life. ‘St. Helena High School: The Golden Years’ (Pastime Publications; $13.95), co-written with Napa Valley resident Dona Bakker, collects these tales into one volume. Told in collage fashion, the book ) 22

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Aren’t you curious... what did show up and at whose doorstep?

Local Lit ( 21

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22

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combines recollections from students, custodians and faculty, with graduation speeches and introductory essays that give a historical context to each decade, starting in 1941 and running through 1972. Approximately 2,000 students passed through the school’s doors during this time, and they’re all accounted for in comprehensive class lists for each year. The result is an insightful peek into small-town life in a bygone era. With all proceeds benefiting a scholarship fund for current students, the book itself would make a great gift for just about anyone who attended St. Helena High School between 1941 and 1972.—L.C.

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to you, the reader, using mostly first-person examples. Topics include motivation, customer service, relentless thinking about the customer, raising a family for success, online marketing, managing stress, commitment and more. Taylor writes a chapter himself, detailing his own rise from “farm boy” to “wealth advisor.” With so many different topics and perspectives, it’s a safe bet that if you’re looking to achieve financial success, this book is going to be helpful.—N.G.

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As 100.1-FM KZST’s expert CPA, Santa Rosa’s Montgomery Taylor is already known and trusted by many Sonoma County taxpayers. And maybe they want to learn how to become just as successful in life. Montgomery has compiled writings from “the world’s leading experts” in ‘The New Rules of Success’ (Celebrity Press; $19.95) to help you do just that. Though none of the authors is quite a household name, each is successful (in this case, that also means wealthy) in life, and shares a nugget of wisdom on how to achieve your goals. It’s a personal book, with each author writing specifically

Every woman should have a mentor. Mentors provide the inspiration, empowerment and encouragement that we don’t tend to get from greater society. Karilee Halo Shames, a holistic nurse best known for her work with husband Dr. Richard Shames around hypothyroidism, has made it easy to learn from women mentors by compiling their stories in ‘Amazing Mentors: Real Hot Mama’s Path to Power’ (Inkwell Productions; $18). Contributors include Code Pink founder Medea Benjamin, former U.S. congresswoman Lynn Woolsey, healer and chiropractor Shalamah Yahchove, Gen. Clara Adams-Ender and others. “If no leadership exists, step up and bring others along,” says Woolsey in the chapter devoted to her—that’s exactly what Halo Shames has done in compiling these thoughts and interviews. —L.C.

23

CULTURE

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Crush The week’s events: a selective guide

N A PA

Carriage Music M Mus It sounds like a slow, slow w, mo moody oody int interlude of an epic post-rock group like Explosions in the Sky or Not to Reason Why, Why y, but no—it’s no—it’s the soundtrack sooundtra to a 1921 silent film called ‘The Phantom Carriage,’ composed by 2013 grad Vintage High School gr a Raja Orr. The film will screen with a live performance of this new composition ad from orchestra, of members of the Napa Valley Youth Symphony and conducted by Orr fr om the pit or chestra, comprised c comprise himself,f, on Satur Saturday, Oct.t.. 19,, at the Jarvis Conservatory. 1711 Main St., Napa. 7pm. $15. 707.255.5445. himself dayy, Oc

S A N TA R O S A

Dubstep P Piano?! Pian Internationally rrenowned enowned conce concert pianist Rudolf Budginas has an unassuming daily life as a music College, but he’s about to bust out of the mold. This week, he plays ffaculty aculty member at Santaa Rosa Junior J Band guitarist Kenny Lee and Kingsborough drummer John Whitney for a in a concert with SSteve teve Miller B called “Piano on the Edge.” His 21st-century arrangements vary from smooth-jazz rrock-themed ock-themed concert ca alled “Pia Maria”” to dubs dubstep-infused classical piano. Witness a rare vision on Saturday, Oct. 19, at versions of ““Ave Ave Maria Auditorium. 1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $20. 707.527.4011. SRJC’s Newman Auditor rium. 15

SEBASTOPOL

Wailin’ W ailin’ a Away Aw way As a member of tthe As he W Wailin’ ailin’ Je Jennys, Ruth Moody has made a name for herself with a downsongs. She’s won two Juno awards (sorta like Canada’s Grammy, home vocal style and honest h s moree integrity integrity) but with mor y) and bbeen featured several times on A Prairie Home Companion. Listening to her sing puts puts the mind at ease, stacking those troubles neatly on the shelf, in chronological chronological order, order, not not to be forgotten but to be managed. See her Saturday, Oct. 19, at the Center 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. 8pm. $18–$23. 707.823.1511. Sebastopol Communityy Center.

YOUNTVILLE

Crazy Diam Diamonds mon It’d be easy to make a joke It’d j connecting con the Pink Floyd Laser Spectacular and psychedelic that’d d drugs, b t th but that t’d be b a disservice. di disser d vic i A Pink Floyd laser show is awesome, even at age 10, even at least once in everyone’s life. With a 50,000at age 70, and should be b experienced expe watt stereo stereo system,, thee Lincoln Theater is just the place to witness this audio and visual the age-70 crowd there—the theater routinely stimulation.. And be sure sure to high-five hig gives tickets to residents residents of the th nearby veterans home. Shine on Saturday, Oct. 19, at the Lincoln Theater. Theater. 100 California California Drive, Yountville. 7pm. $20–$30. 707.944.9900.

SONOMA

Alien Abduction Ali The phrase “parental discretion advised” is a surefire attention-grabber. When applied to a lecture about alien abductions titled “Strange Harvest,” it’s begging it. This week, UFO expert Jim Ledwith talks about the 10,000 animal abductions since 1967—why are farms the target of alien research? Are extraterrestrials curious, or just really hungry? With footage of a bovine abduction and FBI files on the subject, the answers will surely be revealed on Tuesday, Oct. 22, at the Sonoma Community Center. 276 E Napa St., Sonoma. 7pm. $5–$10. 707.938.4626.

—Nicolas Grizzle

OH, JENNY Jenny Lewis, from Rilo Kiley (and ‘The Wizard’!) plays Oct. 24 at GundlachBundschu winery.

Arts John Blackwell

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IN CHARGE Elbert ‘Big Man’ Howard leads this week’s Panther reunion.

