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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19

THURSDAY, JUNE 20

FRIDAY, JUNE 21

MARSHALL TUCKER BAND

KELLIE PICKLER

KIX BROOKS

SATURDAY, JUNE 22

SUNDAY, JUNE 23

FIESTA LATINA:

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Wine Tasting featuring North of the Gate Wine Competition Award Winners p$PPLJOH Demos by North Bay and San Francisco Notable Chefs

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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$UW 6RXUFH DWWKH

garden tour for charity RESORTS IN BLOOM

Open Studios

Visit Preview Exhibit at Sebastopol Center for the Arts 707-829-4797 www.artatthesource.org Presented by Sebastopol Center for the Arts

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

+ 6 / &  tt    

Follow the Yellow Signs! June 8-9 10 am - 5 pm

Bohemian

Enjoy a mini escape while touring 10 unique western Sonoma County properties. Purchase tickets to this popular event by visiting the Resorts in Bloom website or call us today.

Interns Estefany Gonzalez, Anna Hecht, Nadav Soroker

Contributors Michael Amsler, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Jessica Dur Taylor, James Knight, Jenna Loceff, Jacquelynne Ocaña, Jonah Raskin, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

Design Director Kara Brown

GARDEN TOURS:

10 AM- 4PM SAT. & SUN. VIP EVENTS:

5-7PM FRI. & SAT. $30 day / $50 with VIP events www.resortsinbloom.com

707-869-5977 ext. 3313

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Lynda Rael, ext. 204 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor

June 7Oct. 4

West County Health Centers All proceeds from this annual fundraiser benefit patient care for people in need at our six sites. Visit us at wchealth.org to learn more about West County Health Centers and our vision for a community where all residents have a medical home and people are empowered to build healthy lives.

Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Where: Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S. High St, Sebastopol Tickets: $10 each; Best of the Fest Pass to all 7 films: $50 Info: 707-829-4797 www.sebastopolfilmfestival.org

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc. S P O N S O R E D

I N

P A R T

B Y

Cover photo of Courtney Harkins by Sara Sanger. Cover design by Kara Brown.

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This photo was submitted by Chris Wells of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘It’s not like you’re just buying a shirt. We’re creating a whole new way of societal functioning.’ COVER STO RY P1 8 How to Beat the Banks P8 Sharing a Room with Naked People P1 5 Sketches of Miles Davis P24 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Restaurants p12 Wineries p14 Swirl p15

Cover Feature p18 Culture Crush p23 Arts & Ideas p24 Stage p25 Film p26

Music p27 Concerts & Clubs p28 A&E p32 Classified p39 Astrology p39

ABOUT THE COVER This issue’s cover photo is by Sara Sanger. Model is Courtney Harkins, wearing a dress by Heidi Iverson. Hair by Ashley Allred. Makeup by Rochell Overn. Assistant: Mary Petersen. Alpacas at West County Alpacas courtesy of Noelle Gaberman.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

nb YOU COMPLETE ME

Do you realize that you have the most beautiful face? Or part of one?

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Moving Forward Sonoma Clean Power: still better, cheaper than PG&E BY CORDEL STILLMAN

R

achel Dovey’s recent analysis of the final four potential energy suppliers for Sonoma Clean Power (“The Final Four: So just how ‘clean’ are the companies vying for the Sonoma Clean Power job?,” May 15) misled readers while trying to throw darts at the large power companies vying for the contract. The Sonoma County Board of Supervisors has approved Sonoma Clean Power (SCP), and cities are now determining whether to provide their residents and businesses a choice of power providers. Even if some cities elect to join later, residents in the unincorporated parts of the county will be able to get on board starting in January 2014. Anyone not wanting to participate can easily opt out and stay with PG&E. Competition always benefits the consumer, and providing a choice of energy providers will do the same for Sonoma County residents. Sonoma Clean Power is negotiating for the greenest mix of power we can afford, while keeping rates competitive with PG&E. Based on the proposals, residential rates will range from almost 2 percent below PG&E to about 1 percent more. Commercial rates will be as much as 3 percent below PG&E to just 0.5 percent more—with more renewables. It’s important to note that every major energy supply company in the United States—those large enough to supply the needs of Sonoma County—will have some fossil fuels in its national portfolio. But SCP isn’t buying their national portfolio; SCP is telling those companies what we want for our power supplies here in Sonoma. By forming Sonoma Clean Power, the county will be able to reinvest the net income from energy sales back into local energy resources and infrastructure, thus keeping our money local. Your energy bill will be reinvested right here to benefit everyone. Sonoma Clean Power will bring energy consumers in Sonoma County more choice, a reduced carbon footprint and a growing local economy. If you believe in “Go Local,” here’s another chance to show it. Cordel Stillman is program manager for Sonoma Clean Power and deputy chief engineer of the Sonoma County Water Agency. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Dirty Water

My husband and I were going to make an offer on a house and move to Dillon Beach, until reading this article today (“Wrung Dry,” May 29). I am horrified by the greed of this company and the way these people are forced to live. I am all for water conservation, but upon exploring CalWater.com, I am surprised to say that usage isn’t the issue. These people are reusing bath water and not cleaning their medical instruments, but the amount of water one uses contributes very little to the actual amount billed. The size of your meter, the service charges, taxes and additional fees are where they are really gouging customers. These residents should be better informed about their bill breakdown. I am not in the area, but I would like to know how to get involved in changing how Cal Water treats these customers and expose the lack of oversight.

SARAH MICHELLE RICE Via online

Conserve and Pay Regarding Rachel Dovey’s article on Cal Water, a recent PUC public hearing in Guerneville considered a 50.9 to 70.2 percent rate increase application from Cal Water. This district includes Armstrong Woods, Noel Heights, Duncans Mills and Hawkins (Santa Rosa). It is owned by the largest investor-owned water-service company west of the Mississippi and the third largest in the United States. With a significant decrease in water usage, they say “rates then have to be increased to cover fixed costs.” This means a typical monthly bill could increase from $85.72 to $160.86 a month for 50 consumers in Noel Heights—because we are conserving water. There are no infrastructure improvements planned for us. Are we paying for water service, or lining the pockets of the corporate officers and the stockholders? This is the 46th

consecutive year the stockholder dividend has increased. In 2012, the net income increase was 29.5 percent. The PUC mandates a corporate profit and guaranteed fixed minimum stockholder income of approximately 8 percent providing “steady, predictable returns.” It is difficult to have any empathy for the county water agency and Santa Rosa consumers. A reported 1 to 5 percent increase seems so minuscule.

JEANETTE DILLMAN Guerneville

Strike Struggle As front-line workers, RNs are the experts on what we need in our workplace conditions; administrators are not. The hospital makes a huge profit, and it is our business how the surplus is spent. It should matter to nurses at Memorial Hospital that the hospital chooses to invest in “consumer-friendly” new construction while cutting ancillary staff. To the patient who is lying in a soiled bed for half an hour because there are no more nurse’s aides, and his nurse is maintaining pressure on a femoral artery down the hall, that new diagnostic imaging center will be of little comfort. When RNs spend more time doing non-nursing tasks (entering orders, chasing down linens, emptying trash), we are pulled from the bedside. Patients receive less direct nursing care, and poorer outcomes result. Likewise when we are denied breaks. There are ample evidence-based studies linking nurse fatigue to bad outcomes. Demanding that the system step up staffing is not “whining.” We strike not to assert our value (which is self-evident in our work), but to assert our power and solidarity. Our union has defended RNs who crossed our picket line and who never dreamed they would need union help. Your union is an incarnation of the thousands of women and men who fought and died for working conditions that are safe, compensation that is fair and terms that protect RNs from the whims and vagaries of administrative “efficiency.”

THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

The first step toward a rewarding career is making the decision to get the right education. Empire College students are enrolled in comprehensive programs designed to develop marketable skills and entrepreneurial thinking. We owe it to those workers, to new nurses, to our patients and to ourselves to maintain a strong union.

LAURA HINERFELD

Staff nurse, Sutter Hospital

Top Five 1

Crazy lady at Doran Beach accusing people of hitting her car—sheesh

2 ‘Lady in Red’ becomes

Big Money The Big Money that is supporting the Lunny’s oyster farm in Drakes Bay want to set a precedent that allows commercial activity in our National Parks, Wilderness areas in particular (“Salty Situation,” May 29). The other issues—environmental impact, small family farming, local, sustainable— while important, are just smoke screens in this fight for our wilderness areas nationwide. If the effort in Drakes Bay fails, what is next? Mining for minerals in Yellowstone National Park?

MAT LOUNIBOS Petaluma

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

unwitting symbol for protests in Turkey

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Charlie Haden steps up to the bass, plays two nights at Healdsburg Jazz Festival

5 Cheryl Strayed gives

advice to writers in Petaluma: ‘Write like a motherfucker’ 3035 Cleveland Ave. , Santa Rosa

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Rants

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Nadav Soroker

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Adios, Doyle Park; bonjour, Santa Rosa FrenchAmerican Charter School. When the mostly Latino Doyle Park Elementary School in Santa Rosa officially closed last year, the unexpected uproar caused the school board to strike a deal keeping it open for one more year. Now that year is over, Doyle Park is closed, and from the outside, it appears the school board is implementing various forms of segregation. Take the cafeteria of the FrenchAmerican public charter school taking Doyle Park’s place. Last month, the school board approved spending an extra $95,000 annually for fancier food at the school. Healthy food is a good thing, but it sure doesn’t feel fair to the kids who formerly occupied the campus, who will still be grazing next year on lukewarm tater tots and pizza that even Little Caesar’s would be ashamed to serve. The lunch program at the new, mostly white charter school was approved 6–0.

LOOK TO NORTH DAKOTA A public banking system would be able to succeed by working with community credit unions.

Direct Deposit

The Public Banking Institute says there’s a way to build a stronger and more resilient local economy BY LEILANI CLARK

W

ith a price tag of $6 billion, the Bay Bridge retrofit is one of most expensive engineering projects in California’s history. And in the end, taxpayers will pay nearly double that cost—an amount that won’t be paid off until at least 2049—with a huge chunk of interest

paid to the banks funding the project. If a state-owned bank had backed the project, say proponents of a growing public bank movement, the interest could have gone back into public coffers, benefiting California taxpayers rather than bank shareholders. “We’ve given a free pass to Wall Street,” says Marc Armstrong, executive director of the Public Banking Institute. “We’re paying

them millions in interest. We’ve never held that piece under the microscope, and it’s about time that we did. If we funded the Bay Bridge retrofit ourselves, the net cost would be zero because we’d be paying interest to ourselves.” Unlike privately owned banks like Bank of America, a publicly owned bank is ostensibly run for the people of any sized government—county, state, national—or community ) 10 able to meet the

Seven out of 10 noncharter elementary schools in the city have over 85 percent of their students qualifying for free or reduced lunches, one of which was Doyle Park. In 2011, when the French-American Charter School was approved, 71-year-old school board president Larry Haenel was quoted as saying that “there was no downside” to the proposed school. (Another board member, Ted Wakefield, provided the swing vote to close Doyle Park even while planning for his own children to attend the FrenchAmerican Charter School.) While the kids on Sonoma Avenue students enjoy quinoa and free-range duck, perhaps the school board members behind the decision to strengthen economic-racial segregation in our already-segregated schools should enjoy a large bowl of big, fat crow.—Nicolas Grizzle

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Public Banking ( 8

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requirements for setting up a bank. Currently, private banks are the only entities large enough to handle the huge amount of funds generated by cities, counties and states. But what if tax revenues were placed in a public bank, one run by salaried public employees with a transparent pay structure? What if these tax revenues then became a source of credit to be lent out to the community for things like infrastructure or student loans? This story of lost potential was just one of the items discussed at the second annual Public Banking Conference, held June 2–4 at Dominican University in San Rafael. Over 300 people attended the conference to learn about banking with public—and not private—interests as the priority. High-profile supporters like Matt Taibbi have come out in support of the idea. Taibbi, the Rolling Stone investigative journalist who famously described Goldman-Sachs as a “great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money,” spoke at the conference’s “Funding the New Economy” conversation on opening night. Taibbi has made a career of calling out the malfeasance and misdemeanors of too-big-to-fail banks, and “corruption at the molecular level of the economy.” Armstrong and his cohort have been working to educate the world on public banking since 2009, after getting their sea legs at an Economics of Peace conference at the Praxis Institute in Sonoma. They were inspired by Ellen Brown, author of Web of Debt: The Shocking Truth About Our Money System and How We Can Break Free. President of the Public Banking Institute and a featured speaker at the conference, Brown has argued that banking should be a public utility, and money a public asset, protected from the “parasitic pyramid scheme” of loans and interest perpetrated by private banks. The movement has a precedent.

