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INSIDE Volume 45, No.28 October 9-15, 2019

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GROUNDING INFLUENCE How public art helped Santa Cruz recover from the 1989 quake P31

Opinion 4 News 11 Cover Story 18 A&E 31 Events 39

Film 52 Dining 56 Risa’s Stars 60 Classifieds 61

Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.

Good Times is free of charge, limited to one copy per issue per person. Entire contents copyrighted © 2019 Nuz, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form is prohibited without publisher’s written permission. Good Times is printed at a LEED-certified facility. Good Times office: 107 Dakota Ave., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

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FEATURES

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OPINION

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE

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I only saw the Pacific Garden Mall once before the Loma Prieta earthquake, just a few months before downtown Santa Cruz was devastated. But over the years, I’ve heard countless stories about the the downtown’s pre-quake Golden Age, when lush greenery bloomed and street culture flourished. So it was a real gift to get a chance to tour Pacific Avenue last week with historian Ross Gibson, talking about the history of downtown’s most famous buildings in a preview of the tour he’ll give to the public this week. I wrote about that history this week as part of our big issue marking the 30th anniversary of the Loma Prieta quake. Inside, you’ll also find Wallace Baine’s inspiring tale of how the community rallied around one small local business in the darkest days after the quake, learn how the MAH is commemorating the public art that helped Santa Cruz heal, and see a collection of photos from that time that still retain their power to shock and awe to this day. Lots of things to mention this week: First, we didn’t get it in last week’s cover story because it was confirmed after we went to press, but legendary skater Tony Alva will be at the Santa Cruz Film Festival’s screening of The Tony Alva Story today, Oct. 9, at noon at the Colligan Theater. The festival runs through Oct. 13; go to santacruzfilmfestival.

LETTERS ME VS. CENSURE Re: “Commission Granted,” (GT, 10/2): I was the last person censured by a Santa Cruz City Council. And I voted for my own censure. Yes, the drama around my censure was largely politically motivated. And yes, it was hard to quantify how my “crime” actually hurt anyone or was an abuse of power. However, there was an actual issue behind the censure that could actually be proven. I did actually

org for info and tickets. I also want to let you know that we are working again with our partners at UCSC, the ever-curious graduate students in the Science Communication Program, to answer your questions about Santa Cruz. In January, we got a great reader response from our cover story in which they researched the science and history of the Mystery Spot, shark attacks, the limestone quarry industry, monarch butterfly feeding habits, and many more of your inquiries. So once again, let us know what you’re most curious or puzzled about in our area—send your questions about local nature, wildlife, geology, the ocean, natural resources, and conservation to me at steve@goodtimes.sc by Friday, Oct. 18 (subject line: SANTA CRUZ QUESTIONS), and I’ll pass 10 of the best ones to the students to investigate. You’ll see the results as a cover story. We especially encourage middle school and high school students to participate. Thanks in advance for your ideas! Lastly, as I always like to let you know where you can catch up with us around town, Wallace Baine will be part of a LitQuake event at Bookshop Santa Cruz on Tuesday, Oct. 15, at 7pm. The theme of the free event is “Santa Cruz Writers on Keeping it Weird,” and other writers participating in this 20th anniversary Litquake will be GT contributor Liza Monroy, Peggy Townsend, Elizabeth McKenzie, and Micah Perks.

PHOTO CONTEST RED TIDINGS The wharf during red tide last month. Photograph by Esperanza Sanz.

Submit to photos@goodtimes.sc. Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.

GOOD IDEA

GOOD WORK

ECO FRIENDLY

THANKING BACK

Watsonville Wetlands Watch will hold its Fall 2019 Docent Training from Oct. 16-Nov. 2. Participants in this three-week program get be treated to an inside look at the Pajaro Valley and its unique network of freshwater wetlands. They also have fun learning about the natural and cultural history of the wetlands, as well as how to stay committed to community education and environmental conservation. Those interested can call 455-6771 or email noelle@watsonvillewetlandswatch.org.

Every October at the Cocoanut Grove, the Santa Cruz County Volunteer Center honors the 50 people, groups and businesses who do the most to transform Santa Cruz County through volunteerism with the Be the Difference Awards. This year’s lunch event is Thursday, Oct. 10 from 11:30am-1:30pm. Individual winners include Carol Miller, of the Mountain Parks Foundation, mental health advocate Carol Williamson and Pleasure Point Surf Club coach Michael Allen. For more information on the lunch, visit scvolunteercenter.org.

STEVE PALOPOLI | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

break a rule, and it is reasonable to expect councilmembers not to violate city rules, however unreasonable the rules may be. So, beyond all the usual politics, there was a “there” there.

This move to censure is different. Chris Krohn and Drew Glover were accused of serious misconduct publicly, by a member of the Council, Mayor Watkins, who does not agree with their politics, and continues to struggle with them over the Council’s agenda. Her claims were carefully researched by

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QUOTE OF THE WEEK

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LOCAL TALK

How did the 1989 earthquake change Santa Cruz?

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BY MATTHEW COLE SCOTT

It ended the original era of the free-thinking wildness of Santa Cruz. I don’t think that it ever recovered. IAN GORDON SANTA CRUZ | SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR

It just leveled Santa Cruz. The level of devastation was really sad.

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It seems like it has built more emphasis around disaster preparedness and structural integrity. SAM ADELSON ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATOR | COASTAL WATERSHED COUNCIL

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It changed the focus of the business district. New stores, new owners starting out.

THE

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ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of October 9 ARIES Mar21–Apr19 “Love is when you meet someone who tells you something new about yourself,” wrote poet André Breton. I think that’s an excellent principle to put at the top of your priority list in the coming weeks, Aries. To be in maximum alignment with cosmic rhythms, you should seek input from allies who’ll offer insights about you that are outside your current conceptions of yourself. You might even be daring enough to place yourself in the paths of strangers, acquaintances, animals, and teachers who can provide novel reflections. There’s just one caveat: Stay away from people who might be inclined to fling negative feedback.

TAURUS Apr20–May20 Constantine P. Cavafy’s poem “Waiting for the Barbarians” imagines the imminent arrival of an unpredictable agent of chaos. “The barbarians are coming today,” declares the narrator. Everyone in town is uneasy. People’s routines are in disarray. Faces look worried. What’s going to happen? But the poem has a surprise ending. “It is night, and the barbarians haven’t come,” reports the narrator. “Some people have arrived from the frontier and say that there aren’t any more barbarians.” I propose that we use this scene as a metaphor for your life right now, Taurus. It’s quite possible that the perceived threat isn’t really a threat. So here’s my question, taken from near the end of the poem: “What are we going to do now without the barbarians?”

GEMINI May21–June20 Some folklorists prefer the term “wonder tales” rather than “fairy tales.” Indeed, many such stories are filled with marvelous events that feature magical transformations, talking animals and mythical creatures like elves and dragons and unicorns. I bring this up, Gemini, because I want to encourage you to read some wonder tales. Hopefully, as you do, you’ll be inspired to reimagine your life as a wonder tale; you’ll reframe the events of the “real world” around you as being elements in a richly entertaining wonder tale. Why do I recommend this? Because wonder tales are like waking dreams that reveal the wishes and curiosities and fascinations of your deep psyche. And I think you will benefit profoundly in the coming weeks from consciously tuning in to those wishes and curiosities and fascinations.

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

CANCER Jun21–Jul22

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I suspect that in the coming days you’ll be able to see into everyone’s souls more vividly than usual. You’ll have a special talent for piercing through the outer trappings of their personalities so as to gaze at the essence beneath. It’s as if your eyes will be blessed by an enhancement that enables you to discern what’s often hidden. This upgrade in your perception may at times be unsettling. For some of the people you behold, the difference between how they present themselves and who they actually are will be dramatic. But for the most part, penetrating to the depths should be fun, enriching, even healing.

LE0 Jul23–Aug22 “This heart is rusty,” writes poet Gabriel Gadfly. “It creaks, it clanks, it crashes and rattles and bangs.” Why is his heart in such a state? Because he has been separated from a person he loves. And so he’s out of practice in doing the little things, the caring gestures and tender words, that a lover does to keep the heart well-oiled. It’s my observation that most of us go through rusty-heart phases like this even when we are living in close proximity to an intimate ally. We neglect to practice the art of bestowing affectionate attention and low-key adoration. We forget how important it is for our own welfare that we continually refresh and reinvigorate our heart intelligence. These are good meditations for you right now, Leo.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 “All the effort in the world won’t matter if you’re not inspired,” writes novelist Chuck Palahniuk. I agree! And that’s a key meditation for you right now. Your assignment is to enhance and upgrade the inspiration you feel about the

activities that are most important to you—the work and the play that give you the sense you’re living a meaningful life. So how do you boost your excitement and motivation for those essential actions you do on a regular basis? Here’s a good place to begin: visualize in exuberant detail all the reasons you started doing them in the first place.

LIBRA Sep23–Oct 22 I hope you are embarking on a vigorous new phase of self-redefinition. I trust you are excited about shedding old ways of thinking about yourself and eager to revise and reimagine the plot of your life story. As you do, keep in mind this helpful counsel from physicist Richard Feynman: “You have no responsibility to live up to what other people think you ought to accomplish. I have no responsibility to be like they expect me to be. It’s their mistake, not my failing.”

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 You’ve probably heard the saying, “Genius is 99% perspiration and 1% inspiration.” It’s often attributed to inventor Thomas Edison, but 16th-century artist Michelangelo expressed a similar idea. “If you knew how much labor went into it, you would not call it genius,” he said about one of his masterpieces. I’m guessing that you Scorpios have been in a phase when these descriptions are highly apropos. The work you’ve been doing may look productive and interesting and heroic to the casual observer, and maybe only you know how arduous and exacting it has been. So now what do you do? I say it’s time to enjoy the fruits of your efforts. Celebrate! Give yourself a thrilling gift.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec21 “The universe is under no obligation to make sense to you,” declared astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. If that’s even a little bit true, I bet you won’t believe it in the coming weeks. According to my analysis, the universe will make a great deal of sense to you—at times even exquisite, beautiful, breathtaking sense. Life will be in a revelatory and articulate mood. The evocative clues coming your way about the nature of reality could tempt you to believe that there is indeed a coherent plan and meaning to your personal destiny.

CAPRICORN Dec22–Jan19 In 2005, Facebook was a start-up company barely on the map of the internet. Its president asked graffiti artist David Choe to paint murals on the walls of its headquarters. Choe asked for $60,000, but the president convinced him to be paid with Facebook stock instead. Years later, when Facebook went public, Choe became a multi-millionaire. I suspect that in the coming months you will be faced with choices that are less spectacular than that, Capricorn, but similar and important. My conclusion: Be willing to consider smart gambles when projects are germinating.

AQUARIUS Jan20–Feb18 “Experiment is the sole source of truth,” wrote philosopher and polymath Henri Poincaré. “It alone can teach us something new; it alone can give us certainty.” He wasn’t merely referring to the kinds of experiments that scientists conduct in laboratories. He was talking about the probes and explorations we can and should carry out in the course of our daily lives. I mention this, Aquarius, because the coming days will be prime time for you to do just that: ask provocative questions, initiate novel adventures and incite fun learning experiences.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 In my opinion, Piscean singer, poet and actor Saul Williams produces high-quality art. So he has earned a right to critique mediocre art. In speaking about movies and TV shows that are hard to enjoy unless we dumb ourselves down, he says that, “We have more guilty pleasure than actual effing pleasure.” Your assignment in the coming weeks, Pisces, is to cut back on your “guilty pleasures”—the entertainment, art, and socializing that brings meager returns—as you increase and upgrade your actual effing pleasure.

Homework: I discuss some of my ideas about astrology in an article published at tinyurl.com/robonastrology.

© Copyright 2019


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OPINION

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an outside consultant who was paid $19,000 [Editor’s note: the total was $18,219] to do so. The senior City Staff who supervised the report have every reason to look for dirt on Krohn and Glover, as the two of them represent a threat to the usual way that the city operates. However, the report does not find evidence of serious misconduct by Krohn or Glover. Krohn was found to be slightly condescending in one instance while Glover was found to be, in one instance, grumpy with another councilmember. These human failings are not breaches of

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city rules, procedures, or ethics. The report further admonishes Mayor Watkins, stating that councilmembers should talk to other councilmembers prior to making public accusations. Because of my own subjective affinity for the politics of Krohn and Glover, I was careful not to weigh in on the accusations cast at them prior to reading the report. It is certainly possible that people who share my politics could be worthy of censure. I was. But Krohn and Glover are not. MICAH POSNER | SANTA CRUZ

LETTERS POLICY

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NEWS FLAK TO SCHOOL In San Jose and Santa Cruz, a push for universities to help homeless students BY C.J. PRUSI

COUNTER EFFORT The county sheriff’s department has been cracking down on illegal black-market weed grows,

in part so that the regulated market at local dispensaries can thrive. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

On Growing Issue

Some cannabis growers feel squeeze as sheriff cracks down on unpermitted operations BY TODD GUILD [This is part one of a two-part series on Santa Cruz County’s cannabis industry. — Editor]

H

igh in the mountainous hinterlands above Boulder Creek, where the steep, bumpy road is passable only by four-wheel drive and cell reception is all but a rumor, there is a greenhouse that once held 250-square-feet worth of cannabis plants. Now, it’s empty. For nearly a decade, property owner “Bam,” as he’s known by friends, has been living on the property and growing cannabis, some of it for his own medicinal use

and that of a few friends, he says. Bam says cannabis helps alleviate his symptoms of Lyme disease, and lessens mood swings stemming from a traumatic brain injury. In July, Bam got a visit from the county’s Cannabis Licensing Office, which includes a contingent from the Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Office. Officials notified him that he was growing the plants—as well as distributing and manufacturing cannabis-related products— without a license. After cutting down all the plants, they searched his home for contraband, he says. Thanks to a set of county

regulations crafted in 2018 to help ease the county into the legal market, Bam has not been charged criminally. However, he now faces $7,500 in administrative citations, and an additional $10,000 in redtag fines, he says. “It’s been a nightmare,” Bam says. “They are trying to break the bank for people who have no bank.”

POT TO WORRY The Cannabis Licensing Office includes Cannabis Licensing Manager Sam LoForti, one principal planner and two code compliance officers. It also includes Chief >12

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

In addition to the 30 hours that he spends each week serving burgers and fries animal-style at In-N-Out, Alejandro Mayorga is a San Jose State student. He’s studying sociology with an emphasis on community change. Mayorga transferred from a community college in the Southern California city of Inglewood and hopes to graduate in the spring. Last year was Mayorga’s first as a member of the Student Homeless Alliance (SHA), an organization that seeks to call attention to the plight of homeless students and campaigns for meaningful action. The coalition has made headlines in recent months by camping outside on college campuses and calling on school administrators for change. It’s part of a larger statewide movement spotlighting the needs of struggling students—especially those attending class in high-rent areas like San Jose and Santa Cruz. A 2018 survey of 43,000 students at 66 institutions in 20 states by Temple University and the Wisconsin HOPE Lab found that a quarter of college students skipped meals or cut portion sizes because they couldn’t afford enough food. The lack of stable nutrition is a growing problem in the University of California system, where two in five students are foodinsecure, and 19% experience “reduced food intake at times due to limited resources,” according to a 2016 report. More and more students are having to choose between eating and learning as colleges nationwide scramble to open food pantries and resource centers. And according to the 2018 CSU Chancellor’s Office Study of Student Basic Needs, 13% of SJSU students experienced homelessness in 2017. SJSU has the highest population of homelessness in the 23-campus California State University system with 4,300 homeless students. The SHA has three main demands of SJSU, which were enumerated in a Change. org petition created nine months ago. The group is calling for a minimum of 10 parking spots in a parking garage for safe sleeping—an increase from the five >14

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NEWS ON GROWING ISSUE <11

How the Quake Changed Real Estate By Datta Khalsa, Broker

Back when I started out in real estate in Santa Cruz, the effects of the Loma Prieta earthquake were apparent nearly everywhere you looked. Roads were temporarily, and in some cases, permanently closed down. Many homes around the county hadn’t yet had their chimneys rebuilt. In fact, for a while used bricks became a relatively inexpensive and popular building material for anyone willing to haul them away. Downtown, there were still a number of vacant lots where the rubble from destroyed buildings hadn’t been completely cleared, and multiple businesses were still being run out of the “tent city” put up long before that term became associated locally with homeless installations like the Ross camp. Some businesses like the baked potato shop just never reopened. The effects of the quake reached beyond just its visible impact, as government agencies stepped up their regulatory practices in efforts to make things safer. State and local building codes increased requirements for foundations, shear walls and tie downs, and surveys were done to identify masonry buildings that needed to be retrofitted or torn down due to damage, or in some cases, susceptibility to damage. Not surprisingly, the disclosure requirements for real estate transactions were also increased, with the CAR adding and expanding their Geologic Hazards Disclosure form, asking sellers or their representatives to indicate whether the property is located in a mapped zone for earthquakes, liquefaction, landslides, flooding or fire hazards.

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Early on, sellers and agents would fill these forms in on their own, but it became readily apparent to many that this was a liability best left up to a third-party expert, and out of this need sprang up a multi-million dollar industry that quickly filled the void with Geohazard Map Reports. As with any third-party provider, in this category there are good and not-so-good ones, so it is important to know the difference before choosing whom to rely on.

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A key question to ask is from where their map readings are generated, as many of the companies don’t actually have any maps of their own, but simply retrieve and relay electronic data that is already available to the consumer online if they know where to look, such as a GIS mapping service. Many of these services never even look at the hard copy maps that are available and used by true local experts. A telltale sign of this is when you see the phrase “map not yet released by the State.” It is also worth asking the provider whether the reports are run or at least signed off by an actual geologist whom you could call with questions. And do they have anyone who could actually come out to the property if there are specific concerns? Similarly, it is often hit-and-miss among the various providers whether the accuracy of their reports is insured, so you should read the fine print for disclaimers limiting their liability for the information provided. In short, you shouldn’t equate the quality of the report by the size of the company providing it. Fortunately, any good experienced agent has the local knowledge to navigate the many available alternatives to guide you to the right provider who can properly handle your disclosure needs. This helps give peace of mind that you have given your buyers the best information available, thereby helping limit the disasters in your life to ones that you can’t control. Datta Khalsa is the broker and owner at Main Street Realtors in Soquel. He can be reached at (831)818-0181 or datta@mainstrealtors.com Paid Advertorial

Deputy Steve Carney, who oversees two sheriff’s deputies for the office’s enforcement arm. Carney says his team’s role is to help implement, regulate and enforce the county’s relatively new cannabis ordinances. Carney says that after Proposition 64 passed in 2016, many government agencies quickly learned that California needed tough law enforcement to crack down on the black market. Otherwise, users would not have much incentive to buy weed legally. “Our continued goal in working in the cannabis office is to help the regulated market flourish,” Carney says. Enforcement operations begin at a property, Carney explains, when the licensing office receives complaints. The sheriff’s office provides security and offers law enforcement advice during the visits, he says. Investigations largely begin after findings of bad behavior, like environmental degradation, money laundering or interstate transport, Carney says. In April, authorities seized 540 pounds of processed marijuana and more than $140,000 from five properties suspected of skirting the county’s cultivation rules. Businesses faced charges such as money laundering and tax evasion. The sheriff’s office has executed 55 criminal search warrants at 65 sites since January, Carney says. Earlier this year, his team confiscated 900 plants from a grower in the San Lorenzo Valley,

issuing a warning since it was the first offense, he says. The team returned in September to find the person was still growing. He’s now facing a felony cultivation charge and a “substantial” civil fine, Carney says. The suspect, Carney adds, was damaging the environment in their own backyard by diverting water from a local stream and contaminating the runoff. Santa Cruz County Supervisor Ryan Coonerty says environmental damage and fire risk are two reasons that county policy calls for reducing the number of small grows in the mountains. “We want to move it to places that are zoned for commercial agriculture,” he says. “It’s not easy, but we’ve tried to do it in a way that works for the environment and neighborhoods.” Coonerty says that by June 2021, the county plans to have licensed all qualified registrants who have applied for state and local permits, with a target of 102. “We’re hoping to get people into business as quickly as we can,” he says. Bam and growers like him have opined that moving mountain grows into Pajaro Valley greenhouses would be an unfortunate step away from the terroir that makes the county’s cannabis unique. Bam also argues that the “vast majority” of growers are small-scale farmers who are hoping for a license and a chance to fly on the right side of the law. “Do you know how much I would love to just be able to pay my taxes

like a normal citizen, and go about my business and be thought of as an asset to this community?” he says. “Do you know what a badge of honor that would be?”

SHINING A LIGHT Given the resources involved in the county’s effort, Santa Cruz cannabis attorney Trevor Luxon argues that the county has misplaced its priorities. The county has five people working enforcement and two processing applications. “If county leaders directed more of the resources to licensing, they wouldn’t have to worry so much about enforcement,” he says Luxon says that many of his clients are caught in a no-win situation, where they must either put their livelihoods on hold while waiting for their applications to be processed or take their chances growing without a permit. Such growers have nowhere to sell their wares legally, since California law requires distributors and retail establishments to show they purchased from a licensed cultivator. Once caught in the system, they’re slapped with administrative fines that start at $2,500 and can be as high as $7,500. They can also be hit with misdemeanor charges for illegal cultivation. If officials find illegal items such as firearms, illegal drugs or evidence of sales to minors, they can be charged with felonies.

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NUZ WISER GEYSER Santa Cruz drivers must really hate fire hydrants, because they won’t stop running them over. The fire hydrant at Ocean and Broadway, by the 7-Eleven, seems to get ambushed every year, creating a massive water fountain.

Someone hit it again on Sunday night, Oct. 6, and sent waterfall-like rapids downhill over the sidewalk and all over Ocean Street. Apparently fed up, public works crews removed the hydrant once and for all. Then, on Monday evening, a driver took out a fire hydrant on West Cliff Drive. It’s a real hassle for

emergency crews and drivers, but if you pause to soak it in, it’s a heck of a lot easier than traveling to Yellowstone to see Old Faithful.

POTENTIALLY POWERLESS With high winds and heat in the forecast, PG&E has announced that there could be power

blackouts around California due to high fire risk. Shutoffs for up to 32,000 homes and businesses in Santa Cruz County are planned everywhere from Santa Cruz to Aptos, Bonny Doon to Watsonville. Go to pge.com or prepareforpowerdown.com for details.


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NEWS

SUPPLIES AND DEMAND In California’s high-rent college towns, like Santa Cruz and San Jose, college students

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OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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to seven spots that the SJSU administration agreed to last July but has yet to enact. Organizers also want a minimum of 12 beds where unhoused students may stay up to 60 days (an expansion from the two beds for two weeks that are now offered). Lastly, they’re calling for $2,500 emergency grants for students to remain in housing if they cannot afford rent. This year, SHA members have also connected with homeless advocates, visited homeless encampments and provided water and other services to those in need. Part of the group’s campaign last year involved setting up booths that offered hot cocoa, granola bars and mini-donuts to students. Recent SJSU grad Mayra Bernabe, who served as president of SHA for the past academic year, worked these events and

talked firsthand with students experiencing food and housing insecurity. Through these conversations she met many students who had faced housing insecurity or homelessness in a previous semester. “That was really eye-opening for us,” says Bernabe, who got involved via a social action class, where she learned about the prevalence of homelessness and hunger among the student population.

TEACHING MOMENT In Santa Cruz, the City Council considered quickly passing a number of homeless-related measures this past winter. Some of the proposals involved expanding overnight parking options for homeless individuals, with Councilmember Drew Glover eyeing one of UCSC’s Westside administrative buildings as a potential site. A university memo argued that the site wasn’t suitable, and stated that it was evaluating locations for

its own overnight sleeping proposals. The city’s policy ideas stalled in the face of stiff neighborhood opposition, largely due to a perceived lack of community dialogue about the issues. The back-andforth process led the council to create a Community Advisory Committee on Homelessness that’s charged with studying a bevy of solutions. At UCSC in May, the Academic Senate, a legislative body of the school’s faculty, voted to support the creation of a safe parking program for students. More than 1,300 supporters have signed on backing that approach.

CLASS ACTION Organizers in San Jose have found that one of the hardest parts of trying to find solutions for unhoused students is that most don’t talk about their experience with homelessness until it’s over.