DR. D R. D DYLON YLON

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BY JONAH RASKIN

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ho’s afraid of the Black Panthers? Probably no one now, but in 1967 they gave white Americans the willies when they stood on the steps outside Gov. Ronald Reagan’s capitol in Sacramento, wearing black berets, black leather jackets and carrying loaded shotguns. In the turbulent 1960s, the bodacious Panthers advocated armed selfdefense, fed the hungry and taught the illiterate. Bloody police raids and their own “Off-the-pig” bravado sharply reduced their ranks, but not before they woke the nation to the raw beauty and naked truths of African-American life.

This week, Oct. 17–19, Elbert “Big Man” Howard hosts a threeday Black Panther reunion and celebration in Santa Rosa, his adopted hometown. No Panther is better suited than he to rally the faithful and gather the curious. The editor of the Panther newspaper, he served as the party’s roving global ambassador, and prowled the United States, too, a story he tells in his memoir, Panther on the Prowl. After the Panthers imploded, he disappeared for years. Though he’s slowly reemerged—he was the focus of a Bohemian cover story in 2011—the reunion signals a public comeback. Born in the South in 1939, Howard learned about racism on the streets, not in classrooms. “When I was a boy in Tennessee, there were real homegrown terrorists,” he says as he sips an ice tea at the Arlene Francis Center in Santa Rosa. “Hooded Klansmen in white sheets burned crosses at night to try to terrify us. If it weren’t for the black community, I wouldn’t be here now.” He’s carried those early lessons about community all the way to Sonoma County. “My roots here run deep,” he says. “Forty or so years ago, I came here for the first time and bought 60,000 eggs for our free food program. They made hungry folks happy.” His recent work in Sonoma County focuses on ending police misconduct and brutality through the Police Accountability Clinic and Helpline (PACH), the local organization he cofounded. At 75, Howard has no regrets. Still, if he could, he might rewrite a page or two of Panther history and save a few lost souls. “The party provided a home for a whole generation,” he says. “If they were addicts, we helped them get off drugs. If they couldn’t read, we taught them. When the party fell apart, they did, too.” With the reunion, Howard hopes to honor those who didn’t survive, and to show his appreciation for the North Bay community (including its doctors and nurses, who helped him overcome an array of lifethreatening health issues). The Arlene Francis Center’s director of operations, Bruce

Rhodes, remembers Panther meetings he attended 50 years ago. Now 59, Rhodes never officially joined the organization, but in his own quiet way, he’s revived the Panther spirit and helped turn the Arlene Francis into a gathering place for Sonoma County’s scattered AfricanAmerican community and a home for musicians from Ghana, Benin and Burkina Faso who now reside in Santa Rosa. For the three-day event, Howard has rounded up internationally renowned artist Emory Douglas, Dr. Tolbert Small, official Panther historian Billy “X” Jennings, Seattle chapter cofounder Aaron Dixon and others. Rickey Vincent unravels the connections between soul music and black power. Sister Sheba Haven reveals the role of Panther women. As if that weren’t enough historical weight in one room, Panther cofounder Bobby Seale is scheduled to appear at some point over the three days as well. “I first saw Seale in the 1960s,” says Martin Hamilton, executive director at the Arelene Francis Center. “These days, there’s too much Panther mythologizing. At the celebration, we’ll hear real history from people like Seale who actually made it.” Longtime activist Judy Gumbo Albert also remembers the Panthers from 1960s Berkeley. “Back then, they took the national dialogue about race and racial inequality to a whole new level that’s unappreciated today,” she says. “I’m going to the event to relive my past and reconnect to Panthers I knew. Big Man always was a sweetie.” “The Panthers are a prime example of what a community can do when it bands together,” Howard says, reaching for his pork pie hat. “We’ll bring this community together, too.”

The Black Panther 47th anniversary takes place Thursday–Saturday, Oct. 17–19, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Three-day pass, $30–$35; single-day tickets, $12. For more information, see www.bigmanbpp.com or call 707.528.3009.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flight of the Bumblebeeâ&#x20AC;? and more. Oct 20, 3pm. $12-$17. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Bryan Adams

Souls of Mischief

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Summer of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;69â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cuts Like a Knifeâ&#x20AC;? are just two of this rockerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big-time hits. Oct 17, 8pm. $35-$81. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Hieroglyphics crew includes emcees A-Plus, Opio, Phesto and Tajai. Oct 19, 10:30pm. $20. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jazz Forum Informal sessions and concerts with masters and rising stars. Oct 23, Kathy Kosins; 1pm. Free. Green Music Center 1029, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

Piano on the Edge Featuring SRJC faculty pianist Rudolf Budginas, Steve Miller Band member Kenny Lee Lewis and John Whitney of Kingsborough. Oct 19, 8pm. $35-$100. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Ruth Moody Singer from the Wailinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jennys. Oct 19, 8pm. $18-$23. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Santa Rosa Symphony Program features Saint-Saensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carnival of the Animals,â&#x20AC;?

MARIN COUNTY James McMurtry Americana songwriter is the son of author Larry McMurtry of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lonesome Doveâ&#x20AC;? fame. Bobby Jo Valentine opens. Oct 19, 8:30pm. $20-$30. Hopmonk Novato, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

NAPA COUNTY Chris Cornell Soundgarden frontman in a solo concert. Bhi Bhiman opens. Oct 16, 8pm. $65. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Jackie Ryan Jazz singer with full band. Oct 20, 4pm. $40. Robert Mondavi Winery, 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 707.968.2203.

Japanese taiko drumming group has been together for 20 years. Oct 18, 8pm. $35-$65. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Clubs & Venues

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

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Halloween Spooktacular Weekend Double Feature/Halloween 1 and 2 bands, costume contest, creepy food & drink specials and more!

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The Deadlies, The Rebobs, Deluna

SONOMA COUNTY

bands, costume contest, creepy food & drink specials and more!

