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Whoa, There! You mean to say there’s a nonprofit farm that grows food just to give away? p14

Farmers F a armerrs Under 30 p1 p16 16 Beignets & Po’Boys p1 p10 0 Carrie Ro Rodriguez odriguez pp23 23


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The Art of Academic Excellence Twin Hills Middle School

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Architectural Digest

UPCOMING CONCERTS

Anne-Sophie Mutter Sat, Mar 2, 8pm For more than three decades, she has been considered one of the greatest violin virtuosos of our time. Her recital includes works by Mozart, Schubert, Lutoslawski and Saint-SaĂŤns.

Vadim Repin Sun, Apr 7, 3pm His career has taken him all over the globe as a recitalist, chamber musician, and guest artist with the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading orchestras. For his Weill Hall debut, he performs TPOBUBTCZ+BOÂźDÂ&#x2C6;FL #SBINTBOE(SJFH

COMING C OMING SOON N â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ON CAMPUS CAMPUS PRE PRESENTS SENTS

Ben Rector Wed, Mar 6, 7pm Critically acclaimed singer-songwriter #FO3FDUPSIBTKVTUSFMFBTFEIJTGPVSUI album. His recording of Something Like This became the #1 singer-songwriter album on iTunes as soon as it was released. TICKETS TICKET S: 11-866-955-6040 866-955-6040 GREEN G MUSIC MUSIC CENTER ggmc.sonoma.edu mc.sonoma.edu

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;A feat of visual and acoustic wonderâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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Bohemian

COPPERFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BOOKS MARCH EVENTS 5)&#*(3&"% 40/0."$06/5:    Meet â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emily Dickinsonâ&#x20AC;? portrayed by actor Barbara Dana, on tour courtesy of the NEA and Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Read

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

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Staff Writers

Also performing The Belle of Amherst at the 6th Street Playhouse

Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

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Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

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TICKETED TICKETED EVENTS EVENTS

Interns Estefany Gonzalez, Taylor May

Contributors

Tuesday, March 12, 7pm

COPPERFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BOOKS PRESENTS IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER, SONOMA COUNTY FREE WI WITH TH

BBOOK OOK PURCHASE PURCHASE

JODI PICOULT Storyteller

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MARCH OF AUTHORS IN PETALUMA Saturday, March 2, 7pm

MANIL SURI

The City of Devi: A Novel Wednesday, March 13, 6pm BOOK CLUB MIXER FOLLOWED BY 7pm AUTHOR EVENT WITH

REBECCA MILLER

Thursday, February 28, 6pm

Michael Amsler, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Jessica Dur Taylor, James Knight, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Jonah Raskin, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, Alan Sculley, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

KAREN RUSSELL

Design Director

Vampires in the Lemon Grove: Stories

Kara Brown

MARCH: RUTH OZEKI

Mercy Perez

A Tale for the Time Being

Senior Designer

APRIL: JACQUELINE WINSPEAR

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Leaving Everything Most Loved

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Thursday, March 14, 7pm

COPPERFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PAIRINGS book + libations in a great atmosphere! Thursday, March 14, 7pm

WITH CARA BLACK

JOSHUA MOHR Fight Song

Saturday, March 16, 7pm

BEVERLY DONOFRIO

Tuesday, March 19, 7pm

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Wednesday, March 20, 7pm

AMY STEWART

The Drunken Botanist IIPUFMp)FBMETCVSH"WFOVFp )&"-%4#63(

Monday, March 18, 6pm

BOOK CLUB MIXER FOLLOWED BY AN AUTHOR EVENT WITH

MACKENZIE BEZOS .0/5(0.&3:7*--"(& 

Astonished: A Story of Evil, Blessings, Grace, and Solace

Murder Below Montparnasse

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AUTHOR EVENT WITH AMITY GAIGE

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Wednesday, March 27, 7pm

The True Secret of Writing: Connecting Life with Language

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Publisher

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Production Operations Coordinator

Largely FREE events from your independent bookstore

VISIT VI ISIT OUR STORES: STORES:

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of WHOA farm by Sara Sanger. Cover design by Kara Brown.


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This photo was submitted by Alma Shaw of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘It comes with two burly guys to carry you out to your car after the food coma sets in.’ D I NI NG P1 0 Adopting From the Congo T H E PAP E R P 8

Farming for Good; Farming Under 30 COV ER FEATURE P14

‘Margaret,’ the Best Film You Didn’t See F I LM P 2 2 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p10 Restaurants p11 Wineries p13

Swirl p13 Cover Feature p14 Culture Crush p18 Arts & Ideas p19 Stage p21

Film p22 Music p23 A&E p27 Astrology p30 Classified p31

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nb FILL IN THE BLANK So in other words, no going in the pool after eating at _____________?


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 27–MAR C H 5, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Otherwise Occupied

On Palestine and homemade-soda machines BY PIETER S. MYERS

F

riends, if you have seen a recent screening of the film Five Broken Cameras (recently at the Rialto and currently on Netflix) you are excused from reading further. You already share the outrage of the Palestinian people—a people who are prisoners in their own home, a people without a nation and without citizenship, who have no power over their own lives.

Since 1967, the Palestinians have been living under military occupation. Israeli forces regularly confiscate private land, imprison individuals (including children) without process, demolish their homes, bulldoze orchards and crops, destroy shops and businesses, and shoot maim and kill civilians. Over four thousand Palestinians are currently imprisoned by Israel; 27,000 homes have been demolished since 1967; 6,638 Palestinians have been killed since Sept. 29, 2000. Included in this figure are 1,516 Palestinian children—killed simply going to school, playing, shopping or just being in their homes. Israel currently has 170 settlements and 99 “outposts” in the occupied territories, home to half a million Israeli citizens and offlimits to Palestinians. This separation due to ethnicity is akin to the apartheid regime of South Africa. In the face of all this, you may feel that this is not our problem. Why should we in Sonoma County care about this ancient rivalry going back thousands of years? We need to care because this international outrage is being carried out with our tax dollars. Thanks to intense special interest lobbying, we give Israel $3 billion each year—or over $8 million per day. What can we do? We may not be able to affect the Israeli lobby directly, but we can withhold our consent to these policies by the power of our pocketbooks. One example: perhaps you saw the SodaStream commercial during the Super Bowl. The SodaStream factory is an Israeli company operating on illegal land in the West Bank to make home-carbonation appliances. Refuse to buy products from Israeli settlements. Talk to merchants who help support the occupation by selling SodaStream, such as Macy’s, JCPenney, Costco, Target, Staples, Crate & Barrel, Bed Bath & Beyond—and, yes, even Sebastopol Hardware. Pieter S. Myers is an artist and printmaker living in Occidental. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

The Post Office

Thank you to the Bohemian for the great article on the Post Office (“A FirstClass Institution,” Feb. 27). This false “crisis,” brought on by the federal government’s debilitating demand that the USPS pre-fund its health benefits 75 years into the future, is one of the biggest lies of our time. No other papers seem willing to tell the truth. Instead, they praise the so-called good idea of cutting Saturday delivery without saying the real reason the post office is in trouble: it’s getting robbed.

JIM BRANNAN Petaluma

More on Mate Booooo! to the uninspired cover story written by Jay Scherf on Mate (“Bottling the Tradition,” Feb. 13). His angle of traditionalism from the Argentine perspective seemed to be just a thinly veiled dislike of the Guayakí company. It was petty and very unsupportive of a great local company.

ANNE-MARIE ALLEN Santa Rosa

Sorry to the Guayakí supporters, but this was a great and very funny read. It’s worth looking at how the people who first made use of yerba mate regard what we’ve done with it. Reminds me a bit of how tobacco was used traditionally, and what we’ve done with it since.

MIKE ELY Via online

Jay Scherf’s article seems to me more an indictment of the American consumer than of Guayakí’s marketing. Think about it. If Guayakí could manage to sell traditional gourds and shared straws to a public that is addicted to single-use bottles, it would be a miracle! The fact is that we in the U.S. are spoiled. One need look no further than the clogged streets of Sebastopol to find hundreds of so-called environmentalists

behind the wheels of cars, who are too lazy or entitled to ride their bikes to Whole Foods to buy beeswax soap and hemp beer.

As the article points out, Guayakí is on the more conscious end of drink manufacturing, with rainforestprotection efforts and work with local farmers. Those who think the article was a criticism of Guayakí are probably just trying to obscure the real target of their own consumerist patterns.

MICHAEL LUMENS Cotati

The SRJC Job Board Is Free Contrary to a reader’s letter published on Feb. 20, the SRJC job board is in fact a free service to all employers, current students and alumni of SRJC. The SRJC is committed to the success of our students, and committed to support the community at large. In fact, in fulfilling our mission, we are dedicated to exercising our public responsibility for sound resource development and use. One such resource is the SRJC job board. The Career Development Services Department and Student Employment are able to expand our services by contracting with College Central Network. Unfortunately, Tamara went directly to the College Central Network site rather than visiting the Santa Rosa Junior College student employment website. The College Central Network does charge to list open positions to individual employers—and this is why the SRJC pays an annual fee to access its services. By paying this fee, employers, SRJC students and SRJC alumni can use College Network free of charge. It gives all registered users access to a nationwide job search, or jobs specifically listed for the communities in the SRJC service area. As a matter of fact, we have student employees on hand to support any business that might have trouble navigating the employer registration and job-posting services. We are thrilled that Tamara’s internship turned into a permanent position—


THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

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%LUGVHHG  )HHGHUV  %LUGEDWKV  2SWLFV  1DWXUH *LIWV  %RRNV

what a great SRJC success story! In order to create more such success stories, we will be holding a career and internship fair for current students and alumni on April 24. The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Put Your Education to Work.â&#x20AC;? Everyone is welcome to contact us for more information at 707.527.4941.

JEANNIE DULBERG, INTERIM CAREER SERVICES MANAGER Santa Rosa Junior College

Top Five 1 There are seven hilarious deďŹ nitions for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sebastopolâ&#x20AC;? on UrbanDictionary.com

For the Health of Your Petsâ&#x20AC;Ś Keep your home smoke-free

2

Former Giants pitcher Noah Lowry now owns Santa Rosa Ski & Sports

3

Drakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay Oyster Co. wins injunction to stay open until appeal can be heard

For a Dancer I know Erma Murphy personally, and she is just such a delight to work with that it is no wonder she has arisen to such a level of measurable success in the industry (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not Fade Away,â&#x20AC;? Feb. 13). I am so proud to know her and call her my friend. She is a true treasure to this community.

DAWN MCINTOSH Via Online

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

4

Film industry rewards movie about the ďŹ lm industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s power to save lives

5 Forget the vineyard ideaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; why not turn Preservation Ranch into a park?

Second hand smoke in your home can harm your pets! Celebrate Smoke-Free Sonoma County All multi-unit residential housing in the unincorporated areas are now smoke-free.

Learn more at www.sonoma-county.org/BreatheEasy County Ordinance No. 5947

7 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 27â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MA R CH 5, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Rants

Fine Dining For Wild Birds


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 27–MAR C H 5, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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THE

Paper A NEW HOPE Beth Hall with her adopted children from the Congo, where conditions for children are dangerous.

Early Adopters

When a local couple traveled to the Congo to adopt a child, they returned with two BY RACHEL DOVEY

I

t’s 2:30pm, a time Beth Hall calls her golden hour.

