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SANTA CRUZ EXPLORES THE LEGACY OF

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INSIDE Volume 45, No.7 May 15-21, 2019

WASTE NOT Bike composting returns to Santa Cruz P12

We digitally restore your old photos! www.bayphoto.com/local @bayphotolocal

A JUSTICE FOR ALL Santa Cruz event examines the legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg P22

From this...

...to this!

SOCIAL ‘CLUB’ Madcap laughs in clever, chatty new Jewel production ‘The Explorers Club’ P32

Opinion 4 News 12 Cover Story 22 A&E 32 Events 38

Film 52 Dining 56 Risa’s Stars 59 Classifieds 60

Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal. Good Times is free of charge, limited to one copy per issue per person. Entire contents copyrighted © 2019 Nuz, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form is prohibited without publisher’s written permission. Good Times is printed at a LEED-certified facility. Good Times office: 107 Dakota Ave., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

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FEATURES

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OPINION

EDITOR’S NOTE

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

One of the things that impressed me about the documentary RBG was how it tracked Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s transformation from flesh-andblood individual to iconic symbol. She still is a person, of course—and long may she be so—but now all of the things she does, all of the words she writes about American law, seem bigger. Every dissenting opinion is less like a legal document than a major campaign in an epic conflict—and these are not just legal battles, but also cultural and political ones. She’s become someone who we

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can talk about as a way of starting conversations on larger issues. The event in Santa Cruz this week called “My Own Words: The Law and Legacy of RBG” does just that, and so does Georgia Johnson’s cover story about it. In talking to three of the participants in the panel discussion— UCSC professor Bettina Aptheker, Santa Cruz Superior Court Judge Syda Cogliati and local attorney Anna Penrose-Levig, Johnson is able to get into issues of gender in jurisprudence that go beyond just the question of Ginsburg’s influence, although that is hugely important as well. I like how the different perspectives of these three women—a judge, a lawyer and an activist—provide a well-rounded look at RBG’s legacy in the story, and no doubt at the event, too. STEVE PALOPOLI | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

LETTERS

I’LL HAVE WHAT SHE’S HAVING

NOT EVERYONE IN APTOS

I’ve been watching my carbs and fats of late, but Christina Waters’ description of GF carrot cake (GT, 5/1) has me tumbling off the wagon. I’ve heard desserts described as “orgasmic,” or “better than sex,” but I’ve never seen (one of my favorite words) “tumescent,” in a food column. It caught my eye right away. A faux pas, for sure, I sniffed. Then I looked again. Phrases like “a midday second breakfast (to) share with someone,” “inspired partner” and “glorious morning,” made me reconsider my scoff. Maybe it was intentional. I’m all for creative use of language, but “tumescent” carrot cake? I’ll just have to take a bite and see for myself.

Re: “Earth to Santa Cruz” (GT, 5/8): Let it be known that not everyone in Aptos supports highway widening or more parking. This thinking of making the car king is why we are now dealing with the consequences of allocating so much living space on Earth to wider roadways in order to travel between unending parking lots. Rather than continuing to compromise quality of life (which presently also includes requiring an extra hour to get across the county), there are better alternatives which don’t waste millions, and yet ensure safer travel that could have been implemented 50 years ago. This also will not involve making matters drastically worse during the months of construction. Please Google, “Public transportation: If you build it (properly), they will come.” BOB FIFIELD | APTOS

ON YOUR WAY Re: “Earth to Santa Cruz”: Dear Mary, On your way to Watsonville, stop in our new shop in Soquel. There is parking in the back and friendly faces in the shop. We appreciate your business. ELAINE SHERER | OWNER, FOUND ART COLLECTIVE

FOXTROT MOSS | CAPITOLA

ONLINE COMMENTS RE: NONPROFIT WORKERS One of my rules for government is to buy what people want, need and are willing to pay for. This is capitalism applied to the government and in line with the Constitution. This requires the government to divine this and not be subject to special interests’ persuasion, corruption, ideological possession, or self-interest. They >8

PHOTO CONTEST STELLAR VIEW A Stellar’s Jay on a local fence. Photograph by Nanda Currant.

Submit to photos@goodtimes.sc. Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.

GOOD IDEA

GOOD WORK

FEST EVER

PICK-UP GAME

This weekend marks the 40th anniversary of UCSC’s Multicultural Festival, which runs noon-6 p.m. on Saturday, May 18. The free festival raises money for the cultural student organizations that make the event possible. This year’s theme is “Together We Resist, Together We Persist.” Ruby Ibarra, a Pilipino rapper from San Lorenzo, California, will headline. On the school’s Lower Oakes Lawn, there will be 17 student organizations selling food and drink ranging from Thai tea and egg rolls to tofu and steak tacos made on the festival grounds.

Aristeo Flores, a custodian at Scotts Valley Middle School, will be crowned the winner of the nationwide 2019 Cintas Custodian of the Year contest in a surprise 11 a.m. school ceremony on Wednesday, May 15. Flores, a 17-year employee, will be presented with a $5,000 cash prize during an all-school assembly. Scotts Valley Middle School will also receive $5,000 in products and services from Cintas Corporation and Rubbermaid Commercial Products. The students and staff will get an ice cream truck break.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“I’m constantly amazed by the number of people who want to take my picture.” — RUTH BADER GINSBURG

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LOCAL TALK

What would you tell 23-yearold you? BY MATTHEW COLE SCOTT

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ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of May 15 ARIES Mar21–Apr19

LIBRA Sep23–Oct 22

According to humorist Dave Barry, “The method of learning Japanese recommended by experts is to be born as a Japanese baby and raised by a Japanese family, in Japan.” As you enter an intensely educational phase of your astrological cycle, I suggest you adopt a similar strategy toward learning new skills and mastering unfamiliar knowledge and absorbing fresh information. Immerse yourself in environments that will efficiently and effectively fill you with the teachings you need. A more casual, slapdash approach just won’t enable you to take thorough advantage of your current opportunities to expand your repertoire.

“All human nature vigorously resists grace because grace changes us and the change is painful,” wrote author Flannery O’Connor. I think that’s an observation worth considering. But I’ve also seen numerous exceptions to her rule. I know people who have eagerly welcomed grace into their lives even though they know that its arrival will change them forever. And amazingly, many of those people have experienced the resulting change as tonic and interesting, not primarily painful. In fact, I’ve come to believe that the act of eagerly welcoming change-inducing grace makes it more likely that the changes will be tonic and interesting. Everything I’ve just said will especially apply to you in the coming weeks.

TAURUS Apr20–May20 I think it’s time for a sacred celebration—a blow-out extravaganza filled with reverence and revelry, singing and dancing, sensual delights, and spiritual blessings. What is the occasion? After all these eons, your lost love has finally returned. And who exactly is your lost love? You! You are your own lost love! Having weaved and wobbled through countless adventures full of rich lessons, the missing part of you has finally wandered back. So give yourself a flurry of hugs and kisses. Start planning the jubilant hoopla. And exchange ardent vows, swearing that you’ll never be parted again.

GEMINI May21–June20 The Louvre in Paris is the world’s biggest art museum. Over 35,000 works are on display, packed into 15 acres. If you wanted to see every piece, devoting just a minute to each, you would have to spend eight hours a day there for many weeks. I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because I suspect that now would be a good time for you to treat yourself to a marathon gaze-fest of art in the Louvre—or any other museum. For that matter, it’s a favorable phase to gorge yourself on any beauty anywhere that will make your soul freer and smarter and happier. You will thrive to the degree that you absorb a profusion of grace, elegance and loveliness.

CANCER Jun21–Jul22 In my astrological opinion, you now have a mandate to exercise your rights to free speech with acute vigor. It’s time to articulate all the important insights you’ve been waiting for the right moment to call to everyone’s attention. It’s time to unearth the buried truths and veiled agendas and ripening mysteries. It’s time to be the catalyst that helps your allies to realize what’s real and important, what’s fake and irrelevant. I’m not saying you should be rude, but I do encourage you to be as candid as is necessary to nudge people in the direction of authenticity.

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

LE0 Jul23–Aug22

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During summer in the far northern land of Alaska, many days have 20 hours of sunlight. Farmers take advantage of the extra photosynthesis by growing vegetables and fruits that are bigger and sweeter than crops grown further south. During the Alaska State Fair every August, you can find prodigies like 130-pound cabbages and 65-pound cantaloupes. I suspect you’ll express a comparable fertility and productiveness during the coming weeks, Leo. You’re primed to grow and create with extra verve. So let me ask you a key question: to which part of your life do you want to dedicate that bonus power?

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 It’s time for you to reach higher and dig deeper. So don’t be a mere tinkerer nursing a lukewarm interest in mediocre stories and trivial games. Be a strategic adventurer in the service of exalted stories and meaningful games. In fact, I feel strongly that if you’re not prepared to go all the way, you shouldn’t go at all. Either give everything you’ve got or else keep it contained for now. Can you handle one further piece of strenuous advice, my dear? I think you will thrive as long as you don’t settle for business as usual or pleasure as usual. To claim the maximum vitality that’s available, you’ll need to make exceptions to at least some of your rules.

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 There’s a certain problem that has in my opinion occupied too much of your attention. It’s really rather trivial in the big picture of your life, and doesn’t deserve to suck up so much of your attention. I suspect you will soon see things my way, and take measures to move on from this energy sink. Then you’ll be free to focus on a more interesting and potentially productive dilemma—a twisty riddle that truly warrants your loving attention. As you work to solve it, you will reap rewards that will be useful and enduring.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec21 Author Hélène Cixous articulated a poetically rigorous approach to love. I’ll tell you about it, since in my astrological opinion, you’re entering a phase when you'll be wise to upgrade and refine your definitions of love, even as you upgrade and refine your practice of love. Here’s Cixous: “I want to love a person freely, including all her secrets. I want to love in this person someone she doesn’t know. I want to love outside the law: without judgment. Without imposed preference. Does that mean outside morality? No. Only this: without fault. Without false, without true. I want to meet her between the words, beneath language.”

CAPRICORN Dec22–Jan19 Capricorn author Henry Miller wrote that his master plan was, “to remain what I am and to become more and more only what I am—that is, to become more miraculous.” This is an excellent strategy for your use. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to renounce any tendency you might have to compare yourself to anyone else. You’ll attract blessings as you wean yourself from imagining that you should live up to the expectations of others or follow a path that resembles theirs. So here’s my challenge: I dare you to become more and more only what you are—that is, to become more miraculous.

AQUARIUS Jan20–Feb18 London’s British Museum holds a compendium of artifacts from the civilizations of many different eras and locations. Author Jonathan Stroud writes that it’s “home to a million antiquities, several dozen of which were legitimately come by.” Why does he say that? Because so many of the museum’s antiquities were pilfered from other cultures. In accordance with current astrological omens, I invite you to fantasize about a scenario in which the British Museum’s administrators return these treasures to their original owners. When you’re done with that imaginative exercise, move on to the next one, which is to envision scenarios in which you recover the personal treasures and goodies and powers that you have been separated from over the years.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 “I hate it when people tell me that I should ‘get out of my comfort zone,’” writes Piscean blogger Rosespell. “I don't even have a comfort zone. My discomfort zone is pretty much everywhere.” I have good news for Rosespell and all of you Pisceans who might be inclined to utter similar testimony. The coming weeks will feature conditions that make it far more likely than usual that you will locate or create a real comfort zone you can rely on. For best results, cultivate a vivid expectation that such a sweet development is indeed possible.

Homework: Describe what you’d be like if you were already the person you’ll be five years from now. Write freewillastrology.com.

© Copyright 2019


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OPINION

Which route will you take?