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Aqus Cafe Oct 18, Dictator Tots. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Dave Mason

Burbank Auditorium

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Oct 19, Piano on the Edge. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Flamingo Lounge

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Eddie Money

Oct 18, Decades. Oct 19, Aqua Nett. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

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An evening with Pride & Joy

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Faith Ako plus

French Garden Oct 18, Hand Me Down. Oct 19, Simply Lyrical. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden

Patrick Landeza and Steven Espaniola ^Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä?Ďł

Merle Haggard

Special Guest The Malpass Brothers

Sun Dec 8 An evening with The Wailinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Jennys

Oct 16, Klezmer Creek. Oct 23, Celtic Session. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

DIN N E R & A SHOW

Wed Oct 16 ^ŽůŽÄ?ŽƾĆ?Ć&#x;Ä?^Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ˝Ç Chris Cornell

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DAN HICKS AND BAYSIDE JAZZ Oct 18 Dance to Danâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Favorite Standards Fri

8:00 Jeremy Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Antonio presents Oct 20 TINY TELEVISIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Triumphant Return! 5:00 / No Cover Sun

SARA LAINE AND FRIENDS ncho Oct 25 CD Ra Release Party ut! Fri

Grit and Twang from the Heart Deb 8:30 Sat Best Album of the Year Oct 26 FROBECK Original Funk, R&B and Rock 8:30 Sun Rancho Nicasio and KWMR present Oct 27 THE LEGENDARY LAURIE LEWIS WIITH

NINA GERBER AND TOM ROZUM

â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the pre-eminent Bluegrass and Americana artists of our timeâ&#x20AC;? 7:00 Sat Celebrate Day of the Dead! Nov 2 EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE Otherworldy Fun 8:30 Sat The Legendary Queen of Rockabilly Nov 9 W ANDA JACKSON PLUS RED MEAT 8:30 Sun

RUTHIE FOSTER Nov 10 8:00

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Heritage Public House Oct 19, Thick Soup. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Oct 16, VNDMG, Indaskyes, Le Moti. Oct 18, Mark ) Karanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Buds,

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Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG2FWĂŁSP

Glenn Jones

(American Primitive Guitarist) 7KXU2FWĂŁSP

Stu Allen & Mars Hotel

featuring Jason Crosby, John Stewart, Robin Sylvester & Jay Lane

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

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Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons

with The Heavy Guilt and Jeff Crosby & the Refugees 6DW2FWĂŁSP

House of Floyd 7KXU2FWĂŁSP

George Porter Jr & the Runninâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Pardners with Mark Sexton Band 7KXU2FWĂŁSP

New Monsoon HIERO HEAT The mighty Souls of Mischief, still one of hip-hopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest live acts, play Oct. 19 at Hopmonk in Sebastopol. See Concerts, adjacent.

Halloween Costume Party

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1030 Main Street in downtown Napa Tickets & Information

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707.226.7372

Wed to Sun, Oct 16 to Oct 20 TUESDAY NIGHT FLICKS:

PSYCHO (1960)

Tue, Oct 29, 7 PM

Hopmonk Sonoma Oct 18, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Oct 19, Dawn Angelosante. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Oct 19, Adam Schulman Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jack London State Park

All Treats

Oct 20, 4pm, Halloween Piano Recital with Jennifer Farmer. 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Treasure Island Music Fest full of vets, hot newcomers

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oct 17, Saffell. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Oct 16, Gypsy Trio. Oct 17, Rivereens. Oct 18, Brothers of Siren. Oct 19, Pulsators. Oct 20, Danny Montana. Oct 23, Junk Parlor. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Live Musicians Co-Op Oct 19, 2Racks Rock Band Contest. 925 Piner Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8845.

Main Street Station Oct 21, Gypsy Cafe. Oct 16, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. Oct 17, Susan Sutton. Oct 18, Susan Sutton Trio. Oct 19, Bruce Halbohm. Oct 23, Greg Hester. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub Oct 17, Highway Poets. Oct 19, Perfect Crime. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Oct 19, Petty Theft. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Roy Rogers & The Delta Rhythm Kings Fri, Nov 1, 8 PM HAWAIIAN SLACK-KEY GUITARIST

Makana

Sat, Nov 2, 8 PM SINGERâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;SONGWRITER CELEBRATING NEW ALBUM â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;STILL GREENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Patty Larkin Fri, Nov 8, 8 PM

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Kurt Huget, Pat Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Moonlight Rodeo. Oct 19, Souls of Mischief. Oct 23, Dr Dylon, Ini, Mose. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Oct 18, JP & the OK Rhythm Boys. Oct 19, the Skerries. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater Oct 19, Grace in the Woods, the Skunks, These Paper Satellites, Waxwyng, Doomfield. Oct 22, Roach Gigz, Husalah, J Stalin, Bobby Brackins, DJ Skimask, Marlow, Young Remedy, Pac B. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oct 19, Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ugliest Dog.

All set to preview of this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Treasure Island Music Festival, I checked the website to see what time Tricky, the British downtempo rapper and former collaborator with Massive Attack, would be playing. He isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Visa issues,â&#x20AC;? the site proclaims. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being replaced by Danny Brown, a talented Detroit rapper with nasal delivery and clever narration but without the longcareer pedigree of Tricky, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been around since the early 1990s. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be interesting to see if he tailors his set to fit in with Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lineup, which includes Major Lazer, Little Dragon, Phantogram, Disclosure and other electronic-focused acts. Headlining is Atoms for Peace, featuring Thom Yorke (Radiohead) and Flea (Red Hot Chili Peppers). On Sunday, Animal Collective, James Blake, Sleigh Bells, Haim (pictured) and others start the day, but at night, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about Beck. The singer of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Atâ&#x20AC;? is comfortable in just about any genre thrown his way; his albums sound almost like he was dared to try a new genre. In concert, musicality oozes from his sweaty devilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s haircut and dexterous fingers, no matter what instrument heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s currently grasping. Should be a good show, even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only treats and no Tricky. The Treasure Island Music Festival runs Oct. 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20 on Treasure Island in San Francisco. For more, see www.treasureislandfestival.com. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe Oct 18, Les Amis Zydeco. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Russian River Brewing Co Oct 19, the Mud, the Blood & the Beer. Oct 20, Major Powers & the Lo-Fi Symphony. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Sebastopol Community Center Oct 19, Ruth Moody. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Sonoma County Museum Oct 17, Bench Doggs. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Toad in the Hole Pub Oct 18, Disclaimer. Oct 19, Sticky Notes. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds Oct 16, Crossroad Drifters. Oct 18, Bern Man. Oct 23, Cadillac Phil. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Windsor Library Oct 19, Greenhouse. 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor. 707.838.1020.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Oct 19, James Nash. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Rancho Nicasio Oct 18, Dan Hicks & Bayside Jazz. Oct 20, Tiny Television. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sleeping Lady Oct 16, King & Ace. Oct 17, Dave Getz Straight Up Jazz. Oct 18, Fenton Coolfoot & the Right Time. Oct 19, Tom Finch Group. Oct 22, Roadhead. Oct 23, Angeline Saris Gypsy Jazz Trio. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Oct 17, Erin & the Project. Oct 18, Future Twin, Standard Poodle. Oct 19, Dginn. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Station House Cafe Oct 20, Danny Vitali. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Studio 55 Marin Oct 19, Swinging Doors. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Joseph & the Jackmormons, the Heavy Guilt, Jeff Crosby & the Refugees. Oct 19, House of Floyd. Oct 22, Dick Wagner. Free. Oct 23, Jay’s Happy Sunshine Burger Joint. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Upcoming Concerts

Ruth Moody

(of The Wailin’ Jennys) and her band Saturday, October 19, 8:00 pm

Terrapin Crossroads Oct 18, American Jubilee. Oct 19, Sensations. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Quinn Deveaux and the Blue Beat Review and The Sam Chase

NAPA COUNTY Lincoln Theater Oct 18, Yamato. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Robert Mondavi Winery

Friday, October 25, 8:30 pm Dance Concert costumes encouraged

Oct 20, Jackie Ryan. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 707.968.2203.