While the SHA petition received more than 1,200 signatures, a petition on the same site opposing a proposed homeless shelter in San Jose received more than 3,800 signatures. A commenter on this petition wrote: “Crime, criminals, drug use, needles belong nowhere near an elementary school and where a park is. Put this in an industrial area.” Although their demands have not been met, SHA members met with SJSU administrators, who pledged to provide a centralized location for SJSU Cares, a resource hub for students dealing with hunger and homelessness. Mayorga, the sociology major, is hopeful for resources, but he won’t be holding his breath. “I think we are heading in the right direction, but we are just moving extremely slowly—at least at the rate of the problem, the way it’s going down,” he says. “We want to bring in resources.”


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For those looking to procure a cannabis cultivation license, the county charges a $1,500 preapplication fee, and an overall fee of $3,500 per site. Applicants must also pay $100 for background checks and $300 for on-site inspections. Additional fees are possible. In all, local permitting can run from $3,000-8,000, says Cannabis Licensing Manager Sam LoForti. LoForti stresses that local cannabis licensing isn’t treated differently than any other permitting process in the county, and that it was created to help safely regulate a burgeoning industry. “These are standards the state has, and mainly they are driven by state law,” he says. “We’re not going to change safety-related standards for any type of development.” According to LoForti, there are about 28 use permits in process, and more than 50 operators are working toward their permits. The two-stage process includes a pre-application screening, which can take up to two months. Growers also need a use permit application— an expensive proposition because it has to be drafted by professional engineers and must follow state code, LoForti says. Only one preapplication has been denied. Once approved, growers must follow size minimums based on zoning and parcel size. Mountain areas, for example, need at least 5 acres. To bring more growers into compliance, the county in May eased rules for those who use commercial agricultural land. Growers using greenhouses will no longer be required to go through a public hearing or notify neighbors. Still, the Cannabis Licensing Office will continue to enforce local regulations as it acculturates to a legalized marijuana industry that generated $144.2 million in the second quarter of this year alone. “We have a regulated market people need to get used to,” says Santa Cruz County spokesman Jason Hoppin. “This isn’t the Wild West. Those days are over.”


WALK SMART. DON’T CROSS MIDBLOCK. There are a lot of very smart people here on the Central Coast, but some of them still cross the street mid-block—which is dangerous. You should always cross at an intersection and preferably use a marked crosswalk. Don’t cross between parked cars and be vigilant for turning cars. The rule is: Look left, right, and left again, before crossing. It also helps to make eye contact with drivers to be sure you are seen before crossing; otherwise, even if you have the right of way, you may lose. Use your head, as well as your legs, when crossing the street. It’s the Street Smarts thing to do.

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Hope Amidst the Chaos

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

How the Santa Cruz community rallied around a single crisis downtown in the days after the destruction of the 1989 Loma Prieta quake BY WALLACE BAINE

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FIRST RESPONDERS Rescue workers search for victims amid the rubble on the Pacific Garden Mall after the Loma Prieta earthquake. PHOTO: C.E. MEYER, U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


O

What he didn’t know yet, but was soon to learn, was the wall from the bookstore had collapsed in on the neighboring business, the Santa Cruz Coffee Roasting Company. Two of the employees working that day at Coffee Roasting were unaccounted for. By nightfall, the building would become a search-and-rescue site. O’Connell was there that night for hours, as the scene became a vigil for the missing employees. If you were in the line of sight of downtown Santa Cruz that day, you would not have been able to see much. The area was obscured not by smoke from fires (though one house adjacent to downtown did catch fire) but from clouds of yellowish dust from so many suddenly collapsed buildings. One woman said the dust was so thick in the first few minutes, she couldn’t see her hand in front of her face. Then came the distinct mildewy smell from the trapped gases of the downed buildings. In the hours after the quake, when police had fenced off the area, a news photographer remembered the sound of falling brick and broken water mains providing an eerie soundtrack to the ruin all around him. Ryan Coonerty, the fifteen-yearold son of Bookshop’s owners, was changing clothes after enduring an unusually hot day at football practice at Santa Cruz High School. He and his buddies were not yet old enough to drive legally but, as soon as the quake hit, they borrowed a car to cruise around town anyway, figuring the cops would be too busy with other things to notice them. They were right on that score. Ryan’s dad, Neal, was nowhere near downtown Santa Cruz for reasons that had nothing to do with baseball. He had a doctor’s appointment in San Jose, part of the South Bay megalopolis beyond the Santa Cruz Mountains that Santa Cruzans tend to lump together as “over the hill.” Neal Coonerty, a lifelong Californian, knew his earthquakes. He was a kid growing up in the San Fernando Valley north of Los Angeles when the 1952 Tehachapi earthquake struck (magnitude 7.3, the second strongest quake in California in the twentieth century, behind only the

epic 1906 San Francisco quake). “It was the middle of the night,” he says, “and I can remember feeling the bed moving across the floor and my dad coming in to see if I was all right.” Years later, in his early days as Bookshop’s owner, he remembers eating lunch at a downtown restaurant and watching a plateglass window wobble ominously during a minor shaker. What happened on October 17 was of an entirely different character. He felt certain that it was epicentered in the Santa Clara Valley, where he was at the time. “My first thought was, I wonder if they felt it in Santa Cruz.” Electricity went down throughout the region immediately and phone service was spotty as well. Coonerty went to the home of his sister Roseanne in nearby Los Altos. He was finally able to connect with his wife, Candy, at the Coonertys’ Santa Cruz home, where the chimney had collapsed. As the scope of the disaster was first becoming apparent, Coonerty’s first focus was on the welfare of his family, Candy, Ryan and his middle-school daughter, Casey. His in-laws also lived in town and he was preoccupied that everyone was safe and accounted for. Highway 17, the famously treacherous connector between Santa Cruz and San Jose, was quickly closed after the quake, forcing Coonerty onto pokey, twolane Highway 9 to get home. There wasn’t much traffic, he remembered, but the quake had thrown debris onto the roadway in several places, making it a long slog. It was while crawling home on Highway 9 that Coonerty heard a radio report from the local AM station KSCO that referenced Bookshop. Judging only by the intact façade – not even the windows were broken – the radio reporter announced that the Bookshop looked OK. In fact, a desperate drama was unfolding on the site as first responders worked to recover the bodies of the two employees of the Santa Cruz Coffee Roasting Company who had been buried by the bricks of Bookshop’s wall. Coonerty was unaware of any of that. After he finally got home, well after dark, he was up most of the night, assessing the damage to his home and calming

his daughter through the night’s many aftershocks. At first light, he made his way downtown, figuring there was inevitable damage at the bookstore, that he’d spend all day picking up and reshelving books. However, he was unprepared for what he encountered. As he approached the back door of the business, he was stopped by a Santa Cruz police officer who told him no one was allowed inside. “That told me something was very wrong,” he says. He immediately noticed large cracks in the back of the building. He then saw an enormous U-shaped hole in the wall to his left and knew that his business had been crippled, maybe fatally so. It was only then that Coonerty became aware of the drama that had been going on at Coffee Roasting. The night before, rescue workers dug through the bricks in an effort to find the bodies of employees Shawn McCormick and Robin Ortiz, but the numerous aftershocks compelled the workers to retreat; much of the unreinforced brick wall was still standing and thus capable of collapsing, causing potentially more injury or death. Yet friends of the missing coffeehouse employees were vocally upset at the delays, and the scene became fraught with emotion and confrontation. Under the circumstances, few people were thinking about Neal Coonerty’s troubles, even if the ruins of Bookshop made it all too apparent to Coonerty himself. Given that loans on the bookstore were collateralized with his house, it appeared that he was poised to lose everything. *****

I

n the Hollywood movie that will surely never be made of this story, the image on the movie poster would be a bearded, burly Neal Coonerty a few days after the quake, standing on the sidewalk in downtown Santa Cruz, wearing a hardhat and two flashlights ducttaped around each forearm, looking like some lock-key nine-year-old kid pretending to be a superhero. But this was no fun and games. The stakes for Coonerty’s personal and professional life could not have been higher. The mood 20>

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

ne of the most devastating earthquakes in Northern California history struck on October 17, 1989, just minutes before the first pitch of the first World Series game to be played in San Francisco since 1962. When the quake hit, the shops and sidewalks of downtown Santa Cruz were not as populated as you might otherwise expect on a warm, jasmine-scented fall afternoon. Three people died in collapsing buildings in downtown Santa Cruz that day, far fewer than could have been expected to perish under normal circumstances. Instead, many who might have been hanging around downtown on a normal day made the trip to Candlestick Park to see the game or were already home when the quake hit, mixing up their margaritas and making their guacamole while waiting for the first pitch. Downtown Santa Cruz was about 12 miles from the quake’s epicenter, and it was walloped as badly as any city in Northern California. More than three dozen commercial buildings were leveled by or later demolished because of the quake, including the iconic old Cooper House, the symbol of Santa Cruz. Among the crippled properties was the Bookshop building. The Loma Prieta earthquake should have destroyed Bookshop Santa Cruz, as it did many other businesses. In a physical sense, that’s exactly what happened. Manager Tatsat O’Connell, who normally worked until five, was among many who knocked off early to catch the World Series. Once at home, he noticed that his housemate’s dog was “going crazy” in the backyard. A few minutes later, some unseen giant picked up his house and shook it. Like most native Californians, O’Connell was born factory-equipped with an intuitive inner gauge when it came to earthquakes. Right away, he knew that this one was beyond any he had ever experienced. He quickly returned to downtown Santa Cruz and parked near Mission Plaza, which is situated on a bluff overlooking the north end of downtown. From that vantage point, he could see that the second floor of the north-facing wall of the Bookshop building had peeled away.

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LOMA PRIETA QUAKE Hope Amidst the Chaos <19 was tense, the crowd around him somber, emotional. Standing next to him was a sleep-deprived volunteer, acting as a city official, looking at her watch, poised to give the signal. The fate of Bookshop quickly became a secondary concern in the quake’s aftermath. Two young lives had been snuffed out on site. Although its façade looked intact, the beloved bookstore had suffered grave damage. Indeed, it had been red-tagged for demolition by the roving band of structural engineers brought in to decide the fate of each building in the area. Red-tagged buildings had been deemed far too dangerous to enter, particularly given the frequent aftershocks, but many downtown merchants had insisted they be given a chance to retrieve some personal effects from their businesses. The suddenness of the quake had caused people to leave behind their purses, coats, wallets and other valuables. In the days before widespread computer record keeping, many businesses, like Bookshop, also had essential records and documents in folders and file cabinets. The compromise was straightforward. The owner of each red-tagged business would be allowed access to his or her building for fifteen minutes only, for one person to collect and gather whatever they needed in a building with no light or electricity and with unknown dangers and hazards. There was a chance, who was to say how remote, that he or she would not come out alive. Coonerty had with him only a crude diagram that showed him roughly where to find specific items belonging to his employees. The moment came, and the bookseller dashed into the store. Hundreds of fallen books, Megatrends mingling with Michener, John Irving on top of Irving Wallace, covered the floor creating a minefield of potential twisted ankles or falls, particularly for a man in a hurry not used to timed tests of physical agility. The only light in the store was the daylight streaming in through the collapsed wall, but the building had a basement. That’s where Coonerty’s

office was, and where the staff kept their personal belongings. That’s where he was headed. The stairs closest to the front of the store were impassable and Coonerty had to go to the back of the store to access the only other staircase to the basement, then had to reverse course in the pitch-black basement, wielding his arm lights, to reach his office, hearing the tick-tock of his fifteen minutes evaporate with every step. He retrieved what he could, stacking boxes on the sidewalk, winded and sweating, while a crowd looked on. He was even able to drag out an antique English desk that had been right by the front door. The woman with the watch gently informed him that his time was up, although as he remembers it today, he was given more than fifteen minutes. Still, he headed back in, telling her over his shoulder, “This will be a quick trip.” At that moment, Coonerty was overcome by the painful realization that he was spending his final moments inside the bookstore that he had nurtured and sustained for almost his entire adult life. “It was an emotional situation,” he says. “I thought, if I’m going to start over, or even if I’m not, I need to have at least one symbol of the bookstore.” He moved to the store’s children’s area and picked up a rustic wooden rocking horse. A couple of generations of Santa Cruz children, including his own son and daughter, had rocked away on that horse. This, he thought, was worth saving. When he emerged, finally, back outside carrying the rocking horse and one last box of financial records, he thought what everyone else gathered that day thought: Bookshop Santa Cruz was gone. After his 15-minute dash through his red-tagged bookstore, Coonerty, his family, his employees and customers all had to face the reality that Bookshop Santa Cruz was gone. But Coonerty knew he had to act in some way, to exhaust all other possibilities, before he could walk off into a new life. Coonerty carefully reviewed his


LOMA PRIETA QUAKE Hope Amidst the Chaos

The sobering fact that two people had died on the site put a damper on any kind of celebratory mood. No one was certain that the crippled building would not collapse while the book rescue was going on. get thousands of books out of the building and what to do with them once they were out. Still, Coonerty took the plan to Dick Wilson, Santa Cruz’s city manager. Wilson looked at the plans and, once he had made the modifications the engineer suggested, he gave Coonerty two days – daylight hours only – to get his inventory out. On top of that, every person who went into the bookstore had to sign a waiver acknowledging that entering the building was potentially fatal, and if it were to collapse, there would be no rescue efforts. The next day Coonerty went on the air at the local public radio station in Santa Cruz to inform the community what was happening with the bookstore. Many of Bookshop’s twenty employees were hesitant to go inside the building and Coonerty respected their choices. But even if they were all gung-ho, that still left him short-handed to carry out thousands of books, including the newly received inventory for the upcoming holiday season. “The thinking was, let’s solve the problem that was in front of us,” says Coonerty. “The larger concept of ‘Will we make it?’ ‘Will we survive?’ got immediately replaced by ‘What do we have to do today? What do we have to do this hour to move forward?’” After a makeshift tunnel made from railroad ties had been constructed at Bookshop’s back entrance, the day of the big book evacuation arrived. Neal and Candy got up early and made their way to Bookshop, not knowing what to expect. Coming down the hill from their home toward downtown, they saw a huge crowd outside the store. More than four hundred people

22>

THE LESSONS OF LOMA PRIETA +30

If you lived in Santa Cruz County in 1989, you probably remember where you were and what you were doing when the Loma Prieta Ear thquake shook this community. The quake occurred on October 17, 1989 at 5:04PM. It lasted for about 15 seconds, but it changed Santa Cruz County forever.

COMMUNITY EVENTS THIS OCTOBER Oct 12th – Downtown Historical Walking Tour | Walk through downtown with historian Ross Gibson, as he highlights the changes to Downtown Santa Cruz since the ear thquake. The tour begins at Eagle Monument on the corner of Pacific Ave & Front Street (in front of Jamba Juice & The Post Office). 1-2pm. FREE Oct 13th – Loma Prieta +30 Emergency Preparedness and Safety Event | Join Santa Cruz County and State Office of Emergency Services, The Red Cross, PG&E, The Santa Cruz Fire Depar tment, The Santa Cruz Police Depar tment for an Emergency Preparedness and Safety Event at the Civic Center. Plus, browse historical photos of Loma Prieta & enjoy light snacks. 12-4pm. FREE Oct 15th – Be Red Cross Ready Workshop | Join the Red Cross for a special FREE Emergency Preparedness class at Scotts Valley Library. American Red Cross instructors will be there to teach you how to prepare for an emergency and offer instruction in hands-only CPR. 6:30-8pm Oct 16th – Lunchtime Learning: “Struggling for Common Ground after Loma Prieta / Vision Santa Cruz and the Plan for Transformation”. Bring your lunch and questions to hear from Charles Eadie about how Santa Cruz found ways to respond. Sponsored by Sereno Group & the Downtown Association. Location: The MAH. 12-1:30pm. FREE Oct 17th – Naturalist Night: Loma Prieta +30 | Stop by The Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History for a lecture from Frank Perry exploring the history and geology of the 1989 Loma Prieta Ear thquake. Presented in par tnership w/Capitola History Museum. 7-8:30pm Oct 17th – Abbott Square Anniversary Pop-up | Swing by Abbott Square for a family-friendly pop-up event commemorating the ear thquake with photos and ar tifacts from 1989, plus drop-in craft activities. 12-5:04pm. FREE Oct 17th - Loma Prieta Anniversar y Event at the Downtown Library that includes a 15 second moment of silence at 5:04pm and the unveiling of the Libraries’ Epicenter Oral Histories Project. Watch stories from local residents, hear a panel discussion about the ear thquake and enjoy light refreshments. 4:45-6:15pm. FREE

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options. He resisted surrendering to a circumstance that many people might chalk up to cosmic fate. A certain kind of survival instinct, familiar to most small businesspeople, kicked in. Yet he also knew that he needed to keep a cool head and develop a realistic vision of where he wanted to go. “I kept thinking, I have to move forward, but I have no room to make a mistake. One error and it’s all over.” He found out the name of the structural engineer who was in charge of the demolition of the Bookshop building. Through a mutual friend, he was able to contact the man. Coonerty told the engineer, “Look, I know you’re going to pull down the Bookshop building. I have two things to ask. First, could you schedule it for the end of the run of the other demolitions? And two, can you do me the favor of walking through the building and then tell me if I could possibly get my inventory out? If you say it’s just too dangerous and unsafe for anyone to go in there, then I’ll accept my fate. But if you tell me it’s OK, will you allow me to tell the city manager?” The engineer said that he would call the next day. He didn’t. At nightfall, an anxious Coonerty called him back. The engineer’s assessment gave Coonerty some breathing room. If he could prop up the roof with a beam or two and build a kind of tunnel for entrance and exit, the building would probably hold, for a while anyway. Coonerty was convinced that if he could get his books out of the building, he could somehow continue on. Even with that bit of daylight, there were still daunting logistical tasks: How to convince the city to go along with the plan, how to build a tunnel in and out of the building, how to

Looking Back…

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– friends, readers, customers, community members – showed up willing to sign the “buried alive” waiver to help the Coonertys retrieve their books. Those who were there that day remember a palpable sense of purpose. The sobering fact that two people had died on the site put a damper on any kind of celebratory mood. No one was certain that the crippled building would not collapse while the book rescue was going on, and the waiver was somewhat less than reassuring on that score. Yet, many people had been frustrated by a sense of helplessness since the quake. Here was something they could do to help. A task of physical labor like this one, with a patina of danger, of life-and-death seriousness, of limited time, is not something that many contemporary Americans experience much. The volunteers were motivated by that sense of mission and drama, and they got to work with enthusiasm. Other businesses pitched in with vital help and supplies as well. A vegetable packer from the nearby strawberry-rich fields of the Pajaro Valley offered dozens of much-needed cardboard boxes. A local leather tannery loaned out an industrial roller that allowed boxes of books to be moved out of the bookstore, conveyor-belt style, more efficiently. A trucking company brought over a semitrailer in which to store the books. A friend who once ran a department store showed up with his forklift. Someone else contributed hardhats. Even Coonerty’s competitors appeared that day, including the owners and staff of the Capitola Book Café, as well as employees of the county’s library system. A kind of bucket brigade was set up as a small number of specially designated workers inside the building would pass along the books, many of which were coated in dust and debris, to others waiting outside. The work was long and repetitive, but with an autumnal chill in the air (a welcome contrast to the blistering hot afternoon of the quake), the somber occasion

turned to moments of levity and the volunteers experienced a sense of meaningful camaraderie that for many ripened into elation. Today, Coonerty still gets emotional looking back on that weekend. For years after, new hires at Bookshop would hear the story as if it were part of their orientation package. When the Coonertys say that the community saved their bookstore, they are speaking literally. “A community doesn’t come out to help a store proprietor,” says poet and teacher Patrice Vecchione, who grew up in Santa Cruz and was there moving books both days. “A community comes out to restore something that matters to them. This was our bookstore.” By late Sunday afternoon, the bucket brigade had gotten all the inventory out of the damaged Bookshop building. The volunteers had gone home. Neal Coonerty decided to go back into his bookstore one more time. He called to his teenage son Ryan to join him. Ryan had watched dumbfounded for two days as strangers handled his dad’s books with meticulous care. In the darkness of the store as they moved downstairs, he expected his dad to say something poignant, to try to sum up his life as a bookseller or to articulate what the previous ten days had been like for him. Instead, Neal picked up a couple of bricks from the floor, handed one to his son and gestured toward the big windows in his office and Bookshop’s accounting office. “So there we were, father and son, just throwing bricks through windows,” says Ryan, almost three decades later. “I often think about that. He was so moved by the community being there for him. His business had just been saved. I can’t imagine the emotional strain of that day and the weeks leading up to it for him. Yet he could still figure out a way to break the rules a little bit, to still be a risk-taker, to just not take it all so seriously.” Excerpted from ‘A Light in the Midst of Darkness: The Story of a Bookshop, a Community and True Love,’ by Wallace Baine (Wellstone Books).


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HOUSE PROUD Locals still fondly remember the Cooper House, shown here in its heyday. PHOTO: COURTESY OF ROSS GIBSON

Mall Rise

Historian’s tour of downtown memorializes what made the Pacific Garden Mall unique BY STEVE PALOPOLI to his home on the Westside, and not long after, at 5:04pm, he felt the house shake for those infamous 15 seconds— though it felt like an eternity. “Time stood still,” he says. When he had gotten his bearings, Gibson walked out to see if anyone else had felt it. He was thrown off at first by the fact that there were still joggers on the sidewalk and surfers in the water. But then he saw an ominous sign that things were indeed as bad as he thought—in fact, much worse. “This black cloud came up from the downtown,” says Gibson. “I thought, ‘Is downtown on fire?’ But it wasn’t

fire. The buildings that had collapsed had sent up this smoke of debris.” The downtown he had been preparing to pay tribute to had literally just gone up in smoke.

WALKING DISTANCE Now, 30 years later, Gibson will be paying tribute to the Pacific Garden Mall in a different way: by celebrating its memory. On Saturday, Oct. 12, at 1pm, Gibson will lead a tour of downtown that will focus on what made the Pacific Garden Mall unique, pointing out where certain famous buildings

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

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veryone who was in Santa Cruz when the Loma Prieta earthquake hit has a story about it. But few of them are likely to be as tragically ironic as historian Ross Gibson’s. On Oct. 17, 1989, Gibson was going door-to-door downtown, talking to local business owners about his latest project. “We were going to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Pacific Garden Mall, and I had been preparing for it all that day,” he says. “And my experience of the earthquake was seeing the last minutes of the old downtown.” In the late afternoon, he went back

once stood and how the very shape of Pacific Avenue was altered by the Loma Prieta quake. Born in Santa Cruz in the ’50s, and returning in the early ’70s to attend Cabrillo, Gibson is a passionate champion of the unorthodox urban vision that sprawled out over the main street of Santa Cruz for two decades. As I walked along Pacific Avenue with him last week, and he pointed out various sites past and present that he’ll talk about in the tour—the Flatiron Building, the Palomar Arcade, the Trust Building, the Lulu Carpenter sign, and many more—it was obvious that Gibson can discuss any phase of Santa Cruz history, from the 1800s to the present. But it was also obvious that he has a special place in his heart for the Pacific Garden Mall era, and especially for his favorite Santa Cruz building ever: the Cooper House. For that reason, the earthquake’s legacy for him goes beyond some astronomical dollar value or number of buildings lost. The cultural impact was every bit as significant. “The earthquake marked the end of the hippie era in Santa Cruz,” he says. “Not that it didn’t continue in different ways, but the hippie movement here was really tied to the development of the Pacific Garden Mall from 1968 to when it was destroyed. And the Cooper House itself was promoted as a Renaissance art center, where you could go in and shop around and people would dress up in Victorian styles. But it was really counterculture. You had the rainbow dancer in front of the Cooper House, and the band Warmth playing, and the sidewalk café there with all the interesting characters. And then the Oak Room bar. There were just so many wonderful details to that as kind of the heart and soul of downtown. It was just a gem.” As a participant in Vision Santa Cruz—a group formed in 1990 to aid in the redesign and rebuilding of the downtown—Gibson saw first-hand how much the physical nature of Santa Cruz’s main street, with its famously vibrant street culture, was going to change. “Prior to this more straight street with trees along the edge, we had a

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<23 very undulating street. That’s why they called it the Pacific Garden Mall, because the street was mostly garden, and the one-lane road would meander back and forth,” he says. “There were a whole bunch of trees of different kinds. This was an arboreal mall, where every tree would have a little plaque under it describing what kind of tree it was. It was an arboretum, essentially.”