The reason is simple: her four-and-a-half-year-old Tyler is at preschool, and everyone else is down for a nap. That includes three-year-old Piper, 18-month-

old Quinn and, as of this year, her newly adopted children from the Democratic Republic of Congo— three-year-old Grayson and twoyear-old Charlotte. From a bedroom down the hallway, we hear movement and a few cries. Hall pauses to listen. “I gauge who’s crying to see how

much work it’s going to be,” she says. Four weeks ago, the Santa Rosa mom and her husband, Mike, came back from the DRC with the two new additions to their family. With five children under age five, two of whom only speak French, the experience has been compounded

by the poverty and societal trauma that, until a month ago, was their adopted children’s present. And while this adoption no doubt marks a turning point for the two, it’s a transition that hasn’t exactly been easy. Hall began considering adoption when she was told she might never have children, an assessment that obviously turned out to be wrong. But even with biological children, the couple knew it was something they wanted to pursue. When they began learning of the massively underreported conditions in Africa’s second-largest country, they turned their attention there. Since 1998, the DRC has been the site of massacre and sexual violence so overwhelming that the few writers covering it tend toward comparison rather than digits. Incited by the same militant refugee group responsible for the Rwandan genocide, the First Congo War—sometimes called the African World War—involved nine countries, 20 armed factions and has claimed the lives of roughly 5.4 million people. A 2006 report commissioned by the UN relief effort UNICEF puts it like this: “[E]very six months, the burden of death from conflict in the DRC is similar to the toll exacted by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.” Though the exact number of rape victims in this bloody travesty is unknown, the report estimates them to be in the hundreds of thousands. “Sexual violence is consciously deployed as a weapon of war,” it states. Abortions are punishable by imprisonment, and yet women and girls who are raped and become pregnant often become social pariahs, rejected by even their families, according to the document. Considering all this, a scene witnessed by Hall makes tragic sense. She was in the DRC, in an area far from military occupation but still suffering from poverty that afflicts roughly 70 percent of the country’s population, according to Children’s Rights Portal.


‘Adoption, especially international adoption, can be romanticized. But it’s tough.’ Parents routinely abandon children they can’t care for in public places, Hall says, hoping desperately that something better than the life they themselves can give will come along. According to Children’s Rights Portal, the country is home to roughly 70,000 children living on the streets. The new mom asks not to discuss what she knows about her children’s past, for the sake of their privacy. But she adds that she doesn’t know much. “A lot of people will never know their kids’ stories due to the nature of the abandonment,” she says. “We hope to just give them a rich knowledge of their history, and to know that while they were not unloved, the hope is to give them a better life, or a life at all.” Seated on her living room floor, Hall details the highs and lows of the family’s first tumultous month together, which she likens to a roller coaster. “Adoption, especially international adoption, can be romanticized,” she says, “and while I really did not do that, it’s tough.

They’re traumatized by their loss, and mourning as well as a twoand-half-year-old can.” That morning, for example, Charlotte watched Hall put her shoes on and immediately started crying. “I just took my shoes off, and I was like: ‘Mommy’s not leaving,’” she says. But the high points are there, too. “One moment can be so difficult, they act out all of their trauma on top of the trauma of just being three, and then the next moment they’re so sweet and you think they can’t get any more darling,” Hall says. The Halls adopted through a faith-based organization called Compassion for Congo, and Beth recommends that parents trying to adopt internationally learn as much as they can about the organization they’re going through, to avoid bizarre situations enabled by language and cultural barriers and for-profit adoption agencies. In 2009, for example, This American Life did a story on a Samoan agency that took children from their families in what the biological parents thought was a boarding program, and the American parents thought was a done-deal adoption. “Ask a lot of questions, not just of your home-study agency, but of where you’re getting the kids, because it’s easy for them to be very vague,” she says. She also recommends that adoptive parents get as clear a picture of the foster home or orphanage as they can, and try not to be led by blind idealism. Reactive attachment disorder, which can occur when a baby or young child is passed between primary caregivers, is a psychological affliction that can come with abusive or neglectful homes, she says. “It feels really good to look at such a huge problem like the Congo or abandoned children, and then to look in my kids’ eyes and say, ‘I cannot help all of them, but I can help you two,’” she says.

Hotel Hubbub Depending on whom you ask, the Hotel Petaluma has either been an important safety net for residents on fixed incomes or a flophouse for drug users and ne’er-do-wells. But last week, the building’s new owner, Terry Andrews, decided it would be neither. Residents received 30day eviction notices, with some of the longer-term residents allowed to stay until April 15. Andrews’ plan is to refurbish the building, built in 1923, to its former glory, and reopen it as a nightly hotel charging $65–$90 a night. (For many rooms, the bathroom is down the hall.) The city will stand to gain hotel tax, while some note, correctly, that downtown Petaluma could use more hotel rooms. Others are not so swayed. “There are people here who are handicapped and have been here for 10 years, 15 years, and they have to leave,” says resident Mark Perdue. “There’re gonna be a lot of homeless people in a couple months outside in the streets of Petaluma.” Street-level retail owners are worried, too. Vinh Pham, 46, has operated T&T Nail Salon on the ground level of the hotel on East Washington Street for 12 years. Pham reports that last week, Andrews came to the salon and announced his intention to let the salon’s lease expire next year. “He decided we would not continue in this place,” Vinh says. “He said he wanted a coffee shop or a sandwich shop instead.” In December, after he increased tenants’ rents, Andrews told the Press Democrat, “We’re not throwing people out.” Last week, the hotel’s smashed office windows were boarded up, causing speculation that perhaps someone had retaliated against Andrews for going back on those words.—Gabe Meline

Tune into

Swingin' with

Sinatra

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Your vision… my resources, dedication and integrity… Together, we can catch your dream. Realtor Coldwell Banker

Suzanne Wandrei

cell: 707.292.9414 www.suzannewandrei.com Eco Green Certified

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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“A mom walks by with four or five kids, and she’s holding a little three-month-old,” she recalls. “She comes up to us, to a man who was with us, and asks him to take her baby. She was serious. He very kindly said no, and so she asked again, pushing her baby toward us. She just looked like a mom. She just looked like a regular lady.”


Dining Nicolas Grizzle

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 27–MAR C H 5, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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MAMA’S RECIPES Former charter boat captain Rob Lippincott shakes up the usual tourist offerings in Healdsburg.

I’m Just a Po’Boy Parish Cafe brings traditional New Orleans sandwiches and breakfasts to Healdsburg BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

I

n a gruff, slightly drawled voice, New Orleans transplant Rob Lippincott describes the food at his Healdsburg restaurant, the Parish Cafe. “These dishes haven’t changed in over a hundred years, and I don’t want them to,” he says on a sunny afternoon on the veranda of the converted 1860s home. “You can put your Californication on everything, but don’t do it to my food.”

What started as a bustling beignet business at the Santa Rosa and Windsor farmers markets four years ago blossomed into a full-blown Naw’lins po’boy shop late last year. While delicious, the place is decidedly NSFD (not safe for diets). “Look, it’s fried,” says Lippincott of the sandwiches so close to his heart. “But ain’t nothing wrong with that. It’s a beautiful way to cook.” Before the po’boys start flowing at 11:30am, breakfast at Parish Cafe is positively decadent. If it doesn’t stick to your ribs, it’s not

coming out of the kitchen. Pain perdu ($9), French toast with toasted bananas and pecans in a bourbon sauce, constitutes a wonderfully sneaky way to have dessert for breakfast. The crawfish and andouille omelette ($11) boasts color and texture so perfect it looks Photoshopped. The po’boys are the main squeeze, though. Served on Healdsburg’s own Cousteaux bread, these monsters come in eight- and 12-inch sizes, the larger often split for two people. Rookies can start with the ham and cheese

or turkey ($8–$11), but serious eaters should try the fried seafood sandwiches with shrimp, oyster or catfish. The best is the half and half, with oyster and shrimp ($12–$16). A fresh ocean taste permeates the fried goodness and mayonnaise, satisfying those naughty inner cravings while staying unbelievably light and crunchy. One hand holds the sandwich, the other holds the uncapped Honkey Donkey, a hot sauce to be liberally applied before each bite. As if the regular menu isn’t tempting enough, Lippincott gives a peek into the restaurant’s secret menu. Deep fried pickles, mushrooms or green tomatoes? Just ask. The aforementioned half-and-half po’boy covered with debris gravy (trimmings from roast beef simmered for hours into gravy) can be had by whispering “the Peacemaker.” And Lippincott’s favorite offmenu item is the Frankenstein: fried catfish, oyster and shrimp covered in debris gravy. It comes with two burly guys to carry you out to your car after the food coma sets in (unnecessary disclaimer: it actually doesn’t). Lippincott, a former charter boat captain, started his culinary career at a po’boy shop/dive bar in New Orleans. “In New Orleans, po’boys are everywhere,” says Lippincott. “It’s what New Orleaneans eat once or twice a week. All the recipes here, they come from my mom, they come from my grandma.” Future plans include outdoor entertainment on a gaslamp-lit patio, and in May, a return to Santa Rosa and Windsor farmers markets selling those famous beignets (which are also available in the restaurant). “Healdsburg, as hot as a food spot as it is, it’s all geared toward the tourists, nobody’s thinking about the locals,” says Lippincott. “I want somethin’ else. I want a po’boy.” Parish Cafe, 60-A Mill St., Healdsburg. Wednesday–Sunday, 9am–3pm. 707.431.8474.


Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Bistro 29 Bistro. $$-$$$. Get an honestly prepared plate of excellence, reasonably priced, at this veritable palace of crepes. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 620 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2929.

Chinois Asian Bistro Asian. $$. Pan-Asian cuisine done delicious. Happy hour tapas and cocktails weekdays. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 186 Windsor River Rd, Windsor. 707.838.4667.

Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian.

Hamburger Ranch & Pasta Farm American. $. Old-fashioned, informal mom’n’-pop roadhouse. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 31195 N Redwood Hwy, Cloverdale. 707.894.5616.

Jennie Low’s Chinese. $-$$. Light, healthy, and tasty Cantonese, Mandarin, Hunan, and Szechuan home-style cooking. Great selection, including vegetarian fare, seafood, and noodles. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. Two locations: 140 Second St, Ste 120, Petaluma. 707.762.6888. Vintage Oaks Shopping Center, Rowland Ave, Novato. 415.892.8838.

LoCoco’s Cucina Rustica Italian. $$-$$$. Authentic rustic-style Italian with a touch of Northern California, and a favorite with those in the know. Get the cannoli! Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner, Tues-Sun. 117 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.2227.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Pub fare. $. Casual, homey

Phyllis’ Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an oldfashioned patty. Lunch and dinner daily. Four locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 1774 Piner Road #B, Santa Rosa. 707.521.0890. 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.898.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

Russian River Brewing Co Eclectic. $. Decent pizza and excellent brews. Two words: beer bites! Lunch and dinner daily. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2337.

Saddles Steakhouse. $$$$$$$. A steakhouse in the best American tradition, with top-quality grass-fed beef. Pies are made from fruit trees on restaurant property. Dinner daily. 29 E MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.938.2929.

Sonoma-Meritage Martini California-French. $$$. The menu, which changes daily, is well-rounded with plenty of options, thanks in no small part to the fresh seafood bar. Dinner daily. 165 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.9430.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

MARIN CO U N T Y Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195. Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033. Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast and lunch daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Portelli Rossi Italian. $$. Tasty and affordable fare in a cozy setting. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner, Tues-Sun. 868 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.892.6100.

W NTO N JOE W

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$. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner daily. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

place serving no-nonsense pub grub like shepherd’s pie. Lunch and dinner daily. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

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Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and )

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117 West Napa St, Ste B, Sonoma 707.933.8422 | Mon-Sat 11-7 | Sun 12-6 www.sonomaconsignment.com

photo: Marilee Koll

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840.

DO

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

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$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 27–MA R CH 5, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

Boca South American. $$$-


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Dining ( 11

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BRUARY 27–MAR C H 5, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona Ave, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-inthe-wall as they come. Lunch and dinner daily. Two San Rafael locations: 732 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500.