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are horrible at this job usually. I take special aim at the government funding nonprofits as core funding, meaning they just get money every year as opposed to being hired as contractors to do a specific job. Nonprofits have special status because they are supposed to provide a public benefit, not just make money. Clearly they need to provide a public benefit greater than just paying a contractor that does pay taxes to do the same. Nonprofits can and sure do solicit the public for donations. If they are unsuccessful at this, it means the public doesn’t want to fund them.

or

Why then should the government fund them? It is hubris, special-interest lobbying, conceit, self-interest and all the other factors that have no part in the government’s purpose at work. They are paid not much sometimes, unjustified amounts other times, and many nonprofit workers are also on government support, another drain on government. There are minimum wage requirements, even double minimum wage requirements for nonprofits in some cases where all the money goes to them, not so much to performing public benefit. — GARRETT PHILIPP

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WELLNESS

Elena Kelly, Tara Murphy (owner), Sonia Bachir. Back row (left to right): Tori Underwood, Annette LeFever, Alix Cardenas, Kaelin Bovee. PHOTO: JULES HOLDSWORTH

Buti Queens Opposites attract at Santa Cruz’s Estrella Collective BY MARIA GRUSAUSKAS

Y

ou can love someone and be mad at them. That’s how the concept of “dialectics” was introduced recently, on a podcast about relationships, of course. Ever since, I’ve been noticing the coexistence of seemingly diametrically opposed things in all areas of life. To clarify, Buti Yoga is not yoga, it’s a yoga-and-dance-inspired workout. This was the extent of my knowledge of the intriguingly named trend when the final day of Dance Week landed

me at Estrella Collective in downtown Santa Cruz, along with several other ladies and a few gentlemen also visiting for the first time. A smile blooms as the opening song, “B.I.A” by TroyBoi, pumps through the speakers, and I do my best to imitate the grace modeled by instructor and owner Tara Murphy, who pulls from her years of tribal fusion and belly dance (she’s trained in Middle Eastern cabaret and has been dancing since childhood). By song two, we are all beginning to sweat. I’m not mad at Buti Yoga, but my

left calf is close to having an outburst when the music shifts and we move on to a new rarely targeted muscle—a choreography of plyometrics and short intervals of intensity (think gentle burn followed by swift relief) that may appeal to those who prefer exercise that stays interesting and also doesn’t feel like exercise. We spend a lot of time on our knees—the shiny black studio floor offering just enough give under our yoga mats to make this pleasant—and return often to the transverse abdominals. “Circle clockwise!” is a common cue.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

STAR POWER Stylists, yoga instructors and energy workers from Estrella Collective. Front row (left to right): Vaidehi Amair,

By the time Full Crate and Gaidaa’s “A Storm on a Summer’s Day” bleeds into something I really wish I could Shazam, I’m in love with this workout, and considering ripping off my shirt Brandi Chastain style. “Buti is the black sheep of yoga,” says Murphy afterward, sitting on Estrella Collective’s velvet couch. “I feel like either people love it or they don’t. And that’s cool.” That’s also the attitude at the center of Estrella Collective, which celebrates one year in business on June 21. Murphy’s Estrella Collective is a beauty salon and a dance and yoga studio, melding the 41-yearold’s lifelong passions in a way we have honestly never seen before, anywhere. At Estrella, tooth gems, microblading and hair appointments are sandwiched between morning and evening workout classes, and “Thug China” (china plates and tea cups printed with rappers by a local artist) has found a home on a high shelf. Murphy’s mission to fuse inner and outer beauty may not be as overtly defiant as her passion project, Wu-Tang Yoga—a Vinyasa workout done to Wu-Tang that began with an in-class joke (“tuck your chin and protect your neck just like Wu-Tang”), and that she now hopes to trademark. After the idea was born, she collaborated with a partner yoga studio in New York. “I booked a workshop, it sold out, then I did one at Village Yoga in Santa Cruz, it sold out,” says Murphy. “People are craving something different.” I nod, because dialectics, and because while I will always embrace practicing with this town’s oldest and wisest yoga masters, my quest for novelty in bodily movement has been leading me outside of my comfort zone. Oddly enough, I feel quite at home at Estrella. The aesthetic is New York City—an intentional influence that blends a checkered black-andwhite floor with exposed brick and a sea of ivy wound into the ceiling. “For years I think I always thought, ‘I’m this, so I can’t be that,’ and then I realized I’m a walking contradiction— I’m everything, and everyone is like that,” Murphy says. “You can’t be a certain way all of the time.” estrellacollective.com.

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NEWS LETHAL INFLECTION New research and polling reveals a potential stalemate over the death penalty’s future in California

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

BY TOM GOGOLA

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Following Gov. Gavin Newsom’s moratorium on capital punishment via executive fiat in March, will California voters end the death penalty in 2020? New research from the National Institute on Money in Politics indicates that, absent a robust grassroots anti-death penalty effort, it may be a tough sell. That’s owing mostly to the power and influence of statewide unions, such as the California Correctional Peace Officers Association (CCPOA), whose small-donor efforts in 2016 helped turn the tables on a capital-punishment proposition twofer on the ballot that year. Power of unions aside, the recent findings don’t mean the death penalty is actually popular in and of itself. Going back to the 2016 election, Proposition 62 would have ended the death penalty outright, while pro-death penalty Proposition 66 sought to limit appeals in capital cases. The institute’s research found that even as the state was trending away from support for the death penalty, pro-death penalty committees outspent opponents $13.5 million to $9.7 million in 2016. That year, corrections officers made up, “the overwhelming majority of small donors rallying behind the death penalty,” reports the institute’s online research portal, followthemoney.com, which adds that, “35 public sector unions collectively gave $3.3 million to the pro-death-penalty effort.” Almost half of the unions’ combined total came from contributions from CCPOA and the Peace Officers Research Association of California. Some 28,000 CCPOA members contributed $287 each to pro-death penalty committees. Small-donor, anti-death penalty contributions were not nearly so robust. The institute reports that “more than fourfifths of the anti-death-penalty total ($7.9 million) came from just 35 donors who gave $50,000 or more.” Contributors to the opponents’ campaign included George Soros’s Open Society Policy Center. The report further notes that Stanford professor Nick >16

START OVER FROM SCRAP Addison Wilks, a rider for the former Santa Cruz Composting Co.,

is one of the owners of Hard-Core Compost. PHOTO: JULES HOLDSWORTH

Business Is Cyclical Santa Cruz’s bike courier composting operation is back, with a new name and new owners BY HUGH MCCORMICK

A

ddison Wilks, an owner of the Hard-Core Compost cooperative, has developed a unique passion. That passion is for cycling around town picking up food scraps, composting them, and turning them into healthy soil that can be reused in the future. Wilks and seven cyclist friends bought Santa Cruz Composting Co. from founder Ivy Young early this year. Young fell behind on pick-ups and running the rest of her operation

after suffering a wrist injury on the job, and then undergoing a surprisingly complicated surgery last year. “Being a mom and keeping the business going was not going to happen,” Young says. “I ultimately decided to end the service. It was heartbreaking.” The Hard-Core crew has picked up where Young left off, cycling around the county with large bins in tow to pick up food waste from households that don’t have the energy, space or hours to compost it themselves. “We

do it because we can,” says Wilks, one of Young’s former employees. “And we all love bikes!” When a small office space opened up right next to Ped-Ex at the Hub for Sustainable Living in downtown Santa Cruz, Wilks and the other soon-to-be compost entrepreneurs took that as a sign. “That in itself pushed us and motivated us to get our shit together,” Wilks says. It took a few weeks, but they came up with the $8,000 needed to re-launch Young’s business >14


What is

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Public Safety Power Shutoff

or PSPS is a precautionary safety measure that may proactively turn off power lines when extreme fire danger conditions are forecast. We will do this to reduce wildfire risks and keep our customers safe. To receive important outage alerts, update your contact information at pge.com/mywildfirealerts.

What criteria does PG&E consider when calling a PSPS? No single factor will initiate a Public Safety Power Shutoff as each situation is unique. The factors we generally consider include: ■ A Red Flag Warning declared by the National Weather Service ■ Forecasts of strong winds and wind gusts ■ Low humidity levels ■ Critically dry vegetation that could fuel a wildfire ■ And on-the-ground, real-time observations from PG&E field crews

In the interest of public safety, we continue to update and refine our criteria and protocols on an ongoing basis.

How will I know if a PSPS has been called in my neighborhood? Because extreme weather threats can change quickly, our goal is to provide notice through phone calls, emails and text messages to customers 48 hours in advance, again at 24 hours and again just prior to turning off the power for safety. Updates will also be shared through social media, local news, radio and pge.com until the time power is restored. To receive important outage alerts, update your contact information at pge.com/mywildfirealerts.

We advise you to think in advance about your family’s needs and how you might be impacted in the event of a power shutoff — or for any emergency. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Do you have a personal safety plan for all members of your family, including pets? If you own a generator, is it ready to operate safely? Do you know how to open your garage door manually? Do you have cash and a full tank of gas, in the event ATMs and gas stations are unavailable? Are your mobile phones fully charged?

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How can I prepare for a PSPS?

“PG&E” refers to Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation. ©2019 Pacific Gas and Electric Company. All rights reserved. Paid for by PG&E shareholders.

SHUTOFF?

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as a new cooperatively owned company. Young gave the team three months to pay, hooking the new owners up with a drop-off truck, three bike trailers, compost sifters, shovels, and almost 500 green 5-gallon buckets in the process. “I negotiated with them—tallying up how much the equipment was worth and adding a little more for the customer list. It was not a profiteering kind of move,” says Young. “I was going to have to sell the truck, trailers and assorted equipment anyways. We eventually signed a contract we were both happy with.” Hard-Core’s coverage area

stretches from Westside Santa Cruz to portions of Capitola, and subscriptions start at $25 a month. The new business owners— overseeing what is still Santa Cruz County’s only composting service— are running things the same way Young did, but with more riders and a more balanced, sustainable workload. Riders work no more than two days a week. The food waste often goes to the Homeless Garden Project, while customers get a perfectly clean bucket returned to them to start collecting their next round of food waste.

SOIL AND TROUBLE In 2013, Americans sent 254

million tons of garbage to landfills, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has estimated that 30-40% of the food supply gets wasted, coming out to more than 20 pounds per person per month. Local governments across California have for years collected yard trimmings, which get turned into compost. A few, like San Francisco, also collect food scraps for composting. Composting creates soil for local farmers, growers and households, and absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. On top of that, >16 the process stops unneeded

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Members of the local Satanic Temple of Santa Cruz (TSTSC) were minding their own business, staging a beachside ritual involving a goat, when they found themselves taking crap from tourists recently. This was not an animal sacrifice. Temple members were holding their first-annual Goat Pardoning Ritual on April 27. Roughly 20 members of the Satanic Temple from around the Bay Area descended upon Seabright Beach—clad in black and armed with vegan, potluck lunches—to celebrate the life of, and help name, the Santa Cruz chapter’s latest member. Lil Baphy is a white baby goat saved by Watsonville’s Little Hill Sanctuary from imminent slaughter. LHS has set up a Facebook donation page which has raised more than $2,000 to fund the goat’s medical costs. The scene apparently goaded onlookers (who did not ask anyone what was going on) into thinking that they were about to witness a sacrifice of Biblical proportions. “We were all gathered around

the goat pen when the lifeguard showed up,” explains Satanic Temple National Councilmember Sadie Satanas. “We showed her were just symbolically pardoning the goat and she said, ‘That’s not the call I got.’” After a few minutes of explanation, and some tasty, animal-free food, the lifeguard saw there was no threat to the goat. “When we told her what we were doing, [the lifeguard] got really excited,” claims TSTSC chapter head Lanna Navalia. “She even said, ‘Well, we have on-leash rules for dogs, but nothing about goats in pens, so you’re fine!’”

ROSS CAMP’S UGLY END It was just after midnight on Wednesday, May 1, when Sam Bahu saw a scuffle happening outside the Ross Camp homeless encampment just off Highway 1. With the camp set to be disbanded after a court battle, Bahu, a 30-year-old Ben Lomond native, says he was driving down the highway at around 50 miles an hour when he skidded to a stop. “I see a group of young men,

all around my height, around 6 feet, throwing everything they could possibly grab at the homeless camp,” Bahu tells Nuz. “They were going at it for at least 30 seconds in my view.” Bahu says he also saw the group throwing rocks and other objects on the ground, so he called 911. “The first dispatcher blew me off,” he says, and a second told him that a crew would be dispatched, but that nothing was likely to come of the report. Prior to the Ross Camp’s eviction, four camp residents also told reporters at GT that people had thrown objects, including rocks and frozen water bottles, at people in the camp. One woman who lived at the camp also recalled an incident where a homeless man’s dog was shot repeatedly with a paintball gun. With the former residents of the Ross Camp now scattered at the city’s ever-rotating slate of encampments, Bahu says he hopes that someone— anyone—will do something to improve the situation. “People have found a group to target,” he says. “I just want

to hear some type of urgency.”

CLICK BASE Nuz has been wondering as of late what the true point is of the app and website Nextdoor. Is it to fill us in on what’s happening in our neighborhood, or to let us know how bigoted our neighbors really are? Option two, unfortunately, is closer to the truth, according to a new in-depth piece of explanatory journalism by Vox. Not only is Nextdoor’s “Crime and Safety” tab a hornet’s nest for racial stereotyping, but the site feeds a vicious cycle that foments an (often) irrational fear of crime. What’s more, it also now has competitors. A rival app called Citizen is now on the scene, and Amazon has launched its own version called Ring. With this new renaissance, Santa Cruz homeowners will have more avenues to traffic in fear-oriented misinformation than ever before. We can only imagine what they think of goat pardonings.