ABBOTT FLAIR Perhaps even wilder than the civic experiment that Santa Cruz undertook in the 1960s is how close it came to never happening at all. As Gibson explains, the city was set on an entirely different design by 1960, one that could best be described as “post-World War II generic” or—as Gibson likes to call it—“corporate international style.” “The plan was every building in the downtown would be torn down, except for the post office and the city hall and the civic auditorium,” he says. “And everything else would be either glass and steel skyscrapers or cinder-block, one-story shopping center style, without any artistic additions to it. They were planning to freeway-ize the entire downtown.” Three year later, with plans for this freeway-ization the subject of contentious debate, Charles and Esther Abbott arrived in Santa Cruz. Charles—perhaps now best known to the general public as the namesake of Abbott Square—was alarmed to learn of what was in the works, since he and Esther had chosen Santa Cruz for their retirement precisely because of its history and distinctive Victorian flourishes. “He was the one who saw what was happening as people tried to modernize, thinking, ‘We’ve been told this is the way we can become more successful as a downtown business district,’” says Gibson. “A lot of them were whitewashing historic buildings so that the details would not show up—because the more whitewash, the less you would know these were not modern buildings. But Chuck said, ‘Go in the opposite direction, bring out the detail, do it the way the Victorians did, and promote it as a unique place.’”

Incredibly, he was successful, and within a few years, the city had pivoted hard to Abbott’s vision. “He was able to create this as a national downtown historic district, and create the garden mall as a kind of park-like setting for the district,” says Gibson.

FINDING THE WAY Gibson has given this historic tour of downtown many times—in fact, the first time he did so was right after the earthquake, at the request of a group of planning commissioners and architects. “They’d just completed most of the demolitions of the buildings they thought were going to fall over. And they said, ‘Now we can’t remember where anything is. You get down there, there’s this big hole in the ground, it doesn’t look anything like it used to look. Could you take us on a tour of Pacific Avenue and fill in the historical part of it, and let us know where we are?’” Gibson was closely involved with many of the post-earthquake plaques and other architectural memorials that still exist today downtown; some he even designed himself. And though he misses a lot of the more than 30 buildings that were lost in the Loma Prieta quake, he’s proud of the work he did as part of Vision Santa Cruz trying to put the city’s rebuilt downtown on the right path. “We said, ‘Whatever buildings are left, we don’t want them to end up looking lost in a modern setting,” says Gibson. “We need to have downtown design guidelines that will incorporate the humanist ethic that the old buildings were built with, and not the modernist ethic of freeway vernacular—design around cars instead of design around humans. We want detail and artistic elements; we don’t want them stripped down to just a square box.” Ross Gibson will lead a walking tour of downtown on Saturday, Oct. 12, from 1-2pm. The tour begins at the Eagle Monument at Pacific and Front streets (in front of Jamba Juice). Wear comfortable walking shoes. The event is part of ‘Epicenter: The Loma Prieta Earthquake 30th Anniversary Oral Histories Project.’

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CROP BUSTING In agricultural areas of Santa Cruz County, strong shaking during the 7.1 earthquake caused cracks and “sand volcanoes”

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near fields that farmers were preparing for the fall planting season. PHOTO: S.D. ELLEN, U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

The 1989 Quake: A Look Back I t was early evening when the ground started to shake. Within 15 seconds, the facades of shops on Pacific Avenue had crumbled, Earth under fertile farmland in Watsonville had ruptured, and homes in remote reaches of the Santa Cruz Mountains has been destroyed. The impact of the Loma Prieta earthquake, which struck three decades ago next week, extended to almost every corner of Santa Cruz

County. Even today, the legacy of the disaster lives on in local cities that were reimagined in a long and sometimes-contentious rebuilding process. In many ways, the issues most important to the people who live here have come full circle, too. When the quake hit at the tail end of the ’80s, the Central Coast, in particular downtown Santa Cruz, were on edge about how to deal

with familiar issues like unaffordable housing, unaddressed homelessness and drug use, and anxiety about public safety. But in photos that captured the devastation, the collective rescue efforts and unique cultural moments in time—like the tent city that sprung up off Pacific Avenue—there are also reminders of the scrappiness, the camaraderie and the beauty that have helped weather turmoil before.

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DOWNTOWNIDENTITY CRISIS Volunteers and rescue workers flocked to Pacific Garden Mall when the earthquake struck just after 5 p.m. on Oct. 17, 1989. The downtown shopping district expanded during the ’70s and ’80s, but by the time of the disaster, it had become a battleground for debate over issues like homelessness, crime and public safety. PHOTO: C.E. MEYER, U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

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TALE OF TWO CITIES Santa Cruz and Watsonville took different paths to rebuilding after the earthquake. Many Santa Cruz shops set up in tents while a planning commission convened to map out a path forward. In Watsonville, a huge effort was undertaken to reopen the downtown Ford’s department store, pictured here, two years to the day after the earthquake. “Watsonville’s been searching for its identity of late,” local farm bureau President Jeff Brothers told the L.A. Times. “Ford’s is a harbinger of things to come. It’s done first class.” [H.G. Wilshire, U.S. Geological Survey]

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beginnings in the wake of a tragedy. On Sight founder Robin Kandel became fascinated by the aftermath of the disaster. In the excavated lots and empty storefronts of Pacific Avenue, she saw blank canvases where artists could create temporary works to inspire the rebuilding. “Some people’s aesthetic gravitates to ruins and rubble,” Kandel says. “It was just that thing

that’s revealed, you know, the hidden underpinnings of the town.” Kandel started “messing around down there in the rubble,” and had soon constructed what she describes as five “20-foot-tall stick men sculptures, to get the ball rolling.” She recalls a woman telling her that since her apartment building had been condemned after the quake, it was too depressing to walk past her old

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home, but the new sculptures brought a smile to her face. “She was appreciative that something was happening, that it showed that we weren’t just going to be in the pits forever,” Kandel says. Marla Novo, who curated the new MAH exhibit, also experienced the quake firsthand, and remembers the On Sight art projects fondly. “I saw it all,” she says. >32

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

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fter the Loma Prieta earthquake, a group of artists came together under the name “On Sight” to rebuild a sense of hope in the wreckage of downtown Santa Cruz. Art & Healing: 30 Years After The Loma Prieta Earthquake, a new exhibit at the Museum of Art and History (MAH), tells the story of a community finding closure and new

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<31 “We were really in a funk for a while, and it was seriously dark and dusty. And then I remember these little sprouts of creativity coming up. These little artistic gifts started popping up everywhere, and it made us feel like, OK, things can get better.”

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Kandel held the first meeting of what would become On Sight at her house on Nov. 1, 1989, just two weeks after the earthquake that destroyed 29 buildings in downtown alone. As lots were cleared, businesses began moving their inventories into seven enormous, temporary tent-like structures called Phoenix Pavilions, including a volunteer book brigade that helped to reopen what Kandel affectionately referred to as “Booktent Santa Cruz.” “It was like walking through a bazaar,” she says. Artists Renee Flower and Gene Holtan got started with On Sight’s first project: free wrapping paper for the holidays. They made two designs, and the Santa Cruz Sentinel offered to print them for free, producing 10,000 copies in the first week of December and distributing them to downtown businesses. Mike Mandel, an art teacher at Cabrillo College and UCSC, also got his students involved in the push for public art. They installed cardboard figures and faux movie posters in the entrance of the Del Mar Theater, and later decorated plywood construction fencing with photographs. Mandel also spread the word to a network of artists around the bay area, encouraging them to come to Santa Cruz to create something for the community. On Sight became a tax-exempt corporation under the William James Association, and in 1990 the board submitted proposals to fund 18 art projects with some $68,000. Nine projects were funded through 1992. A photograph in the new MAH exhibit shows board members meeting for lunch in the remains of a downtown building. One of the most iconic pieces produced was The Lighthouse, a 30-foot-tall wooden lighthouse built by Robert Catalusci, complete with a rotating spotlight and a carousel

of portraits taken by UCSC students projected from within. Catalusci was quoted in the Sentinel in 1991, calling the sculpture “a beacon of light, signifying a safe harbor to come back to.” Lighting artist John Ammirati was inspired by the ruins of the Pacific Western Bank at Front and Cooper streets, where only two walls of the building remained, heavily buttressed with supports. For his piece Phantom Bank, Ammirati projected lights onto the broken facades and interiors that slowly shifted and changed colors. Other projects included Su-Chen Hung’s interactive photography and collage installation Behind Glass, Chip Lord and Mickey McGowan’s storefront installation for the city planning organization Vision Santa Cruz, and Andy Harader’s sculpture garden at the farmer’s market. In addition to welcoming the community back to Pacific Avenue, the works these artists made after the Loma Prieta earthquake helped establish today’s vibrant arts scene in downtown Santa Cruz. Mandel and others advocated for spaces for art at the Vision Santa Cruz meetings where 36 city officials, bankers, merchants and community members decided the direction of the recovery and rebuilding of the downtown area. For Antonia Franco, interim executive director of the MAH, the outgrowth of art from trauma also symbolized broader resilience. “This exhibit shows how we can turn challenges into uplifting, shared experiences,” Franco tells GT in an email. The post-disaster art wave doubled as a lesson, she adds, that, “We can use creativity to grow stronger and more connected as a community.” Kandel says it was also personally invigorating to get a group of creative people together who may have otherwise never met. “It became about owning your town,” she says, “owning some piece of hope,” ‘Art & Healing’ runs through Aug. 22, 2021, after which it will be incorporated into the history gallery. santacruzmah. org/lomaprieta.


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Making ‘Believe’

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Local musician Henry Chadwick resets after the chaos of indie success on new EP BY AARON CARNES

I

n 2016, local singer-songwriter Henry Chadwick’s life flipped upside down when he released his debut solo EP Guest At Home. One of the songs, “Alright,” was getting an unusually high number of Spotify plays, which grabbed the attention of Rolling Stone and Time, both of whom wrote about it. As exciting as it was, Chadwick was also overwhelmed. At that point in his life, he was playing in several projects at once. He was recording songs, jamming with friends at their shows and playing drums with

successful local roots-rock group the Coffis Brothers. But his solo project—the thing he really wanted to do—was showing potential. He made the decision in 2017 to leave the Coffis Brothers after eight-and-a-half years, and pursue his solo career full-time. As this was all happening, he wrote the song “Never Say No” about his state of upheaval. It’s a numbed-out, tense, pianodriven pop song that explores the contradictions that happen when a person feels overwhelmed with all the things they want.

“I was spreading myself too thin. I had to kind of reassess my priorities,” Chadwick says. “Writing that song was a cathartic thing.” This song is the lead single off his latest EP The President Of Make Believe, which was released last month on Brooklyn indie label Swoon City Music, his first signing. It also comes after the full-length Marlin Fisher (2018), which followed his breakout EP. Three years removed from the stressful urgency he expressed in “Never Say No,” the music has softened.

“It’s less angsty than it used to be. It feels happier singing it now than when I wrote it. I feel like I feel happy with where I’m at,” Chadwick says. “It feels really good the last couple years to just be putting new music out.” The President Of Make Believe was supposed to be released in 2016. When “Alright” took off, a couple different labels reached out about putting out new music, including Swoon City. They went back and forth negotiating the terms of the release. Meanwhile, Chadwick was getting antsy to move forward. Since he had more music, he recorded and selfreleased Marlin Fisher. It’s a heavier and smoother—though still Beatlesesque—collection of indie-pop songs, this time produced by Rob Schnapf (Beck, Elliot Smith, Kurt Vile). Once it got going, all the focus went towards that album. But he and Swoon worked out a deal eventually, and now they are releasing this three-year-old EP, which is musically diverse, with influences ranging from the Beach Boys to the Kinks to David Bowie. “I just kept tracking things,” Chadwick says. “It always happens different than you think it would, but not always in a bad way.” His LP didn’t have any breakout singles the way Guest At Home did. But he got written about in Rolling Stone again—this time, a longer piece. “Alright” continues to accumulate Spotify plays; it’s currently just under 200,000. His next highest song, “Guest At Home,” has 17,000 plays. He’s hopeful about the potential for “Never Say No,” and has a full team behind him. “When a song reaches a point on there where it reaches a lot more ears, it takes on a little bit more of a life of its own, which is cool,” Chadwick says. He’s also touring more and getting his name out however he can. Of course, he just wants to continue to write and record more music. “It’s hard to know what brings people out, and the analytics of what’s reaching who,” Chadwick says. “I’m working on new demos now. I’m going to go in the studio this fall and work on some new stuff, hopefully. It’s good to keep charging ahead.” henrychadwick.net.


2019 SANTA CRUZ FILM FESTIVAL

www.santacruzfilmfestival.org for tickets and info

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

17th Santa Cruz Festival, Oct 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;13th, 2019

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2019 2019 SANTA CRUZSANTA CRUZ FILM FESTIVAL FILM FESTIVAL Tues, Oct Tues, 8 Oct 8 Wed, Oct Wed, 9 Oct 9 Schedule Schedule Landmark’s Landmark’s Del Mar Theatre Del MarMezzanine Theatre Mezzanine

Thu, Oct 10 Thu, Oct 10

4:30 – 6:30 pm 4:30FILMMAKER – 6:30 pm AND VIP FILMMAKER PASSHOLDER ANDRECEPTION VIP PASSHOLDER RECEPTION 1:30 – 10:30 pm 1:30 – 10:30 pm

FILMMAKER AND VIP FILMMAKER PASSHOLDER ANDRECEPTION VIP PASSHOLDER RECEPTION

Landmark’s Landmark’s Del Mar Theatre Del MarAuditorium Theatre Auditorium No. 1 No. 1 6:30 pm THE 6:30 TONY ALVA pmSTORY THE TONY ALVA STORY

Landmark’s Landmark’s Del Mar Theatre Del MarAuditorium Theatre Auditorium No. 3 No. 3 2:30 pm

2:30 pm

GENERAL MAGIC GENERAL MAGIC

4:45 pm

4:45 pm

BOOK WEEK

7:00 pm

7:00 pm

(IN)VISIBILITY: 16 MIGRATIONS (IN)VISIBILITY: 16 MIGRATIONS

9:15 pm

9:15 pm

REBORN

BOOK WEEK

REBORN

Colligan Theater Colligan Theater 12:00 pm

12:00 pm

2:30 pm

2:30 pm

BEES, SEAS, AND WEED: BEES, ACTIVISM SEAS, AND ON WEED: LAND AND ACTIVISM SEA (SHORTS) ON LAND AND SEA THE (SHORTS) BUTTERFLY TREES THE BUTTERFLY TREES

4:45 pm

4:45 pm

SING

7:00 pm

7:00 pm

GO TO HELL AND TURN GO TO LEFTHELL AND TURN LEFT

9:15 pm

9:15 pm

THE TONY ALVA STORY THE TONY ALVA STORY

SING

THE END OF THE VALLEY THEISEND NOTOFTHE THEEND VALLEY OF THE IS NOT WORLD THE END OF THE WORLD

PARIAH DOG

PARIAH DOG

SAFE SPACES

SAFE SPACES

OTHERWORLDLY SHORTS: OTHERWORLDLY SCI-FI, HORROR, SHORTS:EXPERIMENTATION SCI-FI, HORROR, EXPERIMENTATION THE BERLIN BRIDE THE BERLIN BRIDE

Tannery World Tannery Dance World & Cultural Dance &Center Cultural Center 12:00 pm

12:00 pm

2:30 pm

2:30 pm

BOOK WEEK

BOOK WEEK

4:45 pm

4:45 pm

CAMPESINO

CAMPESINO

7:00 pm

7:00 pm

MUSIC AND DANCE MUSIC FROM AROUND AND DANCE THEFROM WORLD AROUND (SHORTS) THE WORLD (SHORTS)

9:15 pm

9:15 pm

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

UCSC Communications UCSC Communications Building 150 Building (Studio 150C) (Studio C) 12:00 pm

12:00 pm

2:30 pm

2:30 pm

4:45 pm

4:45 pm

7:00 pm

7:00 pm

9:15 pm

9:15 pm

DNA’s Comedy DNA’sLab Comedy Lab 12:00 pm

12:00 pm

2:30 pm

2:30 pm

4:45 pm

4:45 pm

7:00 pm

7:00 pm

9:15 pm

9:15 pm

Dream Inn Dream Inn 7:00–10:00 pm 7:00–10:00 pm

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ROAD MOVIES (SHORTS) ROAD MOVIES (SHORTS)

FREE SLAVE

FREE SLAVE


Fri, Oct 11 Fri, Oct 11 Sat, Oct 12Sat, Oct 12 Landmark’s Landmark’s Del Mar Theatre Del MarMezzanine Theatre Mezzanine

Sun, Oct 13 Sun, Oct 13

Key

Key

NARRATIVE

NARRATIVE

Landmark’s Landmark’s Del Mar Theatre Del MarAuditorium Theatre Auditorium No. 1 No. 1

DOCUMENTARY

DOCUMENTARY

Landmark’s Landmark’s Del Mar Theatre Del MarAuditorium Theatre Auditorium No. 3 No. 3

EARTH VISION

EARTH VISION

EXPERIMENTAL

EXPERIMENTAL

Colligan Theater Colligan Theater THE RETURN OF ELDER THE PINGREE RETURN OF — ELDER MEMOIR PINGREE — MEMOIR OF A DEPARTED MORMON OF A DEPARTED MORMON

ABOVE THE CLOUDSABOVE THE CLOUDS

MASTERS OF MINDFULNESS MASTERS(SHORTS) OF MINDFULNESS (SHORTS)

THE CONDOR & THETHE EAGLE CONDOR & THE EAGLE

RUTH WEISS, THE BEAT RUTHGODDESS WEISS, THE BEAT GODDESS

VIOLET IS BLUE: A TALE VIOLET OF IS GIBBONS BLUE: AAND TALEGUARDIANS OF GIBBONS AND GUARDIANS

CURTIZ

AMERICAN MIRROR:AMERICAN INTIMATIONS MIRROR: OF IMMORTALITY INTIMATIONS OF IMMORTALITY THIS IS LOVE

THIS IS LOVE

GENERAL MAGIC GENERAL MAGIC

MAN IN CAMO

MAN IN CAMO

JUST BELIEVE

WHY CAN'T I BE ME? WHY AROUND CAN'T IYOU BE ME? AROUND YOU

REBORN

REBORN

CURTIZ

JUST BELIEVE

Tannery World Tannery Dance World & Cultural Dance &Center Cultural Center BEES, SEAS, AND WEED: BEES,ACTIVISM SEAS, ANDONWEED: ACTIVISM ON LAND AND SEA (SHORTS) LAND AND SEA (SHORTS)

SWARM SEASON SWARM SEASON

IT WAS ALL SO WONDERFUL: IT WAS ALL SO WONDERFUL: THE EVERYDAY MAGIC THEOF EVERYDAY MARY PRATT MAGIC OF MARY PRATT

COMING OF AGE INCOMING THE SCREEN OF AGE AGEIN(SHORTS) THE SCREEN AGE (SHORTS) LIFE AFTER LIFE

ELEPHANT PATH / NJAIA ELEPHANT NJOKU PATH / NJAIA NJOKU

MOVEMENT FOR PEACE MOVEMENT (SHORTS) FOR PEACE (SHORTS)

CREATING COMMUNITY CREATING (SHORTS) COMMUNITY (SHORTS)

BAKOSÓ: AFROBEATS BAKOSÓ: OF CUBA AFROBEATS OF CUBA

FRIDAY NIGHT COMEDY: FRIDAY MODERN NIGHT COMEDY: LIFE IS STRANGE MODERN(SHORTS) LIFE IS STRANGE SAFE(SHORTS) SPACES

THE BUTTERFLY TREES THE BUTTERFLY TREES LIFE AFTER LIFE

GO TO HELL AND TURN GO TO LEFTHELL AND TURN LEFT

SAFE SPACES

UCSC Communications UCSC Communications Building 150 Building (Studio 150C) (Studio C) PERIPHERIES (SHORTS) PERIPHERIES (SHORTS) SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

WHY CAN'T I BE ME? WHY AROUND CAN'T IYOU BE ME? AROUND YOU ¡BOZA!

¡BOZA!

SELF DISCOVERY FOR SELF SOCIAL DISCOVERY SURVIVAL FOR SOCIAL SURVIVAL

PARIAH DOG

PARIAH DOG

OTHERWORLDLY SHORTS: OTHERWORLDLY SCI-FI, HORROR, SHORTS:EXPERIMENTATION SCI-FI, HORROR, EXPERIMENTATION

DNA’s Comedy DNA’sLab Comedy Lab FISH & MEN

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CALENDAR See hundreds more events at santacruz. com.

GREEN FIX

Free calendar listings in print and online are available for community events. Listings show up online within 24 hours. Submissions of free events and those $15 or less received by Thursday at noon, six days prior to the Good Times publication date, will be prioritized for print (space available). All listings must specify a day, start time, location and price (or ‘free’ if applicable). Listings can be set to repeat every week or month, and can be edited by the poster as needed. Ongoing events must be updated quarterly. It is the responsibility of the person submitting an event to cancel or modify the listing. Register at our website at santacruz.com in order to SUBMIT EVENTS ONLINE. E-mail calendar@goodtimes.sc or call 458.1100 with any questions.

CYCLISTS FOR CULTURAL EXCHANGE MEETING

WEDNESDAY 10/9 BIG TREES EXHIBITION Enjoy the

Cyclists for Cultural Exchange (CCE) is looking for the next generation of cycling leaders to carry on the mission of the Strawberry Fields Forever benefit bike ride. Each spring, the ride draws nearly 1,000 cyclists to Santa Cruz County for 30, 60 or 100 miles of scenic views and cycling memories. As the bicycling community in Santa Cruz County continues to grow and evolve, CCE wants to change with it by inviting the community to plug into the future of the event. Ahead of Bike to Work Day, they want the community to know how to get involved with shaping the future of the iconic ride.

history, in images, of Welch’s Big Trees, now the Redwood Loop Trail at Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park. See images of features no longer in the park and learn about others that have unusual stories to tell. Noon-4pm. San Lorenzo Valley Museum, 12547 Hwy. 9, Boulder Creek. slvmuseum. com. Free.

UNIQUE MULTIPLES: TEACHING WITH THE PARKETT COLLECTION FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CASTILLA-LA MANCHA The exclusive exhibition features approximately 60 selected works from the Parkett Collection housed at the University of Castilla-La Mancha School of Fine Arts and the Contemporary Art Archives & Collections (CAAC), including experimental objects and artifacts by internationally influential contemporary artists. Included in this particular selection of the Parkett Collection are works by Ai Weiwei, Cindy Sherman, Andy Warhol, and many other renowned contemporary artists. Wednesday, Oct. 2-Friday, Dec. 6. Mary Porter Sesnon Art Gallery, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz.

MUSIC UKULELE PARTY/ SING-ALONG/ OPEN MIC Monthly second Wednesday

THURSDAY 10/10 ARTS LIVELY ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCE English country dance is a lively, social

ART SEEN

SATURDAY 10/12- SUNDAY 10/13 OPEN FARM TOURS With fall in full swing, there is no better time to pick apples and get to know your farmer than now. They come out to the farmers market every week, so we can get it together to go visit them at least once, right? There will be 14 farms participating, including Alladin nursery, which will be hosting the marketplace, featuring live music, food preservation demonstrations and kids activities. Check online for a full list of events at all of the farms.

‘CONTEXTUAL: VISUALIZING LANGUAGE’

10am-4pm. Locations vary; Alladin Nursery Marketplace, 2905 Freedom Blvd., Watsonville. openfarmtours.com. Free.

form of folk dance that was popular in the Renaissance era. You might have seen it performed at the Renaissance Faire. Couples dance in sets of various shapes and weave through various patterns as they interact with other couples. It's easy to learn. Beginners are very welcome—all dances taught and prompted. Gender-neutral roles/ calling (larks/ravens). 7:30-9:30pm. Peace United Church of Christ, Santa Cruz, 900 High St., Santa Cruz.