N A PA CO U N T Y Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

SMALL BITES

Salad Days The university president and every undeclared freshman at Sonoma State University have at least one thing in common: they’ve probably all eaten salad grown by environmental studies junior MacKenzie Hart. Last year, Hart started a program with grants from both the California Rare Fruit Growers and SSU to grow food on unused plots of land in residential communities outside of the school. “I just left about 200 flyers around the neighborhood,” he says, and now has three plots of land tended by seven students, growing several varieties of lettuce. Now that lettuce supplies much of the salad served on campus. The program is making a profit and giving students in the cafeteria (and diners in the fancier University Club restaurant) a chance to enjoy student-grown produce. “One of the coolest parts about this project,” says Hart, “is the stuff lasts longer because I’m delivering it usually within the hour of it being picked.” All the student owners of the gardens have jobs in addition to working the land. “I had this desire to be in a production-based space because I wanted to test how much a person could produce in their spare time, in the time we spend checking Facebook,” says Hart. With a greater variety of veggies planned for the spring, he’s hoping the trend catches on and other students will like—or dig—the idea of gardening.—Nicolas Grizzle

Gilwoods Cafe Diner.

Take a

FAIR TRADE COFFEE BREAK Friday, March 8, 5–7:30pm Sample yummy fair trade coffee, tea and chocolate Mon–Sat 10:30–6, Sun 12–5Œ605 Fourth StŒSanta RosaŒ 707-579-1459 WWW.KINDREDHANDCRAFTS.COM

$-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza

is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 07.224.8555.

$-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like


Wineries

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S O N OM A CO U N T Y Armida The wines are original, and there are three mysterious geodesic domes on the property. Plus: bocce! 2201 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.433.2222.

Christopher Creek The tasting room is a small, woodpaneled anteroom stocked with bins of wine. There are no fountains, Italian tiles or anything not having to do directly with the business of sampling wines made on the premises. Chard and Cab shine. 641 Limerick Lane, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5pm. 707.433.2001.

De La Montanya Vineyards & Winery

Red Car Wine Co. Lay

Madonna Estate

some track to the “Gateway to Graton” and take your palate on a ride with Boxcar Syrah and Trolley Pinot from Sonoma Coast vineyards. Next stop: Côte-Rôtie on the way to Beaune. 8400 Graton Road, Sebastopol. Thursday-Monday 10am-4:30pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.829.8500.

Millennial contingent of multigenerational family winery, once known as Mount St. John, finds success running it old-school: touristy, oldfashioned, and wildly popular. Refreshing Gewürztraminer for summer picnics. 5400 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. Daily 10am to 5pm; $5–$10. 707.255.8864.

Unti Vineyards Very friendly and casual with an emphasis on young Italianstyle wines. Yum. 4202 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment. 707.433.5590.

N A PA CO U N TY Bouchaine Vineyards

Small family winery turns out diverse small lots culled from the best of a large vineyard operation, just for kicks and giggles. Tucked under Westside Road in a casual barn setting, fun tasting room offers good wines and cheeky diversions: De La Montanya wine club members get both case discounts and the opportunity to pose in fishnets on “PinUp” series labels. 999 Foreman Lane, Healdsburg. Monday– Friday, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.3711.

Venerable producer of estategrown Burgundian style wine in the rustic wind-scraped hills of Carneros. Pinot Noir and Pinot Meuier with a coolclimate, cherry-skin crispness that nearly crunches in the mouth, and Chardonnay with a “mouth of butter.” Patio service in fair weather, cozy hearthside tasting in cooler days; good-humored hospitality throughout. 1075 Buchli Station Road, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–4pm; tasting fee $5. 707.252.9065.

Harvest Moon Winery

Del Dotto Vineyards

Two paths diverged in a bramble, and the one lesstraveled leads here. Tart, taut, and enchanting loweralcohol Zinfandel in modest, comfortable tasting room in the middle of family-owned vineyards. Sparkling Gewürz, too. 2192 Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 10:30am– 5pm. 707.573.8711.

(WC) Caves lined with Italian marble and ancient tiles, not to mention Venetian chandeliers and mosaic marble floors. They host candle-lit tastings, replete with cheese and chocolate, Friday–Sunday. Opera resonates until 4pm; rock rules after 4pm. 1055 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.963.2134.

Moondance Cellars

Fantesca Estate & Winery (WC) Set on land

Dogs, Cabs and cars are the focus; when a supercharged 1965 Corvette is parked in front, the vintner is in the house. Also, Port and Sherry from Sonoma Valley Portworks. 14301 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Daily 11am–6pm. $5 tasting fee. 707.938.7550.

that was the dowry gift when Charles Krug married in 1860, this estate winery specializing in Cab features a wine-aging cave built right into the side of Spring Mountain. 2920 Spring Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.968.9229.

Olabisi & Trahan Wineries In the fancy heart of downtown Napa, a low-budget “cellar” where wines are shelved, with clever economy, in stacks of wood pallets; vibes are laid-back and real. Carneros Chardonnay and fruity but firm and focused Cab and Merlot from Suisin Valley, Napa’s much less popular stepsister to the east. 974 Franklin St., Napa. Open daily, noon–5:30pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.257.7477.

Quixote There is a sense of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stag’s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architect’s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Raymond Vineyards Burgundy scion Jean-Charles Boisset has put his stamp on staid Napa producer. See the Theater of Nature, depicting biodynamics; feel the Corridor of the Senses; luxuriate in the members-only Red Room, party in the gold-plated JCB Room; or just taste good Cab in the club-like Crystal Cellar. 849 Zinfandel Lane, St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 4pm. Fees vary. 707.963.3141.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

Joseph Phelps Freestone Vineyards Cold comfort for the polar bear BY JAMES KNIGHT

H

acks that we are, wine writers may be counted on, come November, to promote a Pinot pairing for T-day, nod to the best bubbly for NYE blowouts and to swoon with enthusiasm for lip-smacking summer sippers come May, employing all the awkward alliteration that the genre allows. It’s all pretty standard stuff, until you get to International Polar Bear Day. That’s observed on Wednesday, Feb. 27, at least according to a freebie Ocean Conservancy calendar that I received from my folks—thanks, folks. On this day, the organization Polar Bears International only asks that we take the “Thermostat Challenge,” turning it down a few degrees as a gesture of action on climate change, which threatens to erase the habitat of that most charismatic of megafauna. Celebrate with ice wine, naturally. This is not in jest. As noted in studies from Germany’s wine-centered Geisenheim Institute, the ice wine category faces a similar threat if temperatures continue to rise. Ice wine is made from white grapes that freeze toward the end of the season. The result is a sweet wine that’s a bit unlike other “late harvest” wines, since ideally, the grapes have frozen before raisining or being overtaken by botrytis mold. Traditionally made in select years in Germany, it’s been popularized in Canada, where, indeed, Ontario’s Ice House Winery features polar bear statues as mascots. But if the grapes don’t freeze on time, ice wine is off the menu. Meanwhile, in St. Helena, Joseph Phelps Vineyards got the notion to produce an ice wine from estate-grown Scheurebe grapes in the 1990s. The 2011 Eisrébe ($50 split) has an aroma that’s more banana liqueur than white raisin, and a mead-like, clean, sweet palate. Although it feels heavy, with more than 20 percent residual sugar, the alcohol is only 8 percent. It’s available at the tasting room in Freestone, which, by the way, has been renamed to emphasize that it’s the westernmost outpost of Joseph Phelps. Fans of vibrant Chardonnay, or Pinot of the forest duff and fresh plum variety, might want to stop by at some point. Look for the little red barn. But where does Phelps come up with an Ontario-level freeze? Alas, the Scheurebe is trucked to a commercial freezing facility in Sacramento. So it’s got a little carbon footprint. Just turn down that thermostat and bundle up. No doubt that Eisrébe paired with apple cobbler will add an extra layer of fat to see you through the winter. Joseph Phelps Vineyards, 12747 El Camino Bodega, Freestone. Daily, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.874.1010.

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Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.


Sara Sanger

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BRUARY 27–MAR C H 5, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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The Best Food Money Can’t Buy

FAMILY FARM Elli Rose, pictured with baby, Olivia, was hired at WHOA last year.

While most poor families get the world’s leftovers, WHOA Farm grows organic food specifically to be given away BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR t the Santa Rosa Health Center in Roseland, 50 percent of Dr. Patricia Kulawiak’s adolescent patients are obese. “There is an epidemic of diabetes in this area,” Kulawiak tells me over the phone, “and since good, healthy food is expensive, poverty severely limits your options.”

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Thanks to the Work Horse Organic Agriculture (WHOA) Farm, dozens of these families receive bags of fresh, organic produce every week—for free. Started two years ago by Eddie and Wendy Gelsman, WHOA

Farm’s motto is “The best food money can’t buy,” a tidy summation of their mission to provide fresh, organically grown food to those who can’t afford it. “It’s not a crime to be poor,” says Eddie. “Everyone has the right to eat well.”

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ocated on 16 acres on Petaluma Hill Road, WHOA Farm began with six months’ worth of nonprofit application paperwork and a few raised beds, which the Gelsmans cultivated themselves. In January of 2012, they hired young farmers Balyn and Elli Rose to live on the property and run the farm, which, as the name indicates, is one of the few in the area that harnesses the power of draft horses to plow the fields. “Horses,” says Wendy,

“are the ultimate piece of the sustainability puzzle.” Even though they were just a few weeks from having their first child, and even though they had never before worked with draft horses, the offer to work on the farm “was an opportunity we just couldn’t pass up,” says Elli, who met Balyn in an agro-ecology class at UC Santa Cruz, where they both graduated in environmental studies. “They are two highly educated and highly skilled agriculturalists,”


Sara Sanger

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Wendy Gelsman, son Eli, and Dan Evans.

Eddie says of the couple, who prior to WHOA ran a farm and CSA program called Wild Rose Ranch for four years. Together with Dan Evans, the only other full-time WHOA Farm employee, the Roses grew and donated 15,000 pounds of organic produce, 876 baskets of strawberries and 556 dozen eggs to health clinics and food banks across Sonoma County last year. (According to Cathryn Couch of the Ceres Community Project, WHOA provided $14,000 worth of food to their organization alone.)

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hile plenty of farms and supermarkets donate their leftover produce once it is no longer marketable, WHOA is unique in its practice of growing food specifically to give away. Produce is harvested in the morning and delivered that same afternoon in order to “give people food with the highest nutritional value,” says Eddie. Anyone who’s ever inherited a surplus of fennel or radicchio

understands that fresh produce is a wonderful thing—as long as you know what to do with it. Which is why education is at the heart of WHOA’s mission. “We are committed to giving away food responsibly,” explains Wendy, “which means that we want people to be comfortable with the produce and understand the nutritional value of what they’re eating.” To that end, health centers in Santa Rosa and West County offer nutrition classes (some taught by Ceres) in which patients learn how to turn things like kale and rutabaga into healthy, delicious meals. All who attend—many of them at-risk, uninsured and lowincome—are given a bag filled with WHOA produce to take home. Ever ambitious, the Gelsmans want to do even more. “Our goal is to be able to give away teams of draft horses to young farmers,” says Eddie, whose plans for WHOA also include hosting educational workshops and internships. Of course, nothing is possible without funding. In addition to private

donations, grants, fundraisers, monthly volunteer days, and an outreach booth at the Santa Rosa farmers market—where customers receive a jar of Elli’s sauerkraut or fruit preserves for a ten-dollar donation—WHOA is also cultivating creative financial solutions. The Gelsmans are leasing the Crane family’s 11-acre vineyard (conveniently situated smackdab in the middle of WHOA’s property), and with the generous help of winemakers Guy and Judy Davis, will soon make WHOA Pinot Noir. Beginning in the fall of 2014, they hope to sell 600 to 800 cases annually, which could provide over 50 percent of WHOA’s operating budget.

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n a recent Friday afternoon, I walk around the farm with Elli and 11month-old Olivia, who mimicked the sound of the hens clucking outside their mobile chicken coop; every couple of days they move it to fresh, new grass. Using expert Doc Hammill’s “gentle

horsemanship” approach, Balyn, who calls this his “ideal job,” harnesses Chip and Mark, whose shiny blonde manes and tails belie their dude-like monikers. The Gelsmans’ vision is evident in the green fields of oat hay shimmering in the winter sunlight. After conditioning the soil for spring planting, the hay will be harvested and fed to the horses, who will then plow the fields where onions, lettuce and parsley sprouts will soon take root. And come September, a patient at the Santa Rosa Health Center will discover the spicy kick of mustard greens or the surprising sweetness of a just-picked carrot. “By honoring the people who are used to getting the leftovers,” Dr. Kulawiak says, “WHOA is working to dismantle health disparities. They are helping people make changes that will last for generations.” For more information, visit www.whoafarm.org.