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WAIT WATCHERS In 2015, a reporter asked San Quentin inmate Robert Galvan how it felt waiting in death penalty limbo. “Like being on a shelf," he said. Galvan was already serving consecutive life sentences before killing his cellmate in 2010. PHOTO: TOM GOGOLA

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

LETHAL INFLECTION <12

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McKeown gave $1.5 million, “a 91% share of the total from education donors,” while Netflix co-founder and CEO Reed Hastings contributed $1 million of the $1.2 million that came from the TV and film industry. Small-donor contributions from 1,700 death penalty opponents totaled $377,000, reports the institute. In the run-up to the 2016 election, opponents contributed an average of $4,750 to the committees; proponents of the death penalty contributed an average of $470. On September 21, 2016, the Sacramento Bee reported that polling up until that point indicated that a plurality of voters supported Prop 62, while only a third of voters supported Prop 66. Then came a CCPOA-led advertising blitz that raised public awareness of Proposition 66. “In the end, 53% of voters rejected Proposition 62 and 51% okayed Proposition 66,” notes the institute. In making his March announcement, Newsom highlighted that the death penalty discriminates against minorities and poor people as he called the practice “ineffective, irreversible and immoral.” He pledged to give a reprieve to the 737 inmates currently on death row in California, close the death chamber at San Quentin (it was dismantled

soon after his announcement), and end a years-long debate over the state’s execution protocols. Most of the 737 condemned in California are men held in one of three death-row tiers at San Quentin. Women on death row are incarcerated at a facility in Chowchilla. The last execution in California took place 13 years ago. As Newsom was making his announcement, Marin Assemblyman Marc Levine (D-Greenbrae) introduced a proposed constitutional amendment on the 2020 ballot that would ban the death penalty. Opponents to Newsom’s moratorium have already ramped up the grassroots activism in light of the renewed push to end capital punishment in the state. Families of crime victims and local district attorneys have embarked on a “Victims of Murder Justice Tour.” In April, NBC Los Angeles reported that the organization (founded by the Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer) would take the tour to each of the 80 Assembly and 40 Senate districts in the state. Death Penalty Focus, a California nonprofit devoted to ending capital punishment in the state through public education and grassroots organizing, was supportive of Newsom’s March move.

District attorneys and victims’ families have accused Newsom of thwarting the 2016 will of the voters, but recent polling suggests that Californians favor life-without-parole over execution in firstdegree murder cases by a 2-to-1 ratio. A Public Policy Institute of California poll conducted two weeks after Newsom’s announcement found that 62% of voters support life in prison over the death penalty. “The survey found that only 31% of adults—38% of whom are likely voters— favored the death penalty,” reported Death Penalty Focus. David Crawford, senior advocacy director at Death Penalty Focus, says in a statement that if death penalty advocates get involved in yet another ballot initiative, they would make adjustments to their fundraising strategies. Nonetheless, he says that, “It’s a bit premature to speculate about an initiative in 2020.” “My organization has many priorities at the moment,” he adds, “including public education, lifting up the voices of impacted communities like victims’ families and the wrongfully convicted, fostering new alliances with other criminal justice reform movements, and advocacy efforts at the local level.”

waste from entering landfills, where it would otherwise release methane—a greenhouse gas 30-80 times more dangerous than CO2. In order to implement the state’s carbon-reduction goals, CalRecycle has mandated that curbside collection of food waste for all California residents must be implemented by Jan. 1, 2022. Santa Cruz County Zero Waste Programs Manager Tim Goncharoff says he expects Santa Cruz County to meet its goal. County officials have identified a compost site at the Buena Vista Landfill, about 1.5 miles from the Watsonville Airport, and are in the process of design and permitting work at the location, he says. The site would need to clear seven state and federal agencies in order to get approval. Many areas, including Santa Cruz County, already have programs to collect food waste from businesses, as required by the state. Today, Santa Cruz County’s food waste goes to the Monterey Regional Waste Management District for processing. Establishing a composting facility within county lines would further reduce greenhouse gas emissions by cutting down the number of miles waste is transported. It would also allow farmers and gardeners to pick up fresh batches of local fertilizer for their own use. “The best approach,” writes Goncharoff, “is to close the loop locally by using organic waste to generate compost to re-apply to the soil, allowing farmers, gardeners, vintners and others to restore nutrients to the soil, conserve water, and sequester carbon.” Janice Bisgaard, a spokesperson for the city of Santa Cruz’s Public Works department, told GT in December that the city was on schedule to roll out curbside pick-up for compostable food scraps by 2022, and to grow its own composting program for businesses in the meantime. The city is working on where to best locate facilities for its composting expansion. For now, the city’s sending compostable food waste to a Santa Clara facility. Bisgaard says that >18


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NEWS

WATCH FOR ME.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has estimated that 3040% of the food supply gets wasted, coming out to more than 20 pounds per person per month.

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BUSINESS IS CYCLICAL <16

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Young is pulling for the Hard-Core crew, but with the comfort of knowing that the sale of her business is in the rear-view mirror. The 2019 holidays were rough on her as she dealt with nagging injury, a constant cycle of self-doubt and the pressures of being a mom without a job. “I really want them to succeed, to keep my dream going,” Young says. “I also want them to do their own thing.” At the end of the day, the force motivating Wilks and the other Hard-Core owners is the same thing that drove Young: a deep passion for environmental stewardship. With Young’s company, however, customers could request compost from her, and she would deliver it to them at the end of each month. Hard-Core is still trying to work this process out, with the team brainstorming ways to provide deliveries in the future. “This isn’t a deal-breaker for most people,” says Wilks. “The majority of people simply don’t want to throw away their food scraps. A lot of people just like doing good for the Earth.” For more information on Hard-Core Compost, visit compost.bike.


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Organization Profile:

Yogurtland

Kevin Dueck, co-owner of two Santa Cruz County Yogurtlands, used to have five or six frozen yogurts a week. He says he’s since cut back and only has a couple, complete with his favorite toasted coconut, chocolate chips, chocolate syrup, blueberry and almond toppings. He will also grab a couple of large 24-ounce containers to bring home for his family.

“It was awesome; my kids loved it. They could put as much yogurt as they wanted and whatever toppings on it,” he says. “I remember walking outside and look-

After visiting the Yogurtland corporate office, they got the okay to open their first Yogurtland in Capitola just a year later. They opened a Watsonville location almost immediately after in 2012. Although Yogurtland is an international franchising company, the particular shops that the Duecks own operate in many of the same ways as other independent local businesses. “We are really involved in the community. We have been involved with most of the schools in the county

from Watsonville to Santa Cruz,” he says. “We try to give back to the education systems. We also buy our produce for toppings locally from Sunnyside Produce in Soquel. A lot of other franchisees buy from corporate brands, but we wanted to keep our produce local. ” Likewise, the Duecks have partnered with Grind Out Hunger and have hosted the Santa Cruz Warriors ball toss event for the last few years, raising more than $35,000 annually for local schools. “I grew up here, and want to keep as many dollars in the area as possible. With so many other companies around that give back to the community, we are all helping each other out,” he says. For example,

Dueck has been banking with the Santa Cruz Community Credit Union (SCCCU) since he opened the frozen yogurt shops years ago. “We opened two stores back to back and they helped make it easier,” he says. “They were fully invested in our concept and ideas, plus the rates that they offer and the help with the loan package, they helped us out a lot. I shopped around and looked at other places and they just had the best offering.”

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Born and raised in Aptos, Dueck and his brother, Brian, opened the two Yogurtlands in Santa Cruz after Kevin visited a shop in Longbeach in 2010.

ing up and down the street and seeing Yogurtland cups in literally every trash receptacle on that side of the street for the entire block. I thought ‘this place is doing something right.’”

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LAW DECIDING CITIZEN Three Santa Cruz women—a lawyer, a judge and an activist—discuss how Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has inspired them and influenced the legal system as they prepare for an event celebrating ‘The Law and Legacy of RBG’ BY GEORGIA JOHNSON

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

U

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.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has fought the good fight for women and underrepresented groups for the better part of her 86 years—long before her appointment to the Supreme Court in 1993, and her recent rocketship to pop culture icon. After graduating from Columbia Law School in 1959, she struggled to find employment because of her gender. She eventually landed at Rutgers University as a law professor, and was told that she would be paid less than her male colleagues because she had a husband with a well-paying job. At the time, she was one of less than 20 female law professors in the U.S. She co-founded the Women's Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), eventually becoming the Project’s general counsel, and went on to litigate several gender-related discrimiation cases in front of the Supreme Court—winning the majority of them and spearheading the fight for women’s justice one argument at a time. Don’t be fooled by her stature, she’s a woman's warrior and a force to be reckoned with. So much so that both the documentary RBG and the biopic about her, On The Basis Of Sex, came out in the last year alone—as did her latest book My Own Words. She also has her own action figure. Ginsburg garnered the nickname “The Notorious RBG.” after fellow Brooklynite and rapper Notorious B.I.G., aka Biggie Smalls. The moniker stuck after an NYU law student started the blog “The Notorious RBG” in 2013 in response to Ginsburg’s dissenting opinions. Although she’s a steadfast lover of opera,

she’s said to have looked into Biggie’s background and music, according to the New York Times. After battling cancer twice, she most recently fractured three ribs and had two cancerous nodules removed from her lung, only to return to the bench a few weeks later while the entire internet volunteered their own vital organs to ensure the associate justice’s recovery. But when it comes to Justice Ginsburg, it turns out that everyone has a different story to tell. In connection with her latest book and the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music’s upcoming concert When There are Nine, inspired by the life of Justice Ginsburg, Bookshop Santa Cruz, the UC Santa Cruz Humanities Institute and Cabrillo Festival will present “My Own Words: The Law and Legacy of RBG,” a discussion about Ginsburg, her achievements and how gender influences legal discourse today. Moderated by UCSC Distinguished Professor and feminist activist Bettina Aptheker, the panel will include Santa Cruz Superior Court Judge Syda Cogliati and attorneys Anna Penrose-Levig and Jessica Delgado. The panelists come from different legal backgrounds, and each works in a different field of specialization, but they are all united by a deep respect and appreciation for Justice Ginsburg. Ahead of the event, panelists spoke to GT about women in law, RBG and other role models who influenced them. (Due to extenuating circumstances, Jessica Delgado was unable to participate in this article.)

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SYDA COGLIATI Santa Cruz Superior Court Judge Syda Cogliati is Santa Cruz County’s newest superior court judge. She deals with misdemeanor cases, and previously worked as senior appellate research attorney at the Sixth District Court of Appeals. After graduating from UCSC as a politics and environmental studies double major, she says she was most interested in environmental law when she decided to pursue law at UC Hastings.

In your time from law school to now, were you particularly influenced by Justice Ginburg’s work? To be honest, as a young law student

and lawyer I wasn’t that keyed in to who she was. I have been lucky in my life to have other similar, female groundbreaking role models. My Justice Ginsburg is actually Justice Patricia Bamattre-Manoukian; she’s at the Sixth District Court of Appeals. I worked for her for over 12 years, and she was a woman who was a first in so many ways. Her grace, intelligence, diligence, and respect for the law really inspired me. I recognize those qualities in Justice Ginsburg. I also love that Justice Ginsburg has become this cultural phenomenon. In law we can start to feel like we are in our own little


LAW DECIDING CITIZEN

It makes a difference, my being a woman in the courtroom. It makes a difference to have people equally represented. —SYDA COGLIATI world, like law dorks or something, but Justice Ginsburg has broken through to modern culture, and I love that she has made law and the Supreme Court so much more accessible to people, especially young women. People know her, even if they have nothing to do with law whatsoever.

What were some of the differences between UC Santa Cruz and UC Hastings Law School?

Historically speaking, the majority of laws were made by, and interpreted by, white men. How do you think having more underrepresented voices in jurisprudence and in the legal field has affected law and how we think about law today? Everyone brings their own perspective when they think about

Do you think gender bias is something that women in law experience frequently? I think that there are some subtle things. Right now for example, for this event, I’m researching women arguing in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, because one of the things that RBG did was she won these very important cases there. When I was going back to dig into them, I realized that for the most significant one, even though she wrote the briefs and significantly participated, she didn’t actually give the argument, which was in front of nine men. I started thinking about how that still persists to some extent. In a big case, if there is a man making a decision, the male partners may argue it themselves because they think they may connect more with that judge. The percentage of women today who argue in the Supreme Court is certainly not as high as the percentage of women lawyers that there are. It’s a place where improvement definitely needs to come. We still aren’t there yet, there’s a glass ceiling still there.

26>

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

In the early 1990s, UC Santa Cruz was a pretty progressive place, and Hastings wasn’t quite that kind of institution yet, I think it’s come quite a long way, but one of the things that will always stand out for me is in my first-year class, I had a young female professor who was a woman of color. She was brand-new, and was teaching property. She was teaching this concept, remainderman, and she used the term “remainderperson.” There were some conservative students in the class, and one of the students in the class had the gall to raise his hand and say “the book says remainderman.” I will never forget that—it was just a moment where the professor realized that not everyone was with her on being more progressive on including women in the law, and including women in basic legal terminology in the law. I love that she had the guts to change that term, and I appreciated that she did so. That’s one of the things that stood out for me, for why I want to make sure that the law includes women in every way.

the law or how laws are applied. It’s best for our whole society to have different voices from different backgrounds interpreting the law and looking at historical developments of the law and how they apply today. Whether that’s women or other underrepresented groups, that’s important. It makes a difference, my being a woman in the courtroom. It makes a difference to have people equally represented. I happen to have a courtroom right now where all four calendar attorneys are men. It’s a nice balance to have a woman in the judge role. It’s a comfort when a woman walks in and sees another woman involved in the process for her, whether she’s a litigant, defendant or attorney.