Formed in 1919, the Bank of North Dakota is the nation’s only stateowned bank. In 2008, as other state legislatures contended with huge revenue shortfalls, the state of North Dakota came out on top, with low foreclosure rates and a large surplus.

‘Wall Street banks are buying bonds in Brazil or funding Chinese manufacturers.’ The history of the Bank of North Dakota is detailed in an April 2013 American Prospect article, in which writer Abby Rapoport describes how the bank was founded over 90 years ago when populist farmers grew tired of being exploited by the big banks. With a deposit base of $5 billion, which comes from state taxes and funds, the bank partners with community banks and credit unions to provide loans to farmers, students and others, who then pay interest that goes back into the public coffers, to be used to fund more lines of credit. Called “Bolshevik” and “socialist” by detractors at the beginning, the bank now has supporters among the state’s most conservative, who’ve seen the economic benefits of keeping capital in-house. In the end, Armstrong says, big banks are looking for short-term profits, rather than what might work for the good of individual communities, and that’s why public banks deserve a second look. “The Wall Street banks are redirecting a lot of the money that we’re putting in as deposits to other countries,” Armstrong explains. “They’re buying bonds in Brazil or funding Chinese manufacturers. That credit is not being used for the good of the people that pay the taxes that are deposited into the bank in the first place.”

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

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exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner, Sat. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Bruno’s on Fourth

Vineyards Inn Spanish.

American. $$-$$$. There’s real sophistication lurking in these upscale American comfort staples like flat-iron steak and fries, macaroni-ham casserole and stellar braised lamb shank. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner only, Sat; Sun, brunch and dinner. 1226 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8222.

Chloe’s French Cafe French. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Fri. 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

Graffiti Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Jazzed-up waterfront destination really is all that jazz. Big menu focuses on creative seafood dishes, also steak and lamb. Variety of indoor and outdoor seating; wide selection of appetizers– half vegetarian–can make the meal. Lunch and dinner daily. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567. La Fondita Mexican. $. Hearty, filling, very tasty. No glop or goop here. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 816 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.0881.

Martha’s Old Mexico Mexican. $. Freshly prepared favorites, along with regional house specialties. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 305 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.4458.

Osake Sushi Bar & Grill Japanese. $$$. Gourmet sushi, exotic seasoned seaweed salad, robata grill specialties and premium sakes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2446 Patio Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8282.

Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of

$$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

MARIN CO U N T Y Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 316 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900. Poggio Italian. $$-$$$.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Two San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500. The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Celadon Global

Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Robata Grill & Sushi

Checkers California. $$.

Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

SMALL BITES

To Cook or Not to Cook? The racial history of whole-hog barbecue. How to sweat a perfect mirepoix. Why we are so drawn to umami, that elusive fifth taste. These topics and many more are dissected in Michael Pollan’s seventh book, Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation. The bestselling author of The Botany of Desire and The Omnivore’s Dilemma, Pollan understands more than most the plants and animals that humans consume—for better and for worse—in this post-industrial age. As a writer, Pollan, who speaks at the Petaluma Seed Bank on June 17, has hit on a winning recipe: Mix equal parts history, science and personal narrative. Season with sharp sociopolitical analysis and a liberal dose of how-to instruction. Serve earnest, with a side of wit. Hold the bravado. Whether he’s being splattered with hot pig fat or analyzing the role of the cauldron in ancient Greece, Pollan’s prose is dense yet easy to digest. By exploring the role of each of the four elements—fire, water, air and earth—in transforming raw ingredients into edible meals, Pollan reveals the intricacies of grilling, braising, baking and fermenting. For those who come away inspired to wrest their nutrition from corporate hands, Pollan includes his own recipes for pork shoulder barbecue, sauerkraut, whole wheat country bread and meat sugo. But don’t be intimidated by his gastronomic piety. As Pollan recently admitted to Stephen Colbert, he does enjoy a box of Cracker Jacks every now and then. Michael Pollan speaks on Monday, June 17, at the Petaluma Seed Bank. 199 Petaluma Blvd., N., Petaluma. 7pm. $30 includes book; $35 includes book and one extra ticket. 707.762.0563.—Jessica Dur Taylor

Summer Summer Special Sp ecial

M o n d ay + W Monday Wednesday e d n e s d ay Happy 5–10pm H appy Hour, Hou r, 5 –10 p m $ 50 1 S Sapporo apporo drafts d ra f t s 50¢ chicken 5 0¢ Haku Ha ku c h icken wings w i n gs

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A Special Invitation for Dads

Father’ s Day Sunday, June 16 David Haydon invites all fathers for a celebratory and complimentary entree.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and

dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

www.ildavide.net‡907 A Street, San Rafael‡Open at 4:30pm Reservations 415.454.8080 or online at urbanspoon.com

13 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Wineries

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Benziger Winery A nontraditional, organic, biodynamically farmed winery. Don’t miss the daily 45-minute tram ride replete with a tour of the vineyard, wildlife sanctuaries and caves. 1883 London Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 888.490.2739.

Family Wineries Kenwood More than

DINE IN SPECIAL!

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GIFT CERTIFICATE

Minimum purchase $29. Expires 6/30/13

Tantalizing Asian Cuisine

ready for tourists and locals. Shelves are stocked with olive oils and sundry wine country snackery, grab-and-go chilled white wines, and strangely irresistible wooden ducks. If that was not enough, a model wine train circles above the horseshoe bar. Wine tasting by multiple choice. 9380 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. Tasting fee, $5–$10. 888.433.6555.

Lynmar Winery Produces world-class Pinot and Chard in elegant rural setting. Look for fun food pairings. 3909 Frei Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.829.3374. Moondance Cellars

707.823.6688 799 Gravenstein Hwy South Sebastopol, behind McDonald’s

Dogs, Cabs and cars are the focus; when a supercharged 1965 Corvette is parked in front, the vintner is in the house. Also, Port and Sherry from Sonoma Valley Portworks. 14301 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Daily 11am–6pm. $5 tasting fee. 707.938.7550.

Roadhouse Winery Dudes abide at this casual, fun spot. Pinot, Zin, Grenache are hot. 240 Center St., Healdsburg. Daily 11am–7pm. 707.922.6362.

Selby Winery Regularly

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served at White House state dinners, Selby Chard has been through several administrations. 215 Center St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.431.1288.

Taft Street Winery Award-winning Sauvignon Blancs are a great deal. 2030 Barlow Lane,

Sebastopol. Monday–Friday, 11am–4pm; Saturday–Sunday, 11am–4:30pm. 707.823.2049.

Topel Winery Hailing from Hopland, Topel offers estategrown Meritage and other wines in this well-appointed tasting room with casement windows open to the street, across from Oakville Grocery. Cedar, chicory, chocolate and brown spice–makes one hungry for a portobellomushroom-on-focaccia sandwich. 125 Matheson St., Hopland. Open daily, 11am– 7pm. Tasting fees, $5–$12. 707.433.4116.

Vinoteca Vinify Wine Services is like a Russian doll of wineries within wineries making brands for still more clients. It’s in a generic industrial-park location, but with unique, single-vineyard wines from Frostwatch, Baker Lane, Bjornstad, Super Sonoman and others. 3358 Coffey Lane, Ste. C, Santa Rosa. Friday– Sunday 11am–5pm. $10 fee. 707.542.3292.

N A PA CO U N TY Constant (WC) Boutique winery specializing in the kind of Cabernet that makes the Wine Spectator drool. 2121 Diamond Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.942.0707. Del Dotto Vineyards (WC) Caves lined with Italian marble and ancient tiles, not to mention Venetian chandeliers and mosaic marble floors. They host candle-lit tastings, replete with cheese and chocolate, Friday–Sunday. Opera resonates until 4pm; rock rules after 4pm. 1055 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.963.2134.

Nichelini Winery Take a joyride in the Napa backcountry and discover this rustic little winery that’s been in the family for generations. See the only Roman wine press

in the Western Hemisphere. 2950 Sage Canyon Road, St. Helena. Saturday and Sunday, 10am–5pm. No fee. 707.963.0717.

Smith-Madrone Riesling is Smith-Madrone’s main fame claim. Its Riesling has steadily gained fame while Napa Valley Riesling in general has become a rare antique. 4022 Spring Mountain Road, St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.2283. Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethen’s heyday was in the ’60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.255.7700.

V. Sattui Though a regular stop on the tourist circuit, it remains charming in the Italian style. With no distribution except via the Net, wines can only be purchased onsite. 1111 White Lane, St. Helena. Open daily, 9am–6pm. 707.963.7774.

Velo Vino Napa Valley Cycling-themed bungalow is filled with enough gear to outfit a peloton, plus wine and espresso, too. Tastings include spiced nuts and dried cherries, but sample-sized Clif and Luna Bars are readily available for your impromptu energy bar and wine pairings. 709 Main St., St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 6pm. $10–$25. 707.968.0625.

Vincent Arroyo Winery Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines. 2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.6995.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

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Award Winning Wines Exceptional Cuisine

Yet another Zin label from Wilson empire—oh, wait, yum

Wi n e C lu b me mb e r a n d a g u e st sa v e 20% d in in g a t C o rk s R e sta u ra n t.