The Seedlings ) 16

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 27–MA R CH 5, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

HOOFING IT WHOA is one of only a handful of local farms to use draft horse, ‘the ultimate piece of the sustainability puzzle.’ (Pictured, left to right: Elli Rose,


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BRUARY 27–MAR C H 5, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

( 15 Sara Sanger

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NO RUFFLED FEATHERS Today’s young farmers speak plainly and bluntly with each other

about slaughtering chickens, cows and hogs.

The Seedlings Under 30: the brave new world of ranchers, farmers and hog butchers BY JONAH RASKIN t Barnard College, the all-woman’s school in New York, Judy Butterfield hunkered down with history. But once she graduated, she came home to California and embarked on a threemonth internship at Green String Farm under the tutelage of the legendary Bob Cannard, who has the claim to fame of educating more organic farmers than any other farmer in Northern California.

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Now 23, Butterfield lives with friends on True Grass Farms in Marin County and works at Grow Kitchen—a new West County hub for food, gardening and media on the outskirts of Sebastopol—where

she weeds, mulches and struggles to stop soil erosion. She’s fast becoming a jill-of-all-farm-trades, though she says she “cowers and wonders at the bigness of it all.” At Green String, she worked with

piglets and rabbits, and as a Woofer in France, she acquired agricultural and communication skills. “I’m still a novice in the farming world,” she says. “In college, I learned how to deconstruct everything. I realized that I wanted to make and grow things and live in and with the landscape. That’s what I’m doing now.”

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t a recent Mardi Gras dinner, Butterfield joins a lively group of two dozen young farmers and ranchers— nearly all of them novices under

the age of 30—at Grow Kitchen, where they eat scrumptious gumbo and white rice made by Matthew Elias, the creative chef at Saltwater Oyster Depot in Inverness. Around the large wooden table where potluck salads and pastas are arrayed sits a lean but not mean group—with scarcely an ounce of fat on anyone in the room—of under-30 farmers who eat meat proudly and raise healthy animals on farms such as Green Valley Village, Pocket Creek and Green String, from Valley Ford and Petaluma to Graton and Occidental. The evening brings Judy Butterfield together with Evan Wiig, Eliza Murphy, Guido Frosini and their friends and co-workers. As many women populate the dinner as men, many in jeans and flannel shirts, a few in overalls and work boots, and everyone wearing Mardi Gras beads. There isn’t a wallflower in sight; one and all converse intensely in twos and threes about food, farming and the art of slaughtering pigs, rabbits, ducks, chickens, cows and the high and mighty hog. Hard-working realists, they share information about pasture land, pig genetics, the best breeds of chickens, and they talk about scythes, hoes, pitchforks, shovels and tools for picking apples and for peeling them. Equipped with iPhones and laptops, they’re the most plugged-in agriculturalists in human history, and unabashedly candid, too. No one I talk to uses the euphemism “harvest” that I often heard just a few years ago when I visited farms and ranches in Marin and Sonoma to gather information about the men and women who raise organic beef and boast about their beloved cows. Slaughter—not harvest—is the word that echoes tonight across Grow Kitchen. From 2006 to 2008, when I made an eye-opening farming odyssey across Northern California, most of the young agriculturalists I met were fanatical about growing delicious carrots, delectable peas and the sweetest of melons. That was then. Increasingly, the new batch of back-to-the-land farmers are raising animals organically


If Madison Avenue wants a sex symbol for another â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;God Made a Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; commercial, Frosini belongs at the top of the list.

At True Grass, which has been in his family since 1867, Frosini and the crew arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just raising farm animals and producing USDA-certiďŹ ed meats; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also aiming to â&#x20AC;&#x153;rejuvenateâ&#x20AC;? the ďŹ elds along the Estero Americano that were severely damaged by decades of overgrazing. To borrow a clichĂŠ, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve chosen a tough row to hoe, and yet itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spiritually uplifting and deeply satisfying. Like ButterďŹ eld, Westman and Frosini, Wiig feels a keen sense of connection to the community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think I can speak for most of us when I say that we want to blend consumers and producers,â&#x20AC;? he tells me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When shoppers go to a market, such as Whole Foods, they usually depend on labels for accurate information about what to buy or not buy. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not so much about labels as we are about conversations. Talk to us, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tell you about our chickens, eggs and pork. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll learn much more, I think, than youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll learn when you just read a label. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll connect to the farmer, the land and the animal he or she raises.â&#x20AC;?

More than any other person in the room, Evan Wiig, 26, gave birth to this Mardi Gras meetgreet-and-eat at Grow Kitchen, which is owned and operated by entrepreneur par excellence, Jeffrey Westman. Wiig also knows how to market. Until recently, he sat at an editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desk at Rowman & LittleďŹ eld, the New York publishing house. Now, he helps raise black Angus cows and Blackworth hogs on the spectacular 1,000-acre pasturelands at True Grass Farms. True Grass Farms is managed by Wiigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longtime pal Guido Frosini, who was born in Florence, Italy, speaks ďŹ&#x201A;uent Italian as well as English, and who wants me to know that he was â&#x20AC;&#x153;baptized in Oakland.â&#x20AC;? Though he wears a faded T-shirt and jeans, Frosini looks as though he might model Armani suits. If Madison Avenue wants a sex symbol for another â&#x20AC;&#x153;God Made a Farmerâ&#x20AC;? commercial, he surely belongs at the top of the list.

utterďŹ eld might well be, in her own words, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;novice.â&#x20AC;? Hell, once upon a time, master farmer Bob Cannard was a novice. Like most of the under-30 crowd at Grow Kitchen, ButterďŹ eld has the bigness and boldness of the novice, and the noviceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sense that anything and everything is possible. The day after we meet, she sends an email in which she writes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Six months into farm life, I still have that feeling you have when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re shaken awake from a very vivid dream in which youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re running fast from nothing and the winding streets appear as if from nowhere.â&#x20AC;? What would the old masters say to ButterďŹ eld and todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novices in ďŹ elds and slaughterhouses? Having heard Canard wax poetic about slow food, slow farming, Alice Waters and Carlo Petrini, I think I know. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right on,â&#x20AC;? heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And keeping on growing organically!â&#x20AC;?

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and sustainably, and, when their beasts are ready for market, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re cutting heads off, butchering and carving up carcasses. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not a squeamish lot afraid of a little blood, mounds of manure or mending fences on bitter cold February mornings. (Not surprisingly, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re inspired by Zazuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Duskie Estes and John Stewart, who work culinary wonders with kale, fava beans, sorrel and more, and who bring out the beauty of bacon and pork belly.)


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18

Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

P E TA L U M A

Holy Thugs, Batman! Layzie Bone, Wish Bone, Flesh-N-Bone, Krayzie Bone and Bizzy Bone are back! Together for longer than most marriages last, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony celebrate their 20-year anniversary reunion this week at the Phoenix. With songs featured in soundtracks for famous movies like Batman and Robin and blaring out of every single car on the cruise in 1993—“Crossroads,” anyone?—the group plays on Saturday, March 2, at the Phoenix Theater. 201 E. Washington St., Petaluma. 8pm. $35–$100. 707.762.3665.

P E TA L U M A

See Emily Play Lock up your daughters—Emily Dickinson is alive! Well, no, not really. She is still dead. But Barbara Dana—author of A Voice of Her Own: Becoming Emily Dickinson—is an expert on all things Dickinson, and brings the pride of Amherst back to life by dressing up as the famous poet and sharing the knowledge and insight she’s acquired by researching and portraying Dickinson on stage. Come meet Emily/Barbara on Tuesday, March 5, at Copperfield’s Books. 140 Kentucky St., Petaluma. 7pm. 707.762.0563.

N A PA

Good Vibrations ‘The Wrecking Crew’ provides a behind-the-scenes look at the uncredited Los Angeles studio musicians responsible for playing on hundreds of hit songs by the Beach Boys, Frank Sinatra, Sonny and Cher, the Monkees and many others. Led by drummer Hal Blaine and featuring pioneering female bassist Carol Kaye, the group is truly the Funk Brothers of Los Angeles. See the film on Tuesday, March 5, at the Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. 7pm. $10. 707.266.7372.

O C C I D E N TA L

The Dancer

ALLEGRO Georgian pianist Khatia Buniatishvili performs March 2 at the Napa Valley Opera House. See Concerts, p24.

Famous for stepping outside of traditional ballet technique, Isadora Duncan created a unique style. Duncan met her tragic death in 1927 after her scarf got caught in the wheel of her Amilcar and broke her neck. Eight decades later, dancer Lois Flood brings her moves to life on Sunday, March 3, at the Occidental Center for the Arts. 3850 Doris Murphy Court, Occidental. 4pm. $10. 707.874.9392.

—Estefany Gonzalez & Taylor May


THE BODY ELECTRIC SOTA founder Lito Briano is expanding the local theater awards to be more inclusive and far-reaching.

And the Winner Is . . . How do Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own Tony-style awards work? BY DAVID TEMPLETON alfway through last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stage One Theater Arts awards, held annually in downtown Santa Rosa, a curious passerby stopped to take in the scene at the Glaser Center, where a merrily multicolored crowd, youthfully dressed to the nines, was milling around the lobby during the showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intermission. Once informed he had stumbled

H

upon the Stage One Theater Arts awards, the inquisitive gentleman pondered that information for a moment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stage One. Stage One,â&#x20AC;? he repeated, eventually adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still time to ďŹ nd a cure.â&#x20AC;? Created ďŹ ve years ago by actorwriter-director and SSU graduate Lito Briano, the SOTA awards honor excellence in Sonoma County theater. But they were initially designed as an on-campus celebration of Sonoma State

Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theater arts program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just wanted to create an extra bit of excitement and energy,â&#x20AC;? Briano says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From the beginning, I envisioned it as something that might someday reach beyond SSU to the entire theater community of Sonoma County.â&#x20AC;? The following year, Briano took the SOTAs off campus, and began the long, slow process of turning them into something the entire community could embrace. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a work-in-progress,â&#x20AC;? says Briano, who admits that some of the youth-quake shenanigans of

the ďŹ rst few yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;co-hosts in boxer shorts; musical numbers in questionable tasteâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;might have been less elegant than they were (undeniably) crowd-pleasing. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice of host, Sixth Street Playhouse artistic director Craig Miller, should lend some extra class and credibility. As for the awards themselves, with nominations and voting patterned after the Academy Awards, Briano has made a huge effort this year to increase the voting membership by reaching out to every theater company in the area. From the original 20 theater students who acted as members of the Stage One Theater Arts Awards Academy, the total SOTA membership now numbers 92 people and counting. Still, there are some major players in the Sonoma County theater community who prefer to sit the SOTAs out, concerned that the awards donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t accurately represent whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in the area. Winners, for example, tend to be those shows presented by the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s younger and newer theater companies. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are awards, and then there are awards,â&#x20AC;? says Elly Lichenstein, executive artistic director of Cinnabar Theater. Lichenstein declined the invitation to become a voting member, though Cinnabarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s showsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and Lichenstein herself, who gave one of the yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best performances in So Nice to Come Home Toâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are still eligible for a number of awards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My feeling about SOTA-type awards, including Best Of awards and all of those things, is that they tend to be a bit too self-congratulatory. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Vote for me! Vote for us! Tell all your friends to vote for my performance!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; That doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any real value for me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in good conscience call my theater company â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;the awardwinning Cinnabar Theater,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; if winning that award really just meant I was the one with the most Facebook friends.â&#x20AC;? ) 20

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SOTA( 19 In fairness to the SOTAs, the Facebook scenario Lichenstein describes better fits the Broadway World Awards, in which anyone at all can log on and submit a vote. Though membership to the SOTA Academy is fairly easy to obtain for those in the theater scene, it isn’t the kind of operation where friends and family can affect the outcome of the vote. “I do think that theater awards can have value,” remarks Beth Craven, artistic director of Main Stage West theater in Sebastopol, and a former associate professor of Theater at SSU. “Awards ceremonies can rally the troops and get your patrons excited, and I do think it can be a good thing.” According to Craven, what the SOTAs need to do next is establish stricter criteria for voting members, requiring each voter to see a minimum number of shows at a variety of theater companies. The Bay Area Theater Critics Circle, in comparison, requires members to see a minimum of 40 shows per year, and no one is allowed to vote for a show they did not see. Unfortunately, the Critics Circle awards rarely ever honors shows north of Petaluma. “There are ninety-something shows happening every year in this area,” Craven says. “I try to get out and see as much theater as I can, but last year I never made it to SSU to see anything they were doing, and I doubt many of them made it to Main Stage West, so I don’t feel it would have been fair for me to be deciding what was the best in Sonoma County.” Ultimately, though, according to Briano, the SOTAs were designed to be less about winning and losing than about celebrating Sonoma County theater and theater artists, new and experienced, young and old. “The SOTAs are a great big party,” he says. “It’s how theater artists get together to support all of our efforts. Basically, it’s just a way to have a good time together.” The Stage One Theater Arts awards take place Monday, March 18, at the Glaser Center. 547 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 7:30pm. Free. 707.568.5381.


shatters preconceived notions of street denizens.