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BETTINA APTHEKER UCSC Professor, UC Presidential Co-Chair, Feminist Critical Race & Ethnic Studies, Feminist and Activist Search “Bettina Aptheker” online and the official title bestowed by Google is “American Activist.” Rest assured ,she holds many more titles than that. Aptheker is a professor, author, activist and feminist. She taught one of the country’s largest and most influential introductory feminist studies courses for nearly three decades at UCSC, and also holds the Jack and Peggy Baskin Foundation Presidential Chair for Feminist Studies.

What’s your relationship to Justice Ginsburg? When was it that you first heard about her? I do not know Justice Ginsburg personally. However, we both grew

up in Brooklyn. She is about 10 years older than I am, and we had very similar experiences in elementary school and our early lives. I was at UC Berkeley, so I wasn’t in law school, but in terms of the sexism we encountered, she describes that beautifully in her book. I was aware of her early on because I had been following her court cases about sex discrimination while I was teaching. I needed to know the cases when I started teaching as San Jose State, I think in ’76. She’s the chief architect of the legal struggle for women’s equality in the law. She did a brilliant job.

It’s interesting that you’ve known who she is for decades, especially

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That’s right, yes, it’s been really amazing. I think she captured the imagination of many young people because of the speaking that she does. She’s out and about—and has been for years—talking to college audiences, especially women. She’s a delightful person, you can see that. She’s a workaholic, and brilliant and delightfully funny. She’s captured the imagination of young women. They started to promote her as an iconic figure, and she certainly didn’t try to stop it.

Something that struck me when I was researching Justice Ginsburg is her relationship with the late Justice Scalia. Especially now, in a time of intense tribalism, do you think people have something to learn from their relationship? I think people do have something to learn. They were two people who formed a friendship based on a love for opera, I believe. They formed a friendship that crossed the divide of their ideological and legal differences, which are very profound. It wasn’t just that Justice Scalia is conservative, he’s an originalist, meaning just trying to read the Constitution as it was originally written. She’s someone who says the Constitution is alive and breathing and growing. So they have this huge difference, but they helped each other also. They would call each other to send their opinions to each other when they wrote them. They strengthened each other, and that’s a marvelous example of humanity. Especially in this period now—where, in my view,

Trump is so dug in, and it’s all about loyalty to him, and God help you if you cross him.

What do you hope people will take away from this event? We are getting the sense that it’ll be standing-room only. I’m happy for whoever comes and am hoping we have a good turnout from the campus. I hope people get a sense of awareness for the Cabrillo Festival and her book, but also hope that people will learn a lot about how we can use the law to create change and how important the issue of liberation of women is for society. That has great currency now with the debate about reproductive freedom, for example, and in addition there are interrelated issues of race and democracy more broadly. We will be talking about those issues that she worked on, in particular the Voting Rights Act.

Historically speaking, the majority of laws have been created and interpreted by white men. Do you think jurisprudence and the law are more accessible to people of color and women than they have been in the past? I think what we have done over the years is expand what the law stands for. A very good example of that is I was very intimately involved in the Angela Davis trial back in the late ’60s and early ’70s, and we used the law. That’s the tool we had. We used it to guarantee as much of a fair trial as we possibly could. From my point of view, the law is an important avenue of struggle for social justice working in tandem with mass movements in the streets.

ANNA PENROSE-LEVIG Associate Attorney, Penrose Chun & Gorman LLP Anna Penrose-Levig never dreamed of being a lawyer. She says she fell into it by accident. Penrose-Levig pursued her degree at UC Hastings because of the opportunity that comes with a law degree. She currently works at her father's firm

and specializes in estate planning.

In what ways has gender factored into your career as a lawyer? I grew up in the Central Valley and I was raised Catholic. That framed my worldview growing up, and


LAW DECIDING CITIZEN

PHOTO OF ANNA PENROSE-LEVIG BY ANNIE K ROWLAND

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questioning that system wasn’t encouraged, nor was it even presented as an option, really. So my world was framed from birth in terms of families being made up of a husband and a wife, and children. Husbands were the “head of the household” and women and girls were valued according to their attractiveness. The messages that I received were that attractiveness included being compliant, not making waves. One of my male teachers in high school hit on me, and commented negatively about my boyfriend and on how my clothes fit me in class in front of other students. Male students disregarded my personal space in really public and humiliating ways more than once. Those men felt empowered to do those things in that environment, and I implicitly understood that life would be easier if I never said anything to anyone about those experiences. So I wouldn’t say that my childhood prepared me to confidently or directly address discrimination of any kind. I was pretty clueless about all forms of discrimination when I left home for higher education. I had no awareness of my own white, middleclass privilege. I didn’t understand

On Tuesday • May 21st from 11-6

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LAW DECIDING CITIZEN <29 with the imperfect goal of advancing and protecting only, or primarily, the interests of people like them.

When Justice Ginsburg was appointed to the Supreme Court, issues of women’s rights and equal pay more specifically weren’t necessarily as well-known and contentious as they are today. With that in mind, do you think that people are more aware of gender biases today than they were 20 years ago?

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I’d like to say yes, but I’m really not sure of whether people are more aware than they were 20 years ago. Maybe there’s more mainstream discussion of the issues, but I’m not sure that the discussion has penetrated practical reality for most people. I’m not sure that the discussion is reflected in our actions in a way that’s meaningful, that behaviors have actually changed. I’m disappointed that we still live in a world in which Justice Ginsburg’s dissenting opinions are required. She’s been writing dissenting opinions so much more frequently, and I feel like I’m being reminded more often lately that people still aren’t doing the right thing. It’s incredibly disappointing that a majority of our Supreme Court Justices are still so far removed from the everyday experiences of the people whom their decisions affect. It’s disappointing that Justice Ginsburg and other Supreme Court Justices still have to point out to the majority much of the time, and to our U.S. Senators and Representatives, that the law, or its application, is still biased in fundamental ways. Justice Ginsburg’s dissenting opinion in Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., a pay discrimination case, is a good example of what I’m talking about. For 20 years, Lilly Ledbetter did the same work as men at the company, and each year the gap grew between her pay and theirs. When the case reached the Supreme Court, a majority of five male Justices ruled against Lilly Ledbetter because she had waited too long to sue. Justice Ginsburg’s dissent invited Congress to change

the law, which Congress did, so that now each new paycheck affected by a discriminatory action resets the time to file a lawsuit. But for this important change to have a beneficial effect, women have to feel empowered to advocate to be paid what they are worth, and to sue when it doesn’t happen. We aren’t generally taught that its acceptable to do that. Instead, society still tells women that when we assert our needs, we are being obnoxious, and when we get angry we’re being unreasonable.

When it comes to having a career and family, did you ever feel like you had to choose? I never felt like I had to choose, but I don’t think I was well-informed. For about the last 10 years, just balancing work and finding time for family that doesn’t involve me being an ogre, that’s been all I’ve had the capacity to handle. I have two daughters, ages 9 and 10. Before them, I didn’t know anything about children, and I was terrified when I had my first. I knew this little person was going to be totally dependent on me to survive for a period of time. I’ve been fortunate to work for flexible employers who understand that this balance is hard, but it’s still true that doing both career and family well is more difficult than I ever could have conceived of. Like Justice Ginsburg, I’m very lucky to have a very supportive partner who shares more than the traditional responsibility for child-rearing, and who does all of the cooking. We have a pretty non-traditional relationship that I’m very proud to have worked out together with him. He is a big part of why I can take the time now to learn more about Justice Ginsburg’s very important contribution to our body of law and our society and participate in relating that information to our community. ‘My Own Words: The Law and the Legacy of RBG’ will take place at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, May 22, at DNA’s Comedy Lab, 155 S River St., Santa Cruz. bookshopsantacruz.com/RBG. Free.


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THEATER

BLUE MAN GROUPIES Left to right: Louis Lotorto, Mike Ryan and Larry Paulsen in ‘The Explorer’s Club.’ PHOTO: STEVE DIBARTOLOMEO

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Players’ ‘Club’

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Cast’s great timing and physical comedy make for a wild time with Jewel Theater’s ‘The Explorers Club’ BY CHRISTINA WATERS

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entlemen’s clubs, colonial chauvinism and scientific rivalry are the targets of Nell Benjamin's vigorous farce The Explorers Club, the season finale at Jewel Theater. Directed

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by the crafty Art Manke—who dazzled regional audiences with one of Shakespeare Santa Cruz's penultimate hits, Bach at Leipzig— the Jewel production sends up nothing less than the entire British

LIT Author Douglas Brinkley pops up at two Santa Cruz events to talk about ’60s culture P34

Empire in its Victorian era heyday. The secret weapon here is the most extravagant set filled with expeditionary plunder ever to fill a Santa Cruz stage—zebra rugs, stuffed alligators, velvet chaise

lounges, mounted gazelle heads, Turkish rugs. Kudos to designer Tom Buderwitz, and to B. Modern for costumes to match. Stage plays can be rocket science. Most of Shakespeare. All of Samuel

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THEATER

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This cast is close to flawless, as is Manke’s direction, with some remarkable bits of gymnastic timing achieved by each.

production. It seems the Explorers Club is known to have the worst bartender in all of London, and in his absence Luigi is pressed into service. You can imagine the results. Actually, you can’t—the cocktail antics have to be seen to be believed. No sacred cow or Anglo stereotype is left intact. Once the first act sets up the situations and introduces us to Phyllida’s twin sister, an overwrought Tibetan monk and an angry mob of Irish patriots, the pace goes ballistic. I’ve probably seen Mike Ryan in a dozen productions, but I cannot remember ever enjoying him quite this much; e.g. his attempts to protect his beloved snake. (“They are not slimy!”) Ryan’s Cope mistakes every conversation for an imagined game of charades in which he cannot guess the correct answer. Silly and sweet, Cope/Ryan is utterly delightful. Late in the play, the wild oration by club member Beebe (Andrew Yabroff), fresh from captivity in a mountaintop monastery and clad in his orange Buddhist robes, left me limp with laughter. This cast is close to flawless, as is Manke’s direction, with some remarkable bits of gymnastic timing achieved by each. But special kudos to Lotorto as the idiot savant wildman who would have been at home in the craziest Marx Brothers routines. The Explorers Club left opening night audiences laughing out loud, and cheering a thoroughly entertaining production. ‘The Explorers Club,’ written by Nell Benjamin, directed by Art Manke and produced by the Jewel Theatre, runs through June 2 at the Colligan Theater, 1010 River St., Santa Cruz. jeweltheatre.net.

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Beckett. Ditto Sam Shepherd. The Explorers Club isn’t, which makes it a perfect spring fling. Here’s the setup: the Explorers Club, devoted to scientific expedition, research and drinking, considers admitting a woman member. She is Phyllida Spotte-Hume (Elinor Gunn), who, having discovered a legendary Lost City, has returned to London with one of its colorful inhabitants, a blue-skinned wild man she calls Luigi (Louis Lotorto). If you’re already thinking Monty Python, you’re very, very close, because the timing, the antics, the physical humor, the outrageous puns, and the sheer inane mayhem of incidents that fill this amuse bouche massages the same funny bone worked senseless by John Cleese and company. Benjamin’s brisk writing pits the reasonable—botanist Lucius Fretway (Tommy Beck)—against the ridiculous, including Professor Walling (Andrew Davids), whose dim-witted guinea pig Jane is imperiled by the beloved though misunderstood cobra belonging to Professor Cope (Mike Ryan). Add the histrionic archaeo-theologist Professor Sloane (Larry Paulsen), and you have a recipe for stiff upper lip pomposity and slapstick disaster. As the men weigh the option of a female club member, in dashes Harry Percy (Crash Buist), a long-lost club member freshly returned from discovering the “East Pole.” Not the brightest bulb in the chandelier, the Hemingway-esque Percy immediately eyes Phyllida Spotte-Hume, who is also fancied by botanist Walling. Rivalry for the lady explorer’s affections gears up just as we learn that the blue-skinned Luigi is to be presented to Queen Victoria. Running jokes, sight gags and riotous wordplay rule this bubbly

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ACE AND SPACE Douglas Brinkley will discuss the 1960s space race at Bookshop Santa Cruz, and the band Ace of Cups at the Rio, before their concert.