Holly Near

Silo’s Oct 17, Robert Jenkins. Oct 18, Susan Enan, Peter Sykes & Graham Yallop. Oct 19, the Zins. Oct 20, Napa Valley Choral Society. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre

Oct 16, Glenn Jones. Oct 17, Stu Allen & Mars Hotel. Oct 18, Jerry

Cumulus Presents & Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Oct 16, Chris Cornell. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

and the Peace Becomes You Band Friday, November 8, 8:00 pm

Sebastopol

Also Coming Soon

Lavay Smith and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers – Nov. 15 Community Alasdair Fraser & Natlalie Haas – Dec. 7 Cultural Center Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

Dance Palace Oct 19, Peter Rowan. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Fenix Oct 18, Shahyar Ghanbari & Farzad Arjmand. Oct 19, Tim Hockenberry Trio. Oct 20, Wil Roberts. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Oct 18, Generation Esmeralda. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Oct 17, the Lady Crooners. Oct 18, Tracorum. Oct 19, James McMurtry. Oct 20, Jill Cohn. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club Oct 16, Down North. Oct 17, the Skinny Gun, Naked Soul. Oct 18, Howell Devine, Jay Bonet. Oct 19, Mixtape. Oct 20, Phil Hardgrave & the Continentals. Oct 23, Munice, Voodoo Switch. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Oct 18, Pocket Change. Oct 19, Tommy Odetto. Oct 20, La Mandanga. Oct 23,

San Francisco’s City Guide

Robert Glasper Experiment Forward-thinking pianist teams with stars of rap and R&B on newest, “Black Radio II.” Oct 18 at SFJAZZ Center.

Treasure Island Music Festival

Sat, November 2 2013

Atoms for Peace, Beck, Animal Collective, Haim, Danny Brown and many, many others . Oct 19-20 at Treasure Island.

Departs Willits and Fort Bragg Skunk Train Depots at 10:00 am and returns by 6:00 pm

Passion Pit After their frontman went public with mental illness, band’s pop carries dark shadows. Oct 21 at the Fox Theater. A Benefit for the

Okkervil River Will Sheff is indie rock’s literary troubadour, penning clever lines with a limber twang. Oct 22 at the Fillmore.

Kanye West He who needs no introduction tours behind “Yeezus,” his most fearless, experimental album yet. Oct 23 at Oracle Arena.

Mendocino County Museum

Mushroom Cook-off Wine, Beer and Mushroom Tasting Mushroom Walk and Talk In the heart of the redwoods at Camp Mendocino TICKETS

&

INFORMATION :

MENDOCINO COUNTY MUSEUM

707 459-2736 Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

www.MendocinoMuseum.org Info@MendoMuseum.org

27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 1 6 –22, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Oct 18, JP Soden. Oct 19, Chinchillas. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Dr Mojo. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

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Hopmonk H o p mo n k N Novato ovato

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTO BE R 1 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 22, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

presents p resents S Songstress ongstresss

Jill Ji ll Co Cohn hn Sunday, S unday y, Oct. Oct. 2 20, 0, 7 7:30pm :30pm S onom a Sonoma Songbirds S on gbi rd s Concert C o nc e r t

HOPMO N K HOPMONK SESSION S E SSION ROOM R OOM

LIVE MUSIC. NO COVER.

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Fri, Oct 18

Bobby Jo Valentine

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Sat, Oct 19

top 40 djâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s TOP 40, & ROCK

Sun, Oct 20

tim hockenberry Sat, Oct 26

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choppin Broccoli Happy Hour Daily 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:30pm

132 KELLER ST, PETALUMA

707.238.0158 info@socialclubrestaurant.com

for calendar of events & information

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Arts Events Galleries RECEPTIONS Oct 16 Finley Community Center, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Student Show,â&#x20AC;? art by SRJC students. 4pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Oct 17 Marin Community Foundation,â&#x20AC;&#x153;Transmissions,â&#x20AC;? work by 30 artists from around the country. 4:30pm. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato.

Oct 19 San Geronimo Valley Community Center, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pressing Matters IV,â&#x20AC;? annual printmakers group show. Noon. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Oct 20 Community Congregational Church, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spirit of Place,â&#x20AC;? works by members of Golden Gate Marin Artists. Reception. Noon. 145 Rock Hill Dr, Tiburon.

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SONOMA COUNTY Agrella Art Gallery Through Oct 17, 12pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tradition of Mayhem,â&#x20AC;? themes of aggression and hostility in human nature. Gallery is free. Parking fees.. SRJC, Doyle Library, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 10 to 4; Sat 12 to 4. 707.527.4298.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Oct 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Work,â&#x20AC;? by member artists. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

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City Hall Council Chambers Through Oct 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oil Paintings,â&#x20AC;? works by Mark Jacobson. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Finley Community Center Through Dec 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Student Show,â&#x20AC;? art by SRJC students. Through Dec 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Senior Show,â&#x20AC;? artwork by Sonoma County seniors. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery One Through Oct 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARTrails 3D Showcase Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? sampling of 3D art by local artists. Through Nov 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;25th Anniversary Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? multimedia works by Judith Klausenstock and Birgit Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery Through Oct 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARTrails Preview,â&#x20AC;? works by ARTrails participants. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hudson Street Wineries

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Projects,â&#x20AC;? follow the Peanuts gang as they struggle through a typical school year with original comic strips. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707tcalabigallery.com

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Oct 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mid-Century Modern,â&#x20AC;? works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. Through Feb 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Play Things: Toys in Peanuts,â&#x20AC;? a nostalgic journey through popular toys in the Peanuts comic strip. Through Mar 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;School