Street Script ‘Angel’ a touching true story of homelessness BY DAVID TEMPLETON

F

ifty-six years ago, when he was eight, Audie Foote’s life changed. It would be decades, though, before he fully realized it.

“I was with my mom,” he recalls. “We were walking in New York City, and I saw a homeless man, this derelict, and I made some kind of joke. I made fun of him.” His mother stopped in her tracks, right there in the street, and told her son a story, a true story, something that had happened to her shortly after World War II. From that moment on, Foote was never unkind to street people again, and that story has stayed with him ever since. Now that story is being told again, this time as a stage play, The Angel of

‘The Angel of Chatham Square’ runs Thursday–Sunday, March 1–10, at the Raven Performing Arts Theater. 115 North St., Healdsburg. Thursday– Saturday at 8pm; 5pm matinees on Sundays. No show on March 8. $15. 707.433.6335.

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Chatham Square, opening this weekend by the Raven Players. “I wrote it as a one-act for a short play festival the Raven was having a couple of years ago,” he says of his first stab at playwriting. “People were just incredibly moved by the story, so I decided to turn it into a full-blown two-act play.” Directed by John DeGaetano, the play takes place in 1948, when Foote’s mother, a waitress, was required to wait each night after midnight at a bus stop near Chatham Square in New York’s notoriously rough Bowery district. “The first night,” says Foote, “she was waiting for the bus, and this guy approached her, a scary guy, clearly with evil intentions. Suddenly, this homeless guy appeared, and he protected her until her bus came. The next night, when she got off the bus at Chatham Square again, this guy who’d saved her was there waiting, to watch over her again until her connecting bus arrived.” Gradually, the one fellow became a small crew of guardians, and as she got to know them, learning their stories as she waited for her bus, she decided to return the favor. “She started bringing them doggy bags from her restaurant,” Foote says. “She brought them my father’s old clothes. She brought them cigarettes. They started calling her the Angel of Chatham Square.” Foote, who’s appeared in close to 20 plays over the last seven years, plays one of his mother’s beloved street guardians. The experience of watching his mother’s lifechanging tale blossom into reality has been, he says, surreal—and incredibly rewarding. Foote is fairly certain that Angel will not be his last play. “I know a couple of other stories,” he laughs.


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n Margaret, cruising through life on a pair of really good thighs and a complicated smile, Lisa Cohen (the astounding Anna Paquin) is a self-described “privileged, Upper West Side Jew.” Lisa is faced with a moral awakening, and it’s like the description of enlightenment in Zen: it’s a red hot ball she can neither swallow nor spit out.

One day Lisa flirts with an MTA bus driver (Mark Ruffalo) long enough so that he accidentally crushes a pedestrian. As all problems come down, utterly, to herself, Lisa involves herself in a search for justice, though this doesn’t interrupt her coming of age, losing her virginity, crashing her report card and getting into

fights with her shallow actress mother (J. Smith-Cameron). Director Kevin Lonergan (You Can Count on Me) captures an adolescent state of mind usually celebrated in movies as the height of whip-smartness—flattering the hell out of a really lucrative ticketbuying demographic. Paquin’s acting should have got every award there was to get in 2011, as seen when she moves through a hallway to a boy she likes to tease or lashing out at the genuinely bereaved in a self-righteous fury. The supporting work is immaculate. Matthew Broderick was brave to take the part of an inept English teacher, whose quote of a Gerard Manley Hopkins poem provides the title. Matt Damon excels as a Midwestern good-guy of a geometry teacher who doesn’t know enough to keep away from Lisa. Other fine performances abound: Jeannie Berlin as the one woman who really has Lisa’s number; a Latin stage-door Johnny (Jean Reno, at his best), an essentially merry liability lawyer (Jonathan Hadary) and a patient-as-a-pachyderm cop (Stephen Adly Guirgis). So why haven’t you seen this movie? Because due to behind-thescenes Hollywood fighting, some ugly lawsuits and three different edits of the film (one by Martin Scorsese, believing so much in the film that he worked for free), Margaret opened in exactly two movie theaters: one in L.A., one in New York. It is, essentially, a buried masterpiece. Margaret recalls Woody Allen in his prime, only without the schtick. Similar to that ’90s masterpiece The Sweet Hereafter, it’s about how litigation has come to replace self-analysis. As for its length, Margaret is in the company of long movies (Secrets and Lies, Tokyo Story, Short Cuts among them) that could have been even longer. The editing process sabotaged its release; the movie was utterly unpromoted. Hopefully its luck will change as word gets out. ‘Margaret’ screens Friday, March 1, at 7pm and Sunday, March 3, at 4pm. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. $7. 707.664.2606.


CATCHING BREATH Carrie

Rodriguez sounds conďŹ dent as ever.

Austin Angel Carrie Rodriguez gives it all sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got BY ALAN SCULLEY

I

t would seem only natural that Carrie Rodriguez became a songwriter. After all, songwriting is in her blood. But as the daughter of David Rodriguez, an acclaimed singer-songwriter, Rodriguez says the connection to her father made her hesitate exploring her songwriting talents.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the kid of someone whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s known for what they do and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really good at it, which my dad isâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very renowned songwriterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to go there,â&#x20AC;? Rodriguez says in a phone interview. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little intimidating.â&#x20AC;? But her plans changed in 2001 when Rodriguez, then performing in a band called Hayseed, was spotted by Chip Taylor. Taylor, who wrote â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wild Thingâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Angel of the Morning,â&#x20AC;? offered to

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Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc., New York City.

TM

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Carrie Rodriguez plays Friday, March 1, at the Sebastopol Community Center. 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. 8pm. $17â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$22. 707.823.1511.

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 27â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MA R CH 5, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

take Rodriguez under his wingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and on the road. This partnership led to three albums as a duo, and Rodriguezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turn as a vocalist and songwriter with the 2006 album Seven Angels on a Bicycle. The CD gained enough notice that Rodriguez landed a deal with major label EMI Records. But almost as quickly as she stepped up to the big leagues with her sophomore album, She Ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Me, Rodriguez was dropped from the roster. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So much of my early musical career was a whirlwind. It happened so quick,â&#x20AC;? Rodriguez says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It left me kind of just wanting to catch my breath and wondering, well, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve enjoyed all of this, but what is truly my voice, when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not being inďŹ&#x201A;uenced by these amazing songwriters and record label executives who are hoping for me to have a hit. I needed some time to ďŹ gure out what it all meant.â&#x20AC;? She bought herself some time by doing a covers record, Love and Circumstance, which helped her reconnect with her musical roots and ďŹ gure out her next step as a songwriter and solo artist. With her latest album, Give Me All You Got, Rodriguez returns, sounding more conďŹ dent and willing to stretch beyond those roots. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Devil in Mind,â&#x20AC;? one of a pair of songs Rodriguez co-wrote with Taylor, is a gritty, spirited tune with a bluesy chorus and bits of rock and folk elsewhere. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Cry for Loveâ&#x20AC;? is an edgy vocal tour de force that combines blues, rock and country. The gently swinging â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tragicâ&#x20AC;? has a bit of torch song jazz in its smoky, late-night sound. On her ďŹ rst tour in support of Give Me All You Got, Rodriguez is touring only with multiinstrumentalist Luke Jacobs, and says the variety of instruments she and Jacobs are able to play keeps things fresh. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can really take liberties that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take when you have drums,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So we can stretch solos out in different ways, change tempos. Usually it sounds good.â&#x20AC;?


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BRUARY 27–MAR C H 5, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24 132 KELLER STREET PETALUMA

HAPPY HOUR Mon–Fri 4:30-6:30pm Saturday Mar 2 Top 40, Rock & Pop

DJ FABIAN 9:30–1:30 No Cover

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri It’s Party Time! Mar 1 THE ED EARLEY BAND Funky R & B 8:00 / No Cover

Concerts

Sat

Bone Thugs-nHarmony

FOXES IN THE HENHOUSE Mar 3 Foxy Four-Part Harmonies

Nineties hip-hop group will see you at the crossroads. Mistah Fab opens. Mar 2, 8pm. $35-$100. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

THE RANCHO ALLSTARS Mar 2 Great Dance Band! 8:30 Sun

6:00 / No Cover

TOM RIGNEY & FLAMBEAU Mar 8 Cajun Orkestra 8:30 Fri

REVOLVER Mar 9 Beatles and Beyond 8:30 Sat

Sunday Mar 3

SUNDAY BRUNCH 9:30pm–2:30pm Sunday Mar 3

SUNDAY SUPPER

with a live preformance by "America's Got Talent" Semi-Finalist

TIM HOCKENBERRY 6pm–9pm

Sun

Mar 10

TINY TELEVISION’S CD RELEASE PARTY!

4:00 / No Cover Fri Let’s Dance! Mar 15 STAGGERWING AND THE INCUBATORS Roots Rock and Americana 8:00

THE ZYDECO FLAMES Mar 16 West Coast’s Premier Zydeco Band Sat

8:30 Sun Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day Mar 17 THE MAD HANNANS WITH THE

6:00

707.238.0158 info@socialclubrestaurant.com

for calendar of events & information

Music

JERRY HANNAN BAND

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

SONOMA COUNTY

Dmitra Smith & Pascal Faivre One-half of recent awardwinning band Static People play acoustic show. Mar 1 at 7:30. Epicurean Connection, 122 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

The Expendables Surf-reggae-punkers from Santa Cruz ready to rip it up and shred the gnar. The 808 Band with Radioactive opens. Mar 5, 8pm. $16. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

TRADJASS Music by the Traditional Ragtime And Dixieland Jazz Appreciation & Strutters Society. First Sunday of every month. $10. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Young People’s Chamber Orchestra World premiere of 14-year-old YPCO member Nicolas Casey’s first opus, “Translucence.” Mar 3, 3pm. $10-$15. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

MARIN COUNTY Pipes & Drums of the Black Watch

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

The world-famous Black Watch, Royal Regiments and Scots Guards parade into Marin Center with all the fanfare, pageantry and music of Great Britain. Mar 2, 8pm. $20-$50. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Ratdog Quartet Featuring Bob Weir, Jay Lane, Robin Sylvester and Jonathan Wilson. Mar 3, 8pm and Mar 4, 8pm. $72. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Khatia Buniatishvili Young virtuoso pianist made her debut recording with a Lizst recital. Mar 2, 8pm. $30-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Grand Night for Singers Vocalists from around Northern California and beyond take turns onstage. Piano accompaniment by host Richard Evans. First Saturday of every month, 7pm. $15. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Aaron Lewis

Chrome Lotus Fri, Sat, Live DJs. 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5643.