BY JAMES KNIGHT

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t. Anne’s Crossing: does it make you think of Australia, too? Lots of this-or-that’s “crossing� Down Under. I’m thinking Shiraz, but no, it’s got nothing to do with that. This Sonoma Valley tasting room is focused almost exclusively on Zinfandel. Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel. And don’t you mind that bright, blue sign screaming “Naked Wines� beneath the staid St. Anne’s sign. It’s got nothing whatsoever to do with that, either. Loving the dissonance? Then let me sell you a little more on this joint. Inside, music from different sources clashes in that special, audio/video store way—remember those? Now, this isn’t the normal state of affairs. This particular evening, the tasting-room roommate, Naked Wines, is hosting an industry mixer, complete with trendy banh mi truck, although I’m told that when members of some St. Anne’s parish or other wander in, tickled to buy a solabeled bottle of the good old sacrament, they don’t mind sharing the room with the “Naked.� Here’s what is known: owner Ken Wilson had a grandmother named Anne. But why “crossing,� nobody here knows, besides offering that Ken Wilson is a man of mystery. The staff I meet at St. Anne’s on a random weekday afternoon just before closing are well-informed and downright personable. And there are only four of them—five including St. Anne’s-dedicated winemaker Chris Barrett. In barrel at Pezzi King, a Sonoma Valley Zin will soon join 15 other Zins. But let’s start with white. If you’re familiar with this vineyard, the 2011 Ritchie Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc ($24) may seem a little wild—rich caramel, supercharged lychee fruit. You want to know if it’s more “New Zealand� or more “Sancerre�? Try Willy Wonka. The 2010 Alexander Valley Chardonnay ($28) is not buttery, but creamy— apple pie milkshake. Blushing with raspberry perfume, beckoning with multigrain toast aromas, the 2010 Serracino Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel ($50) slathers the palate with tart plum. Nothing wrong with the 2010 Old Vine DCV Zinfandel ($32), it’s just the kind of big, woody, blackberry syrupy Zin that had me going “ho hum� the first time I breezed through here during their opening. I’m glad I gave them another chance. Top pick: 2010 Kettleby DCV Zinfandel ($60), which goes down like warm red cherries and ice cream. You want to pay more, you get the 2010 “Kennethwood� DCV Zinfandel ($150), packing extra cracked pepper and Mexican chocolate with the raspberry jam. Yeah, some of these Zins are a bit high, but they do make such sweet music for the mouth. St. Anne’s Crossing, 8450 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Daily, 11am– 5pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.598.5200.

Open 7 Days Brunch - Lunch - Dinner Tast i ng Room O pen D ai l y

5700 Hwy. 116 x 887-3344 x Corks116.com In tro d u c in g

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N\[[`e^j A tradition of excellence since 1976 Call us for a site tour wedding consultation

16702 Coast Hwy One, Bodega 707-876-9818 www.scvilla.com

Savory Lunch Menu Aromatic Loose Teas

Tudor Rose English Tea Room Traditional English Tea Room with a Slice of Silliness Reservations Recommended Wednesday–Sunday, 11–6

Pinkies Up! &OURTH3TREETs3ANTA2OSA sTUDORROSETEAROOMCOM

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

St. Anne’s Crossing

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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ANNOUNCING THE 2013 NORTH BAY MUSIC AWARDS AND 24-HOUR BAND CONTEST! SATURDAY, JULY 13 AT THE ARLENE FRANCIS CENTER IN SANTA ROSA!

Live music will be provided by bands assembled totally at random just 24 hours before in the…

24-HOUR BAND CONTEST. Musicians, here’s your chance to take part in a totally creative experiment. Here’s how it works: you sign up for the 24-Hour Band Contest at www.bohemian.com. You tell us your name and what instrument you play. On Friday, we’ll meet and pick names at random, assembling bands made up of complete strangers. The bands will then have 24 hours to write two original songs and learn one cover song, and return to perform the next night at the NorBays! Are you in? Of course you’re in. Sign up at www.bohemian.com.

Preliminary write-in voting is now live for the 2012 NorBays! Vote for your favorite bands in nine different categories at www.bohemian.com. Preliminary voting will be live through June 19, when winners will advance to the final voting round on June 20. 24-HOUR BAND PERFORMANCES! WINNERS ANNOUNCED! GOLD RECORDS AWARDED! BEER AND WINE! FUNK AND SOUL 45S! LOCAL ARTISTS! GET YOUR PHOTO TAKEN! A GREY CAT IMPERSONATING MEL TORME! IT’S ALL HAPPENING AT THE 2012 NORBAYS! Saturday, July 13, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $5. All Ages!

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Engaging speakers, artists and entertainers will explore the theme

More? Saturday, June 15 | 1pm to 6pm Doors open at 12:15 TEDx speakers will begin promptly at 1pm 5-6pm Fabulous food and wine reception included in ticket price

Pampered Feet Reflexology Center BVhhV\ZI]ZgVen

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The desire for more is part of human nature: to know more, to experience more, to have more. How has this drive for more shaped us? The world we live in? How do we get more out of life? When is less more? Is the sky the limit?

Join the conversation!

Open House

Tickets: $40 general $25 for students Jackson Theater at Sonoma Country Day School 707-284-3200 | www.tedxsonomacounty.com

Drop-in

Boxing

Sessions

includes arms, shoulders, neck, & back and herbal foot soak

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

The TED-style conference returns to Sonoma County!

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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“unbelievable endeavor,” she says, if only for the sheer amount of work it took to build a functional and wearable locally sourced wardrobe— all the way down to her underwear. “The most challenging aspect was getting the clothes,” says the 35-year-old natural dye expert, weaver and educator. “We don’t have a lot of people that know how to make something that fits. Just finding a garment that I could wear functionally and appear seminormal was hard.” So she reached out to artisans and farmers, building a wardrobe one step at a time. Burgess still wears the sweaters, skirts and other items created for her by an all-volunteer labor force three years ago. And just like in the old days, before Americans had access to 100 million new pieces of clothing each year—12.7 million tons of which are thrown away— Photos by Sara Sanger except where noted Burgess spends part of each week mending and repairing those a personal pledge to wear a wardrobe clothes to extend their life. whose dyes, fibers and labor were The inspiration to grow into sourced from no more than 150 something bigger arose as miles from the project’s base. Burgess wondered how to harness “I was committed to using local the community built around labor, locally farmed materials her project. How could she keep and locally grown dyes,” explains together the community of Burgess, who recently moved designers and farmers, and how from San Geronimo to Petaluma. could she democratize the process, The project proved to be an

ou know the drill. You go to a store, maybe Forever 21 or Target, only to be confronted with a hundred different T-shirts, in every shape and color. It seems so easy. Pick out a shirt, plunk down $10, take it home, wear it a few times, and when the threads start unraveling, toss it out and buy another one.

Recent tragedies at Bangladesh clothing factories? Chinese rivers overflowing with toxic runoff from industrial garment factories? You push these images out of your mind as you leave the store, even while knowing that somewhere in the Third World, there are real environmental and human costs to your new cheap T-shirt. Rebecca Burgess didn’t push it out of her mind. Instead, she envisioned an alternative, and now heads a national network of localized farmers, textile makers and clothing producers who sell clothes not only made entirely in the United States, from sheep shearing to sweater knitting, but in one’s own local region. Burgess calls it Fibershed. Just about everybody else calls it an idea whose time has come.

O

r, if you will, a time that has come and gone. Just 23 years ago, in 1990, 50 percent of our clothing was made in the United States. Today, according to Elizabeth Cline, author of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion, that figure stands at about 2 percent. Fibershed’s very beginnings were borne of such awareness. Burgess had understood the true cost of a cheap T-shirt from years of working with textiles, and in 2010, she put her beliefs about ethical fashion into action, making

making it accessible to everyone? Working with her brother and a friend—and a budget of nothing— she launched the Fibershed Marketplace, an online consortium of clothing, kits, yarn and raw fiber from a variety of producers. What started as a personal endeavor soon grew into a nonprofit movement that’s spreading across the nation; Fibershed affiliates have sprung up in Vermont, North Carolina, Utah, Los Angeles and internationally in England and Canada, all united by the goal of creating livelihoods around a garment’s lifecycle, from soil to skin.

T

he way that Fibershed works is simple. A knitter in Santa Rosa might procure skeins of organic Merino wool from sheep raised by Sally Fox, a weaver and rancher dedicated to a sustainable approach to agriculture at her Capay Valley ranch. That knitter would take the yarn, create a pattern, knit a sweater, and then sell it to, say, a client over the hill in Forestville. “We wanted to treat it as a place where the community could have access to one another,” she adds. “If someone in Berkeley didn’t want to drive to Napa for the yarn, the farmer could institutionalize the process of getting the yarn out the door.” This is clothing without the toxic runoff, the pesticides, the incredible dependence on fossil fuels, the unbounded dyes that wash off onto the skin and into waterways, and the horrific deaths of Bangladeshi garment workers feeding the insatiable American demand for cheap clothing.

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or those who can’t afford the kits, or the time commitment of learning how to knit (a reality that Burgess readily acknowledges), there are other ways to help beat the exploitative cheap-clothing system. Burgess recommends shopping at thrift stores and buying clothes made from natural fibers—100 percent wool or 100 percent cotton is best. “Plastic, acrylic and polyester blends are extremely toxic when washed,” she says. “Microfibers have been getting through municipal water treatment systems and out into rivers, bays and oceans.” A 2011 University College Dublin study revealed that during an average wash, one piece of clothing might shed up to 1,900 fibers—microplastics that are polluting beaches worldwide. It’s facts like these that push Burgess to think in a longterm, visionary fashion about Fibershed’s future. “The harvesting, the processing, through to the sale—all of that, to me, should be inspiring,” says Burgess. “This isn’t just a product. It’s a way of life. It’s not like you’re just buying a shirt. We’re creating a whole new way of societal functioning.” For more, see www.fibershed.com.

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Opposite page, inset: Dress by Heidi Iverson. This page: Sweater by Heidi Iverson, made from yarn by Mary Pettis-Sarley

19 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

While the price tag for certain items might seem exorbitant to some—Fibershed sells a coat that costs over $1,000—there are entry points for everyone. “If they can’t afford a Fibershed item, they can make it themselves with the kits,” says Burgess. “We can teach them how to knit. We can teach them how to dye. We can provide them with seeds to start their own dye garden, and we can provide training to learn how to do these things. Someone might say, ‘I don’t want to buy a $200 shirt, but I want to take sewing lessons from the artisan who made the shirt.’” Once those people learn to knit, dye and sew their own coat, the truecost price tag for labor and materials that go into Fibershed’s handmade clothing starts to make more sense.

20 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Fashion ( 19

Shear Delight Twirl Ranch, Napa BY LEILANI CLARK

A

n afternoon at Twirl Ranch—the 2,000-acre Napa ranch where Mary Pettis-Sarley and her husband raise sheep, angora goats, cattle, llamas and even alpacas—is an invitation into jolly chaos. After graduating from UC Berkeley with a degree in textile design and spending a few years teaching, Pettis-Sarley moved to the ranch in 1979 to embrace

“cowboying” in the wilds of Northern California. Now she spends her time among the animals and plants that provide the materials for her fiber work. On a Wednesday afternoon, Pettis-Sarley welcomes me into her upstairs studio, her blue eyes and green shirt under denim overalls as bright as the sky outside, and begins bringing out skein after skein of the naturally dyed yarn that’s sold in the Fibershed Marketplace. “I just have fun,” says PettisSarley, explaining the process

behind colors like “thistle” and “onion.” “It’s all a game,” she adds with a laugh, an attitude obvious in her approach to pretty much everything on the ranch, including her animals. With names like Tidbit, Noodle, Mrs. Sprout and Peanut Butter, the sheep and goats sound like cast members from Yo Gabba Gabba. Seventeen dogs run happily across the property, acting as guardians from mountain lions and coyotes. Up on a ridge above the house, we’re greeted by curious, sweet-faced alpacas—they were “rehomed” to the ranch nearly

two years ago—and freshly sheared sheep of all sizes. Pettis-Sarley shows me to the shearing room, where I feel three raw alpaca fleeces. Incredibly soft and lustrous, they are surely the material for the dreamiest of future Fibershed sweaters. It’s in this same space that she cleans and washes the fleece, and then transfers it outside where it dries in the sun before heading to the Yolo Wool Mill to be processed into yarn. Walking toward the garden, we pass cast-iron cauldrons sitting over an outdoor stove. “I use those pots for the natural dyes,” says Pettis-Sarley. “I’m just going through the whole plant base of this property. I started with the worst weeds first. It ended up being fabulous.” Overgrown kale from the garden gets thrown into the pot, producing a muted, buttery white color. Eucalyptus from the cow pasture has ended in yarns of red, light green and yellow, depending on the variety. Euphorbia, a plant that looks straight out of a Dr. Seuss book, creates an entrancing, bright mustard-green. “At the end of the day, I just want to play,” Pettis-Sarley says, standing in the garden over the land that she stewards—glimmering pond, sloping, green valley and all. “I don’t dream that I’m going to get rich, but I dream that I’m going to have a really good time.” Twirl yarn is available at Knitterly in Petaluma, and can be purchased online in the Fibershed marketplace.