Through Oct 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;50 Series,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Lori Mole. 423 Hudson St, Healdsburg.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Oct 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great Blue and Beyond,â&#x20AC;? art by Marge Mount. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Nov 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Earth, Wind and Fire,â&#x20AC;? gallery exhibit. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Nov 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Victorian Mourning Customs,â&#x20AC;? see how our predecessors honored their deceased. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

RiskPress Gallery Through Oct 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cuttings,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media constructions,

drawings and artists books by Brooke Holve. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Nov 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inspired in France,â&#x20AC;? paintings and photos by Karen Spratt. Through Nov 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just Need a Little Love,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Christine Kierstead. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Oct 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ABZ Etcetera,â&#x20AC;? using letters numbers symbols and characters. Through Oct 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Landscape Impressions: En Plein Air,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Donna DeLaBriandais, and sculptures by Aaron Poovey. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Oct 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artistry in Wood,â&#x20AC;? Showcase of fine regional craftsmanship. Panel Discussion, Oct 17, 7pm. Through Jan 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photography in Mexico,â&#x20AC;? from the collection of the SF MOMA. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Dec 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Delicious Images: Art About Food,â&#x20AC;? paintings and works on paper by Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne. Goldyne in conversation, Oct 24, 7pm. Through Dec 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kitchen Memories,â&#x20AC;? culinary art and equipment collection of Kathleen Thompson Hill. Gadget demonstration, Nov 9, Nov 22, 5:30pm, $12. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Studio Blomster Through Oct 29, Works by David McGraw. 14045 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum Oct 16-Nov 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Architecture of the Invisible,â&#x20AC;? sculptures by Ned Kahn. Oct 16-Nov 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land of a Thousand Birds,â&#x20AC;? photos by Tim Burns. Oct 16-Nov 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Secret Life of Seaweed,â&#x20AC;? photos by Josie Iselin. 48 Wharf ) Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to

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Saturday October 26, 2013 7pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Midnight Odd Fellows Hall Geyserville, CA $ 85/person 750/reserved tables of 10

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Antique Society

2661 Gravenstein Hwy So. (Hwy 116) Sebastopol Â&#x2039; www. AntiqueSociety .com

Open Daily! Cafe on Site! 707.829.1733

& dolls s pottery & art s architectural items s

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Music by former Dire Straits guitarist, Jack Sonni & Band

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Family Style Seasonal Menu by Diavola Chef Dino Bugica

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MAKE OR BREAK Natalie McKeanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;scratch artâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; joins 3D printers, handmade

bicycles, wooden puzzles, robots and more at the Santa Rosa Mini Maker Faire on Oct. 19. See Events, adjacent. 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

COM Art Gallery Through Nov 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Intimate Diebenkorn: Works on Paper 1949â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1992,â&#x20AC;? pieces by Richard Diebenkorn. College of Marin, Fine Arts Building, 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9494.

Community Congregational Church Oct 19-Nov 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spirit of Place,â&#x20AC;? works by members of Golden Gate Marin Artists. 145 Rock Hill Dr, Tiburon.

Elsewhere Gallery

Steve Luther brings back

MARK ST MARY Saturday, Oct 16

Wed, Oct 16 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:45pm 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club

Thur, Oct 17 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm CIRCLES Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Oct 18 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:30pm North Bay Country Dance Society/ Contra Dance Sat, Oct 19 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise Steve Luther brings back MARK ST MARY

Sun, Oct 20 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Oct 21 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am;5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Oct 22 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

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Through Oct 26, 2pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art to Live With,â&#x20AC;? works by Helen Webber. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Gallery Route One Through Oct 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make Believe,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media pieces by Madeline Nieto Hope. Salon, Oct 20, 4pm. Through Oct 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Residencia en la Tierra,â&#x20AC;? 10 artists show work with a deep resonance in the world. Salon, Oct 20, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through Jan 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Transmissions,â&#x20AC;? work by 30 artists from around the country. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

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Through Nov 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Legends of the Bay Area,â&#x20AC;? works by Robert Hudson. Artist talk, Oct 19, 2pm. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Oct 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfamiliar

Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? abstract and expressionistic mixed-media works. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Oct 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pressing Matters IV,â&#x20AC;? annual printmakers group show. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Nov 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Form and Place,â&#x20AC;? sculptures by Jane Rosen and Ann Hollingsworth. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY Grand Hand Gallery Through Nov 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Found in Translation,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media by Thomas Morphis and ceramics by Hiroko Ishida. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Comedy Below the Belt Brandon Revels hosts this evening of standup comedy featuring local talent. Third Fri of every month, 9pm. $10. Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Donald Lacy Comedian has been on BETâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Comic Viewâ&#x20AC;? and HBOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Def Comedy Jam.â&#x20AC;? Marvin DeLoatch Jr, Danny Dechi, John Dekoven and Steve Lee open. Oct 20, 7pm. $10. Fenix, 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Dance Complexions Contemporary ballet group has appeared on â&#x20AC;&#x153;So You Think You Can Dance.â&#x20AC;? Oct 22. 8pm. $25$45. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Events Artstart Masquerade Party Music by Batacha Quartet, food by Gerardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paella, auction packages and art by Stephan Pastis and Mary Vaughan. Oct 19, 6pm. $25. DeTurk Round Barn, Decker and Prince streets, Santa Rosa.

Black Panther Party Reuinion & Celebration Exhibits, films and speakers including Emory Douglas and Claude Marks. Oct 17-19. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Bohemianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Java Jive Readings by the winners of the Bohemianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2013 writing contest, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It Showed Up at My Doorstep.â&#x20AC;? Oct 17, 6pm. Free. Acre Coffee (Montgomery Village), 2365 Midway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.595.5984.

di Party at di Rosa Art auction. Oct 19, 5pm. $300. di Rosa, 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Fall Festival & Mini Maker Faire Over 100 exhibits including robots, bicycles, a clothing swap and more. Oct 19, 10am. $4-$10. Wells Fargo Center,

Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Floating Pumpkin Patch

LBGTQI Film Festival

Day of games, pumpkin decorating and fun for all ages. Oct 19, 2pm. $5-$10. Ridgeway Swim Center, 455 Ridgway Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3421.

Midnight in Paris Parisian-inspired celebration with food, art and music. Oct 19, 7pm. $125. Art Works Downtown, 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.451.8119.