Coffee Catz Sat, 2pm, bluegrass jam. Mon, 6pm, open mic. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Finley Community Center Mar 1, Larry Broderick Trio. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

First Edition Sun, Open Mic Night hosted by Carl and Paul Green. 1420 E Washington Ave, Petaluma. 707.775.3200.

Flamingo Lounge Tues, Swing Dancing with Lessons. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Staind’s frontman plays a solo acoustic country music concert. Mar 3, 8pm. $40. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Forestville Club

Clubs & Venues

Fri, DJ Mike. Wed, Sat, karaoke. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.792.9847.

SONOMA COUNTY

Mar 1, Javi Bonez, Anthony Forté. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

Friar Tuck’s

Gaia’s Garden Feb 27, the Celtic Session. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Aqus Cafe

Green Music Center

Fourth Wednesday of every month, Bluegrass Jam. First Wednesday of every month, Chamber Music. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Mar 3, Young People’s Chamber Orchestra. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Arlene Francis Center

Feb 27, John Stowell. Mar 6, Dayna Stephens & Jeff Denson. SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

Feb 28, DJ lounge. Mar 1, Likc Clockwork Sci-Fi Dance Party. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Feb 28, the Penguins Jazz Party. Mar 1, Down with May, Down Dirty Shake, We are the Men. Mar 2, Dgiin. Mar 3, Thugz. Mon, Artist & Model Mondays. Tues, Bluesy Tuesday. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Bergamot Alley Sun, Live Music. 328A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Christy’s on the Square Feb 28, Boo Radley’s House, Couteaux, 26 MPH. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8565.

Green Music Center 1029

Hopmonk Sebastopol Feb 28, Lowriderz. Mar 1, Best of Open Mic. Mar 2, Petty Theft. Mar 3, Dehli to Dublin. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Mar 1, Clay Bell. Mar 2, Buckeye Knoll. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Mar 1, Si Perkoff and Gary Digman Duo. Mar 2, Stephanie Ozer Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Inn at the Tides Sat, Maple Profant. Bay View Restaurant. 800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 800.541.7788.


Jasper O’Farrell’s

25

Lagunitas Tap Room Feb 27, Prisma Trova. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Feb 27, Jill Cohn, Linda Ferro, Solid Air. Mar 6, Carolyn Wonderland. Tues, karaoke. Wed, Caribbean Wednesday. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Mar 1, Brulee. Mar 2, Yancie Taylor Trio. Mar 6, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. Mar 5, Maple Profant. Sun, Kit Mariah’s open mic. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mavericks Mar 1, Moonshine Bandits, Paulie’s Garage. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Monroe Dance Hall Wed, Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club. Thurs, Sun, Circles ‘n Squares Dance Club. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

RED ROCKER Dmitra Smith from Static People plays

an acoustic show with bandmate Pascal Faivre on March 1 at Epicurean Connection. See Concerts, adjacent.

Mar 2, Andrew Freeman. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Society live music. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Redwood Cafe

Sunflower Center

My Friend Joe

First Tuesday of every month, Rock Overtime. Thurs, Open Mic. First Friday of every month, Dginn. First Sunday of every month, Organix Guitar. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Tues, Sunflower Music Series. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Thurs, 7:30pm, Rubber Chicken Open Mic. 1810 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.829.3403.

Mystic Theatre Mar 2, Foreverland. Mar 5, the Expendables, RadioActive. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Newman Auditorium Mar 3, Rossetti Quartet. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Olive & Vine Cafe Every other Sunday, Songwriter Sessions. 14301 Arnold St, Glen Ellen. 707.996.9150.

Phoenix Theater Mar 1, White Wall, the Sad Tires, Grace in the Woods. Mar 2, Bone Thugs-n-Harmony, Mistah Fab. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Fourth Thursday of every month, writers workshops. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Quincy’s Mar 1, Trial by Combat, Shattered Theory, Laceration.

Toad in the Hole Pub

Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

First Sunday of every month, Robert Herrera, Brianna Lee, Josh Barrett. Mon, open mic with Phil the Security Guard. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Riverside Bistro

Tradewinds

Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

Feb 27, Down With May. Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

River Theatre

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Society: Culture House First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann & guests. Sun, Church on Sundays. Thurs, Casa Rasta. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Spancky’s Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sprenger’s Tap Room Wed, Sonoma County Blues

TICKETS: $35 at calistogavisitors.com / $40 the day of the event General admission includes music, 10 tasting tickets good for wine and food tastes (additional tasting tickets 2 for $5), a wine glass and an event program with map

Sun March 3

Aaron Lewis Fri March 8

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Pablo Cruise plus The Edge Thur March 21

An evening with >ĞŽ<ŽƩŬĞ SOLD OU

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Fri March 22

Boz Scaggs

Special Guest: DJ Harry Duncan

Fri March 29 As seen in "The Hangover"

MARIN COUNTY

Sat March 30

Crystal Bowersox

Mar 2, Polina Osetinskaya. Mar 3, Tin Hat. Mon, Open Mic with Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

ĞůdŚĞ&ƵŶŬLJ,ŽŵŽƐĂƉŝĞŶ

Fri April 12

Wed, 8:20pm, salsa dancing with lessons. 815 W Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.460.0101. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600. )

Wed April 17

Dead Can Dance Sat April 20 An evening with Helen Reddy

Sat May 18 Adam Carolla & Dr Drew’

Reunion Tour Fri Aug 9

Anjelah Johnson

Fenix

Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

26

Saturday, Mar 2

Wed, Feb 27 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB

Thur, Feb 28 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Mar 1 7:15–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts a WEST COAST SWING PARTY

Sat, Mar 2 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise Steve Luther presents BLUES BOX BAYOU BAND

The Dan Band

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Club 101

BLUES BOX BAYOU BAND

Sun, Mar 3 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5pm–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Mar 4 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Mar 5 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 27–MA R CH 5, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Mar 6, Archnemesis. Wed, Brainstorm. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.


Music ( 33

26 NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 27â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MAR C H 5, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR SINGLES S INGLES TO M MEET E ET B EST BAR BAR HHONORABLE BEST ONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC MUSIC VENUE VENUE HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE

THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FEB FEB 28

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS DANCE D ANCE | VARIETY VARIET Y | SHOW SHOW

BELLY B ELLY DANCE DANCE SUPER SUPER STARS STARS

Yo el Rey Roasting and Arthouse

Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. Mar 1, Miles Schon. Mar 2, Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Beautiful Day. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Mar 1, New Monsoon. Mar 2, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415-892-6200.

Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts

$$20 20 ADV/$25 ADV/$25 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 6PM/ALL 6PM /ALL A AGES GES T THUR HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FEB FEB 28 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

Mar 2, Colors of India. Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

TTRAP RAP | HIP HIP H HOP OP | G GLITCH LITCH

LLOWRIDERZ OWRIDERZ

((AN-TEN-NAE AN-TEN-NAE + LLAURA AURA LLOW) OW)

+M MALARKEY ALARKEY

$$44 JJAMESON AMESON & O ORGANIC RGANIC Y YERBA ERBA M MATE ATE CO COCKTAILS CKTAILS

$$15 15 A ADV/$20 DV/$20 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

FRI F RI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MAR MAR 1

THE T HE S SESSION ESSION R ROOM O OM P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

Marin Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Memorial Auditorium

1217 Washington St Downtown Calistoga www.yoelrey.com 707.321.7901

GENERAL G ENERAL

BEST B EST O OF FO OPEN PEN MIC MIC

Yo el Rey Arthouse Presents

A LLOCAL OCAL V VARIETY ARIETY O OF FM MUSICIANS USICIANS

Art Exhibition of

$$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 77PM/21+ PM /21+

SAT S AT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MAR MAR 2

Bruce Skogen

THE T HE A ABBEY BBEY P PRESENTS R E SE NT S CLASSIC C L ASSIC | R ROCK O CK | C COVERS OVERS

PETTY P ETTY T THEFT HEFT

Saturday March 2 8pm

+T THE HE W WHISKEY HISKEY THIEVES TH I E V E S $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SUN S UN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; M MAR AR 3

JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

CELTIC C ELTIC | B BHANGRA HANGRA | WORLD WO R L D

DELHI D ELHI TO TO DUBLIN DUBLIN N + MALARKEY MALARKEY

$$44 JJAMESON AMESON & ORGANIC ORGANIC Y YERBA ERBA M MATE ATE CO COCKTAILS CKTAILS

$$12 12 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 88PM/21+ PM /21+ WEEKLY W EE EK KLY E EVENT VENT HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R ESE NT S OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT W WITH ITH E EVAN V N VA FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES AGES

TUES T UES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MAR MAR 5

THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MAR MAR 7

WEEKLY W EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House "REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER 3!4s0-$//23ss MICHAEL JACKSON TRIBUTE BAND

LITTLE LI TTLE JOHN JOHN MOSAIC MOSAIC - S STRIDAH TRIDAH FRIâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; F RIâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; MAR MAR 8

AN EVENING WITH

FOREVERLAND

45%s0-$//23s!$6$/3s REGGAE/SKA/SURF ROCK

EEXPERIMENTAL XPERIMENTAL | JJAM AM | ROCK R O CK

THE EXPENDABLES

+T THE HE LOUIES LOUIES

ZEPPARELLA

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

FUNGO F UNGO MUNGO MUNGO O $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MAR MAR 9

THE T HE A ABBEY BBEY P PRESENTS R E SE NT S IINDIE NDIE | R ROCK O CK

CHARLEY CH ARLEY P PEACH EACH H +T TBA BA

$$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+ SUN SU N â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MAR MAR 10 10 M MONTHLY ONTHLY E EVENT VENT BS SAGE AGE P PRESENTS R ESE NT S POETRY/SPOKEN PO ETRY/ SPOKEN WORD/LYRICISM WORD / LYRICISM

NORTH N ORTH BAY BAY POETRY POETRY SLAM SLAM FEATURING FE ATURING JAMIE JAMIE DEWOLF DEWOLF

SSLIDING LIDING SSCALE CALE $5/DOORS $5/ DOORS 88PM/ALL PM /ALL A AGES GES

Feb 28, Saxman Mike Luzzi & Black Angels. Fort Baker, Sausalito. 415.332.2319.

Rancho Nicasio Mar 1, Ed Earley Band. Mar 2, Rancho Allstars. Mar 3, Foxes in the Henhouse. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Feb 28, Will Magid Trio. Mar 1, Buffalo Wedding. Mar 2, West African Highlife with Baba Ken. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes & Friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello & Seth. First Wednesday of every month, Tangonero. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady

Mar 2, Pipes & Drums of the Black Watch. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Nickel Rose

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Mon, Wed-Sun, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Feb 28, Eli Carlton Pearson. Mar 1, Ancient Mystic. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

19 Broadway Club Feb 27, Tom Finch Group. Feb 28, the Skinny Guys. Mar 1, Galaxy Adams & San Quinn. Mar 2, Arkaingelle & the Band Dubwise Collection. Tues, Core Tuesdays with Danny Uzilevsky. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Fourth Thursday of every month, Jeremy Knudsen presents Fourth Thursday Hip-Hop Night. Sat, Sean Hannan & Friends. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Sweetwater Music Hall Feb 27, David Thom Band. Mar 1, Elephant Listening Project. Mar 2, Dehli to Dublin. Mar 3, Hobo Paradise. Mar 3 and , Mar 4, Ratdog Quartet. Mar 6,

No Name Bar

HOUSE H OUSE | B BREAKS REAKS | DISCO DISCO

$4 $ 4 JAMESON JAMESON A ALL LL NIGHT!! N IG HT ! ! $$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

Presidio Yacht Club

3!4s8PM DOORSss LED ZEPPELIN TRIBUTE BAND

45%s0-$//23s!$6$/3s JAM BAND/ELECTRONIC

LOTUS

PLUS VIBESQUAD &2)s0-$//23s!$6s BURLESQUE

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7%$s7PM DOORSs!$6$/3s ACOUSTIC/ROCK/REGGAE PLUS

ANUHEA

JUSTIN YOUNG, FAITH AKO TRIO

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7

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First Monday of every month, 8:30pm, Kimrea. Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino Feb 27, Jonathan Poretz. Feb 28, Passion Habanera. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Feb 27, Pine Needles. Feb 28, Kit Weagant. Mar 3, Marianna August. Mar 6, Dave Getz Trio. Mar 5, Swing Fever. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Mar 1, Deep Bench. Mar 2, Rusty Evans & the Ring of Fire. Mar 5, the Pickups. Feb 27 and , Mar 6, the Weissmen. Mon, acoustic open mic. Fourth Thursday of every month, Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jam Sammich. First Sunday of every month, Blues Jam. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

AgapĂŠSoul. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Feb 28, Acacia. Mar 1, Mars Hotel. Tues, American Jubilee. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant Sun, DJ Night. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Molinari Caffe Thurs, Open Mic. 815 Main St, Napa. 707.927.3623.