Spun by Hand Black Mountain Weavers, Pt. Reyes Station BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

lack Mountain Weavers was founded in Point Reyes Station 25 years ago as a coop for clothing makers, but for the past 10 years, Marlie de Swart has run it with a hyperlocal bent. Of its 30 or so members, five actively participate in running the storefront, and four are handspinners, including de Swart herself. “Handspun

B

yarn is very rare,” she says excitedly, clutching a skein of her own soft, fluffy, undyed yarn. “Because it takes so much work, it’s not always lucrative to sell.” And yet Black Mountain’s handspun yarn draws knitters from miles around, she says, surely in part because of de Swart’s emphasis on locale. Her skeins are marked with the farm where the wool was sourced—always within 150 miles of the store (most are within 20). “The carbon footprint is virtually zero,” she says, drawing a

comparison to fabric from China. Transportation isn’t the only impact on the earth; in China, wool is heaped into machines the size of her entire store, and excess material is simply burned off into the atmosphere. Chemical dyes run off into waterways, which then seep into the ground or carry out to the ocean. In contrast, de Swart spins yarn on a wheel in her home, and she and fellow co-op members use natural dyes like indigo (plant) or cochineal (insect). It takes de Swart about two to three hours to make a skein of yarn, not including soaking the wool overnight

three times. From there, it takes about two to three days to knit a sweater, and that’s making good time; she’s been doing it her whole life. Her mother was a spinner and knitter in her native Holland, and de Swart moved to California to attend school in Los Angeles about 35 years ago (she still has a slight accent), met the man who became her husband and moved north soon after. Feeling good about minimizing one’s impact is great, and the sweaters de Swart knits are incredibly soft and beautiful. (Even if you managed to find something that feels as good inside and out for $265 on the top floor of Nordstrom, it still wouldn’t be handmade with organic materials.) It’s not just de Swart’s crafts that catch attention in her tiny store on the bustling street, either. Fingerless mittens knitted with angora rabbit fur are in stock, as well as beautiful scarves made to last a lifetime, unique shirts from tightly knitted fabric and even hats made from dog fur. (Dog fur items are usually made by request from pet owners, who bring in their own “wool.”) The only place to get these handmade items is at de Swart’s store, though a limited number of items are available online through Fibershed. Black Mountain itself does not have an online store, explains de Swart, for one simple reason: “We can’t make it fast enough.” Black Mountain Weavers, 11245 Main St., Pt. Reyes Station. 415.663.9130.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Katie Stohlmann

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22 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Fashion ( 21

The ABCs of Clothes HIJK, Sebastopol BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

H

eidi Iverson became a clothier almost by accident. “I make dolls for a living, it’s my day job,” she says inside her small studio that sits among towering trees in west Sonoma County. But an epiphany came while working in a yarn store: the university-trained ceramicist and sculptor realized that yarn is a raw material just like clay. “I thought, I’m a sculptor, I can build clothes,” she says.

HIJK, the hyperlocal clothing line Iverson produces with Jen Kida, uses raw materials that are grown,

harvested and processed by people she’s met face-to-face. She uses the material to design, sew and dye—in other words, build—clothes. “You give me the yarn, and I will make something amazing with it,” she says. The clothes are high-quality, and the price reflects both the finished product’s durability and the work put into making it. These aren’t $10 shirts from a big-box store—there’s one from HIJK that retails for $200. But its functionality has a certain style that isn’t readily available from a kiosk in the mall. One design, large and flowing, is almost like a tunic, with pockets perfect for burrowing chilly hands in—thick yet breathable. Though her clothes are available through Fibershed, Iverson admits that her priorities

aren’t solely about making money. “Most of what this is about is building community,” she says. The cotton comes from a producer in the Capay Valley near Sacramento, the indigo dye is handmade in Novato, and the all the clothes are hand-sewn and designed at Iverson’s studio, making the term “hyperlocal” most appropriate. Iverson, who moved here from Iowa, also makes dye, which is quite an involved process. For instance, she finds oak galls around her studio and grinds them into a fine powder before soaking them in water for 24 hours. Then she adds iron, procured by letting metal scraps sit in jars of water. The length of time they sit determines how much iron will be added to the dye, which influences

the final color. This process has been used since ancient Roman times, and it’s much safer for the environment and less wasteful than synthetic dyes. The tradeoff is that it costs about $37 to dye one $130 shirt—and much more, say, for HIJK’s $300 pair of fisherman’s pants. Instead of buying clothes over and over again, Iverson would like to see people appreciate what they have, and take good care of it. “People used to fix their clothes,” she says. “In most of Europe, that never really went away. But in the U.S., we’re all about cheap and fast. I would like to see the idea of the ‘slow food’ movement for clothes.” HIJK maintains a Facebook page and can be found at the Fibershed Marketplace online.

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ArtsIdeas Courtesy Napa Valley Museum

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

COOL LINES Davis took to painting in his later years, expressing ďŹ&#x201A;uid, lyrical lines on canvas instead of trumpet.

Royaltyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brush The art of Miles Davis at Napa Museum

M

iles Davis. The very utterance of the jazz pioneerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name evokes the sound of a muted trumpet, lyrical and soaring. Kind of Blue, the most popular jazz album of all time with over 4 million copies sold, and Birth of the Cool, the album that put cool bop on the map, are just two of the many Davis albums that shaped not only jazz, but the entire music world. Somehow, Davis also found time

to paint hundreds of works of art, 42 of which are on display at the Napa Valley Museum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was the Mozart of jazz,â&#x20AC;? allows Kristie Sheppard, executive director of the museum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He completely transformed American music.â&#x20AC;? But what sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most interested in is his lesser-known visual arts side. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was a very talented painter,â&#x20AC;? she says. Sheppard isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alone in only recently discovering this other side to Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; career. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Miles did visual art for fun,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was his release.â&#x20AC;? The exhibit in Napa is a rare chance for the public to see Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; paintings. This is the ďŹ rst time in

BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE ďŹ ve years his work has been on display, Sheppard explains, and the ďŹ rst time that so many pieces have been shown in one place in the United States. InďŹ&#x201A;uenced by Picasso and African tribal art, Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; paintings and mixed-media pieces often show the curvature of the female ďŹ gure. Many pieces prominently feature lines and abstract bits of trumpet, often with lots of color. Just like his music, some pieces are more abstract than others. Many evoke the same strangeness of Bitches Brew, but some are elegantly straightforward, like Kind of Blue. An artist through and through,

Davis was also very interested in fashion. His fondness for mixed-media spilled over into his wardrobe, where his penchant for bombastic jackets and suits put him at the forefront of fashion trends. One of his suits, a red and black stunner, is on display in the exhibit. Other personal effects include Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; high school diploma, a plaque commemorating the Grammy award for Kind of Blue and one of his trumpets. The beautiful, dark brass trumpet with his name etched in cursive on the bell is a rare sight; not only are Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; instruments rarely displayed, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the few that he hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t painted. The main exhibit is a cooperative effort between the museum and the neighboring Lincoln Theater. In addition to several other events, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a screening of the 1986 ďŹ lm Round Midnight on June 29 presented by Dexter Gordonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife, Maxine Gordon, and a performance by 84year-old drummer Jimmy Cobb, who played on Kind of Blue and several other of Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; albums, on July 27. Edmund Ian Grantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jazzland and Other Stories,â&#x20AC;? a complement to Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; art, is a moderately cubist view of the musicians and clubs of the genreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s golden age on exhibit downstairs from the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main gallery. Though Davis died in 1991, his legacy of aural and visual art lives on. For those familiar with his music, experiencing his paintings gives another perspective of the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personality, and connects one more deeply with the elusive man behind the horn. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Miles Davis: The Art of Coolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs June 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 28 at the Napa Valley Museum. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Opening reception, Friday, June 7, 5-8pm ($30 nonmembers; $15 members). 707.944.0500.

Eric Chazankin

TORE-ADORE Mark Kratz as Don José and Rebecca Krouner as Carmen.

Lady in Red

Cinnabar gets ‘Carmen’ right BY DAVID TEMPLETON

G

eorges Bizet’s Carmen is one of the most popular operas ever written. Why then has Petaluma’s Cinnabar Theater, known for 40 years as the primary North Bay presenter of chamber opera, never once staged it? Audiences have clearly been waiting for it; the current three-weekend run was sold out before opening night (prompting the addition of one Wednesday-night performance on June 9). Perhaps Cinnabar’s cozy theater space made the character-heavy Carmen seem like too ambitious an undertaking. If so, director Elly Lichenstein, along with musical director Mary Chun, has ably met that challenge, presenting a nicely crammed but cleverly realized, emotionally rich—and super sexy— staging of the 1875 opera that once

‘Carmen’ runs Friday–Sunday (and one Wednesday, June 9) through June 16 at Cinnabar Theater. 3333 N. Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma. Wednesday and Friday– Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays. $25–$35. 707.763.8920.

25 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Stage

shocked audiences with its provocative images (females smoking cigarettes! soldiers cavorting with “loose women”!) and morally questionable subject matter: seduction, sexual obsession, jealousy, madness and murder. With a strong central cast and a veritable army of ensemble players, the stage overflows with energy and action, sometimes quite literally, and Lichenstein, whose work here represents some of her finest ever, packs every scene with eye-popping visuals and clever details. The beautiful and asymmetrical set by David Lear works upon ominous collapsing slabs with gaping holes in a rock-like facade. This gives the stage a suitably chameleon-like quality, rapidly shifting with the addition of a piece or two of furniture to become a smuggler’s lair, the interior of a lively tavern or the bustling village square where women from the local cigarette factory cavort with soldiers stationed in town. One of those factory workers is Carmen (played with plenty of fire and voracious confidence by mezzosoprano Rebecca Krouner, magnificent!). A Victorian-era force of nature, Carmen is “a naughty girl and a gypsy too,” as she describes herself early on. She knows she can have any man she wants, and since most men want her, she sets her eyes on the straightlaced, duty-obsessed soldier Don José (Mark Andrew Kratz, whose glorious tenor has been featured at the Kennedy Center in Washington). Carmen uses men before they have a chance to use and abuse her, and once José has given up everything for her, she shifts her affections to a handsome bullfighter (Jason Detwiler). The result, set to some of the most memorable music ever written for the stage, well played by Chun’s first-rate chamber orchestra, is an emotionally complex tragedy. As staged at Cinnabar, it’s also one of the best shows, opera or otherwise, of 2013. Rating (out of 5): +++++

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Wed, Jun 5 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB

Thur, Jun 6 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Jun 7 7–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts a WEST COAST SWING PARTY! 7:15pm Lessons, Dancing at 8:15, $10

Sat, Jun 8 10:30am– 12:30pm 5pm–7pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE with Gary Thomas Mike Thompson event

Sun, Jun 9 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5pm–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Jun 10 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Jun 11 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

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1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

Film

YOU AND ME The low-budget production of ‘WaterWalk’ actually serves the narrative.