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Exploring the legacy of the ’60s with historian Douglas Brinkley BY WALLACE BAINE

H

istorian Douglas Brinkley is coming to Santa Cruz for two events with one common goal: to remind us all about the legacy of the 1960s. On Thursday, May 16, Brinkley visits Bookshop Santa Cruz to discuss his new book American Moonshot: John F. Kennedy and the Great Space Race. On the following night, May 17, he will be on stage at the Rio Theatre celebrating the allfemale rock band Ace of Cups, who will then perform. At the Bookshop event, Brinkley will cover the themes of his book, a long-view history on Apollo 11’s historic moon landing in 1969 and the central role that President John F. Kennedy played in making it happen. At the Rio, Brinkley will take a moment to reflect on the overlooked contributions of women in the late 1960s counterculture. American Moonshot is an enthralling account of Kennedy’s conviction, even before he was elected president in 1960, that the U.S. had to do everything it could to land on the moon, even though the technology to do so was nowhere near up to the task at the time. When Kennedy was inaugurated, the Soviets were clearly winning

the Space Race, having been the first to launch a satellite and a live astronaut into orbit. “The question was how to respond,” says Brinkley. “(President Dwight) Eisenhower favored a more incremental approach. But Kennedy wanted to leapfrog the tit-for-tat competition and go for something big. The moonshot gave him that.” At the other end of the historical spectrum, Brinkley is also steeped in the evolution of the counterculture. Among his biography subjects have been Hunter S. Thompson and Jack Kerouac. On Friday, he’ll focus on ’60s all-female band Ace of Cups. “It’s an opportunity to look back at the counterculture and see the misogyny that was a part of it,” Brinkley said. Ace of Cups emerged during the Summer of Love in the Bay Area, and played alongside many of the now-legendary names of the period. But they failed to achieve commercial success. At last, they’re finally getting some recognition.” Douglas Brinkley will speak at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 16, at Bookshop Santa Cruz, 1520 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. Free. Ace of Cups performs at 7 p.m. on Friday, May 17, at the Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $25, tickets to benefit Monarch Family Services.


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MUSIC

SIGN POSTER Sonny Smith started his own record label, Rock in Your Head Records, for his band Sonny and the Sunsets.

To ’Do List MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Sonny and the Sunsets get coiffed BY MIKE HUGUENOR

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S

onny Smith has been thinking about hairdressers lately. “They’re out there saving lives,” he tells me. “Hairdressers are like a mix between a psychiatrist and a guru.” Smith (who dates a hairdresser) says that people often come into salons in a panic, desperate for professional help. It was this observation that inspired Hairdressers From Heaven, the seventh full length by his psychedelic pop group Sonny and the Sunsets. Smith describes this album as a mixtape that’s “full of weird shit.” On its title track, he dives directly into the experience of a

salon customer whose hair is just the start of their problems: “Hairdressers from Heaven / Help me to make sense of myself again,” Smith sings, in a Dylan-lite drawl over piano and drums. The verses of “Hairdressers” tell its tale of coiffure woe against a breezy piano melody; it’s an airy piece of chamber pop comparable in composition to Belle and Sebastian or Beulah. At its chorus, Smith implores the audience to “watch me as I fall into the air,” tapping out a rising melody on the keys. The song swoons, tripping instantly into dreams as he describes himself falling “like hair onto the checkerboard.”

“If you listen to the lyrics, it’s about somebody looking for a hairdresser to save them. Help them feel good again, be themself again,” Smith explains. Rather than musings and reflections, Smith’s lyrics often inhabit characters, who on this album come in the form of customers. In addition to the panicked salon customer, there’s the ripped-off stoner of “Ghost Days,” a Parquet Courts-like tune about a kid who got sold parsley instead of weed. On “Another Life, Another Body,” Smith channels a visitor to a psychic, someone who is mostly talked out of speaking with a dead friend by the psychic’s repeated

refrain that there’s “no pressure.” “That kind of storytelling with characters used to be more popular,” Smith says. “Ray Davies wrote so many songs about characters. Beatles had Penny Lane, or Rita the Meter Maid—they were constantly singing about characters from their neighborhood. Most songwriting I hear is usually autobiographical; it’s about how you’re feeling, it’s very anthemic.” For Smith, this tendency to write characters isn’t about some retro songwriting style, it’s a natural outgrowth of his start as a writer. Many of his early songs emerged directly out of stories he’d written, characters lifted from the page and reanimated in song. “In the early days of the Sunsets I was playing piano or guitar, but I still thought of myself as a writer, like I was just sort of playing music on the side, so to speak,” he says. “It’s weird looking back and realizing I was so off.” Despite a career spanning two decades and 15 albums, Smith still continues to explore and take risks. Recently, he parted with longtime label Polyvinyl to start his own, Rock in Your Head Records, which he’ll be using to showcase the work of fellow San Francisco artists. Last year also saw the release of Rod For Your Love, a solo album that Smith recorded in Nashville with the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach at the helm. While that experience was a career highlight (and the resulting album a strong bit of classic-rock-inspired indie pop), it was also a contrast from his usual style—a contrast which helped inspire the ramshackle nature of Hairdressers From Heaven. “I realized that my favorite way of making records is actually kind of patchwork,” he says. “The song you made in your kitchen sounds way better than the song you made at the million-dollar recording studio. What about instead of picking the ones that are the most professionally made, why don’t we just pick the ones that are the coolest? Let that be the record.” Sonny and the Sunsets perform at 8:30 p.m. on Friday, May 17, at Michael’s On Main, 2591 Main St., Soquel. $30 adv/$33 door. 479-9777.


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GREEN FIX

See hundreds more events at santacruz. com.

PLANT-BASED EATING WORKSHOP Taking steps to reduce meat consumption even slightly has been proven to not only aid human health, but also the environment. Join cookbook author David Gabbe in a demo and lecture class on how to prepare quick, easy and low-stress plant-based meals that are tasty and nourishing. Recipe handouts and food samples are included. This workshop is designed both for adults and teens, advance online registration is recommended. 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, May 21. New Leaf Community Market, 1101 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. newleaf.com/events. Free.

ART SEEN

Free calendar listings in print and online are available for community events. Listings show up online within 24 hours. Submissions of free events and those $15 or less received by Thursday at noon, six days prior to the Good Times publication date, will be prioritized for print (space available). All listings must specify a day, start time, location and price (or ‘free’ if applicable). Listings can be set to repeat every week or month, and can be edited by the poster as needed. Ongoing events must be updated quarterly. It is the responsibility of the person submitting an event to cancel or modify the listing. Register at our website at santacruz.com in order to SUBMIT EVENTS ONLINE. E-mail calendar@goodtimes.sc or call 458.1100 with any questions.

WEDNESDAY 5/15 ARTS BIG TREES EXHIBITION Enjoy the history, in images, of Welch’s Big Trees, now the Redwood Loop Trail at Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park. See images of features no longer in the park and learn about others that have unusual stories to tell. Noon-4 p.m.San Lorenzo Valley Museum, 12547 Hwy. 9, Boulder Creek. slvmuseum. com. Free.

FOOD & WINE DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ FARMERS MARKET In addition to a large variety of farm products, this market offers a great selection of local artisan foodstuffs, delicious baked goods and lots of options for lunch and dinner. 1-6 p.m. Cedar and Lincoln streets, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

HEALTH 11TH ANNUAL HEALTH AND LIFESTYLE EXPO FOR WOMEN Santa

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY THEATER’S ‘RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN’

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Written by Gina Gionfriddo and directed by Mountain Community Theater’s Peter Gelblum, Rapture, Blister, Burn is a comedy about feminists and love that garnered a Pulitzer Prize finalist spot. The play tells the story of two women who chose opposite paths; while one built her career in academia, the other built a home with her husband and children. Years later, the two women wonder if they made the right decisions. Photo: Alaina Boys. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Show runs Friday, May 17-Sunday, June 9. Park Hall, 9400 Mill St., Ben Lomond. 336-4777, mctshows.org. $17 student or senior/$20 general.

SATURDAY 5/18 STAFF OF LIFE 50TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY

Cruz County ladies, you deserve to feel good in your body, mind and spirit. Are you looking to improve your health, get more active, eat better and achieve overall wellness? Then this night is all about you. 5-8 p.m. Cocoanut Grove, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz. mysantacruzdoctor.org. Free.

Whether it’s the unparalleled bulk bins, healthy snack selection or impressive charcuterie, every Santa Cruzan has a special Staff of Life product or memory. It’s no surprise that Staff of Life has been around for 50 years; it is, after all, one of the local businesses at the core of Santa Cruz’s very identity. Join the staff and community in toasting the last half century, and celebrating the next 50 years, with more than 100 of Staff of Life’s suppliers offering free product samples and tastings, wine and beer tastings, cosmetic makeovers, kid’s activities and face painting, vitamin and supplement samples, and free all-natural BBQ samples from Staff of Life Natural Meats.

OUTDOOR

Noon-5 p.m. Staff of Life Natural Food Market, 1266 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. 423-8632, staffoflifemarket.com. Free.

SPRING YOGA AND ETHNOBOTANY SERIES All classes take place in the Australian garden. Directional signs will be visible once you enter the Arboretum. This spring, the UCSC Arboretum & Botanic Garden is bringing back our popular Yoga and Ethnobotany series. 4 p.m. UCSC Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 85 Empire Grade, Santa Cruz. arboretum.ucsc.edu. $230/$16.

FALL CREEK HIKE Hike through a young, 100 year old forest to examine evidence of the logging history and discover how the Bay Area was built on this 4-mile, 4-hour hike.

Join us at one of Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park’s hidden treasures and explore the beauty of Fall Creek. 9 a.m.-Noon. Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park, 101 N Big Trees Park Rd., Felton. thatsmypark.org. Free.

with local artist Lisa Marie Jewelry Design. We are partnering with the Pleasure Point Business Association to offer this monthly event. Refreshments will be served. 5-8 p.m. Way of Life, 1220 A 41st Ave., Capitola. pleasurepointguide.com. Free.

THURSDAY 5/16

CLASSES

ARTS PLEASURE POINT THIRD THURSDAY Join us this evening at Way of Life to meet up

CALIFORNIA’S GALAPAGOS: EXPLORING CHANNEL ISLANDS NATIONAL PARK Local adventurer Leonie

Sherman will present a slideshow on >40


events.ucsc.edu

M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 9

JOIN US AS W E SHARE THE E XCIT EMENT OF LE ARNING

Screening of Cameraperson with Filmmaker Kirsten Johnson MAY 20, 7–9:30PM COMMUNICATIONS BUILDING, STUDIO 150 FREE ADMISSION

Documentary cinematographer Kirsten Johnson (Citizenfour, Fahrenheit 9/11) has spent decades traveling the world, amassing a treasure trove of footage that she has assembled into an insightful, visually bold memoir about the power of images.

An Introduction to Garden Herbalism MAY 18, 9:30AM–12PM UCSC FARM AND GARDEN $0–$40/PERSON

The fields and gardens of UCSC Farm and Garden abound with medicinal plants. Learn how to use these common plants for everyday maladies and health promotion.

Leonardo Art & Science Evening Rendezvous (LASER) MAY 21, 7PM DIGITAL ARTS RESEARCH CENTER (DARC), 108 FREE ADMISSION

LASER talks bring together artists, scientists, and scholars. Featuring Anthony Aguirre, associate professor of physics; Susana Ruiz, assistant professor, film & digital media; Rachel Nelson, curator, Institute of the Arts and Sciences; and Brett Hall, California Native Plant Program director.

Diverse Voices in Engineering Series MAY 22, 4:30–7PM ENGINEERING 2, ROOM 180 FREE ADMISSION

MAY 22, 7–9PM DNA’S COMEDY LAB, 155 S. RIVER ST., SANTA CRUZ FREE ADMISSION

Professor and feminist activist Bettina Aptheker will moderate a conversation with Judge Syda Cogliati, attorney Anna M. Penrose-Levig, and attorney Jessica Delgado about the impact U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has had on women’s equality, civil liberties, and racial justice under the law.

American Night: The Ballad of Juan José MAY 24–JUNE 2; TH, FRI, SAT 7:30PM; SUN 3PM THEATER ARTS MAINSTAGE $0–$18/PERSON

As Juan José feverishly studies for his citizenship exam, his obsession to pass takes him on a fantastical odyssey through U.S. history, guided by a handful of unsung citizens who made courageous choices in some of the country’s toughest times. A play by Richard Montoya.

The Out in Engineering speaker panel discussion concludes this series celebrating diversity in tech. Baskin Engineering students interview successful alumni and technology leaders. Open to the public.

Design Your Life with Dave Evans

THROUGH MAY 17, OPEN DURING LIBRARY HOURS MCHENRY LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS FREE ADMISSION

This exhibit examines the history of iconic medieval manuscripts alongside explorations of modern artists’ reworkings of medieval structural, thematic, and historical themes.

Norman O. Brown: Into the Future/ An Archives Exhibit THROUGH MAY 19, OPEN DURING LIBRARY HOURS MCHENRY LIBRARY THIRD FLOOR FREE ADMISSION

This exhibit presents a selection of documents and photographs from Professor Emeritus of Humanities Norman O. Brown’s papers held in Special Collections & Archives.

UPCOMING EVENTS MAY 30–JUNE 2

The Pirates of Penzance JUNE 5

Mandel Lecture: Lava Worlds to Living Worlds Shakespeare to Go Presents The Tempest JUNE 7

MAY 22, 6–8PM MERRILL CULTURAL CENTER FREE ADMISSION

Computational Poetry Workshop

Seagrasses are in global decline despite restoration efforts. Locally, Elkhorn Slough suffered massive seagrass loss in the mid-1900s. Join Kat Beheshti to learn how seagrass restoration will affect the biodiversity, water quality, and productivity of Elkhorn Slough.