Pink Floyd Laser Spectacular Two hours and 20 minutes of Pink Floyd blasting through a 50,000-watt speaker system with a laser light show. Oct 19, 7pm. $15-$20. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Vikingfest Celebration of Norwegian heritage with food, music and more. Oct 19, 10am. Free. Sons of Norway Hall, 617 W Ninth St, Santa Rosa.

Highlights include: Oct 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Am Divineâ&#x20AC;?; Oct 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Puzzles,â&#x20AC;? with director conversation. Times vary. Oct 19-20. $10-$100. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Letters to Jackie Documentary focuses on letters sent to Jacqueline Kennedy after her husband was assassinated. Oct 17, 7pm. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

Measuring Space A look at how astronomical distances compare to those we use in our everyday life. Fri-Sat, 7pm and Sun, 1:30pm. Through Oct 20. $5-$8. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall 2001, 1502 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

National Theatre London Live in HD

Film

Oct 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Macbethâ&#x20AC;? with Kenneth Branagh; Oct 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hamletâ&#x20AC;? with Rory Kinnear. 7:30pm. $24-$30. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

The Big Year

The Phantom Carriage

Steve Martin, Jack Black and Owen Wilson star in this comedy about birdwatching. Oct 21, 7pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Victor SjĂśstrĂśmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1921 classic silent film with original music by Raja Orr played live. Oct 19, 7pm. $15. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Defending Your Life

Rocky Horror Picture Show

Humorous, romantic fantasy film. Dinner served as well. Oct 18, 6pm. $5-$10. Shambhala Meditation Center, 255 West Napa St, Ste G, Sonoma.

Frida Selma Kayak portrays the famous painter Frida Kahlo. Oct 17, 7pm. $12. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

High Stakes The story of one Pomo man who faces tribal disenrollment. Sun, 2 and 4pm. through Oct 20. Free. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

The Institute Film about a cult in San Francisco. Filmmaker Spencer McCall in person. Oct 20, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Jewish Film Festival Oct 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ballad of the Weeping Spring.â&#x20AC;? $10. Rialto

Interactive screening of the cult classic musical. Oct 17, 10pm. Bergamot Alley, 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720. Cult classic features a interactive moments. Oct 18, 11:30pm. $10. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Solutions Short film on climate change by 18-year-old Rosie Keller. Oct 18, 7pm. Free. Sonoma Valley Grange Hall, 18627 Sonoma Hwy, Boyes Hot Springs.

Sonoma Film Institute Oct 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Life of Oharu.â&#x20AC;? $7. Warren Auditorium, Ives Hall, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Touching Home Ed Harris stars in this film set in West Marin. Oct 20, 6pm. Free. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Vermeer & Music

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Retrospective on Johannes Vermeer by the National Gallery, London. Oct 16, 1pm. $12.50. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 1 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;22, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Vintage Film Series Oct 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Big Year.â&#x20AC;? 7pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Food & Drink Farmer Dinner Three course menu prepared by John McReynolds. Oct 16. $45. Epicurean Connection, 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Pink Party Appetizer and winetasting in support of breast cancer awareness month. Oct 19, 11am. $10. Graton Ridge Cellars, 3561 Gravenstein Hwy. N, Sebastopol. 707.823.3040.

Renaissance Tea Third Sun monthly at 3, treat the belly with specialty teas, sandwiches, scones and sweets. RSVP; ages 12 and up. Third Sun of every month, 3pm. $35. Cedar Gables Inn, 486 Coombs St, Napa. 707.224.7969.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sweetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Includes book by Valerie Gordon and baked goods. Oct 19, 11am. $40. Whole Foods Market, 3682 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6300.

Lectures Affordable Care Act Forum Congressman Mike Thompson joins health care leaders to answer questions about the Affordable Care Act. Oct 17, 6:30pm. Free. Rancho Cotate High School, 5450 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.792.4750.

Animal Abduction UFO expert Jim Ledwith talks about alien abductions of our animals. Oct 22, 7pm. $5-$10. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.579.ARTS.

Bioneers Conference Innovators and global citizens converge to share nature-honoring solutions for restoring people and planet. Oct 18-20. Marin ) Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans

32

Music / Events

Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Organics

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32

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Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Bird Arting Workshop Create wild wire sculpture with Jonqui Albin. Oct 19, 10am. $35. Art Escape, 17474 Sonoma Hwy, Sonoma. 707.938.5551.

Susan Bono Tips on writing personal narrative presented by the Writers Forum of Petaluma. Oct 17, 7pm. $15. Petaluma Community Center, 320 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma.

Early Christianity: Heritage or Heresies? Westar Institute Fall 2013 meeting. Oct 23-26. $20-$170. Flamingo Lounge, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Fall Lecture Series Oct 19, “Confessions of an Itinerant Artist” with Michael Hofmann. 7:30pm. $5-$10. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Michael Pollan & David Mas Masumoto Brilliant food writers in conversation, moderated by Wendy Johnson. Oct 19, 7:30pm. $30. Toby’s Feed Barn, 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1223.

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Pat Monahan Lead singer of Train in conversation with journalist Jane Ganahl. Oct 20, 7:30pm. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Science Buzz Cafe

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Oct 22, “Zero Waste: Is It Possible?” with Portia Sinnott; 6:30pm. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

West Coast Modern Illustrated talk by author and design critic Zahid Sardar. Oct 17, 5:30pm. $20. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Readings Angelico Hall Oct 16, 7pm, “The Signature of All Things” with Elizabeth Gilbert, includes signed book $35. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

Book Passage Oct 17, 1pm, “Still Writing: The Pleasures and Perils of a Creative Life” with Dani