Grand Rapids

Father and son communion in sensitive dude flick ‘WaterWalk’ BY GABE MELINE

A

buddy adventure movie is only as good as the adventure itself. Two hours of guys exploring the mall on Segways? Count me out. Two hours of guys going to junk stores seeking an exhaust manifold for a 1958 Edsel? Count me in, but count almost everybody else out. What almost everybody else wants is two hours of a poignant adventure movie featuring father and son, formerly at odds, who retrace a historic exploration via canoe and, in the process, build a stronger bond. WaterWalk, even with its shortcomings—not the least is budgetary—offers exactly this with charm to spare. Steven Faulkner (Robert Cicchini) is an editor at a small-town West Michigan newspaper who, despite receiving top trophy at the dubious National Obituary Awards, gets canned and is forced to apply for menial jobs. That’s not the least of his troubles. Faulkner’s adopted son, Justin (Chase Maser), had a party last weekend and gave his young sisters beer. Yelling ensues, where Justin laments the effects of his dad’s busy schedule: some other kid’s dad had to show him how to shoot a gun, and, worse, a genuine real-life female had to show him how to throw a baseball. “How pathetic is that?” Justin pleads. Justin proposes that the two paddle a canoe 1,000 miles to St. Louis, just like explorers Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet, and pay for the trip via crowdfunding (of course). You know how most of the rest goes. There’s bickering, but mostly there’s triumph of the human spirit, and a father and son coming together, and other things the man’s voice tells you in so many heart-tugging movie trailers. I won’t give away the end. WaterWalk has several unconvincing smaller characters, mostly of the female kind, which discredits the film slightly. Its ultralow-budget production, however, works in its favor; looking (and especially sounding) like home footage, WaterWalk seems to say, “This could be your story, too.” And who doesn’t live for adventure? ‘WaterWalk’ opens Friday, June 7, at Rialto Cinemas in Sebastopol.

ONE OF MANY David Luning is

among the 99 artists of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Real Music.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Banding Together â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Real Musicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Markets BY GABE MELINE

T

here I was, in Whole Foods about six years ago, standing in the checkout line near a small handful of Putumayo and Norah Jones CDs on an impulse rack, when I heard the guy in front of me ask the checker, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey, do you know any record stores in town that sell CDs?â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Uh, probably Best Buy,â&#x20AC;? the checker replied, to my astonishment. The bag boy also suggested Best Buyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as did a nearby customer. I guess I was naĂŻve. I assumed the average Whole Foods employee, and customer, might be more in tune with the local community, and would have at the time been able to name several independent mom-and-pop record stores. Which makes the local music program at Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market, spearheaded by vice president Tom Scott, all the more welcome. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tom Scott had a meeting,â&#x20AC;? says Last Record Store owner Doug Jayne, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and said he was in a Whole Foods and saw people buying Lady Gaga and Elton John CDs. He said,

The record-release show for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Real Music Vol. 3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; features 25 bands on Friday, June 7, at the Sebastopol Community Center. 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. 6-11pm. Admission is $10 plus a can of food. 707.823.1511.

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8:30

Dance Grooves Jun 8 VOLKER STRIFLER BAND Original Blues and More 8:30

Boogie Woogie Queen! Jun 9 WENDY DEWITTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

â&#x20AC;&#x153;PIANO PARTYâ&#x20AC;? WITH AUSTIN DELONE

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27 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it be cool if we had local artists in our stores?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Thus, Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, in a partnership with the Last Record Store, began selling local bandsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CDs at their checkout lines. Additionally, Jayne, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d released several local-music compilations on his Jackalope Records imprint, suggested that Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s do the same. The Real Music series, an incredible, wideranging document of the Sonoma County local music scene with proceeds going to the Redwood Empire Food Bank, was born. Frank Hayhurst, who most local musicians know from Zone Music, administrates the localmusic program at Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, which is gearing up to release the third volume of Real Music with a record-release show on June 7 at the Sebastopol Community Center featuring a whopping 25 bands. Twenty-ďŹ ve bands may sound big, and going big is all Hayhurstâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing; so far there have been 99 bands represented in the Real Music series, with double-CD packages and long run times. Yet even those who suggested that Hayhurst keep the CDs shorter now concede that the community inclusion has been successful. Real Music Vol. 3 features 33 Sonoma County artists on new and old tracks. Included are local Americana staplesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the piano of John Allair, the harmonica of Charlie Musselwhite, the guitar of Nick Gravenitesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;alongside newer groups like Girls in Suede, Little Lost Boys, the Brothers Comatose, the Steve Pile Band, Dan Imhoff & Cahoots and many others. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tom Scott and Steve Moss, I think the reason theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing so well is they really have a sense of being part of our community and contributing to it in a way where everyone starts wining,â&#x20AC;? says Hayhurst. As for the local artists on consignment at Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, sales have been briskâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;last month, the stores sold over 50 CDs. Incredibly, Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s takes no cut whatsoever of the proďŹ ts. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see Whole Foods try that one, shall we?

Music

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28 2 24 V 224 VINTAGE INTAG E W WAY AY NOVATO N OVA ATO | 415.892.6200 415 . 8 9 2 . 6 2 0 0

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Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG-XQHĂŁSP

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Live Music Sunday Brunch

FREE SHOW with Steep Ravine &ORVHGIRUSULYDWHHYHQWDWSP 0RQ-XQHĂŁSP

Robert Earl Keen with Andrea Davidson 7XH-XQHĂŁSP

Ryan Bingham with VSHFLDOJXHVWVThe Wild Feathers and The Americans www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

VAGABOND OPERA &2)s8PM DOORSs ROCK

SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. PRESENTS:

THE EVERYONE ORCHESTRA MATT BUTLER, STEVE KIMOCK, TREVOR GARROD, SUNSHINE GARCIA BECKER, EDDIE ROBERTS, JOHN KIMOCK AND MIKE SUGAR FRI 6/28s8PM DOORSs FOLK/BLUEGRASS

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7

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Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Foundry Festival Music festival featuring the Rowan Brothers, Lauren Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connell, Foxes in the Henhouse, the Incubators, Side Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Smokehouse and the Mighty Groove. Jun 8, 11:30am. $20-$25. www. AqusFoundryFestival.com. Foundry Wharf, Second and H street docks, Petaluma. 707.347.6692.

Friday Night Live Weekly music series in conjunction with farmers market. Jun 7, JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound; Jun 14, the Magnolia Sisters; Jun 21, Tommy Cassto & the Painkillers; Jun 28, Monophonics; July 5, the Far West; Jul 12, Hot Buttered Rum; Jul 19, Lost Dog Found; Jul 26, SambaDĂĄ; Aug 2, Frobeck; Aug 9, Eddie Robertsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; West Coast Sounds; Aug 16, RonKatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Katdelic; Aug 23, Maxx Cabello Jr; Aug 30, Chuck Prophet & the Mission Express. Fridays, 5:30pm. through Aug 30. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Healdsburg Jazz Festival Fred Hersch, Marcus Shelby & the Freedom Jazz Choir, Charles Lloyd and Jason Moran, Sweet Honey in the Rock and Azar Lawrence and many others. Also at various venues around Healdsburg. Through Jun 9. Price varies. Healdsburg Plaza, Healdsburg Plaza, Healdsburg.

Mac Dre Day Celebrate the short but bright life of Thizzle Washington, the first president of the Hyphy movement, with Husalah, Mac Mall and Mistah Fab. Jun 8, 8pm. $25. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Real Music CD Release Over 20 musical acts on three stages, including Pete Stringfellow, Volker Strifler, the Highway Poets and others. Jun 7, 7pm. $10. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

MARIN COUNTY Pixar in Concert

Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.3600.

Finley Community Center Jun 7, Larry Broderick Trio. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Marin Symphony presents live music from 13 Pixar films with visual highlights. Jun 9, 3pm. $20-$75. Marin Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Flamingo Lounge

Summer Music Series

Guerneville Library

Jun 9, Pete Harris 420 Band; Jun 30, the 7th Sons; Jul 14, Linda Imperial Band; Jul 28, Dynamo Jones; Aug 4, Firewheel; Aug 11, Wendy DeWitt and Kirk Harwood; Aug 25, Danny Montana & the Bar Association; Sep 1, Rockit Science; Jun 9, 1pm. $8. Elkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lodge, 1312 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415-721-7661.

Volker Strifler Band One of North Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best bluesmen rocks his original tunes. Jun 8, 8:30pm. $12-$15. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

NAPA COUNTY Cheap Trick Rockers who recorded the hits â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Want You to Want Meâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Surrenderâ&#x20AC;? also penned the theme song to â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Colbert Report.â&#x20AC;? Jun 12, 7pm. $55-$75. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY

Jun 8, the Power House. Jun 7, Jeff Edwins Dance Band. Tues, Swing Dancing with Lessons. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530. Jun 8, Old Redwood Highway. 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jun 7, Spends Quality & J Kendall, Brycon, Noah D, Fossil. Jun 8, Baby Seal Club, Snail Trail. Jun 12, Zeb Early. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Jun 7, Dan Goldfus. Jun 8, New Skye. Jun 9, Mike Ehlers. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Jun 7, Sylvia Cuenca Trio. Jun 8, Sylvia Cuenca Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jun 5, Joe and Vicki Price. Jun 6, the Cobb Stompers. Jun 7, Nate Lopez. Jun 8, Jinx Jones. Jun 9, Steve James. Jun 12, Dirty Cello. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Jun 7, Slowpoke. Mon, Gypsy Cafe. Tues, Maple Profant. Thurs, Susan Sutton. Sun, Kit Mariahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open mic. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Aubergine

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

Jun 6, Bourbon Legend, the Hots. Jun 7, the Bumptet, Sean Leahy Trio. Jun 8, Pepperland. Jun 9, Moonbeams. Mon, artist and model Mondays. Tues, Bluesy Tuesday. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Jun 7, Liz Brown and Adam Traum. Jun 9, Sean Carscadden. Second Tuesday of every month, open mic. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Bergamot Alley Jun 8, Dustbowl Revival. Sun, Live Music. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Christyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the Square Jun 6, the Spindles, the Chelsea Set, Darwin, Darrin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8565.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery Jun 9, the Haxs. 3100 Gravenstein

Mystic Theatre Jun 8, House of Floyd. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Petaluma Library Jun 8, Guitello Bach Suites 1,2,3 with Jeffrey McFarlandJohnson. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Phoenix Theater Jun 7, Our Vinyl Vows, Cash for Gold, Peace. Jun 8, Mac Dre Day with )