Napa Valley Opera House Mar 2, Khatia Buniatishvili. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Mar 3, Aaron Lewis. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Uva Trattoria Sun, James & Ted. Wed, Gentlemen of Jazz. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

YACHT Portland death-dance duo that brought you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Psychic Cityâ&#x20AC;? return for Noise Pop. Mar 2 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Bomb the Music Industry The band that lets the audience play the songs decides to call it quits. Mar 2 at the Bottom of the Hill.

Curren$y New Orleans rapper behind last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slept-upon â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Stoned Immaculate.â&#x20AC;? Mar 2 at the Mezzanine.

Yes Performing â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Yes Album,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Close to the Edgeâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Going for the Oneâ&#x20AC;? in their entirety. Mar 5 at the Warfield.

Alabama Shakes Behold, Brittany Howardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice, curdling blood and up-stepping Janis Joplin since 2000. Mar 5 at the Fox Theater.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


27

Galleries RECEPTIONS Feb 27 At 6pm. Petaluma Library, “Library Art Show,” works by members of Petaluma Arts Association. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Feb 28 At 6pm. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, “Gardens and Figures,” paintings by Diane Toso and sculpture by Jonnie Russell. Also, “Playground,” art inspired by childhood. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Mar 1 At 7pm. Arts Guild of Sonoma, “REPO,” featuring original pieces made of recycled materials. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

Mar 2 At 5pm. Gallery 300, “Pretty Boy,” new paintings by Jennifer Hirshfield. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.332.1212.

Mar 3 At 2pm. Graton Gallery, “Small Works,” juried show of mixed media. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912.

Mar 5 At 6pm. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, “Darkness and Light,” mixed media exploring the relationship between these two oppositional elements. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

SONOMA COUNTY

Lazarre. Through Mar 7, Exhibition of Abstract Constructions by artists Connie Goldman, Judith Foosaner, and Emily Lazarre. Curated by Suzanne Lacke. Panel discussion with artists moderated by Karen Petersen and Michael Schwager, Mar 4th at noon. Free. SRJC, Doyle Library, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 10 to 4; Sat 12 to 4. 707.527.4298.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Mar 1-23, “REPO,” featuring original pieces made of at least 70 percent recycled materials. Reception, Mar 1, 7pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Apr 1, “Peanuts Celebrations.” Through Apr 28, “Usable, Loveable Peanuts,” highlights from 33 years of Peanuts products plus the licensing and manufacturing stories behind them. Through Sep 1, “Art of the Line,” describing Schulz’s process. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Finley Community Center Through Apr 5, National Arts Program, featuring over 200 works by artists of all ages and backgrounds. Awards ceremony Mar 3, 4pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery 300 Mar 2-24, “Pretty Boy,” new paintings by Jennifer Hirshfield. Reception, Mar 2, 5pm. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Apr 6, “Alkonost,” two- and three-dimensional art from Becoming Independent and community artists. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Agrella Art Gallery

Graton Gallery

Through Mar 7, “The Still Point: Abstract Constructions,” drawings, paintings and collages by Judith Foosaner, Connie Goldman and Emily

Through Apr 7, “Small Works,” juried show of mixed media. Reception, Mar 3, 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 27–MA R CH 5, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Events Hammerfriar Gallery Through Mar 30, “Eight-Year Anniversary,” works by various artists celebrating the gallery’s birthday. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Home of Bev Rowe Mar 2, 11am-5pm and Mar 3, 11am-5pm, “The Last Picture Show,” posthumous exhibition and sale of Quicksilver Mine Company original member Bev Rowe’s paintings. 19104 Church St, Monte Rio.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Mar 10, “Four Weavers,” contemporary expressions of an ancient craft. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Feb 28-Mar 30, “Gardens and Figures,” paintings by Diane Toso and sculpture by Jonnie Russell. Reception, Feb 28, 6pm. Feb 28-Mar 30, “Playground,” art inspired by childhood. Reception, Feb 28, 6pm. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

40 years training experience

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Sebastopol Gallery Mar 3-Apr 28, “Feast Your Eyes,” featuring work by ceramicist Chris Boyd and painter Paula Matzinger. Reception, Mar 16, 5pm. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

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3 Private Sessions for $240 (save $45) exp. 3/31/2013

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Sonoma County Museum Through Apr 21, “Harry Dixon: The Metalsmith’s Workshop,” well-known metalsmith was the brother of painter Maynard Dixon. Through Apr 21, “Mail Call,” story of military mail and communication from the American Revolution to current wars. Storytelling with Kenneth Foster, Mar 21, 7pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

707-322-3272 www.incrediblecanine.com

Irish Pub ƒ–ƒ”…Š͡ȈMarks the 1 year Anniversary of the New & Re-iRished Jasper O'Farrells McCARN & FRIENDS Play bluegrass jazz & blues

MARIN COUNTY

Mar 1-Apr 30, “Lost in Translation,” paintings by Orin Carpenter. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. ) 415.383.9600.

+ all our Music & Community friends

Sun March 17

HAPPY ST. PATRICK'S DAY CELEBRATION

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Fri March 22 thru Sun March 24

REGGAE WEEKEND BLOCK SPECIAL GUESTS AND DJ'S

ƒ–ƒ”…Š͚͛ȈARDEN PARK ROOTS TOUR with BELLYFULL and CONSCIOUSNESS SCIENCE —ƒ”…Š͚͜ȈKING HOPETON

classical Reggae trained pianist & producer for Julian Marley

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28

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 27–MAR C H 5, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28 A E

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Art Works Downtown Through Mar 22, “Shadows,” three prominent, women artists from Marin whose work explores the past, memories and emotions. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Elsewhere Gallery Through Apr 10, “Thresholds,” a mother-son collaboration between Nadine Gay and Adrian Curtet. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Gallery Route One Through Mar 17, Igor Sazevich, paintings of landscapes of the mind, mirages shaped by colors and forms. Through Mar 17, “Ineffable-Canto XXIV,” Diana Marto works and dances, creating site-specific performances along with art installations of related works on paper. Through Mar 17, “An Inventory of Al-Mutanabbi Street,” artist books and broadsides witnessing the bombing of the street of booksellers in Baghdad. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through May 31, “Millennial Abstractions,” choice of color, form, shapes and mark making are transformational and inspiring in the deepest sense. Reception, Mar 14, 4:30pm. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin History Museum History Center Gallery Through Apr 6, “Dorothea Lange at Steep Ravine,” photos of Marin coast in 1950s. 1026 Court St, San Rafael.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Mar 5-28, “Darkness and Light,” mixed media exploring the relationship between these two oppositional elements. Reception, Mar 5, 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Mar 31, “MFA Selections: A Salute to Bay Area Emerging Artists,” artists who recently completed MFA degrees explore sculpture with light, sound, textiles and other unusual materials.

5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

ECHO Gallery Through Mar 31, “Proof of Some Existence,” works by Maki Aizawa, Peter Hassen, Angela Willetts and Michelle Wilson. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Grand Hand Gallery Mar 1-Apr 30, “Vernal Equinox,” paintings by Sandra Juniper Booth and Kim Frances. Reception, Mar 23, 6pm. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Dance Belly Dance Superstars After nine years on tour, this dance art spread its wings as a phenomenon worldwide phenomenon. Feb 28, 6pm. $20-$25. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.7300.

south to the finish line at Vintage High School. Mar 3, 7am. Vintage High School, 1375 Trower Ave, Napa.

Sonoma County Seed Swap Bring seeds to trade with others. Seed experts available for questions. Feb 28, 7pm. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Straight Up! A Charbay Vodka Cocktail Competition Speakeasy-themed event centers on 1920s era casino games, period dress and more. Feb 28, 6 and 9:30pm. $35. Sheraton Sonoma County, 745 Baywood Dr, Petaluma. 707.290.6723.

Zappo the Magician Award-winning magician appears as part of the Buddy Club children’s series. Mar 3, 1 and 2pm. $8. Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts, Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Stop-Motion Animation Festival Short, abstract stop-motion films that push the boundaries of cinematic possibility. Mar 2, 7:30pm. $5-$10. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Watershed, Over Troubled Waters Robert Redford narrates “Watershed,” a documentary about the Colorado River. Ed. Begley Jr. narrates “Over Troubled Waters,” a documentary about the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Q&A afterward. Mar 5, 6pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Food & Drink Chocolate Celebration

Film

Fifth anniversary celebration features chocolate fountain, chocolate tasting and maybe, just maybe, a chocolate massage. Mar 3, 4pm. Free. Viva Chocolat, 110 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.778.9888.

California Forever

Past Present Future

Discovery and creation of California’s state parks system, including the coast redwoods, Big Sur, Yosemite and Lake Tahoe. Feb 28, 7pm. $5. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Taste older wines, present releases and upcoming releases with food from Bay Laurel Catering. Mar 1, 5:30pm. $30. Dutton-Goldfield Winery, 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.3600.

Arbor Day

Celebrate Sonoma County

Sonoma County Beer, Food & Wine Celebration

Tree planting in honor of Luther Burbank’s birthday, followed by cake. Mar 6, 9:30am. Free. Luther Burbank Experiment Farm, 7781 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9492.

Series featuring films shot in Sonoma County. “Forever Young,” Mar 1. $5. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Cavalcade of Stars

Film Classics

Six course meal from John Ash and Co paired with six craft beers from Bear Republic and small production wines from HKG Estate Winery. Mar 1, 7pm. $90-$130. Vintners Inn, 4350 Barnes Rd, Santa Rosa.

Starring Frederick Matthews of the San Francisco Opera, Virginia Pluth and Sol Flamenco. Mar 3, 2pm. $25-$45. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Feb 27, “The Way We Were.” 7pm. $8. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

The Legend of Isadora Lois Flood (Diablo Dance Theater) brings revolutionary dancer Isadora Duncan to dramatic life with costumes, music and historical stories. Mar 3, 4pm. $10. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Events

Crosspulse Percussion Ensemble Polycultural rhythm group in family concert and dance party in support of new children’s album. Mar 3, 4pm. $6-$12. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Napa Valley Marathon Race takes place along the Silverado Trail from Calistoga,

Margaret Coming of age story in post 9/11 New York. Fri, Mar 1, 7pm and Sun, Mar 3, 4pm. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Neighborhood Listening Project Teens present culmination of two-year Listening For a Change project. Feb 28, 6:30pm. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Three Pig Off Breeding two rare, delicious heritage breeds of pig into one previously nonexistant superpig, Zazu serves up the spoils in three pork-centric courses. Mar 3, 6pm. $93. Zazu, 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

Shake It Up An 80-proof fundraiser

F

inally, a good excuse to drink! Thanks to Literacyworks, on March 8 attendees will be able to get their drink on guilt-free at Straight Up!, a vodka cocktail competition and tasting. The money raised goes to literacy programs and organizations here in the North Bay, so that warm feeling inside you get won’t just be from the booze, but from the satisfaction of giving to a good cause.