Shapiro. Oct 17, 7pm, “Slice of Moon” with Kim Dower. Oct 18, 7pm, “The Explanation for Everything” with Lauren Grodstein. Oct 19, 11am, “Eat Drink Vote: An Illustrated Guide to Food Politics” with Marion Nestle. Oct 19, 1pm, “The Double” with George Pelecanos. Oct 19, 4pm, “Triptych” with Margit Liesche. Oct 19, 7pm, “League of Denial: The NFL, Concussions and the Battle for Truth” with Mark Fainara-Wada & Steve Fainara. Oct 20, 1pm, “Never Feel Old Again: Aging Is a Mistake-Learn How to Avoid It” with Raymond Francis. Oct 20, 4pm, “The Best Women’s Travel Writing, Volume 9: True Stories from Around the World” with Lavinia Spalding. Oct 21, 7pm, “Becoming a Rockefeller, Becoming Myself” with Eileen Rockefeller. Oct 22, 7:30pm, “Dollarocracy: How Billionaires Are Buying Our Democracy and What We Can Do About It” with John Nichols & Bob McChesney. Oct 23, 7pm, “The Family: Three Journeys into the Heart of the Twentieth Century” with David Laskin. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Brian’s Comics Oct 23, 11am, “The Other Dead” with Joshua Ortega. 1 Fourth St, Petaluma 707.765.2068.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Oct 17, 4pm, “The Whatnot” with Stefan Bachmann. Oct 22, 4pm, “Home Sweet Horror” with James Preller. Oct 23, 3pm, “Now I’ll Tell You Everything” with Phyllis Reynolds Naylor. Oct 23, 7pm, “League of Denial: The NFL, Concussions and the Battle for Truth” with Mark Fainaru-Wada & Steve Fainaru. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Oct 17, 7pm, “Entering the Healing Ground” with Francis Weller. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Fountaingrove Inn Oct 16, 6pm, “Just One Evil Act: A Lynley Novel” with Elizabeth George, includes dinner and book $65. 101 Fountaingrove Pkwy, Santa Rosa 800.222.6101.

Gaia’s Garden Oct 20, 6pm, “The Times They Were A-Changing: Women Remember the ‘60s and ‘70s.” 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa 707.544.2491.

Napa Valley Welcome Center Oct 19, 11am, “Model Bakery

Cookbook” with Karen Mitchell and Sarah Mitchell Hansen. 600 Main St, Napa 707.251.5895.

Robert Louis Stevenson Museum Oct 17, 6:30pm, “Prohibition in the Napa Valley: Castles Under Siege” with Lin Weber. 1490 Library Lane, St. Helena 707.963.3757.

Terrapin Crossroads Oct 22, 6:30pm, “Jam” with Jay Blakesberg. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Theater Acid Test One-man show tells the true story of spiritualist Ram Dass. Oct 17, 7:30pm. $15-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Blur Melanie Marnich’s whimsical comedy tells the story of a young woman losing her sight due to a genetic disease. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Oct 26. $10-$17. Ives Hall Studio 76, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Brigadoon A mystical Scottish village, which only appears one day every hundred years, is discovered by two American tourists in this rarely performed Broadway musical. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Oct 27. $22-$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Each & Every Thing One-man show by Dan Hoyle about human connectivity. Oct 18, 8pm. $20-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

I & You Two teens learn how to work together in this world premiere performance. Times vary. Tues-Sun through Nov 3. $37$53. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

La Cage aux Folles A young man is afraid to tell his fianceé’s parents that he was raised by two men, but his fathers have a plan to help him break the news in this musical comedic romp. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Nov 3. $25-$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Monique

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

No Sex Please, Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re British Fast-paced British farce tells of newlyweds who receive a mistaken order in the mail. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Oct 20. $20-$28. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

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Spamalot Musical comedy based on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monty Python and the Holy Grail.â&#x20AC;? Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sat-Sun, 2pm. through Oct 20. $33-$38. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

A Streercar Named Desire Tennessee Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; most famous play features lots of drinking and domestic violence in New Orleans. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Oct 20. $10-$20. College of Marin Kentfield Campus, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

Terra Nova True story of the 1911 race to the South Pole. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Oct 27. $18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Witchie Poo Halloween Extravaganza The 33rd annual installation of this variety includes zany characters and a black light â&#x20AC;&#x153;Willie Wonkaâ&#x20AC;? performance. Sat-Sun, 2pm. through Oct 27. $7-$10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Wretch Like Me â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bohemianâ&#x20AC;? contributor David Templetonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one-man show about a teenager getting saved from salvation. Sun, Oct 20, 3pm. $10. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Tales from the Tombs

Psst! Wanna hear a spooky story . . . in a mausoleum? Ghosts get bored like anyone else. So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a very special Halloween season this year when a troupe of local writers and actors join forces to tell original and classic mystery stories inside the 100-year-old mausoleum at Santa Rosa Memorial Park. Titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mystery Writers in the Mausoleum,â&#x20AC;? the self-explanatory one-night-only literary presentation will be sure to entertain any souls still lingering inside the mausoleumâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but those with a pulse and a taste for the mysterious are invited to attend the free event, too. Illuminated by candlelight, the historic building will be ďŹ lled with the spirited imaginations of the late Edgar Alan Poe and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, along with local (still living) writers such as Ana Manwaring, Ann Wilkes, Robbi Sommers Bryant, Paul Foley, Charles Markee, Jo Lauer, and Karen Pierce Gonzalez, reading their own stories of mystery, murder, demon slayers, haunted rooms and chupacabras. Actors John Moran and David Gonzalez add to the spooky atmosphere with spine-tingling readings from Frankenstein and the entire short story â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tell-Tale Heartâ&#x20AC;? when â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mystery Writers in the Mausoleumâ&#x20AC;? gets underway on Wednesday, Oct. 23, at Santa Rosa Memorial Park. 1900 Franklin Ave., Santa Rosa. 7pm. Free. 707.542.1580.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;David Templeton

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A combination of mystery and terrifying suspense, with just a touch of the supernatural. FriSat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Nov 3. $20-$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

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BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of October 16