30

ŴŻ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music ( 29

30 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Husalah, Mac Mall, Mistah Fab. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Redwood Cafe Jun 8, Rhythm Rangers. Second Tuesday of every month, 9pm, Barnburners Poetry Slam. Thurs, Open Mic. First Friday of every month, Dginn. Second Sunday of every month, trad Irish. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Russian River Brewing Co Jun 8, Blue Diamond Fillups. Jun 9, Matt Bolton. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Jun 8, Maury Manseau and Cheri Buonaguidi. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sebastopol Community Center Jun 7, Real Music CD Release. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Society: Culture House Jun 5, the Mighty Groove. Jun 12, Jami Jamison Band. Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann & guests. Sun, Church on Sundays. Thurs, Casa Rasta. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

June 15 Peter Welker’s Bay Area All-Stars Featuring Deborah Winters

Spancky’s

Tickets $35

July 20 Alan Pasqua Trio 3 time Grammy Award Winning jazz pianist Tickets $50

Information and Tickets shop.sonomacutrer.com 707.237.3489

August 17 Bill Champlin with Special Friends 2 time Grammy Award Winner Tickets $50

Concerts start at 6pm Terrace opens at 5pm

Jun 7, Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers. Jun 8, ADD/C. Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sunflower Center Jun 7, Jon Mendle. Jun 8, Roots Reggae Singer’s Showcase. Tues, Sunflower Music Series. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Toad in the Hole Pub Jun 7, Baba Fats. Jun 8, the Budrows. Second Sunday of every month, Ian Scherrer. Mon, open mic with Phil the Security Guard. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Jun 5, Led Kaapana and Mike Kaawa. Jun 6, Cello Squared. Jun 9, Throckmorton Chamber Players. Mon, Open Mic with

Quality Spending Sebastopol label celebrates triple album release There’s no stopping Sonoma County’s former hip-hop collective Sonicbloom. The band-turned-label has become a cornerstone for artists to pursue independent careers in rapping and beat production. Now a full-on label exec, founding member Spencer Williams, aka Spends Quality, has been promoting CFO Recordings artists, as well as his own music, through synergetic album releases. Time Piece showcases Sonicbloom beat master Mr. Tay, whose complexity and melodic risk-taking proves polished and appealing. Alongside that is the debut solo album of Sonicbloom saxophonist-vocalist J. Kendall, whose Maxwell-esque neo-soul jams on Moving Forward are kept fresh with hip-hop bass lines. Featured artists include N8 the Gr8 and Maryann, keeping the energy high on an album doused in Kendall’s velvet delivery. Tripling down for full effect, Williams’ own Flight Music is a self-produced sophomore album, less rhythmically varied but equally proficient in showcasing his talent as a quick-witted lyricist. “After collaborating in the group dynamic for so long,” he says, “it was nice to be able to take ownership and say, ‘I produced this whole record.’” All three albums are solid reflections of CFO’s maturing productivity. And while the threefold drop is ambitious, it should earn the label some hype for its hard work. CFO Records presents their triple album release party with Spends Quality, J. Kendall and friends at on Friday, June 7, at Hopmonk Tavern. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 9pm. $10–$15. 707.829.7300.—Jacquelynne Ocaña

Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Jun 9, Albany Big Band. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Fenix Jun 6, Tanya Scarlet. Jun 7, Greg Johnson & Glass Brick Boulevard. Jun 8, the Dreamset. Jun 9, Pamela Rose. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Hopmonk Novato Jun 6, California Honeydrops. Jun 7, Bobby Jo Valentine. Jun 8, Shotgun Wedding Quintet with Forrest Day. Jun 9, Merrimack, Psychic Jui Jitsu, False Prophet. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium Jun 9, Marin Symphony presents Pixar in Concert. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

19 Broadway Club Jun 5, Zahira Soul Luminaries, Rocker T. Jun 6, Physical Suicide Deterrent Systems Project. Jun 7, New Monsoon, Angels & Diamonds. Jun 8, Cambo, Alex Spit, DJ Effective, Fenton Coolfot & the Right Time. Jun 9, Natural Gas Jazz Band. Jun 11, Gabe Diamond. Jun 12, Mari and the Monitors. Mon, 9pm, open mic. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Travis Marina

Jun 6, Curtis Woodman Trio. Jun 7, Key Lime Pie. Jun 8, West African Highlife Band. Jun 9, Orquestra Borinquen. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello & Seth. First Wednesday of every month, Tangonero. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Second Sunday of every month, the Lonestar Retrobates. Fort Baker, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Second Wednesday of every month, Finger-Style Guitar Showcase. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jun 5, the Overcommitments. Jun 7, Salvador Santana & the Scribe Project. Jun 8, Reckless In Vegas. Jun 9, Steep Ravine. Jun 10, Robert Earl Keen. Jun 11, Ryan Bingham & the Wild Feathers. Jun 12, Gina Sicilia. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Tues, American Jubilee. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Osteria Divino

Jun 5, Joan Getz Quartet. Jun 6, C-JAM with Connie Ducey. Jun 11, James Moseley Quartet. Jun 12, Bob Gordon. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Jun 5, the Weissmen. Jun 7, the Gravel Spreaders. Jun 8, Danny Montana, Gravel Spreaders, Jay Bonet. Jun 12, Soul Discipilz. Tues, John Varn & Tom Odetto. First Thursday of every month, Biambu’s Groove Room. Mon, acoustic open mic. Second Sunday of every month, Sexy Sunday: Women Rockers. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Jun 7, Kevin Russell Trio. Jun 8, Volker Strifler Band. Jun 9, Wendy DeWitt, Austin Delone. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

NAPA COUNTY Brannan’s Grill Fri-Sun, Herb Gibson. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Jun 6, Ralph Woodson. Jun 7, Charles Wheal Band. Jun 8, Jinx Jones. Sun, DJ Night. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Napa Valley Opera House Jun 6, Norman Brown, Kirk Whalum, Rick Brown. Jun 7, Larry Graham, Sinbad. Second Tuesday of every month, Cafe Theatre Comedy Series. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Silo’s Jun 7, Ray Charles Project. Jun 8, Garage Band 101 for Adults. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Jun 8, Fab Four. Jun 12, Cheap Trick. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Jun 12, Piro Patton Duo. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

31 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Dance Palace

Sausalito Seahorse

Five Iron Frenzy A reunion tour and a Kickstarter campaign? Are these guys riding the Zeitgeist or what? Jun 8 at the Regency Ballroom.

Bad Brains Fun 2013 game: try to decipher HR’s mutterings (hint: they’re usually about aliens). Jun 8 at the Fillmore.

Larry Graham Where would porno music be without his trademark bass slap and pop technique? Jun 8-9 at Yoshi’s Oakland.

KMEL Summer Jam

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

Kendrick Lamar, 2 Chainz, Trinidad James, J. Cole and other top rappers of now. Jun 9 at the Oakland Arena.

Alice Smith Raised in D.C. and Augusta, singer evokes the best of soul and ’70s AM radio. Jun 12 at the Independent.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Tues-Fri 7:30-6:00 321 Second Street

769-0162

Petaluma

HONDA TOYOT A M AZ DA NI S SAN SUBARU

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

32

Arts Events

30th

Galleries RECEPTIONS

FESTIVAL F E S TI VA AL ART A R T WIN W WINE E MUS MUSIC SIC

Jun 7 At 5pm. Napa Valley Museum, “Miles Davis,” paintings by Miles Davis. Reception $30 with reservation. 55 Presidents Cir, Yountville. 707.944.0500. At 5pm. Arts Guild of Sonoma, “Invitational and New Work,” pieces by guild members. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115. At 5pm, City Council Chambers, “Pinhole Photography,” works by Ira Meinhofer. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010. At 6pm. Seager Gray Gallery, “Mysterious Barricades,” paintings by Devorah Jacoby. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. 415.384.8288.

Jun 8 From 11am to 7pm. Studio 28, 10 artists open their work spaces to visitors. 28 Rich St, Larkspur. 415.927.0595. At 4pm. History Center, “Sculpture Trail,” outdoor exhibit. 215 N. Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

Fathers Day Special 60-minute massage 30-minute 3 0 minute ffacial acial Organic take home grooming kit $ 130 Gift Certificates in any amount

At 4pm. Gallery Bergelli, “Ten Years of Water,” paintings by Pegan Brooke. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454. At 5pm. Gallery 300, “Untitled,” juried exhibition. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.332.1212. At 5pm. Upstairs Art Gallery, paintings by Henry White. 306 Center Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.4214. At 5pm, Gallery One, “New Gallery,” paintings by Jennifer Jaeger, watercolors by Lucy Arnold. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma.

SONOMA COUNTY Annex Galleries Through Jun 29, “Art & Life,” watercolors, block prints and intaglios by William Seltzer Rice. 604 College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Sat, 12 to 5. 707.546.7352.

Art at the Source Saturdays-Sundays. through Jun 9, open studios featuring 160 artists in 98 studios. See www.artatthesoruce.org for more information. Various Locations in West County, Sebastopol.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Jun 5-Jul 1, “Invitational and New Work,” pieces by guild members. Reception, Jun 7, 6pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Calabi Gallery Through Jul 13, “Intimate Enigmas,” abstract stone sculptures by Easton. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Jun 5-Oct 14, “Barking Up the Family Tree,” featuring comic strips with Snoopy’s siblings. Through Sep 1, “Art of the Line,” describing Schulz’s process, from the tools he used to the research he undertook. Through Oct 27, “Mid-Century Modern,” works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Jul 10, “Pinhole Photography,” works by Ira Meinhofer. Reception, Jun 7, 5pm. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Jun 8, “Atmosphere,” works of art creating a space of being. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery 300 Jun 8-29, “Untitled,” juried exhibition of local and international artists. Reception, Jun 8, 5pm. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Gallery One Through Jul 13, “New Gallery,” oil paintings by Jennifer Jaeger and watercolors by Lucy Arnold. Reception, Jun 8, 5pm. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Aug 11, “The Summer of 2013,” featuring pieces by Harley, Bill Shelley, Brian Wilson and Hugh Livingston. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

History Center Jun 8-Feb 6, “Sculpture Trail,” outdoor exhibit with sculptures along Cloverdale Blvd. and Geyserville Ave. changing every nine months. Reception, Jun 8, 4pm. 215 N. Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

RiskPress Gallery Through Jun 27, “Andrew Annenberg Masterworks,” abstract and surrealist paintings. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jul 7, “The Faces o f El Capitan,” fine art paintings by Jeffery T Williams. Through Jul 7, “Into the Deep,” underwater photography by Jeff Lemelin. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Santa Rosa City Council Chambers Through Jul 10, “Pinhole Photography,” works by Ira Meinhofer. Reception, Jun 7, 5pm. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 9 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Jun 9, “Open Studios Preview,” hosting a piece of each participating artist’s work. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jun 9, “Cross Currents,” showcasing the flow of influences in art across the Pacific Ocean. Through Aug 18, “Margins to Mainstream,” seven contemporary artists with disabilities. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

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Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bright Summer Lights,â&#x20AC;? multimedia by Janet McBeen and oil paintings by Adele Pruitt. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

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Upstairs Art Gallery Through Jun 30, Paintings by Henry White. Reception, Jun 8, 5pm. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. Sun-Thurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum Through Jun 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Asia Then,â&#x20AC;? photographs by photographs by Alfred Palmer. Through Jun 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Historical Paintings of Coastal Marin,â&#x20AC;? featuring pieces by prominent artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Through Jun 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Patricia Briceno: Dances with Wools,â&#x20AC;? art with felted wool, silk and dyes. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Gallery Bergelli Jun 8-Jul 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ten Years of Water,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Pegan Brooke. Reception, Jun 8, 4pm. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Jun 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reliquaries for the Materials Inside,â&#x20AC;? art by Leah Jachimowicz, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Uninvited Guests,â&#x20AC;? art by Suzanne Parker. Artist talk, Jun 9, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA Through Jul 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer National Juried Exhibition,â&#x20AC;? featuring 45 pieces selected from hundreds of entries. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mysterious Barricades,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Devorah Jacoby. Reception, Jun 7, 6pm. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6.