Design your life with Dave Evans, top designer, Stanford professor, #1 NY Times best-selling author, in this workshop hosted by the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurial Development (CIED) and Student Creativity and Entrepreneurial Empowerment (SCEE)!

MAY 25, 10AM–3PM ENGINEERING 2, 180 FREE ADMISSION

events.ucsc.edu

New Twists on Old Tales: 1000 Years of Handmade Books

JUNE 6

MAY 19, 1:30–2:30PM SEYMOUR MARINE DISCOVERY CENTER FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE CENTER

LE ARN MORE AT

ONGOING EVENTS

Guest speaker Allison Parrish and invited poets and practitioners will examine the intersection between poetry, computation, and generative art.

Spring 2019 Open Studios & Print Sale JUNE 7 & 8

Grupo Folklorico Los Mejicas de UCSC JUNE 8

Poetry & Music in the Alan Chadwick Garden

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

Science Sunday— Eelgrass Restoration Success in Elkhorn Slough

My Own Words: The Law and the Legacy of RBG

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CALENDAR BIG TREES EXHIBITION Enjoy the history, in images, of Welch’s Big Trees, now the Redwood Loop Trail at Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park. See images of features no longer in the park and learn about others that have unusual stories to tell. Noon-4 p.m.San Lorenzo Valley Museum, 12547 Hwy. 9, Boulder Creek. slvmuseum. com. Free.

FOOD & WINE WATSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET This market is in the heart of the famously bountiful Pajaro Valley. Peaceful and family-oriented, the Latino heritage of this community gives this market a “mercado” feel. 2-7 p.m. 200 Main St., Watsonville.

FOOD TRUCKS AND FREE MOVIE IN THE PARK It’s Free Movie in the Park Night with Star Wars: The Force Awakens

THURSDAY 5/16-SATURDAY 5/18 PALACE ART 70TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Join Santa Cruz County’s most iconic art supply store for three days of arts workshops, demos and art exhibitions in celebration of their 70th anniversary. There will be festivities at both the Santa Cruz and Capitola locations, and activities will include everything from printmaking to watercolor painting to paper marbling to card making. All events are free, but some do require pre-registration, so check out the schedule at stores.gopalace.com/anniversary. 1-5 p.m. on Thursday, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday-Saturday. Palace Art and Office Supply, 1407 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, 427-1550 and 1501 41st. Ave., Capitola, 464-2700. gopalace.com. Free.

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

<38 her several weeks camping and

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exploring these biologically rich islands in different seasons on foot and by paddle board. 7 p.m. Live Oak Grange, 1900 17th Ave., Santa Cruz. act.sierraclub.org. Donations/Free.

FOOD & WINE THINK LOCAL FIRST SPRING MIXER Join Think Local First at Our Spring Mixer for a great business networking opportunity, live music, delicious food and drink and more. 5-7 p.m. Whiskey Hill Farms, 371 Calabasas Rd., Watsonville. 332-1935. $10/Donation.

OUTDOOR YOUNGER LAGOON RESERVE TOURS This 90-minute, behind-the-scenes hiking tour takes visitors into Younger Lagoon

Reserve adjacent to the Seymour Marine Discovery Center. Part of the University of California Natural Reserve System, Younger Lagoon Reserve contains diverse coastal habitat and is home to birds of prey, migrating sea birds, bobcats, and other wildlife. 10:30 a.m.-Noon. Seymour Marine Discovery Center, 100 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz. seymourcenter.ucsc.edu.

FRIDAY 5/17 ARTS PRE-SCHOOL STORYTIME Join us at the Aptos Library for our weekly Preschool Story Time. We'll read books, sing songs and make simple crafts. Suggested ages 3-6. 10-11 a.m. Aptos Branch Library, 7695 Soquel Drive, Aptos. Free.

on the big outdoor screen. Come dressed in your favorite Star Wars outfit, bring lawn chairs, sabers and blankets and spread out on the green grass & open space. 5-9 p.m. Skypark, 361 Kings Village Rd., Scotts Valley. 438-3251. Free.

OUTDOOR REDWOOD GROVE LOOP WALK Join us for this fun and informative guided half-mile stroll through a magnificent oldgrowth redwood forest. Meet the famous Mother Tree, the Father of the Forest and the incredible Chimney Tree on this 90-minute walk. Stroller and wheelchair accessible. Various times. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. thatsmypark.org. $10/Free.

METEOR TRAIL HIKE Join a Big Basin docent on one of our most diverse hikes— by mountain streams, oak woodlands, chaparral, and redwoods. We’ll discuss forests, flowers, and fires on a six-mile, 3.5hour hike. 10 a.m. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. thatsmypark.org. $10/Free. BIRD WALK Join a park docent and Santa Cruz Bird Club member for a 1-mile, 1.5 hour walk through good bird viewing areas and practice birding by ear too. Bring binoculars or borrow ours. 10:30 a.m. Natural Bridges State Beach, Swanton Boulevard and West Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. thatsmypark.org. $10/Free.

SATURDAY 5/18 ARTS BIG TREES EXHIBITION Enjoy the history, in images, of Welch’s Big Trees, now the Redwood Loop Trail at Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park. See images of features no longer in the park and learn about others that have unusual stories to tell. Noon-4 p.m.San Lorenzo Valley Museum, 12547 Hwy.9, Boulder Creek. slvmuseum. com. Free.

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY HISTORY FAIR Over 20 museums and historical societies will share displays of old photos, artifacts, and information on local history. There will also be books for sale and activities for children. Bring your questions, curiosity, and perhaps an old photo to share, or just come and look. Noon. City of Capitola Community Center, 4400 Jade St., Santa Cruz. santacruzpl.libcal.com. Free.

WOOL, SPINNING, AND WEAVING How did an isolated settlement clothe the hundreds of people who lived there? Take an in-depth look at the cloth industry of Mission Santa Cruz. We will follow the path of wool from the sheep to the shirt. 1 p.m. Santa Cruz Mission Historic State Park, 144 School St., Santa Cruz. thatsmypark.org. Free.

CLASSES INTRODUCTION TO GARDEN HERBALISM The fields and gardens of the UCSC Farm abound with medicinal plants. Come learn how to use these common plants for every day maladies and health promotion. 9:30-Noon. Center for Agroecology & Sustainable Food Systems, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz. 459-3240. $30/ Free.

FOOD & WINE APTOS FARMERS MARKET AT CABRILLO COLLEGE Voted Good Times best farmers market in Santa Cruz County. With more than 90 vendors, the Aptos Farmers Market offers an unmatched selection of locally-grown produce and specialty foods. 8 a.m.-Noon, Saturdays, Cabrillo College. montereybayfarmers.org or akeller@montereybayfarmers.org. Free.

WESTSIDE FARMERS MARKET The Westside Farmers Market takes place every week at the corner of Highway 1 and Western Drive, situated on the northern edge of Santa


CALENDAR Cruz’s greenbelt. This market serves the communities of the west-end of Santa Cruz, including Bonny Doon, North Coast, UCSC Campus and is a short trip from downtown. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Mission Street and Western Drive, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

incredible Chimney Tree on this 90-minute walk. Stroller and wheelchair accessible.Two walks available between 11 a.m-3:30 p.m. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. thatsmypark.org. $10/Free.

GROUPS

HIDDEN GEMS: FLOWERS OF BIG BASIN There are many less-famous, yet

CANNA GET A BREAK YOGA AND CANNABIS RETREAT We’ll focus on

still beautiful, plants in the redwood forest. Join docent Kathy Willott on this four-mile, three-hour walk and meet some of the hidden gems of Big Basin. 10 a.m. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. thatsmypark.org. $10/Free.

how to gain calmness and clarity, and how to get centered and recharged. Through cannabis-inspired yoga, walks through the beautiful Bird Valley Organic cannabis farm, and keto-focused nutrition talks - we will focus on self-care and recreating the calm, so we can go home a better mom. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Bird Valley Organic Farm, 355 Webb Rd., Watsonville. heretotherecoaching.com. $165.

MUSIC IL DOLCE SUONO SPRING CONCERT IL Dolce Suono, student led choir, sings a variety of choral and vocal music in different languages and from all periods of music history. Cabrillo Samper Recital Hall, 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos. cabrillovapa. com.$15/$13/$10.

PUSAKA SUNDA: GAMELAN MUSIC OF WEST JAVA Following Pusaka Sunda’s return from our 30th Anniversary Tour to West Java, the group will continue the anniversary celebrations with a concert of Gamelan Degung music featuring master bamboo flute musician, Burhan Sukarma. 8 p.m. First United Methodist Church Santa Cruz, 250 California St., Santa Cruz. pusakasunda.org.

FREE SWIM LESSONS WITH SEAHORSE SWIM SCHOOL In an effort to reduce accidental drownings, Seahorse Swim School will offer free swim lessons to children and adults on select dates this Spring. In partnership with the Make a Splash Foundation and USA Swimming, these swim lessons are available to all for no charge. 1-2 p.m. Seascape Sports Club, 1505 Seascape Blvd., Aptos. seahorseswimschool. com. Free.

are there so few old growth trees left? How important are banana slugs to the redwood ecosystems? Answer these questions and more every Saturday on our Redwood Grove Walks. One of our knowledgeable and friendly docents will lead you through the wondrous old growth forest and answer any questions you may have. Various times. Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park, 101 N Big Trees Park Rd., Felton. thatsmypark.org. Free.

PARK RESTORATION WORK DAY Help dig and pull invasive plants to make a big difference. Bring gloves and trowels or borrow ours. Be ready to get a bit dirty and wear closed toed shoes, socks, long sleeves, and long pants. 12:30 p.m. Natural Bridges State Beach, Swanton Boulevard and West Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. thatsmypark.org. $10/Free. DISCOVER BIG BASIN REDWOODS HIKE Explore the park’s less travelled backcountry with Docent Barry Grimm. This moderately paced hike will be individually tailored to your group. Based on group size, experience level, and weather conditions, we will choose from the many trails that explore the park’s most scenic areas. Noon. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. thatsmypark.org. $10/Free.

SUNDAY 5/19 ARTS

REDWOOD GROVE LOOP WALK Join

SUNDAY SEASIDE CRAFTS AT THE SEYMOUR CENTER Come create and

us for this fun and informative guided half-mile stroll through a magnificent oldgrowth redwood forest. Meet the famous Mother Tree, the Father of the Forest and the

take home a fun souvenir, an activity for the whole family to share. For example, find out what gray whales eat by creating a bright sun catcher for your window, or create >42

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

OUTDOOR

OLD-GROWTH REDWOOD TOURS Why

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CALENDAR THE CABRILLO SYMPHONIC WINDS —THE CEMENT SHIP 100 YEARS The Cabrillo Symphonic Winds will perform a concert of band music with a special tribute to the Cement Ship on its 100th birthday. 3:30 p.m. Cabrillo Crocker Theater, 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos. cabrillovapa.com. Free.

OUTDOOR ELEPHANT SEAL EQUAL ACCESS TOUR To accommodate those who require mobility assistance, Año Nuevo offers a 2-hour tour for visitors to access the natural preserve and view the elephant seals. Various times. Ano Nuevo State Park, New Years Creek Road, Pescadero. www. thatsmypark.org. $10/Free.

SENDEROS VIVE OAXACA GUELAGUETZA CULTURAL FESTIVAL Citizens of Humanity AG • Mother Denim • Paige Michael Stars • Groceries Free People • Velvet • Wilt Frank & Eileen • Johnny Was Sanctuary • Lucky Brand CP Shades • Jag • Cut Loose Nic & Zoe • Eileen Fisher

SATURDAY 5/18 ART EXPO This outdoor inaugural Art Expo will feature artwork from over 50 individual artists and galleries throughout the greater Bay Area and Northern California Regions, from Sacramento to Monterey. The weekend event at the Old Wrigley Building lot will also include food from Ate3one and Chuy Santa Cruz, plus guest wineries. This art blockparty is sponsored by Event Santa Cruz, the Art Cave and Idea Fab Labs Santa Cruz. 3-7 p.m. The Art Cave, 2956 Mission St., Santa Cruz. (949) 413-9104. $5-$10.

Locally Owned Since 1972

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Santa Cruz • (831) 423-3349 • 1224 Pacific Ave Capitola • (831) 476-6109 • 504C Bay Ave

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a fancy fish with paper, paint, and color. 1-3 p.m. Seymour Marine Discovery Center, 100 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz. seymourcenter.ucsc.edu.