FOOD & WINE APTOS CHAMBER COMMUNITY BREAKFAST MEETING Join us for our breakfast meeting with community reports, guest speakers, networking, and a lovely breakfast buffet provided by Severino’s Bar & Grill. Different Guest Speaker each month, please visit website or facebook page for speaker of the month! 7:30-9am. Best Western Seacliff Inn, 7500 Old Dominion Ct., Aptos. $27/$30. aptoschamber.com.

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The Cabrillo Gallery’s latest exhibit showcases seven artists who synthesize art and language. The medium and the message vary from one artist to the next, each of them combining a transcript of text with the visual vocabulary of their medium. There is everything from printmaking and tapestry to mixed media and cut paper. Show runs through Friday, Oct. 25. Cabrillo Gallery, 6500 Soquel Drive, Room 1002, Aptos. 479-6308. Free.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

Ukelele Party at Pono Hawaiian Grill and The Reef Bar and Restaurant. Our first Ukulele Party was a lot of fun! Monthly we feature noted Ukulele performers. Bring your Ukes, Community and Family Friendly. Music starts at 6:30pm, featured artist at 7, with sheet music selections from the Santa Cruz Ukulele Book provided for sing along. Open Mic follows. Come early for a good seat. Pono serves very affordable Best of Santa Cruz Hawaiian food as well as a fine tropical bar. 6:30pm. Pono Hawaiian Grill, 120 Union St., Santa Cruz.

7-9pm. Tuesday, Oct. 15. Simpkins Family Swim Center, 979 17th Ave., Santa Cruz. Free.

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CALENDAR rehearse for their performances. 7:30-10pm. Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium, 307 Church St., Santa Cruz. Free.

MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY THEATER PRESENTS: ‘MAMMA MIA!’ Mountain Community Theater is proud to present Mamma Mia! By Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus with songs from Stig Anderson, book by Catherine Johnson, and originally conceived by Judy Craymer. Over 54 million people all around the world have fallen in love with the characters, the story and the music that make Mamma Mia! the ultimate feel-good show! A mother. A daughter. Three possible dads. And a trip down the aisle you’ll never forget! The production opens Friday, Sept. 20 and runs five weekends through Sunday, Oct. 20. 8pm. Mountain Community Theater/Park Hall, 9400 Mill St., Ben Lomond. mammamiathemusical. brownpapertickets.com. $25.

SATURDAY 10/12 GLOW: A FESTIVAL OF FIRE AND LIGHT The Glow festival began eight years ago, when local artists Steve Cooper and Drew Detweiler pitched their vision of a mini-Burning Man to the MAH. Cooper, Detweiler and the local Burning Man community were craving a space to share their art outside of the annual festival. Glow has since become the MAH’s (and downtown Santa Cruz’s) largest festival. The event completely takes over the MAH, Abbott Square and Cooper Street. With more digital art, science experiments and LED sculptures inside the museum and performances, flame throwers and flaming sculptures overflowing the plaza and Cooper Street. 7-10pm. The Museum of Art and History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. santacruzmah.org/glow. $20/$25.

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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MUSIC

‘RED LIGHT LIT’ Red Light Lit is a mashup of live music, storytelling and poetry set to a live score. The performers explore love relationships, sexuality and gender. Featuring musical guest: David Williams. 8pm. lille æske, 13160 Central Ave., Boulder Creek. $15/$20. REGGAE THURSDAYS MI DEH YAH Reality Sound International and The Catalyst present Reggae Thursdays with DJ Spleece and friends. Dancehall reggae remix. 7pm. The Catalyst Club, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. santacruzreggae.com. Free.

FRIDAY 10/11 ARTS FIRE & GRACE GALA ART PARTY Edwin and William have been touring the United

States as Fire & Grace for over three years. Canadian-born violinist Edwin Huizinga has established himself as one of North America’s most versatile violinists. Grammy award winning guitarist William Coulter has been performing and recording traditional and classical music for over 25 years. Together and separately, they have graced Baroque Festival’s stage with early music performances, now hear them cut loose! What is Fire & Grace? An eclectic exploration into the fire and grace that connects the elements of classical, folk and contemporary musical from around the world. 4-6pm. R. Blitzer Gallery, 2801 Mission St., Santa Cruz. $45/$50.

FREE OPEN REHEARSAL OF THE SANTA CRUZ SYMPHONY: ‘ASCENDANCE’ Witness music coming to life! Enjoy a behind the scenes look as the musicians, soloists and our maestro

MUSIC JON LEIDECKER: ‘UNITED FEEDBACK PLUS: A RETROACTIVE MANIFESTO FOR THE EARLY DECADES OF AMERICAN ELECTRONIC MUSIC’ Artist and scholar Jon Leidecker traces the history of modern artificial intelligence back to the chaotic electronic feedback circuits of early electronic music pioneers. Leidecker traces commonalities in the works of Louis and Bebe Barron (who scored the 1956 film Forbidden Planet), David Tudor, Pauline Oliveros, the members of the Sonic Arts Union (Robert Ashley, Alvin Lucier, David Behrman, and Gordon Mumma), and their European contemporaries Eliane Radigue, Pietro Grossi, Jaap Vink, and Roland Kayn. This event is part of a series of Digital Alchemy Talks at Design By Cosmic, probing the intellectual and ideological histories of art and technology. 6pm. Design by Cosmic, 115 Cooper St., Santa Cruz.

SANTA CRUZ SURF FILM FESTIVAL Take a surf trip around the world from your seat in the Rio Theatre this Oct. 11 and 12 as the Santa Cruz Surf Film Festival returns for its sixth year. Four entirely different programs of the best new international surf films over two nights - a mix of inspiring, story-driven movies for people who love to ride waves or just watch them. Your ticket purchase gives you a chance to win great raffle prizes—including a Yeti hard cooler and gear at every screening, Kala Ukuleles, a custom Bona Fide wetsuit, SurfEars earplugs, Active Skin Repair for athletes, Pleasure Pizza gift certificates and more! 6:30-11pm. Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. scsff.com/tickets.

TAHITIAN DANCE WITH LIVE DRUMMING Learn the exciting, aerobic Ori Tahiti with Yola and Siaosi! Build a solid foundation in Tahitian Dance. This grounded form emphasizes strong, fast hip circles and accents. Learn to dance solo and with a group. Original choreography by Yola. Bring a sarong to tie around the hips. 5:15-6:15pm. Te Hau Nui Dance Studio, 924 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz.

FOOD & WINE NIGHT MARKET Held on the second Friday of every month through fall, this is your chance to experience it back in full force! Come out for this delicious evening of local food, craft cocktails and live music. 4-9pm. Santa Cruz Food Lounge, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. scfoodlounge.com.

OUTDOOR BIRD WATCHING FOR BEGINNERS On this two-hour walk, be prepared to hike two miles on uneven surfaces, with many stops to view the many birds, plants, and scenery along the way. You will help each other spot and identify birds! Bring your binoculars if you have them (binoculars are available to borrow), clothes for variable weather, and good walking shoes. Meet at the interpretive center. Everyone is welcome, but children under the age of 18 must be accompanied by adults. Rain cancels. 9am. Wilder Ranch State Park, 1401 Coast Rd., Santa Cruz. 4260505. $10.

REDWOOD GROVE LOOP WALK How do these grand redwoods grow to be so old? So tall? How are they important to humans? Join us for this fun and informative guided half-mile stroll through a magnificent oldgrowth redwood forest. Meet the famous Mother Tree, the Father of the Forest and the incredible Chimney Tree on this 1.5hour walk. Bring water and good walking shoes. Meet at park headquarters. Stroller and wheelchair accessible. 11am-12:30pm, 2-3:30pm. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. 3388883. $10.

SATURDAY 10/12 ARTS ‘ASCENDANCE’ Our season begins with world renowned pianist Jon

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events.ucsc.edu

OC TO B E R 2019

JOIN US AS W E SHARE THE E XCIT EMENT OF LE ARNING

Funny & Peculiar: Santa Cruz Writers on Keeping It Weird OCTOBER 15, 7PM BOOKSHOP SANTA CRUZ, 1520 PACIFIC AVE., SANTA CRUZ FREE ADMISSION

It’s 2019 and it seems like things couldn’t get any stranger. What better time to mine the oddities of life with noted writers Elizabeth McKenzie (Merrill ‘81), Micah Perks, Peggy Townsend, Liza Monroy, and Wallace Baine? Moderated by Dan White and Amy Ettinger (Merrill ’95).

Teju Cole: Kresge’s Media and Society Series OCTOBER 10, 7:30PM MUSIC CENTER RECITAL HALL FREE ADMISSION

Teju Cole is a photographer, a novelist, an art historian, and the New York Times Magazine photography critic. He is also co-author of Human Archipelago, a book about refugees and displaced people. He balances protest and activism with subtlety and nuance. Cosponsored by Kresge College, the University Library, and friends.

Ruha Benjamin: A New Jim Code? OCTOBER 16, 2–4PM MERRILL CULTURAL CENTER FREE ADMISSION

From everyday apps to complex algorithms, technology has the potential to hide, speed, and even deepen discrimination. Ruha Benjamin presents the “New Jim Code,” exploring discriminatory designs that encode inequity.

Master of Arts in Education & Teaching Credential Program Information Night OCTOBER 17, 6:30PM STEVENSON EVENT CENTER FREE ADMISSION

The Education Department will be presenting information about the 2020–21 Master of Arts in Education & Teaching Credential Program. For future teachers with a passion for fostering social justice in the K–12 public school system.

17th Annual Practical Activism Conference OCTOBER 19, 10:30AM–5PM COLLEGES NINE AND TEN MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM FREE ADMISSION

A daylong student-run conference featuring dynamic keynote speakers, provocative spoken word artists, engaging workshops, creative activism opportunities, and tabling by campus and community organizations.

Founded in Paris in 1947, Trianon Press published an astonishing catalog of fine art books in the latter half of the 20th century. This exhibit explores the breadth of this renowned press’s publications and the highly skilled printers’ art behind each edition’s creation.

Unique Multiples Exhibition TUES–SAT 12–5PM; WED 12–8PM SESNON GALLERY FREE ADMISSION

The exhibition showcases selected experimental objects and artifacts by Andy Warhol, Cindy Sherman, Ai Weiwei, and other internationally influential contemporary artists whose works are featured in the Parkett Collection.

OCTOBER 27

A Conversation About Oliver Sacks with Ren Weschler and Robert Krulwich Alumnus Ren Weschler discusses And How Are You, Dr. Sacks?—his biographical memoir about Oliver Sacks. Joining Ren is Radiolab’s Robert Krulwich, who spent decades in deep and delightful conversation with frequent guest Sacks. Register in advance at calendar.ucsc.edu/event/oliver.

Stories in Seed Breeding: Colored Cotton, Ancient Wheat OCTOBER 30

André Borges: RightWing Populism and Party System Change in Brazil: A Subnational Perspective OCTOBER 30

Living Trusts—Who Needs Them and Why

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

Slug Tank 2019

OCTOBER 21, 7–9PM MUSIC CENTER RECITAL HALL FREE ADMISSION; PLEASE REGISTER

events.ucsc.edu

DURING LIBRARY HOURS UC SANTA CRUZ MCHENRY LIBRARY THROUGH NOV 4; FREE ADMISSION

OCTOBER 24

OCTOBER 12, 10AM–4PM ARBORETUM, NORRIE’S GIFT SHOP FREE ADMISSION

LE ARN MORE AT

Songs of Labor & Transcendence: The Trianon Press Archive

UPCOMING EVENTS

Norrie’s Nursery Grand Opening! Not a traditional Arboretum Plant Sale! Visit our lovely and newly expanded gift and garden shop for a wonderful array of beautiful plants from Mediterranean climates and household gifts. Tour the gardens while you’re here!

ONGOING EVENTS

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CALENDAR

SANTA CRUZ Sunday, October 13, 2019 9AM –2PM A ONE-DAY POP-UP STREET PARK West Cliff Drive from Lighthouse Field to Natural Bridges

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

ACTIVITIES / GAMES / DANCE MUSIC / COMMUNITY GROUPS

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Play, dance, bike, and stroll in the street with no cars! Perfect for children and families. SCOpenStreets.org Open Streets Santa Cruz County A PROJECT OF BIKE SANTA CRUZ COUNTY

THURSDAY 10/17 DEEPAK CHOPRA ON BEING ‘METAHUMAN’ Is it possible to venture beyond daily living and experience heightened states of awareness? Only Deepak Chopra knows the answer. Join the New York Times-bestselling author as he addresses some of life’s hardest questions. In this highly anticipated new book, Deepak Chopra unlocks the secrets to moving beyond our present limitations to access a field of infinite possibilities. How does one do this? By becoming metahuman. 7pm. Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium, 307 Church St., Santa Cruz. 423-0900. bookshopsantacruz.com/chopra2019. $35.

<40 Nakamatsu performing Beethoven’s magisterial piano concerto no. 5, The Emperor. Grammy award winning composer & DJ Mason Bates joins us for performances of his wildly popular showpiece for DJ and orchestra, 'Mothership'. Stravinsky’s enchanting score to his ballet 'Firebird' luxuriates in dazzlingly romanticism. 7:3010 p.m. Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium, 307 Church St., Santa Cruz.

MAKE A PLATE W/ANNIE WORKSHOP AT ANNIEGLASS Decorate your own round 13-inch Annieglass serving plate. Draw with pastel colored glaze crayons on sandblasted glass for a beautiful pastel like imagery. Day of the Dead-themed, or your choice. There will be Day of the Dead designs that can be used for inspiration or tracing during the workshop or a theme of your choice! 2-3:30pm. Annieglass Incorporated, 310 Harvest Drive, Watsonville.

PINE NEEDLE BASKET MAKING WORKSHOP Participate in a marvelous

family workshop learning how to make a basket from local ponderosa pine needles. No experience necessary. The class capacity is 20; please arrive on time to reserve your seat. Meet at the visitor center. Children 10 and older may attend if accompanied by an adult. 10am. Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park, 101 N Big Trees Park Rd., Felton. 3357077. $10.

SONDHEIM'S COMPANY A contemporary take on Stephen Sondheim’s iconic musical about life, love, marriage, and the quest to find what makes one happy. Company is largely regarded as a trailblazer of the darkcomedy, modern-musical genre and the winner of seven Tony Awards, including Best Musical, Best Score, Best Lyrics, and Best Book by George Furth. 8pm. Center Stage Theater, 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. WOOL, SPINNING AND WEAVING How did an isolated settlement clothe the hundreds of people who lived there? Take an in-depth look at the cloth industry of >44


NPR for Santa Cruz County sm

PUBLICATION DATE: Wednesday, October 30

SPACE RESERVATION DEADLINE: Thursday, October 24

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

Women In Business

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CALENDAR <42 Mission Santa Cruz. We will follow

the path of wool from the sheep to the shirt. You will have the chance to try your hand at a drop spindle and spin your own wool. 1-2pm. Santa Cruz Mission Historic State Park, 144 School St., Santa Cruz. 4255849. Free.

CLASSES COLLEGE APPLICATION ESSAY WORKSHOP The Young Writers Program will hold its 5th Annual College Application Essay Workshop, free for high school juniors and seniors. Students will receive high quality support and resources for writing their Common Application Personal Statement Essay and Personal Insight Questions for the UC application. Trained volunteer writing mentors will be working one-on-one to help students brainstorm, outline, craft, or fine-tune their essays. To register: go to the events page on the Young Writers Program’s website at youngwriterssc.org. 10am. Santa Cruz County Office of Education, 400 Encinal St., Santa Cruz.

FOOD & WINE

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

LOBSTER FEED: FUNDRAISER FOR MOUNTAIN PARKS FOUNDATION

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Twinkling lights under a canopy of stars, the delightful sounds of live music floating through the air - it's that time of year again! Join us for Mountain Parks Foundation’s annual Lobster Feed Fundraiser. Enjoy a full dinner featuring a 1.5-pound fresh Maine lobster served with crisp salad, steaming corn-on-the-cob, warm garlic bread, wine and beer, coffee, and dessert. Proceeds go to support environmental and cultural education programs at Henry Cowell Redwoods and Big Basin Redwoods State Park. 4:30pm. Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park, 101 N Big Trees Park Rd., Felton.. mountainparks.org. 335-3174.

HEALTH PACHAMAMA AWAKENING THE DREAMER SYMPOSIUM Attend a free workshop created by the Pachamama Alliance—the community that’s committed to bringing forth an environmentally sustainable, spiritually fulfilling, socially just human presence on this planet. See what’s possible for the planet and for life itself. Learn where we are as a human family and how we got here. Discover your role in creating a sustainable future. Connect

with like-minded, open-hearted people and move into action. 1-5pm. Resource Center For Nonviolence, 612 Ocean St., Santa Cruz. pachamama.org.

OUTDOOR 2019 CALIFORNIA BODYSURFING CHAMPIONSHIPS The 35th-Annual California Bodysurfing Championships is on for Oct. 12, 2019 at Laguna Creek Beach in north Santa Cruz County. Visit www.santacruzbodysurfing.org for more information and registration. This year Santa Cruz is the third stop on the California BodySurf Tour. 7 a.m. Lagunas Beach, Laguna Road, Santa Cruz.

DAY OUT WITH THOMAS: HALLOWEEN PARTY! All aboard! Thomas the Tank Engine invites little engineers to join him and his best friend Percy for a day of engaging activities and fun adventures at Day Out With Thomas: The Steam Team Tour 2019. Children are invited to spend the day with their friend Thomas when the #1 Engine and Percy pull into Felton, California on October 12-13, 19-20, 26-27, 2019. Day Out With Thomas: The Steam Team Tour 2019 is presented by Mattel. 10 a.m. Roaring Camp Railroads, 5401 Graham Hill Road, Felton, CA

OUTLOOK FROM MT. MCABEE HIKE Join Docent Hal Anjo on a 6-mile, 3.5 hour moderate hike to McAbee Outlook. We'll stop at the top and enjoy the lovely ocean views, returning through a beautiful old-growth redwood forest. Learn about the different habitats as you watch the environment change as we climb and enjoy the view. Bring plenty of water, snacks, and good hiking shoes. Meet at park headquarters. 10:30 a.m. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. $10.

RIVER HEALTH DAY Volunteer and make a difference in the San Lorenzo River ecosystem! Every second Saturday of the month you can join the Coastal Watershed Council in improving habitat conditions along the lower San Lorenzo River. During the summer River Health Days, we will be watering beneficial native seedlings and removing invasive plants along the banks of the San Lorenzo River to improve biodiversity and habitat complexity. 9:30 a.m. Coastal Watershed Council, 107 Dakota Ave., Santa Cruz. 464 9200 x104. coastal-watershed.org/events. Free.

VOLUNTEER WITH THE TRAIL CREW Since 1969, the Big Basin Volunteer Trail

Crew has helped make it possible for others to safely enjoy the beauty of our park. The trail crew meets the second Saturday of each month, rain or shine. A typical workday lasts until mid-afternoon. Please bring your own work gloves, lunch, and water. Join us for a unique perspective of Big Basin, a lively and productive experience with others who share a love of these redwood forests, and the satisfaction of participating in a vital part of the park's ability to educate and inspire the public! Meet at park headquarters. 9 a.m. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. 338-8883. $10.

FOOD & WINE

SUNDAY 10/13

HEALTH

ARTS ASCENDANCE Our season begins with world renowned pianist Jon Nakamatsu performing Beethoven’s magisterial piano concerto no. 5, 'The Emperor'. Grammy award winning composer & DJ Mason Bates joins us for performances of his wildly popular showpiece for DJ and orchestra, 'Mothership'. Stravinsky’s enchanting score to his ballet 'Firebird' luxuriates in dazzlingly romanticism. 2-4:30 p.m. Henry J. Mello Center for the Performing Arts, 250 East Beach Street, Watsonville.

DOSED DOCUMENTARY - ONE SHOW ONLY - SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA Santa Cruz Film Festival presents: DOSED Come early to meet with members of Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) and there'll be an audience Q&A after the movie that will include experts and community leaders talking about therapeutic and medical uses for psychedelics: After many years of prescription medications failed her a suicidal woman turns to underground healers to try and overcome her depression, anxiety, and opioid addiction with illegal psychedelic medicine like magic mushrooms and iboga. 4:45-7 p.m. DNA's Comedy Lab, 155 River St. S, Santa Cruz. dosedmovie.com.

DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ ANTIQUE STREET FAIR The Downtown Santa Cruz antique fair has been going strong for 16 years. This monthly event attracts locals and visitors alike to browse, explore, and score one-of-a-kind and unique treasures! Dozens of vendors are anticipating your arrival! 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Downtown Santa Cruz Antique Faire, 100 Lincoln St., Santa Cruz. Free.

LEFT BANK BRUNCH Bad Animal is hosting 'Left Bank Brunch' on Sundays from 11-2. The Left Bank title is a nod to the artistic and bohemian enclave in Paris, though we're also on the left bank of the mighty San Lorenzo River and on the left coast of the continent. The brunch menu will retain a focus on California-French fare. In the afternoon hours, we'll also be putting on a series of lectures and readings, all free and open to the public. 11 a.m. Bad Animal, 1011 Cedar St., Santa Cruz.

SANTA CRUZ PSYCHIC & HEALING ARTS FAIR Please join some of the area's most respected authorities on health, wealth, love, & happiness, at the Santa Cruz Psychic & Healing Arts Fair at Avalon Visions Center For Creative Spirituality in Soquel. For a Free Pass and a list of Exhibitors, Speakers, Prizes, and more, visit newearthevents.com/ santacruz. 10 a.m. Avalon Visions Center for Creative Spirituality, 2815 Porter St., Soquel.

MUSIC CRYSTAL BAY FARM PUMPKIN HARVEST PARTY FEATURING THE STEVEN GRAVES BAND & DOUG SURFING MAGICIAN Join the Steven Graves Band at the Crystal Bay Farms for a Pumpkin Patch Harvest Party with special guest Doug The Surfing Magician! There will be organic food and beer and crafts for the kids. 3-6 p.m. Crystal Bay Farm, 40 Zils Road, Watsonville. $10-$20.

OUTDOOR MONARCH BUTTERFLY TOURS MidOctober through December; Saturdays and Sundays at 11am and 2pm. Meet at the visitor center for a free 1-hour guided tour of the Monarch Butterfly Natural Preserve. Monarch migration is variable, please check the website or contact the park to find out the current population. 11 a.m.-noon. Natural Bridges State Beach, Swanton Blvd & W. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. 423-4609. thatsmypark.org. $10.

REDWOODS AND THE CHANGING CLIMATE How have coast redwoods adapted to the natural environment? Can coast redwoods adapt to rapidly changing climate conditions? How can we make a difference? Answer these questions and more during a Sunday saunter. Walk


CALENDAR through the ancient old-growth forest with a docent and discuss our relationship with the forest and the prospective future. Meet at the visitor center. Recommended for age 12 and older. 2 p.m. Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park, 101 N Big Trees Park Road, Felton. 335-7077. $10.

OPEN STUDIOS ARTISTS

MONDAY 10/14 CLASSES DANCE THE BROADWAY CLASSICS Let your inner stage-performer loose by learning and dancing original choreography set to iconic Broadway musical pieces. Classes will start with a full body warm-up followed by dance technique instruction and choreography. All skill levels welcome. 10:1511:45 a.m.Begins Oct. 7th. Synergy Dance, 9055 Soquel Drive, Aptos.

GROUPS

form • function • color • texture

#98

ARM-IN-ARM CANCER SUPPORT GROUP For women with advanced, recurrent and metastatic cancers. 12:30-2 p.m. WomenCARE, 2901 Park Ave., Suite A1, Soquel. 457-2273. Free.

LITQUAKE SANTA CRUZ: FUNNY & PECULIAR: SANTA CRUZ WRITERS ON KEEPING IT WEIRD The logo for

MIDTOWN HOT SPOT

FOOD & WINE TACO TUESDAY On Tuesdays we eat tacos! Two delicious tacos and a locally crafted beer for $10. If the mood suits you, add a side of guacamole or a single order of tacos! 6-9pm. Hotel Paradox, 611 Ocean St., Santa Cruz.