33

Yo el Rey Roasting and Arthouse

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Thur July July 18 18 & Fri Fri July July 19 19 d^Í&#x160; Thur

Best in Napa

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Rita Moreno reads from her memoir in a lunch at Book Passage on June 8. See Readings, p36.

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Planning P lanning an an event? event? C Contact ontact u uss for for rental rental info info Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Studio 28 Jun 8, 10 artists open their work spaces to visitors. 28 Rich St, Larkspur. 11am to 7pm. Other times by appointment. 415.927.0595.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;From Two Worlds,â&#x20AC;? photography by Linda Connor. Through Dec 31, Largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

ECHO Gallery Through Jul 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Great Wall of Doof,â&#x20AC;? installation by Tim Sharman. Through Jul 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Touch of Nature,â&#x20AC;? juried exhibition exploring the wild and wonderful ways of nature in all media. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Gordon Huether Gallery Through Jul 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Norcal Modern,â&#x20AC;? new paintings by Grace Slick. 1465 First St, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Jul 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Juke Box,â&#x20AC;? photography by Christopher Felver. Through

Jul 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fruit Juice,â&#x20AC;? work incorporating or inspired by all things fruit. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Napa Valley Museum Jun 8-Jul 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Miles Davis,â&#x20AC;? sketches and oil paintings by jazz pioneer Miles Davis. Reception, Jun 7, 5pm, $30, reservations required. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Clean Comedy Show Featuring Mothershed, Tyler V, Heidi Bartlett and Steve Ausburne. Hosted by Uncle Charlie Adams. Jun 8, 7pm. $5. Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Java, 3080 Marlow Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1332.

Matt Gubser Evening hosted by Josh Argyle. Also featuring Juan Carlos, Melanie Conway Brewer, Lila Cugini, Joshua Doan, Mike Olsen and Richard Sarvate. Jun 7, 9pm. $10. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Mark & Dre Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program featured a fast-paced variety show with sketch comedy and more. Jun 12, 11am. Free. ) Petaluma Library,

34

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MARIACHI DIVAS Saturday, June 22, 8 PM

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LITTLE WALTER TRIBUTE Thursday, June 27, 8 PM

GREG BROWN Saturday, June 29, 8 PM

ESTONIAN NATIONAL BALLET Sunday, June 30, 4 PM

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Through Jun 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art Rewards the Student,â&#x20AC;? work by elementary school students inspired by Roger Shimomura. Through Jun 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Minidoka on My Mind,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Roger Shimomura. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

34

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Mean Dave and Dirty Dan P headline, hosted by Tony Sparks. Jun 9, 8:30pm. $10. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Lou Montgomery Buddhist comedian joined by musicians Richard Mandel, Hoytus Rolen and Kim Atkinson. Jun 8, 8pm. $20. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

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Author Marilyn Kentz (formerly of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;the Mommiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;) explores the aging process. Jun 6, 7:30pm. $20. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

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Events Beckoning Butterflies, Birds & Bees Specialists, enthusiasts and vendors on hand to help create a haven for these winged friends. Jun 8-9, 10am. $2. Russian River Rose Company, 1685 Magnolia Dr, Healdsburg. 707.575.6744.

Bicycle Skills Rodeo Bike skills courses, helmet fitting and low cost helmets, bicycle mechanics for safety inspections and minor adjustments. For children 8-13. Jun 8, 10:30am. Free. Rohnert Park Community Center, 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.545.0153.

Creativity Jam

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

Family event featuring artist-led projects by Nimbus Arts and interactive musical sessions. Jun 9, 11am. $10-$20. di Rosa, 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991. "The Errant Tree of Life" by Easton, 2012

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

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Festival of Art, Wine & Music Food, wine, music and art. Bands include the Tubes,

Luvplanet, Davey Pattison, Metalshop and others. Jun 8-9, 10am. Downtown Novato, Grant Avenue, Novato.

a man and his snake. Jun 12, 2:30pm. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville, Free.

Filipino-American Fiesta

Resorts in Bloom

Entertainment by traditional Filipino dancers and singers including Kariktan Dance Company, Filipino food and games for children. Jun 9, 11am. Free. Filipino-American Community Center, 3361 Fulton Road, Fulton. 707.280.4842.

Tour 10 of West Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most spectacular gardens while supporting West County Health Centers. Details at www.resortsinbloom.com. Jun 7-9. $30-$50. West County Gardens, Various Locations in West County.

French Market Antique fair in the style of a French neighborhood street market. Jun 9, 9am. Free. Marin Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Granada Nights A Spanish feast with music by Sol Flamenco. Jun 8, 5pm. Ramekins Culinary School, 50 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.933.0450.

Hemp History Week Learn about industrial hemp with John Trudell and Bad Dog. Jun 9, 7:30pm. $20. Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Learning Through Art Gallery-based art engagement program for fourth, fifth and sixth graders. Second Sat of every month, 11am. Free-$2.50. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

ListenFest Performances of theater, dance and spoken word on the topic of listening. Jun 7, 8pm. Donation. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Magic Dan Childrens program featuring tricks, jokes and odds-defying sleight-of-hand. Jun 5, 11am. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Napa River Paddle Day Launch at Cuttingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wharf and paddle up the river to the yacht club. Jun 9, 10am. $10. Napa Valley Yacht Club, 100 Riverside Dr, Napa.

Paws for a Cause Music, drinks and silent auction to benefit Pets Lifeline. Jun 9, 5pm. $95. Vintage Kennel Club, 22071 Bonness Rd, Sonoma.

Python Ron Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program featuring

Film AIM Film Fest Tamalpais High School student film festival. Jun 7, 7pm. $10$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Artesanos Documentary about the role of the artist in culture and the responsibility of artists in society. Jun 12, 7pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Chasing Ice Time-lapse cameras make this documentary about melting glaciers. Jun 7, 8pm. Free. Contratti Park, School St, Fairfax.

Eames: The Architect and the Painter Introduction by Eames Office archivist and Eamesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; granddaughter, Llisa Demetrios. Jun 7, 5pm. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Le Sylphide Ballet filmed at the Opera de Paris in 2004, conducted by Ermanno Florio. Jun 8, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Meet Me in St Louis Judy Garland stars in this 1944 film about a family living through the 1904 Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fair. Wed, Jun 5, 1pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Rockshow: Wings Over America Footage from the 1976 tour of Paul McCartneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other band. Jun 6, 7pm. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222. Also on Jun 8, 7pm, at the Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa.707.226.7372. )

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Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Passport to Pinot 707/ 546-6000 ☎ www.comfirstcu.org Guerneville Healdsburg Napa Sebastopol Santa Rosa x2

Over 30 Russian River Valley wineries sample the versatile red over the weekend. More information at www.rrvw.org. Jun 8-9. DuttonGoldfield Winery, 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.3600.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Sonoma Farmers Market Depot Park, First St W, Sonoma. Fri, 9am-noon. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. 707.538.7023.

Tam Valley Farmers Market Local artisan food, flowers and crafts. Tues, 3pm, through Aug 27. Shoreline Shopping Center, 219 Shoreline Highway, Mill Valley.

Wednesday Night Market Food, vendors, produce, live music and activities. Wed, 5pm, through Aug 21. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

Lectures Art Uncorked Recreate masterpieces in this fun painting class. First Thurs of every month, 6:30pm. $45. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Burbank Lecture Series Jun 12, Cheri Kraus of the Neighborhood Watch Program. $10. Luther Burbank Experiment Farm, 7781 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9492.

EMS Symposium Daylong educational conference with experts providing critical information about trends in field care medicine. Jun 10, 8am. $50. Carole Ellis Auditorium, SRJC Petaluma Campus, Petaluma.

Readings Book Passage Jun 5, 7pm, “The Wolf and the Watchman: A Father, a Son, and the CIA” with Scott C Johnson. Jun 6, 12pm, “We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves” with Karen Joy Fowler, price includes lunch and a signed book $55. Jun 6, 7pm, “Your Network Is Your Net Worth: Unlock the Hidden Power of Connections for Wealth, Success, and Happiness in the Digital Age” with Porter Gale. Jun 7, 7pm, “Lost Cat: A True Story of Love, Desperation, and GPS Technology” with Caroline Paul and Wendy Macnaughton. Jun 8, 12pm, “Rita Moreno: A Memoir” with Rita Moreno, price includes lunch and signed book $55. Jun 8, 4pm, “Tiger Babies Strike Back: How I Was Raised by a Tiger Mom But Could Not Be Turned to the Dark Side” with Kim Wong Keltner. Jun 8, 7pm, “And the Mountains Echoed” with Khaled Hosseini, price includes signed book $35. Jun 8, 7pm, Travel Writers. Jun 9, 1pm, “The Infinite Tides” with Christian Kiefer. Jun 9, 4pm, “We Need New Names” with NoViolet Bulawayo. Jun 9, 7pm, “Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link to Optimum Health” with Jo Robinson. Jun 10, 7pm, “Cinnamon and Gunpowder” with Eli Brown. Jun 12, 6pm, “Inside Apple: How America’s Most Admired–and Secretive–Company Really Works” with Adam Lashinsky. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Dance Palace Jun 8, 7pm, “Wild Mind: A Field Guide to the Human Psyche” with Bill Plotkin. $20. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1075.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Second Sunday of every month, North Bay Poetry Slam,

Monthly poetry performance and competition. $5-$10. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.7300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jun 7, 7:30pm, “Native Funk & Flash” with Alexandra Jacopetti Hart. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jun 7, 7pm, Young Adult Author Pizza Party. Jun 8, 1:30pm, “The Fearless Way” with Susan Sattler. Jun 10, 6pm, Ransom Riggs, Tahereh Mafi and Michelle Gagnon. Jun 11, 7pm, “On Sal Mal Lane” with Ru Freeman. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Redwood Cafe Second Tuesday of every month, 8:30pm, Slamazon Poetry Slam, All-women’s open mic with competitive poetry and a headlining poet. $5-$10. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jun 5, 7pm, “Seating Arrangements” with Maggie Shipstead. Jun 10, 7pm, “The Engine 2 Diet” with Rip Esselstyn. Jun 12, 7pm, “Snacks” with Marcy Smothers. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Jun 5, 7pm, “The Power of the Herd: A Nonpredatory Approach to Social Intelligence, Leadership, and Innovation” with Linda Kohanov. Jun 10, 7pm, “Midnight in Mexico” with Alfredo Corchado. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Santa Rosa High School Jun 7, 8pm, “And the Mountain Echoed” with Khaled Hosseini. $35. 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Theater Kimberly Akimbo Dark comedy about a family that puts the fun in dysfunctional. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 4pm. through Jun 16. $15-$30. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