At the annual event, mixologists from restaurants all over the North Bay battle it out for bragging rights and the coveted title of “Best Charbay Flavored Vodka Cocktail in the North Bay.” Competing restaurants include Cyrus, Farmstead, Graffiti, Hilltop 1892, John Ash, JoLe, Rocker Oysterfellers, Sonoma Meritage, the Sheraton and Tres Hombres. Judging the competition is the Bohemian’s own James Knight, the Pacific Sun’s Dani Burlison, the Press Democrat’s Heather Irwin and the KRSH’s Brian Griffith. We warn you: media people know how to drink. To spice things up, the speakeasy-themed event features 1920s-era casino games, period dress and jazz-age music by the Rivereens. So while slurring your speech and pretending to be Nucky Thompson from Boardwalk Empire, you’ll also be helping a child learn his ABC’s on Thursday, March 8, at the Petaluma Sheraton. 745 Baywood Drive, Petaluma. 6–9pm. $35 includes two drink tickets. 707.364.4567.—Taylor May

Lectures Conncecting the Green Dots Talk featuring Peter Joseph, Christine O’Rourke and Tamra Peters on helping with a community’s climate action plan. Mar 5, 7pm. Free. San

Anselmo Council Chamber, 525 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo.

Judith Cunningham Watercolor artist talks about

Chinese watercolor painting. Mar 5, 7:30pm. Free. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

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How Green Jobs Can Rebuild California Featured speakers include: Rep. Mike Thompson, SRJC President Frank Chong, Sonoma County Supervisor Mike McGuire and Union Bank of Switzerland representative Tom McLoughlin. Mar 1, 9am. $20. Bertolini Student Center, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4266.

LGBT Legal Limbo Panel discussion on legal questions for LGBT couples. Feb 28, 9:30am. $15. Hyatt Vineyard Creek, 170 Railroad St, Santa Rosa.

Modern Parenting Tips, Tricks & Traps Dr. Steven Hughes examines the consequences of current trends in parenting behavior. Mar 1, 6:30pm. $15. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Science Buzz Cafe Feb 28, “Life & Legacy of a Rebel: Lynn Margulis, PhD” with Philip Harriman, PhD. 7pm. $4. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Sculpture Workshop Create your own delicate imbalance inspired by Carl Dern’s sculptures by incorporating forms from nature and from the heart. Families welcome. Mar 2, 10am. $20. Bolinas Museum, 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

character as part of the Big Read Sonoma County. Mar 4, 7pm. Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books, 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938. Also on Mar 5, 7pm, at Petaluma Copperfield’s Books, 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Mar 2, 7pm, “The City of Devil” with Manil Suri. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Dance Palace Mar 5, 7pm, “Grandmother Power” with Paola Gianturco. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1075.

Hotel La Rose Feb 28, 6pm, High Tea with Karen Russell, Author of “Vampires in the Lemon Grove: Stories.” Includes copy of book. $50. 308 Wilson St, Santa Rosa 707.579.3200.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Church Mar 3, 3pm, “Wash” with Margaret Wrinkle. 11445 Shoreline Highway, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1349.

Book Passage Feb 27, 7pm, “Vampires in the Lemon Grove” with Karen Russell. Feb 28, 7pm, “The City of Devi” with Manil Suri. Mar 1, 7pm, “A Guide for Spiritual Living” with George L McLaird. Mar 2, 1pm, “Fire & Water” with Betsy Fasbinder. Mar 3, 1pm, “Know Yourself, Forget Yourself: Five Truths That Will Transform Your Work, Relationships and Everyday Life” with Marc Lesser. Mar 3, 4pm, “The Golden Shore: California’s Love Affair with the Sea” with David Helvarg. Mar 6, 7pm, “The Aviator’s Wife” with Melanie Benjamin. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Meet Emily Dickinson Actress Barbara Dana in

Pocket Opera’s performance of Mozart’s classic comic opera. Mar 3, 2pm. $39. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Theater The Angel of Chatham Square Story in the mold of “It’s a Wonderful Life,” but based on a true tale. Fri, Mar 1, 8pm, Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through Mar 10. $15. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145. The age-old tale of BoyMeets-Girl, set aboard an ocean liner bound from New York to London. Presented by the theater’s youth program. Fri, 7:30pm and Sat-Sun, 2pm. through Mar 10. $14-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Big River Characters from Mark Twain’s novels come to life in this musical. Directed by James Dunn. Fri-Sat, 8pm, through Mar 16. $10-$25. College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of February 27

Suspense, mystery and treachery by F Andrew Leslie. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm, through Mar 3. $18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Left After Not

TAURUS (April 20–May 20) Your power animal

Inspired by Farid Ud-Din Attar’s “The Conference of the Birds.” Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm, through Mar 16. $15-$25. Imaginists Theatre Collective, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

is not the soaring eagle or the shrewd wolf or the brave bear. No, Taurus, it’s the rubber chicken. I’m serious. With the rubber chicken as your guardian spirit, you might be inspired to commit random acts of goofiness and surrealism. And that would reduce tension in the people around you. It could motivate you to play jokes and pull harmless pranks that influence everyone to take themselves less seriously. Are you willing to risk losing your dignity if it helps make the general mood looser and more generous? Nothing could be better for group solidarity, which is crucial these days. (Thanks, Gina Williams.)

Midsummer Jersey Midsummer Night’s Dream set on the boardwalk of a seaside town in modern-day New Jersey. Presented by Young Repertory Theater. Fri-Sat, 7:30pm and Sun, 2pm, through Mar 3. $10-$15. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920. Drama about friendship and trust presented by Novato Theater Company. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 3pm, through Mar 10. $12-$22. St Vincent’s School, 1 St Vincent Dr, San Rafael.

The Vagina Monologues Eve Ensler’s show about the mystery, humor, pain, power, outrage and excitement buried in women’s experiences. Feb 28-Mar 2, 8pm. $20-$25. Rooster Run Golf Club, 2301 E Washington St, Petaluma.

West Side Stories Five-minute true stories told live on-stage without notes. “Fame & Fortune,” Mar 6. $5. Sonoma Valley Portworks, 613 Second St, Petaluma. 707.769.5203.

The Belle of Amherst One-woman play starring Barbara Dana as Emily Dickinson. Mar 2, 8pm. $5$10. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Astrology

FREE WILL

ARIES (March 21–April 19) In 1993, Frenchman Emile Leray was on a solo trip through the Sahara Desert. In the middle of nowhere, his car suffered a major breakdown. It was unfixable. But he didn’t panic. Instead, he used a few basic tools he had on hand to dismantle the vehicle and convert its parts into a makeshift motorcycle. He was able to ride it back to civilization. I foresee the possibility of a metaphorically similar development in your future, Aries. You will get the opportunity to be very resourceful as you turn an apparent setback into a successful twist of fate.

The Hound of the Baskervilles

Steel Magnolias

Anything Goes

Readings

Don Giovanni

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) In the language of the Huron Indians, “orenda” is a word that refers to the spiritual power that resides in all creatures and things. If you’ve got enough of it, you may be able to declare at least partial independence from your own past. You can better shape the life you want for yourself rather than being so thoroughly subject to the limitations of your karma and conditioning. I happen to believe that your current supply of orenda is unusually abundant, Gemini. What’s the best use you can make of it? CANCER (June 21–July 22)

When I lived in Santa Cruz years ago, some of my published writings were illustrated by a local cartoonist named Karl Vidstrand. His work was funny, outrageous and often offensive in the most entertaining ways. Eventually he wandered away from our colorful, creative community and moved to a small town at the edge of California’s Mojave Desert, near where the Space Shuttles landed. He liked living at the fringes of space, he told journalist R. D. Pickle. It gave him the sense of “being out of bounds at all times.” I suggest you adopt some of the Vidstrand spirit in the next three weeks, Cancerian. Being on the fringes and out of bounds are exactly where you belong.

LEO (July 23–August 22) The history of your pain is entering a new phase. Gradually, almost imperceptibly at first, an emotional ache that has been sapping your vitality will begin to diminish. You will free yourself of its power to define you. You will learn to live without its oddly seductive glamour. More and more, as the weeks go by, you will find yourself less interested in it, less attracted to the maddening mystery it has foisted on you. No later than mid-April, I’m guessing that you will be ready to conduct a ritual of completion; you’ll be able to give it a formal send-off as you squeeze one last lesson out of it.

component? What if, in other words, you have within you a higher intelligence whose function it is to steer you away from useless trouble and dumb risks? I say there is such a thing. I say this other protector works best if you maintain a conscious relationship with it, asking it to guide you and instruct you. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to deepen your connection.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Some rules in the game of life don’t apply to you and can therefore be safely ignored. Do you know which ones they are? On the other hand, do you understand which of the rules in the game of life are crucial to observe if you want to translate your fondest dreams into real experiences? To recognize the difference is a high art. I’m thinking that now would be an excellent time to solidify your mastery of this distinction. I suggest that you formally renounce your investment in the irrelevant rules and polish your skills at playing by the applicable rules.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) “Don’t think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter,” wrote the Persian mystic poet Rumi. “It’s quiet, but the roots are down there riotous.” I think you’re like that winter garden right now, Sagittarius. Outwardly, there’s not much heat and flash. Bright ideas and strong opinions are not pouring out of you at their usual rates. You’re not even prone to talking too loud or accidentally knocking things over. This may in fact be as close as you can get to being a wallflower. And yet deep beneath the surface, out of sight from casual observers, you are charging up your psychic battery. The action down there is vibrant and vigorous. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “When you come right down to it,” says religion writer Rabbi Marc Gellman, “there are only four basic prayers. Gimme! Thanks! Oops! and Wow!” Personally, I would add a fifth type of prayer to Gellman’s list: “Do you need any assistance?” The Creator always needs collaborators to help implement the gritty details of the latest divine schemes. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you would be an excellent choice to volunteer for that role right now—especially in tasks that involve blending beautiful fragments, healing sad schisms, furthering peace negotiations and overcoming seemingly irreconcilable differences. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) In the movie Fight Club, there is an animated scene at the very end that required an inordinate amount of time to produce. Each frame in this scene took the editors eight hours to process. Since there are 24 frames in each second, their work went on for three weeks. That’s the kind of attention to detail I recommend you summon as you devote yourself to your labor of love in the coming days, Aquarius. I think you know which specific parts of your creation need such intense focus. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

“When looking for a book, you may discover that you were in fact looking for the book next to it.” Italian writer Roberto Calasso told that to The Paris Review, and now I’m passing it on to you. But I’d like you to expand upon its meaning, and regard it as a metaphor that applies to your whole life right now. Every time you go searching for a specific something—a learning experience, an invigorating pleasure, a helpful influence—consider the possibility that what you really want and need is a different one that’s nearby.

“I have decided to rename the constellations that have domineered our skies too long,” writes an internet denizen named Hasheeshee St. Frank. He gives only one example. The Big Dipper, he says, shall forevermore be known as the Star-Spangled Gas Can. I invite you to come up with additional substitutes, Pisces. It’s an excellent time for you to reshape and redefine the high and mighty things to which you have given away too much of your power. It’s a perfect moment to reconfigure your relationship with impersonal, overarching forces that have wielded a disproportionately large influence over your thoughts and feelings. How about if you call the constellation Orion by the new title of Three-Eyed Orangutan? Or instead of Pegasus, use the name Sexy Dolphin? Other ideas?

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) At least once a day, a cell in your body mutates in a way that makes it potentially cancerous. Just as often, your immune system hunts down that dangerous cell and kills it, preserving your health. Do you understand how amazing this is? You have a vigilant protector that’s always on duty, operating below the level of your awareness. What if I told you that this physical aspect of your organism has an equivalent psychic

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22)


31

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