Peter Vizzusi Artist #261 Blown Glass

422 Cliff Drive, Aptos

803 PINE ST.

#101

Caia Koopman

#100

Rosie Eckerman

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS Special Rates Available: Oct 16 Call your sales rep for details 458-1100

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

the Humanities Institute at UC Santa Cruz.It’s 2019 and it seems like things couldn’t get any stranger. What better time to mine the oddities of life with noted writers Elizabeth McKenzie, Micah Perks, Peggy Townsend, Liza Monroy and Wallace Baine? Moderated by Dan White and Amy Ettinger. This event is co-presented by The Humanities Institute at UC Santa Cruz. In honor of Litquake's 20th anniversary in 2019, the festival is holding 20 events in 20 cities nationwide - including this Santa Cruz event! 7 p.m. Bookshop Santa Cruz, 1520 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz.

Michael Eckerman 301 HANOVER ST.

TUESDAY 10/15 ARTS

#99

Ea Eckerman

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MUSIC CALENDAR

LOVE YOUR

LOCAL BAND ASARI

When local instrumental quartet Asari formed a year-and-a-half ago, the goal was to play quietly and unassumingly enough to hear people’s conversations as they performed. That’s pretty much the exact opposite of what most musicians want, but Asari began with a different goal: not to take over events, but to blend in with them.

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

“You can engage or you can not engage,” says drummer Andrew Hawes. “I’m inspired by other art forms. So we try to make live music that leaves space for other things to happen.”

46

Asari wants to bring ambience to an event while also pushing boundaries musically. The group, which also features Ravi Lamb on guitar, Shahya Khodadadio on bass and Will Henry Dias on keys, mixes jazz, hip-hop, and R&B, and gives the whole thing a modern, low-key, chill vibe. The musicians are all highly skilled and each have a long resumé, spanning Boostive, Beat Tape, Redlight District, and Ginger and Juice. Asari plays originals but also give jazz standards a new twist. As the band grew, they started to play actual clubs show, where the intent is generally to be an overpowering force. In those cases, the band frequently brings in guest singers, horn players or other instruments. The musical influences are similar, but the shows also depend on what the guest musicians are bringing to the table. “We like to incorporate live sampling and improvisation,” says Hawes. We try to be collaborative with what feels good for the artist.” AARON CARNES 9pm. Friday, Oct. 11, Michael’s On Main, 2591 Main St., Soquel. $8 adv/$10 door. 479-9777.

TAZ

WEDNESDAY 10/9 INDIE

ZACH DEPUTY By now, most people have seen someone perform solo with a bunch of instruments and a looping rig, and just blow the audience away by creating what sounds like an entire 10-piece band. Georgia singer-songwriter Zach Deputy does this, but he takes it a step further and makes his looping station a one-man-dance-party band. We’re talking funk, reggae, drum ‘n’ bass, calypso, electronica. He’s sitting up there on stage creating it himself, alone, using all his fancy technology and having a blast. AC 8:30pm. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $12 adv/$15 door. 479-1854.

THURSDAY 10/10 JAZZ

BILLY COBHAM Billy Cobham is the definitive jazzrock fusion drummer. From the groundbreaking combo Dreams to his seminal work with Miles Davis on Bitches Brew to his game-changing tenure in Mahavishnu Orchestra, Cobham’s combination of torrential

power and polyrhythmic precision still inspire awe today. An undiminished force at 75, the longtime resident of Switzerland has assembled a combustible band focusing on the music from his second album, 1974’s Crosswinds. ANDREW GILBERT 7 and 9pm. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $36.75-52.50. 427-2227.

FRIDAY 10/11 HIP-HOP

KRS-ONE Rapper KRS-One has been critical of the materialism and sexism in hip-hop. He’s also made comments about a lot of rappers’ lackluster performances. Hey, if KRS-One wants to be critical, he has every right to be. Not only is he about as old school as you can get—his mid-’80s group Boogie Down Productions helped redefine the genre to be more artful and conscious—he’s also always been one of the most consistently high-energy rappers to see live. Between spontaneous freestyle verses, and rants about the metaphysical world, his energy is unparalleled. He’ll outlast rappers half his age, and still spit the best bars you ever heard. AC 9pm. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $25. 423-1338.

INDIE

PETE YORN This coming November, Pete Yorn will be touring backed by his indie dreampop group Day Wave. But for now, he plays Felton as part of the You & Me solo acoustic tour. Instead of his normal melodic vocals, hazy atmospheric ambiance and sparkling guitar riffs, folks will hear his music in its rawest and starkest form. But even his acoustic renditions have a reflective vibe that invites the listener to sink into a cushion-y porch swing and watch as summertime raindrops refract tiny rainbows against the screen door. Yorn’s music will invoke daydreams from the subconscious while he wistfully lulls alone on his guitar. Bring someone to philosophize and cuddle with. AMY BEE 9pm. Felton Music Hall, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $27 adv/$29 door. 704-7113.

SATURDAY 10/12 COMEDY

JUDAH FRIEDLANDER Judah Friedlander has seen the future, and in it, he is president. As early as 2012, the be-trucker-hatted comedian


MUSIC

BE OUR GUEST JOEL ROSS

ZACH DEPUTY

was regaling his future constituents with the abuses of power he’d one day wield with his presidential authority. “You like Hawaii?” he asked an unsuspecting audience member. “Ok, well I’m gonna move it to Michigan. Much closer.” You might recognize Friedlander for his iconic role on 30 Rock, but did you know he was once known as “the Hug Guy” in a Dave Matthews Band video? Nothing but respect for my president. MIKE HUGUENOR

SYNTH-POP

ASHE Ashe’s emotive vocals and vintage pop sound make listening to the singer-songwriter’s tunes feel like a journey through the heart. Laden with dynamic melodies and dramatic lyrics, Ashe soars from impassioned vociferations on a messy divorce to quiet, pained platitudes on the nature of heartbreak. Her songs contain a soft edge of whimsical fun from the quirky musical arrangements. These almost-silly moments make you grin when waters are darkest and deepest, and pull you back toward safer shores. AB 8:30pm., Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $13. 423-1338.

BRANDON “TAZ” NIEDERAUER He’s wild, crazed and has shredded the guitar on the same stage as Gregg Allman, Buddy Guy and Slash. Oh, and he’s only 16 years old. Brandon “Taz” Niederauer says he’s living proof that dreams come true. Niederauer picked up the six-stringed axe at the age of 8 after watching School of Rock and never put it down. Four years later, he was cast in the Broadway production of his inspirational catalyst. This is one artist to keep on the radar—only time will tell what he has planned for the next eight years before he ultimately retires at 24. J/k! MAT WEIR

7pm. Felton Music Hall, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $12 adv/$14 door. 704-7113.

SUNDAY 10/13 PSYCHEDELIC POP

AARON LEE TASJAN Renowned as both a guitarist and a songwriter, Aaron Lee Tasjan’s melodic sense, sartorial style and proclivity for 12-string electrics have drawn more than a few comparisons to a cer-

tain four many consider to have been fab. On this year’s Karma for Cheap, however, the Nashville musician leans a little heavier into the ’70s, coating his psychedelic melodies in the glittering excess of glam rock. Songs like “The Truth is So Hard to Believe,” with its platform-booted stomp, and the piano-rocking “The Rest is Yet to Come,” will get your sequins shaking. MH 8pm. Felton Music Hall, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $12 adv/$14 door. 704-7113.

MONDAY 10/14 HIP-HOP

THE PALMER SQUARES Oh snap, son! The Palmer Squares are back on tour. This Chicago-based hiphop duo first gained attention in the beginning of the 2010s on YouTube. In 2012, the group dropped its debut release, the Spooky Language EP, and have since continued on the independent path, releasing their own music, videos and, most recently, a podcast. For fans of Lyrics Born, Atmosphere, Run the Jewels or any woke hip-hop with beats and melodies that ride the line of funky and weird. MW 8:30pm. Blue Lagoon, 923 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $5. 423-7117.

7pm. Thursday, Oct. 17, Kuumbwa Jazz Center, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $28.35 adv/$33.60 door. Information: kuumbwajazz.org. WANT TO GO? Go to santacruz.com/giveaways before 11am on Thursday, Oct. 10, to find out how you could win a pair of tickets to the show.

IN THE QUEUE HAWTTHORNS

Heartland duo from L.A. Wednesday at Crepe Place GYPTIAN

Soulful Jamaican dancehall artist. Friday at Moe’s Alley THE BUILDERS AND THE BUTCHERS

Bring-your-own-washboard folk-rock ensemble. Saturday at Crepe Place SKULLS

L.A. Punk band old enough to be your granddad. Saturday at Blue Lagoon GRACE KELLY

Mind-bending jazz saxophonist. Monday at Kuumbwa Jazz Center

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

7 & 9:30pm. DNA’s Comedy Lab, 155 S River St., Santa Cruz. $20 adv/$25 door. 900-5123.

ROCK

The great thing about jazz is that sometimes, the most unlikely instruments are celebrated. Enter Joel Ross, a hot new figure in the genre and a virtuoso on the vibraphone. Yeah, you know, that instrument you play with mallets. He’s performed with greats like Herbie Hancock, Christian McBride and Louis Hayes. Earlier this year, the 23-year-old musician released his debut album as band leader, KingMaker. It’s an utterly fantastic record that brings to mind some of the more psychedelic jazz records of the ’60s and ’70s. The chaos of his performance never strays too far from an emotive melody.

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Wednesday October 9 – 8:30pm $15

Funk & Soul With Multi Instrumentalist

ZACH DEPUTY

LIVE MUSIC

+ CHRISTOPHER HAWLEY Thursday October 10 – 8/8:30pm $10/15 Double Bill Dance Party

SWEET PLOT + YAK ATTACK

Friday October 11 – 8/9pm $15/20 Live Reggae From Jamaican

PREZIDENT BROWN

+ KAVA JAH & THE REMEDY Saturday October 12 – 8/9pm $20/25

Afro/Latin/Cumbia/Funk Dance Party

WED

10/9

THU

10/10

FRI

10/11

SAT

10/12

APTOS ST. BBQ 8059 Aptos St, Aptos

Little Jonny Lawton Free 6-8p

James Murray Free 6-8p

Gil de Leon Trio Free 6-8p

Blind Rick Free 6-8p

Mojo Mix Free 6-8p

BOARDWALK BOWL 115 Cliff St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

Benny Basset 9:15p-12:45a

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

Yung Gravy w/ Billy Marchiafava & Dirt Nasty $25-$99 9p

Mayday! w/ 1 Ton $12 9p

THE CATALYST 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Collie Buddz w/ Keznamdi $25/$30 9p

Rio Ten w/ Al Ross & more $18-$75 9p

Ashe w/ Charlie Burg & Gavin Haley $13-$55 8:30p

THE CATALYST ATRIUM 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

This Wild Life w/ the Happy Fits $15 9p

Krs-One w/ DJ Aspect & Manila Killa w/ Myrne more $25/$29 9p $20-$70 9p

CILANTROS 1934 Main St, Watsonville

Hippo Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

CORK AND FORK 312 Capitola Ave, Capitola

Open Mic Night Free 7-10p

Americana/Bluegrass With

CORRALITOS CULTURAL CENTER 127 Hames Rd., Corralitos

+ DAVE HOLODILOFF

THE CREPE PLACE 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

FRONT COUNTRY

Chicago Bill & the Next Blues Band Free 6-8p

Funk Night with DJ Ed G Free 9p

Afternoon Blues Series

Thursday October 17 – 8/8:30pm $10/15

10/15

Palmer Squares, Stevie Dipygus, Skulls & more The Box: Gothic/ Ray, Quadroon & more Industrial Night Free 9p $5 9p $8 9p

Karaoke 9-12:30a

JOE MARCINEK + GROOVESESSION

TUE

Voice Of Addiction, Enemy Of My Enemy & more $5 9p

Karaoke 9-12:30a

Jam/Funk Dance Party

10/14

Comedy Night w/ Chree, Retro Dance Party Free 9p

Alex Lucero & Friends 8p

Wednesday October 16 – 8/8:30pm $8/12

MON

Manorlady, MAITA & Collograph $5 9p

BRITANNIA ARMS 110 Monterey Ave, Capitola

AKI GOES TO BOLLYWOOD

10/13

BLUE LAGOON 923 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

B-SIDE PLAYERS

Sunday October 13 – 3/4pm $10/15

SUN

Ten O’Clock Lunchband GLOW Free 7-9:30p Free 7-9:30p

ABBOTT SQUARE 118 Cooper St, Santa Cruz

KPIG Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p Grapes for Good Free 6-9p

The Messiahs Free 7-10p

The Paperback Ryders Free 7-10p

Open Mic 7-10p Western Wednesday $10 8p

Friday October 18 –8/9pm $15/20

Karaoke 6p-Close

Acoustic Open Jam 3-5p

The Builders & the Marshall House Project Butchers w/ Hangtown w/ Lost Ox $10 9p $12 9p

Funk Night w/ Space Heater $6 9p-12a

Gypsy/Rock/Americana Double Bill

DIEGO’S UMBRELLA + VANDOLIERS Saturday October 19 –8/8:30pm $15/20 Psychedelic Surf Rock With

THE MERMEN

Sunday October 20 –3/4pm $15/20 Afternoon Blues Series

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

CHRIS CAIN

48

Oct 24 Oct 25 Oct 26 Oct 27 Oct 27 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 5 Nov 6 Nov 7 Nov 8

QIENSAVE + ROB RAMOS Y CALIGENTE SOULWISE + HARBOR PATROL WOOSTER WHITEY JOHNSON w/ GARY NICHOLSON LEE SCRATCH PERRY SAMBADÁ BODEANS FRUITION RHETT MILLER of OLD 97’s VETIVER MICKY & THE MOTORCARS HOT BUTTERED RUM + Coffee Zombie Nov 9 MAKING MOVIES + LOS RAKAS Nov 13 MARLON ASHER Nov 14 DAN BERN Nov 15 DANIEL RODRIGUEZ of ELEPHANT REVIVAL + WHISKERMAN & KENDRA MCKINLEY Nov 16 LOS AMIGOS INVISIBLES Nov 17 SELWYN BIRCHWOOD Nov 20 EDDIE SPAGHETTI + JD PINKUS Nov 21 MORE FATTER + PROXIMA PARADA Nov 22 THE HIDALGOS w DAVID of LOS LOBOS

THE

CREPE PLACE OPEN LATE - EVERY NIGHT!

ADVANCE TICKETS ON TICKETWEB FRIDAY 10/11

MARSHALL HOUSE PROJECT w/ LOST OX 9PM - $10 DOOR

SATURDAY 10/12

THE BUILDERS & THE BUTCHERS w/ HANGTOWN 9PM - $12 DOOR SUNDAY 10/13

BLUEGRASS JAM 5PM - FREE IN THE GARDEN TUESDAY 10/15

FUNK NIGHT w/ SPACE HEATER

9:30 UNTIL MIDNIGHT

WEDNESDAY 10/16

LORENA LEIGH w/ EULALIA & JAKE PADORR 9PM

THURSDAY 10/17

STRAIGHT EDGE KEGGER

SANTA CRUZ MOVIE PREMIER 8PM - $10 ADVANCE TICKETS

FRIDAY 10/8

THE HARD TIMES PRESENTS:

COLD MOON

w/ BLOOM 9PM - $10 ADVANCE / $12 DOOR

WEEKEND BRUNCH FULL BAR MIDTOWN SANTA CRUZ

1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz 429-6994

Wed. Oct. 9 7:30pm

In the Spirit of Lennon

John Lennon Birthday Celebration

$15 adv./$15 door SEATED <21 W/PARENT

AJ Lee & Blue Summit

Thu. Oct. 10 7:30pm $8 adv./$10 door SEATED <21 W/PARENT

Blind Rick

Fri. Oct. 11 5pm HAPPY HOUR/NO COVER Fri. Oct. 11 9pm

Getaway Dogs plus Asari $8 adv./$10 door Dance – ages 21 +

Sat. Oct. 12 2pm

Matinee Comedy vs Cancer Taking The Bad Guy Down Michael Pritchard, Fred Reiss, Richard Stockton

$20 adv./$25 door Seated <21 w/parent

Sound Reasoning

Sat. Oct. 12 8:30pm $10 adv./$12 door Dance – ages 21 + Sun. Oct. 13 5:30pm GRATEFUL DEAD TUNES/NO COVER

Grateful Sunday

Shady Rest

Wed. Oct. 16 7:30pm $10 adv./$10 door Seated <21 w/parent Thu. Oct. 17 7:30pm

Christie McCarthy & The Wielders $15 adv./$15 door Seated <21 w/parent COMING UP

Joe Craven & The Sometimers Zepparella All-Female Zeppelin Powerhouse Tue. Oct. 22 Elie Mabanza & Friends Wed. Oct. 23 Zach Nugent’s Disco Dead Fri. Oct. 18 Sat. Oct. 19

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Full Concert Calendar : MichaelsonMainMusic.com 2591 Main St, Soquel, CA 95073


LIVE MUSIC WED CROW’S NEST 2218 E. Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

10/9

Stella by Barlight $3 7:30p

THU

10/10

GrandSam $5 8p

FRI

10/11

Thursday, October 10 • 7 PM & 9 PM SAT

10/12

Tsunami $6 9p

Groovity $7 9:30p

Virginia Jones 7&9:30p

Judah Friedlander 7&9:30p

SUN

10/13

MON

10/14

Live Comedy $7 9p

TUE

10/15

The Morgan Brothers $5 8p

DISCRETION BREWING 2703 41st Ave, Soquel

Blind Tiger Open Mic Night 8p

DNA’S COMEDY LAB 155 River St, Santa Cruz

Zumba Glow Bash w/ Monique & Cecilia $12/$15 6p

FELTON MUSIC HALL 6275 Hwy 9, Felton

Linc Russin 7-9p

Tickets: eventbrite.com

Monday, October 14 • 7 PM

GRACE KELLY

An electrifying saxophonist, genre-bending vocalist, and charismatic bandleader.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS

Bob Basa 6:30-9:30p

JACK O’NEILL RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 175 W Cliff Dr. Santa Cruz

Matias 6:30-9:30p

KUUMBWA JAZZ 320-2 Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Billy Cobham Crosswinds Project $36.75/$42 7&9p

LILLE AESKE 13160 CA-9, Boulder Creek

Redlight Lit $15/$20 7p

The Lowest Pair $25/$30 7p

AJ Lee & Blue Summit $8/$10 7:30p

Blind Rick Free 5p the Getaway Dogs $8/$10 9p

Comedy vs. Cancer $20/$25 2p Sound Reasoning $10/$12 8p

Lloyd Whitley Free 6p

Pete Madsen Duo Free 6p

MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 2591 Main St, Soquel

SIN SISTERS BURLESQUE

GreyHound 8p

GABRIELLA CAFE 910 Cedar St., Santa Cruz

In the Spirit of Lennon $15 7:30p

MISSION ST. BBQ 1618 Mission St, Santa Cruz

A landmark chapter in the storied career of a drum legend. Saturday, October 12 • 8:30 PM

Brandon Taz Aaron Lee Tasjan w/ An Evening w/ Pete Yorn Neiderauer w/ Johnny Gallagher $27/$29 8p August Sun $12/$14 7p $12/$14 7p

THE FISH HOUSE 972 Main St, Watsonville

BILLY COBHAM CROSSWINDS PROJECT WITH RANDY BRECKER – 75th BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION TOUR

Scott Slaughter 6:30-9:30p

Tuesday, October 15 • 7:30 PM

STEVE POLTZ

Breedloves 6:30-9:30p

Tickets: snazzyproductions.com

Sin Sisters Burlesque: Halloween Show $20-$40 7:30p

Grace Kelly $31.50/$36.75 6p

Grateful Sunday Concert Series Free 5:30p

Steve Poltz $25-$40 6:45p

Wednesday, October 16 • 7 PM

MASTER CLASS: CLAUDIA VILLELA – LEARN TO SING & PLAY BRAZILIAN BOSSA NOVA Insights into bossa nova.

FREE

Thursday, October 17 • 7 PM

JOEL ROSS ‘GOOD VIBES’

An award-winning vibraphonist on an ascent to the top of the contemporary jazz scene.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS Friday, October 18 • 7:30 PM

AUSTIN LOUNGE LIZARDS WITH ROY ZIMMERMAN

PULSE PRODUCTIONS WELCOMES

RICHARD JAKE THOMPSON SHIMABUKURO

Tickets: snazzyproductions.com Monday, October 21 • 7 PM with special guest

THE GREATEST DAY TOUR

Lisa Males

CHRISTIAN SANDS TRIO

One of the most in-demand pianists in jazz.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS Thursday, October 24 • 7 PM

NICOLAS BEARDE: THE MUSIC OF NAT KING COLE

Special Guest

A velvet-toned vocalist’s salute to Cole.

Eliza Gilkyson

KUUMBWA JAZZ CENTER

Monday, October 28 • 7 PM

FRIDAY WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 8TH NOVEMBER 13TH RIO THEATRE RIO THEATRE Sinead O’Connor

PETER ERSKINE QUARTET WITH GEORGE GARZONE, ALAN PASQUA & DAREK OLES

A swinging ensemble led by one of the most recorded drummers of all-time. Wednesday, November 6 • 7 PM

DORADO SCHMITT & THE DJANGO FESTIVAL ALL-STARS

An Evening of Kirtan

Bringing the music of Django Reinhardt into the 21st century. Friday, November 8 • 7 PM & 9 PM

AN EVENING WITH THE BRANFORD MARSALIS QUARTET

Monday November 25th Rio Theatre

Wednesday February 12th Rio Theatre

WWW.PULSEPRODUCTIONS.NET

Unless noted, advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org and dinner served one hour before Kuumbwa presented concerts. Premium wine & beer available. All ages welcome.

320-2 Cedar St | Santa Cruz 831.427.2227 kuumbwajazz.org

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 23rd

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS

49


U P C O M I N G

SHOWS

LIVE MUSIC

OCT 11TH WED

PETE YORN OCT 12TH

BRANDON “TAZ” NIEDERAUER OCT 13TH

AARON LEE TASJAN

10/9

THU

10/10

FRI

10/11

SAT

Zach Deputy & Christopher Hawley $12/$15 8p

Sweet Plot & Yak Attack Prezident Brown, Kava B-Side Players $10/$15 8p Jah & more $15/$20 8p $20/$25 8p

MOTIV 1209 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Euphoric 9:30p

Libation Lab w/ King Wizard & Chief Transcend 9:30p

NEW BOHEMIA BREWERY 1030 41st Ave, Santa Cruz 99 BOTTLES 110 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz

Adam Cova 9:30p

WITCH OCT 17TH

WHITE REAPER

SUN

10/13

MON

10/14

PARADISE BEACH 215 Esplanade, Capitola

10/15

The Takeover 9:30p

Reggae Night Free 7p Trivia 8p

TUE

Aki Goes to Bollywood $10/$15 3p

Audio One 9:30p

Tacos & Trivia Free 6:30p

Matt Masih Duo 8p Timo 2-5p

Vinny Johnson 2-5p

POET & PATRIOT 320 E. Cedar St, Santa Cruz

OCT 16TH

10/12

MOE’S ALLEY 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

Paperback Ryders 2-5p

Erin Avila 6-9p Comedy Free 8p

Open Mic Free 4-7p

Open Mic Free 8-11p

THE RED 200 Locust St, Santa Cruz

‘Geeks Who Drink’ Trivia Night 8p

THE REEF 120 Union St, Santa Cruz

Variety Show w/ Toby Gray 6:30p

RIO THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

Snatam Kaur $35-$95 7:30p

ROSIE MCCANN’S 1220 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Comedy Night 9p

THE SAND BAR 211 Esplanade, Capitola

Acoustic Classics 6:30p

Aloha Friday 6:30p

Acoustic Grooves 12:30p Light Acoustic 12:30p Featured Acts 6:30p Acoustic Classics 6p

Santa Cruz Surf Film Festival $16 6p

Santa Cruz Surf Film Festival $16 6p

First & Third Celtic Jam

Live DJ

Live DJ

The Joint Chiefs & friends 8p

The Jake Nielson Triple Threat 9p

Touch’d Too Much 9p

Open Mic 6p

Light Acoustic 6:30p

Trivia 7:30p Dennis Dove Open Jam 7:30p

Alex Lucero & friends 7:30p

OCT 18TH

CHRIS PUREKA & LAURA GIBSON 1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-429-4135

OCT 19TH

DIRTY CELLO RESTAURANT NOW OPEN

WED-SUN 4-9PM

FELTONMUSICHALL.COM

Thursday, October 10 • Ages 16+

C ollie B uddz

Thursday, October 10 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

THIS WILD LIFE

plus The Happy Fits

Friday, October 11 • Ages 18+

RIOT TEN Friday, October 11 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

KRS-ONE

50

Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center

BOOST YOUR MOOD, ENERGY & WELL-BEING

B-12 HAPPY HOUR

plus DJ Aspect

Saturday, October 12 • Ages 16+

Manila Killa Saturday, October 12 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

ASHE

plus Charlie Burg also Gavin Haley

Monday, October 14 • Ages 16+

YUNG GRAVY Tuesday, October 15 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

¡MAYDAY!