All My Sons Saga explores the changing sense of family, social responsibility and values as two generations seek to heal

CRITIC’S CHOICE

The Foreigner

Beyond Kabul Khaled Hosseini appears at Santa Rosa High School Americans hear about Afghanistan with steady regularity as the neverending war on “terror” drags on, but it’s rare that we’re able to put a human face on day-to-day life there. Perhaps that’s why so many readers gravitated toward Khaled Hosseini’s first novel, The Kite Runner, which took place in Afghanistan over a 30-year span, and which spent over a hundred weeks on the New York Times bestseller list while millions of copies worldwide. Inspired by his work as U.N. envoy, Hosseini established a nonprofit, which provides humanitarian aid to the people of Afghanistan. His latest book, And the Mountains Echoed, moves out of his home country (he’s lived in the United States since 1980), following characters from Kabul to Paris to San Francisco to Greece. Since its May 21 release, the book has received stellar reviews, and promises to be just as captivating as his previous work. Khaled Hosseini reads from And the Mountains Echoed on Friday, June 7, at the Santa Rosa High School auditorium in an event sponsored by Copperfield’s Books. 1235 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 8pm. Admission runs $35 (includes a book) to $50 (includes two tickets and a book). 707.578.8938.—Leilani Clark

and rebuild. Thurs, 7:30pm, FriSat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jun 16. $10-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

mother in this comedy. TuesThurs-Sat, 8pm, Sun, 2 and 7pm and Wed, 7:30pm. through Jun 16. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The Beauty Queen of Leenane

Carmen

Middle-aged, unmarried and embittered, Maureen is locked in a stalemate with her elderly

Georges Bizet’s classic opera in which a woman will risk everything, including her own life, to live the life she desires.

Set in a fishing lodge in Georgia, a British demolitions expert is trying to put his friend at ease. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 3pm. through Jun 16. $19-$25. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Ste C, Novato. 415.883.4498.

37

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Cinnabar premiere. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sat, 8pm, Sun, 2pm and Wed, Jun 12, 7:30pm. through Jun 16. $25$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Sell Local in Old Downtown Windsor 707.836.1840

How a Mountain Was Made World premiere of story cycle by Greg Sarris. Adapted from stories from Southern Pomo and Coast Miwok tribes. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Jun 9. $15-$25. Imaginists Theatre Collective, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

Love Letters AR Gurney play in which two characters who sit side by side at tables and read letters which span nearly 50 years. Fri, Jun 7, 8pm, Sat, Jun 8, 2 and 8pm and Sun, Jun 9, 2pm. $30. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Prisoner of Love A single mom hooks up with a charming, intelligent guy who happens to be serving a life sentence for murder. Staged reading. Jun 12, 7:30pm. $10$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

The Sound of Music

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What are a few of your favorite things? Sun, 2pm. through Jun 16. $20-$40. Mountain Theatre, Mt Tamalpais State Park, 801 Panoramic Hwy, Mill Valley.

West Side Stories Five-minute true stories told live onstage without notes. Jun 5, “I’ll Never Do That Again.” First Wed of every month, 7:30pm. through Jun 5. $5. Sonoma Valley Portworks, 613 Second St, Petaluma. 707.769.5203.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of June 5

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) The longest natural arch in the world is the Fairy Bridge in Guangxi Province, China. Made of limestone, this 400-foot-wide span crosses over the Buliu River. No one outside of China knew about it until 2009, when an American explorer spied it on Google Earth. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make the Fairy Bridge your metaphor of the month, Aries. Judging by the astrological omens, I suspect thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good chance you will soon ďŹ nd something like a natural, previously hidden bridge. In other words, be alert for a link between things you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know were connected. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) I hope that in recent weeks youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made yourself a master of sticky and intricate details. I trust youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been working harder and smarter than you have in a long time. Have you, Taurus? Have you been grunting and sweating a lot, exerting yourself on behalf of good causes? Please tell me you have. And please say youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re willing to continue for a while longer. The way I see it, your demanding tasks arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite ďŹ nished. In fact, the full reward for your efforts may not become available unless you keep pushing beyond the point that you consider to be your fair share. GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) How free do you want to be, Gemini? A tiny bit free, hemmed in by comfortable complications that require you to rely on white lies? Or would you rather be moderately free in ways that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too demandingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;politely, sensibly free? Maybe you feel brave and strong enough to ďŹ&#x201A;irt with a breathtaking version of liberationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a pure, naked freedom that brings you close to the edge of wild abandon and asks you to exercise more responsibility than youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re used to. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not telling you which kind you should opt for, but I am suggesting that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best if you do make a conscious choice. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

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SPIRITUAL

Astrology

In August 1961, the communist government of East Germany built the Berlin Wall. It was a thick concrete barrier designed to prevent the oppressed citizens of East Berlin from escaping to freedom in West Berlin. The barrier was eventually policed by armed guards. TrafďŹ c between the two Berlins became virtually impossible for the next 28 years. Then a miracle occurred: East German authorities relinquished their stranglehold. They tentatively allowed East Berliners to travel to West Berlin. Soon the Mauerspechte, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;wall woodpeckers,â&#x20AC;? showed up. Armed with hammers and chisels, these people began chipping away at the Wall. Two years later, most of it had been demolished. I hereby assign you to be a wall woodpecker in your own sphere, Cancer. The time is right to demolish a barricade. It may take a while, but youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready to start.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) The following slogan captures the spirit I bring to composing my horoscopes: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I live in the future so that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to.â&#x20AC;? But right now this slogan doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t apply to you. From what I can tell, you are currently visiting the future as much as I do. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I wonder, though: Are you time-traveling simply to run away from the dilemmas that face you in the present? Or are you taking advantage of your jaunts to acquire revelations that will help you solve those dilemmas once you return?

If you manage to hike that rate up to 10 percent or higher, you stand a good chance of achieving a spiritual epiphany that will fuel you for months.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21) Resurrection is the Scorpionic specialty. Better than any other sign of the zodiac, you can summon the power to be reborn. It is your birthright to reanimate dreams and feelings and experiences that have expired, and make them live again in new forms. Your sacred totem is the mythical phoenix, which burns itself in a ďŹ re of its own creation and then regenerates itself from the ashes. Now hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the big news headline, Scorpio: I have rarely seen you in possession of more skill to perform these rites than you have right now.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Octavio Paz spoke to a lover in his poem â&#x20AC;&#x153;Counterpartsâ&#x20AC;?: â&#x20AC;&#x153;In my body you search the mountain for the sun buried in its forest. In your body I search for the boat adrift in the middle of the night.â&#x20AC;? What have you searched for in the bodies of your lovers, Sagittarius? What mysteries and riddles have you explored while immersed in their depths? How has making love helped you to better understand the meaning of life? I invite you to ruminate on these uncanny joys. Remember the breakthroughs that have come your way thanks to sex. Exult in the spiritual education you have received through your dealings with lust and sensuality. And then go out and stir up some fresh epiphanies. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Do you know what minced oaths are? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re rarely used anymore. If you went back a hundred years, though, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d hear them regularly. They were sanitized swear words, basically; peculiar exclamations that would allow people the emotional release of profanities without causing a ruckus among those who were listening. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bejabbers!â&#x20AC;? was one. So were â&#x20AC;&#x153;thunderation!â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;dad-blast!â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;consarn!â&#x20AC;? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of my favorite minced oaths: â&#x20AC;&#x153;By St. Boogar and the saints at the backside door of purgatory!â&#x20AC;? I bring this up, Capricorn, because I suspect itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a minced oath kind of week for you. What I mean is: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have every right to get riled up, and you should express your feelings, but not in ways that create problems for you. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only one correct way to spell the English word â&#x20AC;&#x153;beauty.â&#x20AC;? But that wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t true centuries ago. Before the advent of the printing press, orthographic anarchy prevailed for many words. Some of beautyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s variations included bewte, beaute, beaultye, beuaute, bealte, buute, bewtee and beaultye. I bring this up, Aquarius, because I think it would be fun and healthy for you to take a respite from having to slavishly obey standardized rules. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m talking about not just those that apply to spelling, but others, too. See what you can get away with.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) You know that there are different kinds of stress, right? Some varieties wear you out and demoralize you, while other kinds of stress excite and motivate you. Some lead you away from your long-term goals and others propel you closer. The coming weeks would be an excellent time for you to ďŹ ne-tune your ability to distinguish between them. I suspect that the more you cultivate and seek out the good kind, the less susceptible youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be to the bad kind.

In the last chapter of Fyodor Dostoevskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel The Brothers Karamazov, the lead character says the following: â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is nothing nobler, stronger, healthier, and more helpful in life than a good remembrance, particularly a remembrance from childhood. A beautiful, holy memory preserved from childhood can be the single most important thing in our development.â&#x20AC;? I bring this up, Pisces, so as to get you in the right frame of mind for this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s featured activity: remembrance. One of the greatest gifts you can give yourself is to reminisce about the old days and the old ways. To do so will enhance your physical health and purify your emotional hygiene.

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) Studies show that people spend 87 percent of their time inside buildings and 6 percent in enclosed vehicles. In other words, they are roaming around outside enjoying the wind and sky and weather for only 7 percent of their lives. I think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have to do better than that in the coming week, Libra. To ensure your mental hygiene stays robust, you should try to expose yourself to the natural elements at least 9 percent of the time.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žŝ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 5-11, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Classifieds

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Young Artists & Writers Workshops June 10–14 & July 15–19, 2013 Ages 10–12 and 13–15 Kate Roth Williams and Walter Williams, Instructors Where: Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Time: 10am to 3pm Go to: www.svma.org/calendar to register and for more details or call 707.939.7862 Tuition per Workshop: $350/$295 (SVMA family member price)

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Filipino-American Fiesta Entertainment by traditional Filipino dancers and singers including Kariktan Dance Company, Filipino food and games for children. Jun 9, 11am. Free. Filipino-American Community Center, 3361 Fulton Road, Fulton, 707.280.4842.

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Hemp History Week Learn about industrial hemp with John Trudell and Bad Dog. Jun 9, 7:30pm. $20. Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma, 707.792.5300.

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Jun 8-Jul 28, “Miles Davis,” sketches and oil paintings by jazz pioneer Miles Davis. Reception, Jun 7, 5pm, $30, reservations required. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

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Rodney Strong Summer Concert Series Calabi Gallery Live on the Green. Sat June 22 Michael McDonald. Sat August 3 BWB: Rick Braun, Kirk Whalum & Norman Brown.

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Through Jul 13, “Intimate Enigmas,” abstract stone sculptures by Easton. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Sonoma-Cutrer Jazzy Summer Nights June 15, Peter Welker’s Bay Area All-Stars featuring Deborah Winters

Comedy Night Featuring Matt Gubser, Juan Carlos, Josh Argyle, Melanie Conway Brewer, Lila Cugini, Joshua Doan, Mike Olsen and Richard Sarvate. Jun 7, 9pm. $10. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati, 707.795.7868.

Wings Over America Footage from the 1976 tour of Paul McCartney’s other band. Jun 6, 7pm. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.528.4222.


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