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) This is an indelicate oracle. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re offended by the mention of bodily functions in a prophetic context you should STOP READING NOW. Still here? OK. I was walking through my neighborhood when I spied an older woman standing over her aged Yorkshire Terrier next to a bush. The dog was in discomfort, squatting and shivering but unable to relieve himself. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s having trouble getting his business done,â&#x20AC;? his owner conďŹ ded in me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been struggling for 10 minutes.â&#x20AC;? I felt a rush of sympathy for the distressed creature. With a ďŹ&#x201A;ourish of my hand, I said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;More power to you, little one. May you purge your burden.â&#x20AC;? The dog instantly defecated. Shrieking her approval, the woman exclaimed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like you waved a magic wand!â&#x20AC;? Now I am invoking my wizardry in your behalf, Aries, although in a less literal way: More power to you. May you purge your psychological burden. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it at the right time,â&#x20AC;? warns writer Kate Moller. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be late. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be early. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get re-routed. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get delayed. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll change your mind. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll change your heart. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going to turn out the way you thought it would.â&#x20AC;? And yet, Moller concludesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are you ready for the punch line?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;it will be better.â&#x20AC;? In describing your future, Taurus, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have said it better myself. Fate may be comical in the way it plays with your expectations and plans, but I predict you will ultimately be glad about the outcome.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) In the coming weeks, you Geminis could be skillful and even spectacular liars. You will have the potential to deceive more people, bend more truths and even fool yourself better than anyone else. On the other hand, you will also have the knack to channel this same slipperiness in a different direction. You could tell imaginative stories that rouse people from their ruts. You might explore the positive aspects of Kurt Vonnegutâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theory that we tend to become what we pretend to be. Or you could simply be so creative and playful and improvisational in everything you do that you catalyze a lot of inspirational fun. Which way will you go? CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m all in favor of you indulging your instinct for self-protection. As a Cancerian myself, I understand that one of the ways you take good care of yourself is by making sure that you feel reasonably safe. Having said that, I also want to remind you that your mental and emotional health requires you to leave your comfort zone on a regular basis. Now is one of those times. The call to adventure will arrive soon. If you make yourself ready and eager for changes, the changes that come will kick your ass in mostly educational and pleasurable ways.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Who exactly do you want to be when you grow up, and what is the single most important experience you need in order to make that happen? What riches do you want to possess when you are ďŹ nally wise enough to make enlightened use of them, and how can you boost your eligibility for those riches? Which one of your glorious dreams is not quite ripe enough for you to fulďŹ ll it, but is primed to be dramatically ripened in the coming weeks? If I were you, Leo, I would meditate on these questions. Answers will be forthcoming. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) At an elementary school festival some years ago, I performed the role of the Mad Hatter from Alice in Wonderland. One of my tasks was to ask kids to make a wish, whereupon I sprinkled their heads with magic fairy dust. Some of the kids were skeptical about the whole business. They questioned the proposition that the fairy dust would make their wishes come true. A few were so suspicious that they walked away without making a wish or accepting the fairy dust. Yet every single one of those distrustful kids came back later to tell me they had changed their minds, and every single one asked me to bestow more than the usual amount of fairy dust. They are your role models, Virgo. Like them, you should return to the scene of your doubts and demand extra fairy dust. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The door to the invisible must be visible,â&#x20AC;? wrote the surrealist spiritual author RenĂŠ Daumal. This describes an

opportunity that is on the verge of becoming available to you. The opportunity is still invisible simply because it has no precedents in your life; you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t imagine what it is. But just recently a door to that unknown realm has become visible to you. I suggest you open it, even though you have almost no idea whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the other side.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

In Tim Burtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ lm Alice in Wonderland, Alice asks the White Rabbit, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How long is forever?â&#x20AC;? The talking rabbit replies, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes, just one second.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an important piece of information for you to keep in mind, Scorpio. It implies that â&#x20AC;&#x153;foreverâ&#x20AC;? may not necessarily, in all cases, last until the universe dies out 5 billion years from now. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Foreverâ&#x20AC;? might actually turn out to be one second or 90 minutes or a month or a year or who knows? So how does this apply to your life right now? Well, a situation you assumed was permanent could ultimately changeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;perhaps much faster than you have imagined. An apparently everlasting decree or perpetual feeling could unexpectedly shift, as if by magic.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I need a little language such as lovers use,â&#x20AC;? wrote Virginia Woolf in her novel The Waves. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I need no words. Nothing neat . . . I need a howl; a cry.â&#x20AC;? If Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m reading the astrological omens correctly, Sagittarius, Woolf is speaking for you right now. You should be willing to get guttural and primal . . . to trust the teachings of silence and the crazy wisdom of your body . . . to exult in the inarticulate mysteries and bask in the dumfounding brilliance of the Eternal Wow. Are you brave enough to love what canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be put into words? CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I get bored with the idea of becoming a better listener,â&#x20AC;? writes business blogger Penelope Trunk. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why would I do that when interrupting people is so much faster?â&#x20AC;? If your main goal is to impose your will on people and get things over with as soon as possible, Capricorn, by all means follow Trunkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advice this week. But if you have other goalsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;like building consensus, ďŹ nding out important information you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know yet and winning help from people who feel affection for youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I suggest that you ďŹ nd out how to have maximum fun by being an excellent listener. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) The last time meteorologists ofďŹ cially added a new type of cloud formation to the International Cloud Atlas was 1951. But theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re considering another one now. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called â&#x20AC;&#x153;asperatus,â&#x20AC;? which is derived from the Latin term undulatus asperatus, meaning â&#x20AC;&#x153;turbulent undulation.â&#x20AC;? According to the Cloud Appreciation Society, it resembles â&#x20AC;&#x153;the surface of a choppy sea from below.â&#x20AC;? But although it looks rough and agitated, it almost never brings a storm. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make asperatus your mascot for the next few weeks. Aquarius. I suspect that you, too, will soon discover something new under the sun. It may at ďŹ rst look turbulent, but I bet it will mostly just be interesting.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Should you try private experiments that might generate intimate miracles? Yes! Should you dream up extravagant proposals and schedule midnight rendezvous! By all means! Should you pick up where your fantasies left off the last time you got too timid to explore further? Naturally! Should you ďŹ nd out what â&#x20AC;&#x153;as raw as the law allowsâ&#x20AC;? actually means? I encourage you! Should you question taboos that are no longer relevant? Most assuredly! Should you burn away the rotting pain with a show of liberated strength? Beyond a doubt! Should you tap into the open secret at the core of your wild beauty! Of course!

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žš NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 1 6-22, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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B-12 Shots Happy Hour! â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursdays 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6pm Onlyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;$18 (30% off) WALK-INS ONLY. For energy, immune, fatigue, anxiety @ the Naturopathic Wellness Center@ the Integrative Medical Clinic of SR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dr. Dana Michaels ND and Dr. Moses Goldberg ND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 175 Concourse Blvd. 707.284.9200

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Low Cost Vaccination Clinics every Sunday, 9:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:30am

WESTERN FARM CENTER 707.545.0721 21 West 7th St., Santa Rosa

Win Free Stuff bohemian.com/northbay/freeStuff

 Doggie Day Care 2nd Day FREE! A

$

 VALUE

 100 off Boot Camp  3 Private Sessions for $250 $

SAVE $

exp. 10/31/2013

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 YEARS TRAINING EXPERIENCE /BEDIENCE TRAINING THE NATURAL WAY  ACRES OF SAFE COUNTRY TRAINING GROUNDS %XCEPTIONAL FOR &EAR  !GGRESSION ISSUES 3TRONG LEADERSHIP SKILLS TAUGHT FOR OWNERS

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