Wednesdays 3-6 PM Walk-Ins Welcome

plus 1 Ton

Oct 17 Common Kings (Ages 16+) Oct 19 & 20 Santa Cruz Music Festival (Ages 16+) Oct 21 Granger Smith (Ages 16+) Oct 23 The Distillers (Ages 16+) Oct 24 The Polish Ambassador (Ages 16+) Oct 25 The Devil Wears Prada (Ages 16+) Oct 26 The Garden/ So Pitted (Ages 16+) Oct 28 Blueface/ Coyotes (Ages 16+) Oct 29 & 30 Shoreline Mafia (Ages 16+) Oct 31 Skizzy Mars/ Yoshi Flower (Ages 16+) Nov 1 P-Lo (Ages 16+) Nov 2 Elephante/ PLS&TY (Ages 16+) Nov 3 Sinead Harnett (Ages 16+) Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating.

736 Chestnut Street downtown Santa Cruz 831.477.1377 www.scnmc.com

Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

www.catalystclub.com

Oct-Nov 2019 Tues,Oct Oct15 15 Tues, 7:30 pm pm 7:30 $25 Gen. Gen. Adv. Adv. $25 $40 Gold Gold Circle Circle $40

Kuumbwa

Fri, Oct 18 7:30 pm $27 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Kuumbwa

Thurs, Nov 7 7:30 pm $30 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Kuumbwa

Sun, Nov 17 7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Kuumbwa &

With: Sherry Austin, Ginny Mitchell, Diana Donnelly, Mira Goto, The Shady Rest Band, Bonny June, Ken Kraft, Craig Owen, Patti Maxine,

Tracy Parker, Debbie Reed, Ellica Nash and Friends and more to be announced!

Snazzy at Michael’s On Main Thurs, Oct 31 Thurs, Nov 7

7:30 pm 7:30 pm

The Sam Chase”The Halloween Event “ Costume Dance Party $20 Adv/$25 Door Del Rey $15 Adv/ $20 Door

Snazzy at Felton Music Hall Sat, Dec 14

8:00 pm

Holiday Swing w/ John Jorgenson & Maria Muldaur

$35 Adv/$35 Door

each side (40 seats). Additional $4 for each ticket purchased at the door. Tax is included.


LIVE MUSIC WED

10/9

THU

10/10

FRI

10/11

SANDERLINGS 1 Seascape Resort, Aptos

Sambassa 8-11p

SEABRIGHT BREWERY 519 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz

Lucky Losers 6:30p

SAT

10/12

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

Don McCaslin & the Amazing Jazz Geezers 6-9p

Lara Price & Velvet Plum 8-11:30p

Hall Pass 8-11:30p

SHADOWBROOK 1750 Wharf Road, Capitola

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Joe Ferrara 6:30-9:30p

Claudio Melega 7-10p

Getaway Dogs Free 6-9p

Grand Larson Free 6-9p

Jeremy Ferrara Free 6-9p

STEEL BONNET 20 Victor Square, Scotts Valley

Soul Doubt Free 5p

Josh Mann Free 5p

SUSHI GARDEN S.V. 5600 Scotts Valley Dr, Scotts Valley

Dan Frechette Free 5:30p

Erin Avila Free 5:30p

SHANTY SHACK BREWING 138 Fern St, Santa Cruz

UGLY MUG 4640 Soquel Ave, Soquel

Body Language Free 6=9p

SUN

10/13

DJ Monk Earl & General Phlint Free 6-9p

Todalo Shakers $18/$20 7:30p

Open Mic w/ Steven David 5:30p

Flamenco Show w/ Isabelle & Francisco 6-8p

Mikey Billelo 6-8p

Joe Leonard 6-8p

WHARF HOUSE 1400 Wharf Road, Capitola ZELDA’S 203 Esplanade, Capitola

10/14

TUE

10/15

Wild Blue 6-9p

VINOCRUZ 4901 Soquel Drive, Soquel VINO LOCALE 55 Municipal Wharf, Santa Cruz

MON

Calico 8-11p

The Beach Cowboys 1p DJ Joey Aliotti & DJ Huey 9:30p

The Vinny Johnson Band 1p

Hijinx 9:30p

Upcoming Shows

OCT 09 Snatam Kaur OCT 11-12 Santa Cruz Surf Film Festival OCT 18-19 Matilda the Musical OCT 22 The Celtic Tenors OCT 24 Todd Snider and Ramblin’ Jack Elliott OCT 25-26 Matilda the Musical OCT 29 Film: Strong OCT 30 Films: Winterland & Roadless NOV 01 Film: Trail Vision Awards NOV 03 Simrit Kaur Music NOV 08 Richard Thompson NOV 09 Mountainfilm on Tour NOV 13 Los Lonely Boys NOV 15 Film: Reel Rock NOV 17 Jesse Cook NOV 19 Lecture: Flea (Chili Peppers) NOV 20 A Tuba to Cuba NOV 21 Built To Spill NOV 23 Warren Miller’s “Timeless” NOV 25 Kirtan w/ Krishna Das DEC 05 Lecture: Rob Bell DEC 09 Tommy Emmanuel DEC 27-28 The White Album Ensemble JAN 14 Lecture: How Not to Die Follow the Rio Theatre on Facebook & Twitter! info@riotheatre.com www.riotheatre.com

Amazing waterfront deck views.

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

See live music grid for this week’s bands.

STAND-UP COMEDY

Three live comedians every Sunday night.

HAPPY HOUR

Mon–Fri from 3:00pm. Wednesday all night!

OCEANVIEW BREAKFAST DAILY DEAL WITH A VIEW

$9.95 Dinners Mon. - Fri. from 6:00pm

DINING ROOM SPECIALS M-TH Celebrating 50 years of Fun - New low prices!

Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily

(831) 476-4560

crowsnest-santacruz.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

All gorgeous on the Western front. . . LOCATED ON THE BEACH

51


FILM

TEX MESSAGES The new documentary ‘Raise Hell’ gives fiery Texas political journalist Molly Ivins her due.

To Wit End OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Outrage, scathing humor fuel irresistible ‘Raise Hell: The Life And Times Of Molly Ivins’ BY LISA JENSEN

52

S

he was an Amazon among puny mortals. As if she wasn’t already unusual enough as a progressive in Texas, the smart, savagely funny political journalist Molly Ivins also stood 6-feet tall. Not gifted with conventional proportions, she felt entitled to hold outsized opinions expressed with outsized gusto. The zenith of her popularity came as a syndicated columnist in some 400 U.S. newspapers during the George W. Bush era (she called him “Shrub”), giving her plenty of fodder for her trademark blend of savvy political insight and stinging humor. As Ivins herself once said about American politics, “You can laugh, you

can cry, or you can throw up. Crying and throwing up’s bad for you, so you might as well laugh.” There’s plenty to laugh at—and get riled up over—in Janice Engel’s documentary Raise Hell: The Life and Times of Molly Ivins. Ivins succumbed to breast cancer in 2007 at age 62, but Engel’s film celebrates all the ways the outspoken writer raised hell in her own life as a pioneering woman in a world and profession run by good ol’ boys. Through documentary footage and interviews, Engel allows Ivins to tell much of her own story in her own words. When back-up is called for, Engels solicits commentary from folks like Rachel Maddow and political columnist Jim Hightower, but it’s the

particular zing of Ivins’ own voice that makes this movie so irresistible. Raised in Texas by an authoritarian, staunchly Republican father and a college-educated, homemaker mother, Ivins found her given name Mary too ordinary, so switched to Molly. Ordinary, she never was. She went to Smith College, studied political science in Paris and earned a Masters degree in journalism from Columbia. Her checkered career in her chosen profession stretched from intern at the Houston Chronicle and cub reporter at the Minneapolis Tribune to co-editor and political reporter at the alternative paper The Texas Observer. Ever determined to avoid “the snake pit” — to which female

reporters were traditionally exiled to write about food and fashion, ca. 1970—Ivins instead cracked the boys’ club of male reporters covering the Texas legislature. She saw it a riotous example of cronyism, corruption and sexism (“How could you not find it funny?”), inspiring her to perfect her talent for savage satirical barbs. Having freelanced some pieces to The New York Times, she accepted a job at that august paper, but disliked the way her down-home exuberance was routinely edited out of her columns to fit the more staid NYT style. She was sent west to become the paper’s Rocky Mountain bureau chief (“I was the chief,” she recalls, “and I was the bureau”), but ran into more trouble with editor Abe Rosenthal over using the expression “gang-pluck” to describe a Denver chicken-killing festival. Accused of trying to insert vulgar language into the minds of their readership, Ivins deadpanned, “Damn if I could fool you, Mr. Rosenthal.” She was soon seduced back to Texas by the Dallas Times Herald, where she was given free rein to write about anything (and in any way) that she pleased. From this platform, she was twice nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, published popular books of her collected essays and vastly increased her fan base by going into syndication. Through it all, Ivins retained her razor-sharp wit, her sense of fun and her finely-honed moral outrage at the utter disregard of those in power for everybody else. Along with the pleasures of watching Ivins in action, answering fans and critics alike with irreverent aplomb, Engel’s movie serves up an affectionate portrait of Ivins’ longtime friendship with another strong, salty Texas woman, Ann Richards, herself something of a pioneer as a Democratic female governor of Texas. Sadly, we can only imagine the glee with which Ivins might have squared off against the current crop of scoundrels in Washington. But her clarion call to “have fun, do good and raise hell” is more timely than ever. RAISE HELL: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF MOLLY IVINS **** (out of four) With Molly Ivins. Written by Janice Engel and Monique Zavitoski. Directed by Janice Engel. A Magnolia Pictures release. (Not rated) 93 minutes.


THE TASTIEST WEEK OF THE YEAR

A FESTIVAL OF FIRE & LIGHT

THREE-COURSE DINNERS FIXED PRICE $25, $35 & $45

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

OCTOBER 16-23

53


FILM NEW RELEASES THE ADDAMS FAMILY They’re creepy and they’re kooky/Mysterious and spooky/And once again cartoon-y/The Addams Family/I liked the live-action movies/That Wednesday girl was groovy/But the drawings are better, sue me/It’s how they’re supposed to be. Directed by Greg Tiernan and Conrad Vernon. Featuring the voices of Oscar Isaac as Gomez, Charlize Theron as Morticia, Chloe Grace Mortez as Wednesday, Bette Midler as Grandma, and Snoop Dogg as It. (PG) 105 minutes. (SP)

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

GEMINI MAN Has any high-concept science-fiction flick ever had as many lead actors fall through as Gemini Man? Over the last 20 years of its development hell, the main role of an aging government assassin who has to avoid being assassinated himself—by his own clone—has been attached to Harrison Ford, Nicolas Cage, Brad Pitt, Tom Cruise, Clint Eastwood, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sean Connery, and many more. But since the premise of the film is that the clone is also played by a de-aged, computer-modified version of the same actor, I’m pretty sure all they had to do to get Will Smith is tell him that his name would be at the top of the poster twice. Directed by Ang Lee. Starring Will Smith, Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Clive Owen. (PG-13) 117 minutes. (SP)

54

JEXI Remember that time you were like,“I wish there was a comedy about a renegade phone AI program that talks like Siri but makes fun of its nerd-loser owner about his looks and penis size, and then becomes jealous when he starts to date a human girl?” No? Well, somebody thought it, ’cause here it is. Directed by Jon Lucas and Scott Moore. Starring Adam Devine, Alexandra Shipp and Rose Byrne as the voice of Jexi. (R) (SP) LUCY IN THE SKY Before I heard what this movie was about, I had no idea there was such a thing as astronaut crime. But there is! And this movie is sort of about that, being loosely based on the story of reallife astronaut Lisa Novak, who was arrested in 2007 after driving to the Houston airport with all kinds of scary

stuff in her car and confronting a woman who had begun a relationship with another astronaut Novak had been romantically involved with. She was charged with attempted kidnapping and later pled guilty to lesser charges. The baffling trailer for Lucy in the Sky, however, chooses to ignore all that interesting stuff, and make it look as though the movie is mainly about Natalie Portman being sad about space—and maybe losing her marbles because she did a spacewalk? Every eye in NASA just rolled all the way up right now, and it’s not because of zero gravity. (R) 124 minutes. (SP) MONOS This Spanish-language war drama is about a group of Latin American commandos on a mountain, guarding a prisoner. It’s a gritty and grim look at the dehumanizing psychology of war. But on the flip side, some of their code names are delightful! You may be a bloodthirsty killer, Smurf—and Bigfoot and Boom Boom, you’re probably just as cold-blooded. But you have great taste in aliases, and … well, that’s something. Directed by Alejandro Landes. Starring Julianne Nicholson, Moises Arias and Jorge Roman. (R) 102 minutes. (SP) CONTINUING EVENT: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES Film buffs are invited Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. to downtown Santa Cruz, where each week the group discusses a different current release. For location and discussion topic, go to groups.google.com/group/LTATM.

NOW PLAYING ABOMINABLE Since this movie first went into development in 2010, there have been two other animated films about a yeti having whimsical adventures. I wish there was a word for that kind of terrible luck. It’s not just bad luck, it’s … it’s … nope, can’t think of one. Directed by Jill Culton. Featuring the voices of Chloe Bennet, Albert Tsai, Eddie Izzard, and Sarah Paulson. (PG) 97 minutes. (SP) AD ASTRA Director James Grey tries out a Terence Malick style in Ad Astra to crack the enigmatic calm of a Neil Armstrong type. Brad Pitt,

bewitchingly cool and handsome in a space suit, plays near-future astronaut Major Roy McBryde. He is a famous man and a stranger to himself. In voice over, he muses about the lack of emotion that’s caused his wife (Liv Tyler) to leave him. Roy’s father Clifford (Tommy Lee Jones) was a renowned astronaut who abandoned his family on a mission. Pitt’s humanity keeps one hooked through this. The lost-father drama can be tedious in the deftest hands. But this time, the celestial backdrop adds some allegorical freshness to the subject of fathers so obsessed with their business, so closed off from their families, that they might as well be in ice-cold orbit around one of the outer planets. (PG-13) 122 minutes. (RvB) BRITTANY RUNS A MARATHON Can a movie be a comedy and an inspirational drama and not suck? That’s the question this new film from first-time writer-director Paul Downs Colaizzo seeks to answer with a “yes.” Based on the real-life story of Colaizzo’s roommate Brittany O’Neill (whose photos are shown at the end), the film features Jillian Bell (getting her first starring role after impressing in Workaholics and Eastbound and Down) as a woman who takes up running to lose weight and ends up training for the New York City Marathon. Co-starring Michaela Watkins, Micah Stock and Alice Lee. (R) 104 minutes. (SP) DOWNTON ABBEY No one knows Downton Abbey better than Julian Fellowes, creator and scriptwriter for the insanely popular PBS television series—unless you count the untold gazillions of rabid fans who embraced the show during its five years on the air. The faithful will adore every juicy frame of the Crawley family’s cinematic adventure, from the lavish 1927-era costumes to every pointed remark between beloved characters, upstairs and downstairs. Beneath the main plot about a visit from the King and Queen of England, subplots are devoted to catching up with as many familiar characters as possible—with just enough storyline skipping along the movie’s glittery surface to propel things to a satisfying and stylish conclusion. As usual, Maggie Smith

as the Dowager Countess, clan matriarch, is Fellowes’ secret weapon. She makes an elegant feast out of every caustic syllable he feeds her. (PG) 122 minutes. (LJ) HUSTLERS Remember that New York magazine article about strippers embezzling money from their Wall Street patrons? No? Well, your failure to get around to that stack of magazines you said you were going to read back in 2015 apparently didn’t faze studio execs, because they made a movie about it. But don’t worry, they probably didn’t read it, either. Written and directed by Lorene Scafaria. Starring Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez and Julia Stiles. (R) 109 minutes. (SP) JOKER Critics see this sympathetic retelling of the Joker’s origin story, in which he is basically a crazy disaffected white guy who leads a bunch of other crazy disaffected white guys in getting their violent “revenge” on society, as—well, I probably don’t have to explain to you why this is the worst timing ever for this movie. For some reason, the people involved in the movie don’t get it, though, or are at least pretending not to. Director Todd Phillips wondered aloud why John Wick 3 didn’t get the same criticism (I’m assuming he didn’t see John Wick 3, a rather traditional action movie which toys with literally none of the hot-button issues that Joker does). Meanwhile, star Joaquin Phoenix simply walked out of an interview where a question about these themes was raised. Whoa, you really showed people with reasonable questions where to stick it, Joaquin! This might be the best movie of the year, for all I know, but if you’re going to make a controversial movie that fetishizes a twisted psychology that has led to real-world tragedy, maybe have the basic decency and intelligence level to talk about it articulately? (R) 121 minutes. (SP) JUDY Judy Garland has been gone for 50 years, but despite everything she went through in her life, Hollywood is not done with her yet. Rupert Goold’s biopic is a cautionary tale about the pitfalls of stardom, and an attempt to celebrate Garland’s

fighting spirit and her magnetic hold on her audience. But while Renee Zellweger is often fascinating in the title role, the movie never soars above conventional Hollywood biopic clichés (let alone over the rainbow). That Zellweger does her own singing is both gutsy and problematic: even at the twilight of her career, Garland’s voice was more distinctive than this. But Zellweger nails her dramatic mannerisms, vibrant emotionalism and sly, self-deprecating sense of humor. She deserves a movie as complicated as her performance. (PG-13) 118 minutes. (LJ) LINDA RONSTADT: THE SOUND OF MY VOICE In a hilariously stupid negative review of this documentary, the slobberingly conservative National Review tried to argue that considering Ronstadt’s career through a political lens is an egregious distortion of cultural history. Ultimately, the only thing they proved is that they know next to nothing about Ronstadt, whose political activism is legendary even in a music industry known for its earnest dogooding. As always, you can count on this time-tested rule: if the National Review doesn’t like a movie, it’s great. Directed by Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman. (PG-13) 95 minutes. (SP) RAISE HELL: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF MOLLY IVINS Reviewed this issue. 93 minutes. (SP) RAMBO: LAST BLOOD If you had to think of a name for a Rambo parody movie, wouldn’t Last Blood be pretty close to the top of the list? Is there anything that represents the sheer bone-headed terribleness of this character and all the bloodsoaked, bullet-hell films Sylvester Stallone made after the original First Blood better than calling the last film in the series Last Blood? I’m almost disappointed that the tagline isn’t something equally making-youexpel-iced-tea-from-your-nostrils ridiculous, like “He’s good to the last drop.” In fact, the actual tagline is,“Everyone has one last fight left in them.” Uh, were they thinking of Stallone’s other franchise, the Rocky movies? Directed by Adrian Grunberg. (R) 89 minutes. (SP)


MOVIE TIMES

October 9-15

All times are PM unless otherwise noted.

DEL MAR THEATRE

831.359.4447

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9:40; Mon 10/14, Tue 10/15 2:10, 4:45, 7:10, 9:40 DONNIE DARKO Sat 10/12 11:55 DOWNTON ABBEY Wed 10/9 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:35; Thu 10/10 12:40, 1:40, 4:20, 6, 7, 9:35; Fri 10/11 1:40, 4:20, 7,

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BRITTANY RUNS A MARATHON Wed 10/9 2, 4:30, 9:40; Thu 10/10 2, 4:30 JUDY Wed 10/9,Thu 10/10 1:45, 4:20, 7, 9:30; Fri 10/11 1:50, 4:20, 7, 9:30; Sat 10/12, Sun 10/13 11:10, 1:50, 4:20,

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Sun 10/13 12, 2:20, 4:50, 7:30, 9:40; Mon 10/14, Tue 10/15 2:20, 4:50, 7:30, 9:40 LUCY IN THE SKY Thu 10/10 7:10, 9:50; Fri 10/11 1:40, 4:30, 7:10, 9:45; Sat 10/12, Sun 10/13 11, 1:40, 4:30, 7:10,

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&

FOOD & DRINK last week brought home the obvious: Bantam is a serious restaurant disguised as a neighborhood pizza joint. Our main plate was an elegant creation of grilled scallops astride a landscape of black lentils surrounded by avocado cream ($25). The scallops were perfect—tender inside, golden crisp outside. Crimson Jimmy Nardello peppers joined the shellfish, and everything gleamed in an intense citrus oil. This was a spectacular constellation of flavors and textures. Earthy luxury, and a dynamite pairing with both the bubbly and the Pinot. Since we had been sharing each plate, we both had room for a little something more. Dessert? You bet. We instantly went for a special blackberry and strawberry crumble, topped with almonds and a scoop of bold, house-made ginger ice cream ($9). This deeply satisfying pastry gave currency to the concept of bypassing dinner and going straight to dessert. The berries were warm from the oven, the almondy crumble an exact topping—not too much, not too skimpy. And the icing on the cake (I can’t help it) was the tart and barely sweet, ultra-creamy —almost gelato-esque—ginger ice cream. Berries, almonds and ginger ice cream: you do the math. Thank you Bantam for locating yourself very close to where we live.

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

SLICE OF LIFE Chefs prepare pizza at Bantam on the Westside of Santa Cruz. PHOTO: TARMO HANNULA

56

Bantam, 1010 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 420-0101, bantam1010.com.

ANIMAL BRANCHES OUT

A Bite of Bantam A blur of flavor and texture at incognito pizzeria BY CHRISTINA WATERS

I

love the boisterous pace and energy of Bantam, although I admit that Katya and I try to get there right at opening time in order to score our favorite spots at the bar. And before the noise level rises. Chef/owner Ben Sims was chopping and dicing along with his team in front of the hard-working wood-fired pizza oven, so we made a point of sampling some of the

evening’s menu in addition to some liquid refreshments. We tasted a few wines by the glass, then zeroed in on an icy flute of Blanc de Blanc ($12) and a pour of Ampelos Cellars Santa Rita Hills Pinot Noir ($14), both solid choices with the food to come. A plate of house bread and salted butter made sense with a starter of cauliflower pickles ($6), bright yellow from turmeric and tossed

with black sesame seeds. They were crunchy and dazzling to the tongue. Perfect, light pickling made them almost addictive. Another opening plate of creamy burrata ($12) with wood-oven figs and hazelnuts in an oregano olive oil sauce was diverting, but might have prospered with less oregano and more figs. Adventurous idea, though. Two more dishes that we shared

Just when you thought it was merely a sophisticated bookstore with a wine bar attached, now there’s fried chicken at Bad Animal (and no, the chicken isn’t the animal in question.) Proprietors Jess and Andrew continue with their Left Bank Brunches on Sundays, and in the evening, Chef Parker is growing and morphing the Southern Sunday Supper menu (5-8:30pm) in homage to the New Orleans institution Willie Mae’s Scotch House, featuring not only fried chicken (be still my heart) but the ultimate comfort food, macaroni and cheese. Bad Animal, 1011 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. 900-5031, badanimalbooks.com.