<41

OPEN HOUSE AT THE CASTRO ADOBE: WOMEN OF THE CASTRO ADOBE Without working women out in

"The Carver's Groove" Custom woodworking, antique care & restoration, architectural feature reproduction. SINCE 1989

ANDREW CHURCH

front and behind the scenes, our adobe would have fallen apart ages ago. From the first indigenous woman to light the fire in the cocina, to the architectural historian who began picking up the pieces of her home after the Loma Prieta earthquake, to the project manager of our current reconstruction efforts, we honor them all this weekend. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Castro Adobe State Historic Park, 184 Old Adobe Rd., Watsonville. thatsmypark.org. Free.

719 Swift Street #14, Santa Cruz (near Hotline Wetsuits)

CLASSES

831.818.8051

SCIENCE SUNDAY—EELGRASS RESTORATION SUCCESS IN ELKHORN

SLOUGH Seagrasses are in global decline despite restoration efforts. To date, the majority of these efforts have been unsuccessful. Locally, Elkhorn Slough suffered massive seagrass loss in the mid 1900s. Since 1980, there has been some natural recovery in the slough—though small relative to historical extent. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Seymour Marine Discovery Center, 100 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz. seymourcenter. ucsc.edu.

MUSIC YOUTH SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT Highlights of the Santa Cruz County Youth Symphony’s Spring Concert include 16-yearold Eli Gilbert performing Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto in A major and the Santa Cruz premiere of Aurora Australis for Didgeridoo and Orchestra, by Ron Miller. 7 p.m. Peace United Church of Christ, Santa Cruz, 900 High St., Santa Cruz. sccys.org.

Spend the day in Oaxaca! Senderos invites you to the 14th Annual Vive Oaxaca Guelaguetza, an authentic food, music, dance, crafts and cultural festival like those held annually in Oaxaca, Mexico. Featuring delicious Oaxacan food and beverages: mole, tlayudas, tejate and more. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. San Lorenzo Park, 137 Dakota Ave., Santa Cruz. scsenderos.org.

THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED: A DOGFRIENDLY WALK On this dog-friendly walk, we travel North Escape Road, a paved road closed to traffic. We tour stunning old-growth redwood groves along beautiful Opal Creek. This is a fun and easy, 3-mile, 2-hour walk with docent Diane Shaw. Dogs not required, but welcome. Bring water. 9:30 a.m. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. thatsmypark.org. $10/ Free.

BIRDING FOR BEGINNERS Join birder extraordinaire Jim Williams for a tranquil morning filled with our little flying friends. Learn about the birds in our park, receive a Henry Cowell RSP birding brochure, and begin your career as an energized birder. Make sure to bring water, comfortable footwear, and a keen eye and/or ears. 8 a.m. Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park, 101 N Big Trees Park Road, Felton. thatsmypark. org. $10/Free.

REDWOOD GROVE LOOP WALK Join us for this fun and informative guided half-mile stroll through a magnificent oldgrowth redwood forest. Meet the famous Mother Tree, the Father of the Forest and the incredible Chimney Tree on this 90-minute


CALENDAR walk. Stroller and wheelchair accessible.Two walks available between 11 a.m-3:30 p.m. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. thatsmypark.org. $10/Free.

SEQUOIA AUDUBON TRAIL Enjoy an easy 2-mile hike along the California coast into the Pescadero Marsh Natural Preserve with popular spots for good bird watching. Bring water and snacks. Close toed shoes, layered clothing, sunscreen, and binoculars recommended. 1 p.m. Half Moon Bay State Beach, 95 Kelly Ave., Half Moon Bay. thatsmypark.org. Free.

WHEN SPECIES COLLIDE Join docent Ken Koll for a four-mile hike on the beautiful Skyline to Sea Bypass Trail. Along the way we will pass through the varied habitats of the Waddell Valley and explore topics like native vs. non-native plants, invasive species, and adaptations. Noon. Rancho del Oso Nature and History Center, 3600 California 1, Davenport. 427-2288. Free.

SEACLIFF HISTORY TOUR Learn the history of Seacliff and surrounding Aptos in this one-hour, half-mile history walk. Led by docent Pete Wang, the tour focuses on the Ohlone, Raphael Castro, Claus Spreckels, Aptos Landing Wharf, the development of Seacliff Park — including Paul Woodside, “the Madman of Seacliff” — and the Concrete Ship. 11 a.m. Seacliff State Beach, State Park Drive exit from Highway 1, Aptos. thatsmypark.org. $10/Free.

STRAWBERRY FIELDS FOREVER BIKE RIDE It will be tons of fun with

MONDAY 5/20 CLASSES TRIYOGA BASICS YOGA CLASS A relaxing, stretching, strengthening Basics TriYoga class to benefit your backs and hips. With Dr. Kim Beecher (chiropractor). For beginners and all levels. 6-7:30 p.m. TriYoga Center, 708 Washington St., Santa Cruz. triyoga-santacruz.com. $15.

THICH NHAT HANH MEDITATION Santa

GENTLE YOGA Customized for every body (with adaptations for those with injuries). Learn to move the body with loving intention, easy breathing practices, asana variations provided for each body.We have lots of props, no rental fee for mats. Lovely wood floors, sunny and bright with ceiling fans (heat and AC if needed). 10:30-11:30 a.m. Mark Stephens Yoga, 1010 Fair Ave. Suite C, Santa Cruz. yogawithirene.com. $10.

LIVE PERFORMANCES BY ERIC & HAPPIE • ROCKID

LEVEL 1 - FOUNDATION COURSE IN ESSENTIAL OIL THERAPY This class

TICKETS: APJCC.ORG/MUSIC

is a rich introduction to the essential oil experience. The information you learn in this class will provide you with a valuable, lifelong reference guide to the healing properties of essential oils and can truly be a life changing experience. 5 p.m. The College of Botanical Healing Arts, 4170 Gross Road Ext #5, Capitola. cobha.org.

STRONG VINYASA Join seasoned instructors Marilu Shinn and Angela Rocchio for a class that will challenge, invigorate, and open you deeply. Strong Vinyasa is equivalent to a level 2/3 practice and is recommended for experienced practitioners. 5:30 p.m. Watsonville Yoga, Dance and Healing Arts, 375 N. Main, Watsonville. 7139843. SANTA CRUZ WRITERS Join other published writers in a weekly workshop. We plan an online publication and video showcasing our best writing from short fiction and excerpts to memoirs and nonfiction to poems and short plays. 1 p.m. The Bagelry, 320 Cedar St., Suite A, Santa Cruz. cdbaghaw@att.net. Free.

GROUPS

PHARAOH’S DAUGHTER TRIO

Thank You To Our Sponsors

Bill Lister

The APJCC is proud to be a part of the Initiative on Jewish Peoplehood, co-funded by the Koret Foundation and the Taube Foundation for Jewish Life & Culture and supported further by the Jewish Federation of Silicon Valley and other generous supporters. ® OF SILICON VALLEY

Neal H. Fearn

CONGRATULATIONS

to

STAFF OF LIFE on 50 years in Santa Cruz!

TRANS & ALLIES AA SUPPORT GROUP The Diversity Center's Trans A.A. group serves to provide a self-supporting environment for trans folks and allies who are seeking assistance with their substance use. The primary purpose of A.A. is to carry its message of recovery, treatment, and sobriety. 8-9 p.m. The Diversity Center, 1117 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. diversitycenter.org.

ARM-IN-ARM CANCER SUPPORT GROUP For women with advanced, >44

from your friends at Good Times

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

outrageously scenic cycling for our worthwhile cause. We’ve got lots of extra goodies planned, including of course a very special custom-designed collectible jersey and T-shirt. 7 a.m. Pajaro Valley High School, 500 Harkins Slough Rd., Watsonville. cyclistsforculturalexchange.org. $80.

Cruz Heart Sangha is a meditation group in the Thich Nhat Hanh tradition that meets every Monday. We welcome all to spend with us an hour in silent sitting and walking meditation followed by Dharma sharing. 7-9 p.m. Santa Cruz Zen Center, 113 School St., Santa Cruz. Free.

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YOUTH activities CAMPREgister CAPITOLA now!

CALENDAR

• Awesome summer experience for kids & teens! • 7 new camps with field trips. • 1 & 2 week sessions w/ 1/2 day, all day & extended care available.

THE CLASSIC CAMP: Ages 6-11

Arts & crafts, beach days, field trips & more!

NATURE CAMP: Ages 8-12

Meet California’s wild animals, field trip with Adventure Out and the S.C. History Musuem!

SPORTS CAMP: Ages 8-12

Archery, disc golf @ DeLaveaga, surf lessons, swimming @ Simpkins and so much more!

All around town CAMP: Ages 6-11 Visit the Seymore

Center, Natural Bridges, climb at Pacific Edge & more!

EMPOWERED: Ages 12-15

A program for girls & female identified. Skate w/ S.C. Derby Girls, aerial @ Radical Movement Factory & more!

on a wire camp: Ages 12-15 Climbing @ Pacific Edge, ropes course w/ Apex Adventures & more fun adventures!

art camp: Ages 8-12 Explore art from craft to project ending w/

an art show! Field trip to Tannery Art Center & visit Glow Candle Making.

DRAMA camp: Ages 8-12 Find your character & put on a play.

Visit S.C. Shakespeare, attend a performace workshop & more!

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT:

WWW.CITYOFCAPITOLA.ORG/RECREATION/PAGE/CAMP-CAPITOLA

SATURDAY 5/18 FUNNIEST STUDENT IN SANTA CRUZ DNA’s Comedy Lab is looking for the funniest student in Santa Cruz. Winners will receive cash, prizes, a chance to work a weekend show at DNA’s Comedy Lab and radio time on KPIG. It's first-come, first-served, and every student will be judged to see if they progress to the big show the following day. All you need to do is show up and audition. Each audition is three minutes long. Those 16 and over must bring a current, valid student ID. Those under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. If selected, you must be able to compete the following day. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. DNA’s Comedy Lab, 155 S. River St., Santa Cruz. dnascomedylab.com. Free.

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

<43 recurrent and metastatic cancers.

44

Week long specialty camps for grades K-6 July 15 to August 9 9am-4pm - Ranch Builders - Chess - Musica y Espanol Move’n’Groove - Discovery Camp - and many more...

Santa Cruz Soccer Camp Over 30 years of soccer fun!

Registration required at 457-2273. 12:30-2 p.m. WomenCARE, 2901 Park Ave., Suite A1, Soquel. 457-2273. Free.

performed slowly and with breath awareness. This wonderfully therapeutic practice will help you increase strength and range of motion. 9:30 a.m. California Grey Bears, 2710 Chanticleer Ave., Santa Cruz. 234-6791. $5.

SANTA CRUZ BODYWORK COLLECTIVE Santa Cruz Bodywork

HOMEWORK HELP Drop-in homework

Collective is a dojo—a place of the way— for those seeking guided instruction to achieving greater ease, flow and connection in one's bodymind, Heart and Life. 7 p.m. Cypress Health Institute, 1119 Pacific Ave. Suite 300, Santa Cruz. 476-2115. Free.

TUESDAY 5/21 CLASSES gatewaysc.org/campgateway 255 Swift Street, Santa Cruz (831) 423-0341 x334

831.246.1517

santacruzsoccercamp.com

CHAIR YOGA WITH SUZI Instructor Suzi Mahler, CMT, NE, will guide you through a series of gentle seated yoga postures that are

help for students through grade 12. 3-5 p.m. Various locations throughout the county. santacruzpl.org. Free.

PSYCHIC SOUND HEALER-MICHELE NEWMAN Join Us for a deep sonic journey into healing on a cellular level with harmonic, alchemical crystal bowls. Feel free to sit up or lay down in a restorative pose and receive this uniquely relaxing expression of compassion. Immerse your whole being in healing crystal bowl sound resonance and Michele's Angelic Voice. 7-9 p.m. Avalon Visions Center for Creative Spirituality, 2815 Porter St., Soquel. 247-1489. $15.


CALENDAR COMMUNITY PILATES CLASS Community Pilates class led by Pilates Instructor Jennifer Balboni. Drop-in any Tuesday or Thursday for a fun and challenging 60-minute, core-based flowing strength class. Bring your own mat. 10 a.m. Temple Beth El, 3055 Porter Gulch Rd., Aptos. tbeaptos.org. Free.

TRIYOGA BASICS CLASS WITH TERRI TriYoga flows are presented with personalized guided alignment assistance. 9:30 a.m. TriYoga Center, 708 Washington St., Santa Cruz. triyoga-santacruz.com. $15.

TEN-WEEK COGNITIVELY BASED COMPASSION TRAINING Pre-registration required. Cognitively Based Compassion Training (CBCT) is a 10 week secular ethics training with roots in buddhism yet is not religious. Developed at Emory University by Geshe Lobsang Tenzin Negi, PhD with input from multiple disciplines & the Dalai Lama, and taught in medical & educational institutions—anyone can learn this practice. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wisdom Center of Santa Cruz, 740 Front St. #155, Santa Cruz. wisdomcentersc.org.

GENTLE YOGA / YOGA FOR SENIORS

Chaminade Lane, Santa Cruz. chaminade. com. $18.