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View Hubpurchases and any ofmade the 9/14/19–12/9/19 product models from set forth above with PowerView Motorization the be quantities turer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebatein will issued insettheforth formabove. of a If you purchase less than the specified quantity, you will not be entitled to a rebate. Nantucket™ Window Shadings, Silhouette® Window Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed ward card and mailed within 4 weeks of rebateOffer claimexcludes approval.HDOrigins™ Funds do not and expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00a collection monthly feeofwill be assessed againstShadings. card weeks of See rebate claim terms approval. Fundswith do not expire. to applicable $2.00 fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each months after card issuance and eachwithin month4thereafter. complete distributed reward card.Subject Additional limitations law, may aapply. Askmonthly participating dealer and rebate form. ©2019 Hunter Douglas. Allthereafter. rights reserved. All trademarks used herein arewith the property of Hunter Douglaslimitations or their respective owners. month See complete terms distributed reward card. Additional may apply. Ask 19Q4NPDUC1 participating dealer for details and rebate form. **PowerView® App and PowerView® Hub required. ©2019 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 19Q3MULTI

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VINE & DINE

&

DOWN SOUTH Pescadero winery Sante Arcangeli has opened

an Aptos tasting room. PHOTO: SANTE ARCANGELI

Sante Arcangeli Rosé of Pinot Noir 2018 BY JOSIE COWDEN

I

you check out the dazzling array of socks and shoes. Sante Arcangeli Family Wines, 154 Aptos Village Way, Aptos. Open Thursday to Sunday, noon-6pm.

FIRESIDE FRIDAYS AT BIG BASIN VINEYARDS From 5:30-9:30pm every Friday until the end of October, Big Basin Vineyards puts on Fireside Fridays, complete with fine wines and fire pits. Toast the start of the weekend with a tasting flight or wines by the glass and bottle. Small artisan snacks available, but guests are also welcome to bring outside food to enjoy with their wine. Winemaker Bradley Brown’s property is beautiful. His glorious fields of grapes are a wonderful sight. Tours of the estate are now available, too. Big Basin Vineyards, 830 Memory Lane, Boulder Creek. 621-8028, bigbasinvineyards.com.

FRUITION DINNER Persephone Restaurant in Aptos will partner with Fruition Brewing for a four-course beer-pairing dinner on Sunday, Oct. 20. Cost is $60. persephonerestaurant.com.

One item up to $25 value with two or more entree orders Must present ad with order. Cannot be combined with other offers. 1 offer per table, in only. store for more details. Good through June 5, 13, 2019. per per visit.visit. DineDine in only. See See store for more details. Good through November 2019.

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

left Sante Arcangeli’s tasting room in Pescadero with a splendid Rosé of Pinot Noir. We had out-of-town guests staying for a few days, and sharing a well-made local wine with them was such a joy. Undoubtedly one of the best and most respected area vintners, winery owner John Benedetti always produces top-notch wines. The 2018 Rosé of Pinot Noir ($25) is made with grapes harvested from the Santa Cruz Mountains, Lester Family Estate being one of the premium vineyards. It is crisp, pale and bone dry, with notes of wild strawberry and grapefruit. Benedetti says it is “refreshing and fruit-driven, with an underlying earthiness that is unmistakably Pinot Noir.” He recently opened another tasting room in the Aptos Village complex, alongside Cat & Cloud Coffee, New Leaf Market, Sockshop & Shoe Company, and more to come. If you haven’t yet visited the village, then you have a treat in store. Sante Arcangeli’s tasting room adjoins Sockshop, and you can walk around their store with a glass of wine while

Free Birthday Meal

59


VINE TIME

H RISA’S STARS BY RISA D’ANGELES LIBRA—EVERYTHING IN BALANCE

Friday Happy Hour!

Tuesday evening, as the first star appeared at sunset, the Jewish Festival of Yom Kippur began. Jewish festivals always begin at sunset. The holiest day of the Jewish year, Yom Kippur is a Day of atonement, repentance, fasting, and prayer. We continue to ask forgiveness from everyone, including God, during these sacred days—also called the Days of Awe. Wednesday is the birthday of famous Russian painter, designer, writer, theosophist, esotericist, traveler, and philosopher Nicholas Roerich (Oct. 9, 1874), known for his Peace Pact. Here we are in Libra, our harvest time. Sunday is full moon, Libra solar festival. The Harvest Moon time. Libra brings forth an interlude, when the light—moving here

and there, up and down—seeks a place of contemplative rest. Autumn brings us to the dark half of the year. In Libra, the Virgin stands within the “cave of the heart” gestating the new consciousness/light to be birthed at Winter Solstice, when the week-long Festival of the New Group of World Servers begins. In Libra, Persephone enters the underworld, remaining with Pluto until spring. We enter the underworld with her. We eat pomegranates, persimmons and pumpkins. Ceres, Persephone’s mother, stands in grief at the loss of her daughter. We grieve with her. The golden leaves fall. Autumn is here.Everything comes into balance.

ARIES Mar21–Apr20

LIBRA Sep23–Oct22

Something appears, is seen, recognized, brought to balance, and creates an interlude in your relationships. Perhaps you identify how to have true Right Relations with those who love you. Perhaps you learn that through relationships your true self emerges because relationships are an I/Thou situation and this always balances you, provides structure and discipline, and leads to true intimacy.

Libra’s month is an important passage of time, a growing-up time and a maturing developmental stage for everyone. There’s a challenge to choose which path to take. A challenge to change, too. Perhaps frustrations and time issues, shadows and pressures, are distractions. You want wisdom to guide you. There will be times of stillness and times of acceleration. Saturn, your father, guide, disciplinarian, Dweller on the Threshold and Angel of the Presence, loves you.

TAURUS Apr21–May21

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21

There are times when others tell you their deepest needs. Sometimes you can’t hear or understand them. This month, your needs—usually hidden and unknown to you, thus hardly ever tended—will emerge. Changes, small and subtle, begin to manifest in how you express yourself, and to whom you speak. It’s important to initiate a discussion of long-term wishes, desires and wants. Since your usual word is “no,” everyone listens attentively.

Your deepest desires come forth and although directed at others, the reality is the desire to know the self, to create a new image that better defines you, and the need for a partnership between your emotions, intellect, body, and soul. Emotions may become more passionate; people may shy away should you display too much depth of feeling. Assess who’s safe, who understands, who will support, encourage, defend, and who truly loves you.

Esoteric Astrology as news for week of Oct. 9, 2019

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GEMINI May 22–June 20 Who is your family? What does family mean to you? Perhaps family means criticism and judgments, or gardens of nourishment. Whatever family signifies for you, it’s time to create your own family, and build balance and love, discipline and rules, kindness and communication into it. We have times when we can recreate certain events and ideas. This time has arrived for you. When you praise others and show gratitude, an alchemy of love emerges.

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

CANCER Jun21–Jul20

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You’re both in the world and not, at home while also working, all at the same time. Family’s close by and yet it’s not. It’s always in your heart. Both you and family have spiritual work to accomplish, though perhaps not in the same geographical region. A new set of realities concerning resources emerges. Your specific and particular skills are a deeply needed resource. When you share them, they nurture and nourish, and we are grateful.

Lunch

LE0 Jul21–Aug22

Dinner

A tradition—perhaps religious, and including the emotional and intellectual—becomes important. It summons you to a discipline, structure and ritual that brings order and stability to your life. Perhaps you’re remembering a parent, teacher, someone older and wiser than you, who instilled ethics and justice, seeing you as equal. Who is this person? What is this ritual? Honor this. Ask and offer forgiveness.

11:30am to 2:00pm Wednesday through Friday Oswald Burger, Salads, Sandwiches and more 5:00pm to close Tuesday through Sunday Seasonal Menu Cocktail Hour Tuesday through Thursday 4:00pm to 5:30pm Bar Bites, Craft Cocktails, Beer and Wine Specials

OswaldRestaurant.com 121 Soquel Avenue at Front Street, Santa Cruz 831.423.7427 CLOSED MONDAY

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 You have resources in common with another. Resources don’t only refer to money. They include values and/or possessions held in common, intimacy, interaction, and relationships. There’s a question about relationships, and perhaps a feeling of restriction and grief? Remember the beginnings of your relationships and their original emotional value. Can you discover this again? What seems so far away is usually what is closest by.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec20 Turn toward your religious roots, studying the teachings as tools and guidelines that illuminate and make sturdy your inner and outer life. This may sound old-fashioned. However, Jupiter, as a major planet of love and spirituality, is traveling through Sagittarius, where your sun resides. Jupiter provides you with love, wisdom and direction. Another choice is to maintain a state of self-enforced contemplation, solitude and seclusion. Include lots of music, reading matter, deep pools of water and food.

CAPRICORN Dec21–Jan20 An old cycle ends and a new cycle begins. It’s connected to the harvest festival, the gathering of summer fruits and placing them into a root cellar of cool darkness. It’s time to begin fall and winter planting. I suggest reading the book Agriculture, a study of biodynamic planting, which uses special plant, animal and mineral (homeopathic) preparations, and follows rhythmic influences of the sun, moon, planets, and stars (reminding you that you are one).

AQUARIUS Jan21–Feb18 An entirely different set of ideals (values, goals) begin to dawn, and your view your life changes. Notice it seems the rules have changed, previous values become less important, things taken for granted are no longer useful, and perhaps your faith is being tested. It’s time for new journeys, new studies, definitely new adventures, and travels to new cultures. The disillusion felt will not last forever. Life becomes more realistic. Something about home beckons.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 While thinking about life and death, and the process of aging, take walks in the early morning and evening. Focus upon making contact with the elements, the devas and nature (plants). Nature is the most balancing of kingdoms. Gather seeds, pods, notice what is ripening yet still green, stop and view the architecture; notice what soothes and comforts. Read A Pattern Language by Christopher Alexander. Begin your own photographic journal. Life finds you in other places soon. The groups are gathering.


services

PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR

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AMY (831) 462-1033 PSYCHOTHERAPY

Counseling Through Creativity with Melinda Martindale, LCSW

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(408) 464-3789

DIAZ HOUSE CLEANING

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Family run local business since 1989!

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MASSAGE

Call Curt feel good now! Muscles relaxed and moods adjusted. De-stress in my warm safe hands. Days and Evenings, CMP.

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REDWOOD HAULING

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TECH HELP FOR ALL

Help make your Computers, WiFi, Phones, and TV easier to operate.

call Jonathan (831) 325-2827

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A*wonderful*Touch.

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CLEANING & ORGANIZING

Quality Housecleaning call or text

Kristina (650) 703-5179 *uses only plant based cleaning products *free estimates *multiple references available

PAINTING

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Paving & Construction

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HAULING

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services

PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

FENCE REPAIR

Jose Lopez

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BLUEPRINTS & PERMITS Make your Dream Home a Reality! Call for a free consultation

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BLUEPRINTS for city or county applications

COMPUTER REPAIR

COMPUTER ZONE

Kendra Barnett

Mission St. Store (831) 466-9099 Laurel St. Store (831) 466-9065

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CARPET CLEANING

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—RUSS CASTRONOVO

62

END OF LIFE DOULA

WALT

(831) 295-8150 *non medical holistic support

TUTORING

The Bond Academy Offering specialized tutors in all subjects

Ted Bond (831) 419-0241

ASIAN MASSAGE

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HUERTA’S TREE SERVICE & DEVELOPMENT INC.

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HELP WANTED

Walt is an excellent breed ambassador! He is a gentle boy who gets along with all dogs. He is friendly towards everyone who gives him attention and will happily trot along, wagging his tail.

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He is 10 years old and 86 pounds.

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Good Times is seeking part-time temporary office help for the months of December and January.

Call 831.458.1100 X 200 Email kmansfeld@GoodTimes.sc

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831-718-9122

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HELP WANTED AIDE DIRECT CARE

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ.PETITION OF JOSE VALENTIN RICO RODRIGUEZ CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.19CV02668. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner JOSE VALENTIN RICO RODRIGUEZ has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from:JOSE VALENTIN RICO RODRIGUEZ to: VALENTIN RICO RODRIGUEZ. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING October 22, 2019 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Sept. 5, 2019. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Sept. 18, 25, Oct. 2, & 9.

Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Sept. 5, 2019. September 18, 25, Oct. 2, & 9.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001360 The following Individual is doing business as BAY CARPETS & UPHOLSTERY CARE. 11 ZEPHYR CT., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. OSCAR TOLEDO-SAENZ. 11 ZEPHYR CT., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: OSCAR TOLEDO-SAENZ. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is 8/5/2019. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on August 05, 2019. September 18, 25, Oct. 2 & 9.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001605. The following Copartnership is doing business as SHANDOKAN TRIBAL MARTIAL ARTS AND CROSS TRAINING. 2232 S. RODEO GULCH RD., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. ROBERT WILSON IVAN. 1705 ESCALONDA DR., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060 & SITHAN PAT. 2232 S. RODEO GULCH RD., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by a Copartnership signed: SITHAN PAT. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Sept. 13, 2019. Sept 18, 25, Oct. 2 & 9.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001567 The following Individual is doing business as SANTA CRUZ WINDOW TINTING. 715 SAN JUAN AVE. #A, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95065. County of Santa Cruz. BRYCE GOERING. 715 SAN JUAN AVE. #A, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95065. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: BRYCE GOERING. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Sept. 6, 2019. September 18, 25, Oct. 2, & 9.

WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. This business is conducted by a family trust signed: WILLIAM MILLER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Sept. 10, 2019. Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 9, & 16.

real estate

Hiring Bonus $500 for FT employee. Intellectually challenged adults in residential or day program setting. Shift work. Up to $15 per hr to start DOE Apply M – F 8am-3pm (831) 475-0888

ARF MANAGER/ADMINISTRATOR Experience working with intellectually challenged adults preferred. Ability to become (employer paid) ARF Certified. Training Available. Responsible for 24hr operation of home including employee management, shopping, medical appointments. Work with an existing team & long term clients. DOE up to $54,080 per year. Dental, Vacation, and Sick , California Retirement. Apply M – F 8am-3pm (831) 475-0888

LIEN SALES LIEN SALE 10/21/19 10AM AT 3055 WINKLE AVE, SANTA CRUZ 07 MERZ LIC# 6CKC752 VIN# WDBRF52H07F923624

RENTAL PROPERTIES 2bdr, 1.5 bath, 2d floor condo. In the “Villas of Capitola” with wood-burning fireplace and 1 covered parking. Short walk down the hill to Capitola Village. Large swimming pool, long lap pool, and outside hot tub spa. No smoking. No pets. - Mo to Mo; $2500 + Security Deposit $2,500. 408-836-3740

Kathleen M. Pouls LAc,CMP ~ Acupuncture ~ ~ Refined Bodywork ~ ~ Combination Treatments ~

A Family Practice, Pre/Postnatal Care

• Antique Restorations • Furniture Design & Repair

Small Business Coach

Tim Gillett Cert Coach

(Owner of Pondmagic, 20+yrs)

• Wooden Boat Works

Free 30isminute phone session What the one thing you can do

• Musical Instruments

your business right now? •forPersonal/Business Coaching

• Unique Projects

831-251-0377 isaiahwilliams13@gmail.com mastercraftsman.webs.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001587 The following family trust is doing business as LA SELVA LAVENDAR. 107 RANCHO RD., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. KIM MILLER, TRUSTEE OF W&K MILLER REVOCABLE TRUST AND WILLIAM MILLER, TRUSTEE OF W&K MILLER REVOCABLE TRUST. 107 RANCHO RD.,

831.475.8885 • 3335 Mission Drive (Doctors Plaza by Dominican Hospital) Serving Santa Cruz since 1984 Insurance accepted kpoulshealingarts.com

• Complimentary First session

831.588.4397 bayareasmallbusinesscoach.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001630 The following Corporation is doing business as KEN AVERILL CONCRETE. 1540 DAY VALLEY RD., APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. AVERILL WORKS, INC. 1540 DAY VALLEY RD., APTOS, CA 95003. Al# 4300714. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: AVERILL WORKS, INC. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/18/2019. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on September 18, 2019. Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 9, & 16. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001560 The following Individual is doing business as MODERN EYEBROWS. 508 MAIN ST., WATSONVILLE, CA 95076. County of Santa Cruz. MY LUONG. 3519 DEANES LANE, CAPITOLA, CA 95010. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: MY LUONG. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is 9/6/2019. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on September 6, 2019. September 25, Oct. 2, 9, & 16. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001664 The following Corporation is doing business as INSIGHT SANTA CRUZ. 740 FRONT ST. SUITE 240, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. VIPASSANA SANTA CRUZ. 740 FRONT ST. SUITE 240, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. Al# 2264897. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: VIPASSANA SANTA CRUZ. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/1/2011. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Sept 24, 2019. Oct. 2, 9, 16, & 23. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001635. The following General Partnership is doing business as NORTHERN ROOTS BEE CO. 1760 47TH AVE., CAPITOLA, CA 95010. County of Santa Cruz. MOLLY BURNS EATON, & COLE ANTON YAKEMCHUK. 1760 47TH AVE., CAPITOLA, CA 95010. This business is conducted by a General Partnership signed: MOLLY BURNS EATON. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Sept. 19, 2019. Oct. 2, 9, 16, & 23.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001553 The following Individual is doing business as MARTZ CLEANING. 575 BALTUSROL DR., APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. PATRICIA B. MENDOZA. 575 BALTUSROL DR., APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: PATRICIA B. MENDOZA. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001436 The following Individual is doing business as YOUR PLACE IS THE BEST PLACE. 1719 MISSION ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. RACHEL WISOTSKY. 125 OXFORD WAY, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: RACHEL WISOTSKY. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on August 13, 2019. September 18, 25, Oct. 2, & 9.

REFILING OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT WITH CHANGE FILE NO. 2019-0001629. The following MARRIED COUPLE is doing business as CAPITOLA ALTERATIONS. 810 BAY AVE. #F, CAPITOLA, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. TAE HUI KIM & BYONG KU KIM. 2910 LEOTAR CIR., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by a MARRIED COUPLE signed: TAE HUI KIM. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/1/2014. Original FBN number: 2014-0001926. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Sept. 18, 2019. Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 9, & 16.

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#1

REAL

ESTATE

COM PANY

FEATURED PROPERTY

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ.PETITION OF AMIRHOSSEIN BEIGZADEH DELIJANI CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.19CV02981. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner AMIRHOSSEIN BEIGZADEH DELIJANI has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: AMIRHOSSEIN BEIGZADEH DELIJANI to: AMIR DELIJANI. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING November 18, 2019 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Oct. 3, 2019. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Oct. 9, 16, 23, & 30.

SANTA

C RU Z

COU NTY

FEATURED PROPERTY

120 TARYN LN, WATSONVILLE

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0001707 The following Individual is doing business as BRIGHTON AERIAL. 731 36TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. BRIGHTON LEO DENEVAN. 731 36TH AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: BRIGHTON LEO DENEVAN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on October 2, 2019. Oct. 9, 16, 23, & 30.

IN

1845 ENOS LN, CORRALITOS

4 Beds | 4 Baths | 3,545 sq. ft. | $2,195,000

5 Beds | 5 Baths | 3,693 sq. ft. | $1,890,000

FEATURED PROPERTY

FEATURED PROPERTY

8491 BERTA VIEWS LN, SALINAS

77 PELICAN DR, WATSONVILLE

5 Beds | 3 Baths | 3,248 sq. ft. | $998,000

4 Beds | 2.5 Baths | 2,146 sq. ft. | $699,000

FEATURED PROPERTY

FEATURED PROPERTY

605 ALMOND DR, WATSONVILLE 2 Beds | 2 Baths | 1,286 sq. ft. | $499,000

Angelica Martinez-Curiel

831.818.0100

43 EASTON RD ROYAL OAKS

2 Beds | 1.5 Baths | 1,123 sq. ft. | $675,000

Sandi McGinnis-Garcia

831.818.8971

Juan Salas

831.345.7213

55 PENNY LANE, SUITE 102, WATSONVILLE, CALIFORNIA 95076

A BUYERS GALLERY OF FINE HOMES®

DAVIDLYNG.COM 831.429.5700

Tom Brezsny’s

REAL ESTATE OF MIND

Provoking thought since 1990

Continuing the conversation…Who’s selling homes in Santa Cruz and where are they going? And who’s buying them and where are they coming from? Last week we talked about the average seller profile. Most are aging baby boomers or the aging parents of aging baby boomers. Common reasons for selling include: Estate sales occurring as people living into their 80s and 90s pass away (we’re all going to get there). The desire to downsize and make proactive choices well ahead of the aging curve. Or the need to react a little too late to specific challenges that arise due to aging (health concerns, mobility issues, passing of a spouse, proximity to family, financial challenges etc.) Here are common destinations: Local: Not so much. There’s a lack of singlelevel condos or townhomes out there. They weren’t making many during the 1980s and ‘90s when builders were stacking as much multi-story square footage as possible on those relatively small in-fill parcels. And there’s no doubt that the waiting list for Dominican Oaks is expanding, but there aren’t enough residences there to meet current demand, and there aren’t many other desirable assisted living choices in the County either. In theory, we should be seeing lots of local sellers transitioning into smaller single level homes right here in sunny Santa Cruz. But in practice, people are finding in-town movedowns difficult to accomplish in a place where there just aren’t enough smaller, single level homes offered at prices that allow them to transfer their property taxes and/or free up enough equity to live off of. In State: Not so much either. In the old days, the Sierras were a destination of choice for aging baby-boomers. These days, increasing fears about fire danger and the perceived lack of access to medical care are limiting the silver-haired migration to Gold Country. The numbers would increase if property tax transfers were available in all counties, but since the recent state measure failed to pass, they won’t grow any time soon. Out of State: The majority of sellers are moving out of California. There’s not one preferred destination for their new homes away from home, but Oregon, Washington, Nevada all rank high on the list. Throw in Idaho as well, and a little New Mexico and Texas on top. Most of those places have tax structures that serve as justification for the move. But the real similarity is that the cost of real estate and cost of living are both a lot lower than they are here. That’s the quick overview on the selling side of the equation. Next week, let’s look at the buyers and where they are coming from.

Tom Brezsny

Realtor® DRE#01063297

831-818-1431 getreal@serenogroup.com PA I D A D V E R T O R I A L


PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

SANTA CRUZ, CA BID NOVEMBER 4–7

AUCTION NO RESERVE Previously Offered for $3.699M. SELLING TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, REGARDLESS OF PRICE. ConciergeAuctions.com | +1 646.760.7823 This property is listed for sale by Alistair Craft (01402715) of Sereno Group (#01519580) 720 FRONT ST, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060; 831-234-1092. Concierge Auctions, LLC is a marketing service provider for auctions, is not a licensed Real Estate broker, and possesses California Auctioneer’s Bond #62662376 — 800 Brazos Street, Suite 220, Austin, TX 78701; +1 (212) 202-2940. Licensed Auctioneer Frank Trunzo (CA Bond #511522). All measurements, property corners, etc. to be verified by buyer to buyer’s full satisfaction. The services referred to herein are not available to residents of any state where prohibited by applicable state law. Concierge Auctions, LLC, its agents and affiliates, broker partners, auctioneer, and sellers do not warrant or guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information and shall have no liability for errors or omissions or inaccuracies under any circumstances in this or any other property listings or advertising, promotional or publicity statements and materials. This is not meant as a solicitation for listings. Brokers are protected and encouraged to participate. Equal Housing Opportunity. See Auction Terms and Conditions for full details.

310 Marigold Ave., Freedom, CA 95019

This 1932 Estate has been beautifully updated. In one of Watsonville’s most established and desired areas, rarely does a home like this come onto the market. From crystal chandeliers and light fixtures, designer tile, paint, carpet, solid mahogany doors and built-ins, to the Master Bedrooms private balcony patio, every corner of this home has been lovely taken care of. Over 3000 sq. ft. in the Main House with 4 Bedrooms and 3.5 Baths, Formal Living Room, Formal Dining, Family Room and Wet Bar. The Studio Apartment above the Garage has a Separate Entrance, Kitchen, Bath and Laundry. As you walk through the Beautiful Gardens with Extensive Patios with mature landscaping you’ll find an Outdoor Kitchen that’s perfect for a quiet dinner or a large family gathering. This is truly a Special Property. Please call for your private showing.

JOHN SKILLICORN Realtor®

831-818-1540 | www.JohnSkillicorn.com | johnskillicorn@att.net

CALBRE #01875872

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

Wonderful single level family home in a nice neighborhood close to shopping and schools. Enjoy 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Living Room, Family Room, a large patio deck and backyard that’s great for the kids, family BBQ or your next party. Enjoy the comforts of the Kitchen that opens to the Dining Area and Family Room. Perfect for the young family just starting out or the family that needs more space. The holidays are coming so don’t miss out on this special property. Welcome Home!

39 Gonzales Street, Watsonville

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List With The Leader! WE’RE LOCAL • WE’RE GLOBAL

FEATURED HOMES APTOS/RIO DEL MAR

APTOS/RIO DEL MAR

SANTA CRUZ

203 Ranchitos Del Sol, Aptos Mediterranean, light filled 3BR/2. 5BA, 2,000sf home in desirable Day Valley features beamed ceilings, hardwood & tile floors, new carpet & paint. Chef’s kitchen, stainless appliances, wine coolers, Wolf range. All BR’s feature private decks. Nearly half an acre of flat landscaped grounds. Hot Tub. $1,069,000 Host: Byron Rifkind DRE# 01127076

9019 Rhodes Ave, Aptos It’s so cute & charming! This 2BR/1BA, 1,200 square foot home is located near to the Polo fields. Close to some of the best walking beaches, shopping and restaurants. $698,000 Host: David Long DRE# 01153320

925 Western Dr, Santa Cruz Single level ranch style home on the West Side. Cozy 3BR/2BA home, lovingly remodeled on a large lot ready for expansion or Granny unit. Near open space for hiking, biking, dog park & exploration. Close to UCSC. Only a couple of miles to the ocean. A multitude of possibilities for the fenced & divided backyard. $989,900 Host: Marilyn Johnson DRE# 01095691

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OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

320 Rio Del Mar Blvd, Aptos Turn-key, 5-star rated beach house & permitted vacation rental. EZ walk to beach & restaurants in exclusive Rio Del Mar/Cement ship area. New glass garage door, hardwood floors, open floor plan, newer appliances. Large level lot, fenced back yard w/artist or home office cottage. $1,199,000 Host: Bryan Chambers DRE# 01459135

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151 Camino Pacifico, Aptos Beautiful contemporary 3BR/2. 5BA, 1,584 sq ft home tucked away in coveted Seascape neighborhood. Location can’t be beat! Vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, fireplace in living area. Dining room slider opens to wood deck & lush landscaping. Enjoy the Beach Lifestyle! $894,500 Host: Nick Bailey DRE# 02042562 704 Encino Dr, Rio Del Mar Lovely 3BR/2BA home in the trees on sunny spot near the top of the hill. Loving remodeled from head to toe. Move-in ready. Open floor plan. Living area has wall to wall & ceiling to floor windows. Minutes from beaches, great schools, easy freeway access. $720,000 Host: Candie Noel DRE# 01339841

CAPITOLA/SOQUEL 5520 Bogey Dr, Soquel WOW! This “Artsy,” Single-Level, 3 w bedroom / 2 bath Home is turn Ne key! Exceptional Landscaping with a Fish Pond! Exceptional Interior: flooring, windows, lighting, kitchen, sound system. And there’s more! See www.5520Bogey.com. $975,000 Host: Susan Steely DRE# 01002379 g! tin s i L

46 Sears Cl, Soquel Clean, comfortable, move in ready 3BR/2.5BA home in super convenient Soquel location. This lovingly maintained home is located on a quiet street close to beaches, Capitola Village & Cabrillo College. New carpet & paint, versatile open floorplan with fenced back yard & attached 2-car garage. $799,000 Host: Janine De Rosa DRE# 2071324 4425 Clares #82, Capitola Loma Vista Estates! Quiet, centrally located 55+ co-op community. Organized events & affordable HOA fee. 2BR/2BA home on spacious lot. Beautiful updated kitchen. Open porch, added sunroom. This home has much to offer & is a special find. Walk to Capitola Mall & the Village. $365,000 Host: Jill Lindsay DRE# 01797789

! ed ist L st Ju

132 Pearl, Santa Cruz Wow! Great price to be in town, close to beach, Seabright, downtown. Walk or ride your bike to everything. Gated backyard, garage, parking. New kitchen. Wood counters. This is a jewel, Must see! $739,999 Host: Allan Melikian DRE# 01240135 ! ch ea B ar Ne

36 Kite Hill Rd, Santa Cruz Coveted Pasatiempo Golf gated w community. Architecturally stunNe ning 5BR/4.5BA, 4,095 sq ft home on 1/2 acre lot. Chef’s kitchen opens to family room with rare 6-panel ached windows. Master suite features a gas fireplace, soaking tub, walk-in closet, private office. Top rated Scotts Valley schools. $1,875,000 Host: Jennifer Graham DRE# 01359890 g! tin s i L

156 Montclair Dr, Santa Cruz Impressive value! Privacy & serenw ity combined w/great commute Ne location in highly desired Rolling Woods Neighborhood & award winning schools. Stop by & view this well maintained 3BR/3BA home built w/quality materials. Awesome views of lush Mother Nature at her finest. Beach & State park close by. $1,170,000 Host: Marilyn Johnson DRE# 01095691 ! ice Pr


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FEATURED HOMES SANTA CRUZ 730 Tanner Ct, Santa Cruz Walk to SC Yacht Harbor or bike to nearby beaches from this 18 year new, 2,043 sq ft, high-end custom home located on quiet Cul-de-Sac in convenient mid-town location. Features include open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, tile & wood floors, mature landscaped yards. $1,195,000 Host: Pete Cullen DRE# 01375721 220 Atlantic Ave #307, Santa Cruz Don’t miss out on this bright, airy, peaceful oasis. 1BR/1BA Condo. Beautiful laminate floors, granite counter tops. Relaxing, sunny, heated year-round pool area. One block from ocean. Just a short walk to boardwalk, marina, & best Seabright destinations. $499,000 Host: Tarah Fyock DRE# 02095120

SAN LORENZO VALLEY

SOUTH SANTA CRUZ COUNTY

16605 Big Basin Way #12, Boulder Creek Don’t miss out on possibly the best location at the Boulder Creek Golf Course. This 2BR/2BA, 1,394 sf condo features single level living, vaulted ceilings, private deck and only steps to the community pool. First time on the market in over 40 years! $475,000 Hosts: Lori Hoover Hayley Hackett DRE# 00677874 DRE# 02002432

835 Browns Valley, Corralitos Only 5 minutes to the Market! 2BR/2BA, 1,408 sq ft home on 12.7 acres. Cozy light filled family room centered around a wood burning stove. Updated electric kitchen, quartz counters. 1 BR/ BA on ground floor, 1BR/BA, desk area, balcony + another living area on 2nd floor. Raised bed planters, deer fencing. $675,000 Hosts: Lori Hoover Hayley Hackett DRE# 00677874 DRE# 02002432

&

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SCOTTS VALLEY 197 Glenwood Dr, Scotts Valley This is the one! SINGLE level, 3BR/ 2BA, 1,625 sq ft, nestled to back of nearly 10,000 sq ft level lot! Open beam ceiling in LR, manicured private yard w/new deck, canning kitchen. Scotts Valley Schools. Just a few minutes to all amenities, highway 17 & much more! $899,900 Host: Angela Heredia DRE# 02066033

5476-5480 Jackson Way, Felton 4BR/2BA updated farmhouse w w/550 sq ft 1BR/1BA modern guest Ne house on beautiful level parcel in prime location. Farm house elevated w/1,500 sq ft workshop below. Beautiful stone fireplace. Wrap-around decking. Cottage nicely positioned on lot w/fenced bkyd. Investment opportunity, 2-unit rental income! $1,119,000 Host: Jo Ellen Smith DRE# 01340453 ! ice Pr

120 Lake Dr #6, Boulder Creek WOW! New Kitchen, Appliances, Bathroom Upgraded. Stunning, sunny 18th Green view, open floor plan, double pane windows, newer wood floors, Great Price. Great Location. EZ 45-minute commute to Silicon Valley. Wood burning fireplace. $339,999 Host: Bryan Chambers DRE# 01459135

&

MORGAN HILL 17160 Creekbed Ct, Morgan Hill Wonderful 2BR+huge loft/2.5BA, 1,600+ sq ft townhouse in beautiful gated community. Spacious living/ dining combo w/fireplace. Kitchen w/stainless appl & new flooring. Interior laundry, new A/C. Complex has low HOA dues & lush common space. Close to everything. $629,000 Host: Derek Scranton DRE# 02041332

SOUTH SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 90 Brodin Lane, Corralitos Located in the heart of wonderful Corralitos Village at the end of a 2-block long street w/no through traffic. 3BR/2BA on spacious parcel. Great layout for extended family or perhaps extra income. Aptos schools. Upgrades include dual pane windows, granite counters, gas fireplace. X-St: Blake/Hames. $749,000 Host: Pat Simmons DRE# 01211263 ! tos ali r r Co

PRUNEDALE 15665 Plaza Serena, Prunedale Very private updated 5BR/4BA, 2,726 sf home in Prunedale. Main home connected to guest unit by enclosed hallway. 2 full garages & separate bkyds. Deck area in back. Fruit trees in front. New furnace in main home, new stove & fridge in guest unit. All on 3.08 acres. 15 minutes to beach. $974,999 Host: Gloria Behman DRE# 01483481 e! ric dP e c du Re

270 Hames Rd #13, Corralitos Beautiful updated 2BR/1.5BA, 1440sf home in Rancho Corralitos, a picturesque Senior Park on over 40 acres, stunning views in all directions. Open floor plan, bamboo floors throughout, modern kitchen. New decking, fruit trees & garden areas. Spacious shed with a workbench & storage. $412,500 Host: Jill Lindsay DRE# 01797789 Aptos

Aptos

WE’RE LOCAL - WE’RE GLOBAL

Aptos 688.7434 • Santa Cruz 426.4100 • Scotts Valley 438.2300 • Watsonville 722.8874 BaileyProperties.com Sales • Property Management • Vacation Rentals • Mortgage • Relocation Connecting you to the world of Luxury. Luxury Real Estate is far more than a transaction. It’s about living the life you deserve.

DRE#1319514

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

SAN LORENZO VALLEY

BOULDER CREEK

! ed ist L st Ju

67 Contact a Bailey Properties agent to discover the Luxury Portfolio difference LUXURYPORTFOLIO.COM | BAILEYPROPERTIES.COM APTOS 688-7434

SANTA CRUZ 426-4100

SCOTTS VALLEY 438-2300

WATSONVILLE 722-8874


PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

650 TRAVERS LANE (X-ST. GREEN VALLEY RD.)

FEATURED LISTING

Broker BRE# 01835165

THE ONLY REALTOR® YOU NEED! Becky Campos Cell: 818-7607 CalBRE #00575464

beckycampos.com rcampos 969@aol.com

Serving You at 4 Locations: Carmel, Prunedale, Salinas & Watsonville

To download my app: Text BHHSBCAMPOS to 1(844) 558-2447

250 BELLA VISTA FEATURED LISTING

Darling 2 bedroom home on 2.58 acres, 2 car garage, useable land, Water and road agreements in place. Gorgeous views and gentle rolling hills with meadow and some older apple trees, perhaps plant more trees, gardens, vineyard, horses etc. Lots of possibilities. L# 4002 $679,000

494 SUNCREST WAY 500 TRAVERS LANE PARCELS FEATURED LISTING

FEATURED LISTING

OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

REDUCED

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Panoramic Monterey Bay View!!! Estate sized property situated on approx 6 Acres, overlooking the coastline of Santa Cruz, Salinas & the Monterey Bay. Perched on a hilltop this private estate has 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths and approx 6095 square feet, formal living and dining rooms, two family rooms, country size kitchen, 2 pellet stoves and one wood burning fireplace. You will love the large size of every room in this home. There is an Eagles nest/ Bar room perfect for getting away by yourself. So many amenities, two ovens, two dishwashers, trash compactor, two refrigerators, stainless steel railing around patio to relax and enjoy the view and privacy with family and friends. Abundant natural light throughout. Gated entry, location is central to Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Monterey & San Benito Counties. 1248 sq feet Shop/Garage with grease pit and one tall door for a motorhome. INCREDIBLE PROPERTY! BRIGHT & OPEN FLOOR PLAN, BRINGS OUTDOORS IN! VIEWS FROM EVERY ROOM! OCEAN, COAST, VALLEY & MOUNTAINS! SPECTACULAR SUNSETS AND CITY LIGHTS! L#4005 $1,795,000

Gorgeous adult village home with 2 bedrooms plus Den with double doors. This home is pretty special with it being newly remodeled with new cabinets and full backsplash granite in kitchen. Both baths redone, tiled floors throughout home, crown molding in every room, stainless appliances, flagstone patio front and back, gas log set in fireplace, tiled roof and 2 car garage. Front lawn is artificial turf plus beautiful flowering bushes all on drip. #4006 $575,000

3 country parcels perfect to build your dream home and or investment properties on. Perhaps modular or Tiny Homes. Nice private location, quiet rolling hills. Santa Cruz county, Easy commute to work then back home to enjoy the country. Consists of parcels with the following acreage 3.49 acres, 3.02 acres and 2.95 acres. $629,000


The THC Experience A cozy, family-operated cannabis boutique in the heart of Soquel Village promoting an effective alternative and holistic approach to your wellness needs through cannabis, one customer at a time.

ORDER ONLINE / PICK UP ONLY Follow us on social media THCSoquel

TherapeuticHealthcareC

5011 Soquel Dr., Soquel, CA – 831-713-5641 www.THCSoquel.com Monday - Saturday 9–9pm Sunday 10–8pm CA Retailer License A10-17-0000043-TEMP

35,000 Inserted into Good Times on Nov. 27. Another 35,000 distributed all over Santa Cruz County until Dec. 24 Also distributed in Los Gatos!

Please contact one of our sales representatives to reserve your space 831-458-1100

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

GOOD TIMES ANNUAL HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

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70 OCTOBER 9-15, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM


Find your kind. View our full menu at kindpeoples.com

3600 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz 8am – 10pm Daily

533 Ocean Street, Santa Cruz 8am – 9pm Daily

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | OCTOBER 9-15, 2019

Licenses: C10-0000172-LIC • C10-0000234-LIC

Valid ID Required | All 21+ Welcome | 18+ Medical

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Where the locals shop since 1938. VOTED BEST BUTCHER SHOP BEST WINE SELECTION BEST CHEESE SELECTION BEST LOCALLY OWNED GROCERY STORE BEST MURAL /PUBLIC ART

Family owned & operated 80 years. 622 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz

OUR 80 TH YEAR

WEEKLY SPECIALS Good th r u 10/15/19

GROCERY

BUTCHER SHOP

ALL NATURAL USDA Choice beef & lamb, Local, Organic, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet only corn-fed Midwest pork, Rocky free-range Compare & Save - Beverages chickens, Mary’s air-chilled chickens, ■ IZZE Sparkling Juice, 4Pk Bottles, wild-caught seafood, Boar’s Head products BEEF 12oz/ 4.99 +CRV

WINE & FOOD PAIRING VEAL CHOP WITH PORTOBELLO MUSHROOMS Ingredients

5 tablespoons olive oil, divided 1 tablespoon butter 2 veal chops 1 portobello mushroom, sliced 1-1/2 cups chicken broth 1-1/2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, chopped ½ cup red wine

WINE & SPIRITS

Best Buys, Local, Regional, International

Beer

■ HOPWORKS “Robot Panda” or “Ferocious” 6Pk Cans, 12oz/ 8.99 ■ BON & VIV Spiked Seltzer, Variety 6Pk, 12oz/ 7.99 +CRV ■ DOGFISH HEAD “Punkin Ale” 6Pk Btls, ■ FLAT IRON STEAKS, USDA Choice/ 6.98 Lb ■ SAN PELLEGRINO Italian Sparkling Beverage, 12oz/ 1.99 +CRV ■ BEEF HANGER STEAKS, USDA Choice/ 6.98 Lb 6Pk Cans, All Flavors, 11.5oz/ 4.99 +CRV ■ TRUMER PILS German Pilsner 6Pk Btls, ■ VEAL RIB CHOPS Pasture Fed/ 12.98 Lb 12oz/ 11.99 +CRV ■ SANTA CRUZ ORGANIC Lemonades, 32oz/ 1.99 PORK ■ TRULY Spiked Seltzer, Variety 12Pk, ■ HIBALL Select Flavors, 16 oz/ 1.89 +CRV ■ PORK LOIN ROAST, Boneless/ 3.98 Lb 12oz/ 15.99 +CRV Whiskey ■ C20 COCONUT WATER Original & With Pulp, ■ PORK BABY BACK RIBS/ 4.98 Lb ■ WILD TURKEY 101 “Hot Price”/ 14.99 SAUSAGE 17.5oz/ 1.89 ■ ELIJAH CRAIG Small Batch (93BTI)/ 19.99 ■ GARLIC & BASIL SAUSAGE/ 5.98 Lb Local Bakeries “Fresh Daily" ■ MAKERS MARK Kentucky Bourbon/ 21.99 ■ BEER BRATWURST/ 5.98 Lb ■ 1792 Small Batch (92.5WB)/ 26.99 ■ BECKMANN’S California Sourdough/ 4.09 ■ SMOKED ITALIAN SAUSAGE/ 5.98 Lb ■ BASIL HAYDEN Kentucky Straight/ 29.99 ■ WHOLE GRAIN Oat Bran/ 4.19

MARINATED TUMBLED MEATS

BBQ Reds

■ KELLY’S Sour Baguette, 16oz/ 2.69

■ 2014 ERRAZURIZ CARMÉNÈRE (Reg 17.99)/ 7.99 ■ 2013 WEST CLIFF ZINFANDEL Old Vine ■ SUMANO’S Sourdough Round/ 4.49 (Reg 17.99)/ 9.99 ■ 2013 TELLUS MERLOT (91JS, Reg 22.99)/ 11.99 Delicatessen ■ 2014 MONTES ALPHA SYRAH (92WS, Reg 26.99) ■ PASTA MIKE’S “Local Business” / 12.99 RAVIOLIS 5.89 PASTA 3.79 PASTA SAUCE 3.79 ■ 2016 SANTA RITA PINOT NOIR Secret Reserve (93JS, Reg 16.99)/ 9.99 ■ GALBANI RICOTTA Whole & Park Skim,

■ LEMON PEPPER CHICKEN BREAST,Boneless/ ■ SUMANO’S 9-Grain Loaf/ 4.49 5.98 Lb

■ LEMON PEPPER CHICKEN LEGS/ 4.69 Lb

Directions Heat 4 tablespoons olive oil with butter in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook chops until browned, 2 to 3minutes per side. Once browned, stir in mushrooms and cook for 1 minute. Add chicken broth and rosemary; cover and simmer 10 minutes. Stir in red wine, increase heat, and cook, uncovered, until sauce is reduced by half. Veal chops may be removed at any time to prevent over-cooking, then returned to the pan for the final minute.

Wine Pairing

2013 Silvertip Sandstone Pinot Noir Santa Cruz Mountains Reg. 26.99 Shoppers Special 13.99!!

FISH

■ PACIFIC RED SNAPPER FILLETS/ 6.39 Lb ■ SALMON LOX TRIMMINGS/ 9.98 Lb

■ AHI TUNA STEAKS Thick Cut/ 14.98 Lb

PRODUCE

California Fresh, Blemish-Free, Organic, Arrow Citrus Co., Lakeside Organics, Happy Boy Farms

■ AVOCADOS Table Ripe Ready/ 1.59 Ea ■ PEARS Bartlett, Bosc, Comice and d’Anjou/ 1.49 ■ LEAF LETTUCE Red, Romaine, Butter and Iceberg/1.29 Ea ■ YELLOW ONIONS Premium Quality/ .59 Lb ■ BANANAS Always Ripe / .79 Lb ■ ZUCCHINI AND YELLOW SQUASH Top Quality/ 1.19 Lb ■ CLUSTER TOMATOES Ripe on the Vine/ 2.29 Lb ■ YUKON GOLD POTATOES Yellow Flesh Potatoes/ .99 Lb ■ SEEDLESS GRAPES Red and Green/ 2.99 Lb ■ ORGANIC BANANAS The Perfect Snack/ .99 Lb

32oz/ 5.79 ■ GALLO PEPPERONI & SALAME 7oz/ 3.29 ■ HEMPLER BACON All Kinds, 10oz/ 7.89

Cheese – Best Selection in Santa Cruz ■ MILD CHEDDAR “rBST-Free” ■ Loaf Cuts/ 3.29 Lb Average Cuts/ 3.49 Lb ■ COLBY JACK “Great Melted”/ 2.99 Lb ■ BLACK RIVER GORGONZOLA A Customer Favorite/ 6.09 Lb ■ STELLA PARMESAN Domestic/ 7.89 Lb

Whites and Rosé

■ 2015 DECUGNANO DEI BARBI Orvieto (90WE, Reg 18.99)/ 4.99 ■ 2016 CHALK HILL Rosé (Reg 28.99)/ 6.99 ■ 2017 14 HANDS Rosé (Reg 13.99)/ 6.99 ■ 2016 SANTA RITA Sauvignon Blanc Secret Reserve (91JS, Reg 12.99)/ 7.99 ■ 2015 ZACA MESA Z Blanc (91WE, Reg 24.99) / 8.99

Connoisseur’s Corner - Italy

■ 2013 LA GERLA Brunello di Montalcino (94RP)/ 58.99 ■ 2013 FELSINA RANCIA Chianti Classico Riserva Clover Sonoma - Best Prices In Santa Cruz (96V)/ 52.99 ■ SOUR CREAM 16oz/ 2.29 ■ 2013 PIO CESARE Barolo (95WE)/ 64.99 ■ ORGANIC YOGURT Plain & Vanilla, 32oz/ 3.49 ■ 2011 MASTROBERARDINO RADICI Taurasi ■ ORGANIC CREAM TOP YOGURT 24oz/ 3.49 (94WE)/ 59.99 ■ BUTTER QUARTERS Lb/ 4.99 ■ 2016 TIGNANELLO Toscana (97WE, 97RP, 98V) ■ MILK Gallon/ 4.49 / 139.99

MELISSA HART, 23-Year Customer, Santa Cruz

S HOPP ER’S SPOTLIG HT

Occupation: Retired environmental planner; teacher’s aide Hobbies: Walking, swimming, bunco, book club, volunteering, cooking Who or what first got you shopping here? My husband and I had just moved to Santa Cruz from Santa Barbara.A couple invited us over, and I mentioned that I missed my hometown.The wife asked if I had been to Shopper’s — I hadn’t. She said she greatly valued Shopper’s saying it was unique to the area. My first impression of Shopper’s was ‘happiness.’ I found the manager and said, ‘This is the first place I’ve been to that makes me miss Santa Barbara less!’ Nowadays, I shop here three to four times a week and I treat it like my pantry. If I ever left Santa Cruz, I would have to take Shopper’s with me!

What do you like to cook? I love interpreting traditional Italian dishes into vegan dishes. My diet is 80 percent vegan but cook meat for my family. I guess I’m like a jazz player as I like to riff on whatever inspires. I may be impressed by an online recipe and I can come to Shopper’s and usually find all the ingredients.A favorite meat dish I make is Sicilian pot roast which I shred over pasta and top with gramalta. It’s yummy and kinda spicy. When making vegan bolognese sauce, I’ll add porcini mushrooms lentils and walnuts. I’ve made vegan liver pâté for guests and they’ll ask how I make all these delicious foods. I say,‘Shopper’s… they have so many things that spark my creativity.’

You prefer shopping Shopper’s over the chains or big box stores? One hundred percent! The big stores are overwhelming. Shopper’s scale works for me. I feel acknowledged by the butchers and checkers — everybody.There’s a personal touch and they don’t overdo it because they’re genuine. I see customers who look glad to be here; I think Shopper’s is a good part of their day. Shopper’s carries so many exciting specialty products and their produce is the best.They’re really good about curating it so you don’t have to pick through it. I’ve told people on strict budgets that if they shop here, they’ll waste less and be able to broaden their food selections without overspending.

“I’ve told people on strict budgets that if they shop here, they’ll waste less and be able to broaden their food selections without overspending.”

|

Corner: Soquel & Branciforte Avenues 7 Days: 6am-9pm

| Meat: (831) 423-1696 | Produce: (831) 429-1499 | Grocery: (831) 423-1398 | Wine: (831) 429-1804

Superb Products of Value: Local, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ■ Neighborly Service for 80 Years

Profile for Metro Publishing

Good Times Santa Cruz October 9-15, 2019  

Good Times Santa Cruz October 9-15, 2019