TACO TUESDAY Tuesdays are better with tacos, especially when you can enjoy 2 delicious tacos with a locally crafted beer and a B-rated movie. 6-9 p.m. Solaire Restaurant + Bar, 611 Ocean St., Santa Cruz. hotelparadox.com. $10. LIBERTARIAN PARTY MONTHLY DINNER MEETING Join us for pizza, an adult beverage, libertarian principles, and meet some really neat people. Find out how you can go about recovering freedom, liberty and equal opportunity. 6:30 p.m. Woodstock's Pizza, 710 Front St., Santa Cruz. 295-1536. Free.

GROUPS CANCER SUPPORT GROUP WomenCARE support group for women newly diagnosed or undergoing treatment for cancer. Registration required. 12:30-2 p.m. WomenCARE, 2901 Park Ave., Suite A1, Soquel. 457-2273. Free.

GENDERQUEER SUPPORT GROUP

Join us for a very enjoyable and relaxing deep stretch through a variety of postures clearly narrated and slowly paced for safety and personalization; with meditation and pranayama offered. Seated and reclined poses that are relaxing and build flexibilty and joint mobility are highlighted. 10:30 a.m. Watsonville Yoga, Dance and Healing Arts, 375 N. Main, Watsonville. watsonville.yoga.

The support and discussion group is for people (of any age) who identify on the spectrum of GenderQueer/Non-Binary/ Agender/GenderFluid, etc. The group also welcomes those who want to explore their identity, but who may not need or want to classify themselves. 7:30-9 p.m. The Diversity Center, 1117 Ocean St., Santa Cruz. diversitycenter.org.

GEOLOGY ILLUSTRATION WORKSHOP AT THE SANTA CRUZ MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY Learn to visualize

OUTDOOR

FOOD & WINE LIVE MUSIC AND TACO BAR Chaminade Resort and Spa’s live music series begins March 26 and runs through Aug. 27. Enjoy live music from 6-8 p.m. on our outdoor patio (weather permitting) performed by some of Santa Cruz’s well-known musicians. 6-8 p.m. Chaminade Resort and Spa, 1

SPRING YOGA AND ETHNOBOTANY SERIES All classes take place in the Australian garden. Directional signs will be visible once you enter the Arboretum. This spring, the UCSC Arboretum & Botanic Garden is bringing back our popular Yoga and Ethnobotany series. 4 p.m. UCSC Arboretum & Botanic Garden, 85 Empire Grade, Santa Cruz. arboretum.ucsc.edu. $230/$16.

EXPLORING BIG BASIN Learn about redwoods, forest plants, fires, geology, history and more on these fun, varied hikes with docent Diane Shaw. Hikes are 5-8 miles and last up to 5 hours. We go rain or shine, but strong winds may cancel. 9 a.m. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, 21600 Big Basin Way, Boulder Creek. thatsmypark.org. $10/ Free.

Raffle Prizes, Pop-ups, Demonstrations $10 suggested donation at the door

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

and draw the rock formations that define landscapes at the Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History. Geologists peel back the stratigraphic layers by creating maps, crosssections, and three-dimensional diagrams to show the relationships between layers of rocks, faults, and other features. 5:307:30 p.m. Santa Cruz Museum Of Natural History, 1305 E Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. santacruzmuseum.org. $20/$15.

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MUSIC CALENDAR

LOVE YOUR

LOCAL BAND GIVE YOU NOTHING

Spencer Biddiscombe recalls when the head of his record label, Snubbed Records, gave Give You Nothing’s album a listen. He said it sounded like a mid’90s Bay Area punk band. Biddiscombe thanked him for the compliment. “That’s what we’re going for,” he tells GT. “Every other band I’ve been in, I don’t think we ever sounded like what we set out to sound like.” The band’s debut self-titled, full-length album was released May 1. It’s got heavy, energetic skate-punk riffs with melodic vocals throughout, giving the music a nice blend of pop and hardcore.

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

As new as the band is, the members have been involved in the scene since the early 2000s—but they’d played hardcore, thrash and powerviolence.

46

“This is what we grew up listening to in the ’90s in Santa Cruz. AFI, Fury 66. We were like, ‘We want to do a band like that,’” Biddiscombe says of Give You Nothing. The band spent over a year on the record, throwing out songs they didn’t absolutely love, demoing the rest and getting a nice, polished studio recording that still has the live energy intact. This upcoming show is the unofficial record release. The group hopes to put together a bigger release show sometime in July. “Our biggest thing is just having fun,” Biddiscombe says. “There’s so many bands that are way too serious now.” AARON CARNES

9 p.m., Wednesday, May 22. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $10. 429-6994.

CHAMPIAN FULTON

WEDNESDAY 5/15 WORLD

FLOR DE TOLOACHE Ingestion of the toloache plant is known to cause euphoria, hallucinations and even spontaneous feelings of love. Its flower—a white, five-petaled bulb—is known as the “angel’s trumpet,” an instrument whose silent tone announces a bottomless mysticism beneath. Appropriately, Flor de Toloache, NYC’s first all-female mariachi group, has chosen this flower as their namesake. The Grammy-winning and boundary-pushing Flor de Toloache puts a modern spin on an enduring art form, shedding new light both on its natural beauty and its raw mystic power. MIKE HUGUENOR 7 p.m. Kuumbwa, 320-2 Cedar Street, Santa Cruz. $26.25 adv/$31.50 door. 427-2227.

THURSDAY 5/16 ELECTRONIC

JAI WOLF Sajeeb Saha, who goes by Jai Wolf, started producing electronic tracks in 2011. Just a couple years later, he released his official debut single “Indian Summer,” which reached No. 31 on the Billboard

charts. It’s a simple, uplifting song that relies more on its triumphant melody than its danceable beat to carry it. As he’s continued to release singles, many of which also charted, he’s followed this format and inserted an infectious pop sensibility into electronic music that sounds like the sun rising on a night of joyous partying. AC 8 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $25 adv/$30 door. 423-1338.

THURSDAY 5/16 BLUEGRASS

FRONT COUNTRY You know that saying, “The grass is always bluer on the other side?” What? You don’t? Well, it’s a pretty recent phrase. This is it’s first time in print, in fact, but I have a feeling it will take off any day now, just like Front Country’s modernized take on bluegrass did. With a powerful main vocalist, and woodsy covers of King Crimson, tUnE-yArDs and Don Henley, Front Country stretches the borders of bluegrass into the world of pop, without sacrificing the core sensibilities of the genre. The grass really is bluer. MH 8:30 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $10 adv/$15 door. 479-1854.

FRIDAY 5/17 INDIE

CARSIE BLANTON Carsie Blanton is a folk artist with a feisty, brash sense of humour—a playful but genuine take on sexuality with political edginess. Musically, she’s always willing to break with genre; if she feels the country song needs some jazz riffs and a quip about masturbation, well, she’ll go ahead and follow what her strange muses have urged her. After all, as Blanton says herself, making people feel comfortable isn’t a priority for her anymore. AMY BEE 9 p.m. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $12 adv/$14 door. 429-6994.

JAZZ

CHAMPIAN FULTON In a jazz scene crowded with excellent singers who can accompany themselves, Champian Fulton ranks among the best. She recently released her 10th album, The Stylings of Champian, but for this date she’s


MUSIC

BE OUR GUEST HIEROGLYPHICS

CARSIE BLANTON

focusing on songs from her acclaimed 2016 project After Dark, a tribute to Dinah Washington. One of jazz’s most influential singers, Washington was just as commanding singing blues, R&B and pop. Champian concentrates on the standards that the Queen remade in her inimitable style. ANDREW GILBERT 7 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $26.25 adv/$31.50 door. 427-2227.

METAL

GRODY Merriam-Webster defines “grody” as, “Nasty, disgusting, revolting.” Clearly, the band Grody has picked the perfect name to describe their buzzsaw-death-grind sound. On the heels of a self-titled debut, the Northern California five-piece will hit the Blue Lagoon on May 18 with local heshers Dead War and Blood Omen, along with San Jose’s Cult Graves. MAT WEIR 9 p.m. Blue Lagoon, 923 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $5. 423-7117.

COMEDY

ELIZA SKINNER If you don’t know the name Eliza Skinner, you’re probably familiar with her work. Not only has she written several Funny or Die skits (including the viral “Mary Poppins Quits” with Kristen Bell) and co-produced Adam Ruins Everything in 2015, she is also currently a writer for The Late Late Show With James Corden and his infamous carpool karaokes. But when she steps out from behind the scenes, Skinner is a one-woman tour de force of comedy who has no problem tackling life’s challenges one joke at a time. MW 7:30 and 10 p.m. DNA’s Comedy Lab, 155 S River St., Santa Cruz. $20 adv/$25 door. (530) 592-5250.

SUNDAY 5/19 INDIE

MAC DEMARCO Mac Demarco’s music has been called “blue wave” and “slacker rock.” He’s fond of calling it “jizz jazz,” which might be worthy of analyzing somewhere else. The most pragmatic

label would be folk rock, with some Ariel Pink underpinnings and a light sprinkling of island music. DeMarco’s tunes have an acoustic feel, even when synthesizers and digital equipment are obviously in play. The effect is nostalgic and warm, yet also cold and calculating music that’s kinda creepy-crawly, but still enjoyable— like your favorite ASMR video. AB 9 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $55.99 adv/$60.99 door. 423-1338.

TUESDAY 5/21 BLUEGRASS

CHE APALACHE What happens if you mix traditional bluegrass with traditional Latin music? I know this sounds like a riddle, but it’s actually an apt description of Buenos Aires-based, four-piece acoustic band Che Apalache. Founded by North Carolinian Joe Troop, the group is a byproduct of his time spent teaching young Argentinian musicians how to play bluegrass. They call it Latingrass, but you have to hear it to get a sense of this culturally complex, fascinating project. AC 7:30 p.m. Michael’s On Main, 2591 Main St., Soquel. $20. 479-9777.

9 p.m. Thursday, May 23. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $20/adv, $25/door. Information: catalystclub. com. WANT TO GO? Go to santacruz. com/giveaways before 11 a.m. on Friday, May 17, to find out how you could win a pair of tickets to the show.

IN THE QUEUE THE MOONDOGGIES

Rock ‘n’ roll, canine-style. Thursday at Crepe Place ACE OF CUPS

One of the first all-female rock bands. Friday at Rio Theatre SHOOTER JENNINGS

Outlaw country packing heat. Saturday at Moe’s Alley ARI LENNOX

Neo-soul for your cerebrum. Saturday at Catalyst QUATTLEBAUM

So much banjo! Sunday at Crepe Place

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

SATURDAY 5/18

SATURDAY 5/18

Hip-hop fanatics like to talk about quintessential crews that define an area. New York has Wu-Tang. Atlanta has Dungeon Family. For the Bay Area, that crew is Hieroglyphics. The group was formed in the early ’90s by hiphop misfit Del tha Homosapien, but the individual members were all over the map—from hard-hitting street rappers like Casual to more offbeat minds like A-Plus. As a collective, they toggle between the Bay Area hyphy sound and a cutting-edge alt-jazzy hip-hop sound. For the past three decades, even in years when they haven’t been active, Hieroglyphics’ influence can still be felt all over the Bay.

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LIVE MUSIC

Wednesday May 15 –8/8:30pm $15

Double Bill Featuring 2 Guitar Greats w/ Bands

SCOTT PEMBERTON + FAREED HAQUE Thursday May 16 –8/8:30pm $10/15 Bluegrass & American Roots Music

FRONT COUNTRY + BLUE SUMMIT

Friday May 17 –8/9pm $25/30 Roots Reggae From St. Croix

AKAE BEKA

+ BLAZEEN & TRIBE Saturday May 18 –7:30/8:30pm $23/28 Outlaw Country/Rock & Roll With

SHOOTER JENNINGS

+ JESSE DANIEL Sunday May 19 –3/4pm $20/25 Afternoon Blues Series

SUE FOLEY + NICK SCHNEBELEN Wednesday May 22 –8/8:30pm $8/12 Live Reggae Showcase

TUNNEL VISION PACIFIC ROOTS CYDEWAYS

WED

5/15

THU

5/16

ABBOTT SQUARE 118 Cooper St, Santa Cruz

FRI

5/17

SAT

5/18

Papiba & Friends 6:30-9p

Static Tilt 7-9:30p

SUN

5/19

MON

5/20

TUE

5/21

APTOS ST. BBQ 8059 Aptos St, Aptos

Little Jonny Lawton 6-8p

Danny Brooks & Lil Miss Debi 6-8p

James Murray 6-8p

Pete Madsen 6-8p

Kid Andersen 6-8p

Broken Shades 6-8p

Scott Miller 6-8p

BOARDWALK BOWL 115 Cliff St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

The Rougher Yet 9:15p-12a

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

BOCCI’S CELLAR 140 Encinal St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke Free 8p

Swing Dance 5:30p

BRITANNIA ARMS 110 Monterey Ave, Capitola

Alex Lucero & Friends 8p

Karaoke 9-12:30a

Karaoke 9-12:30a

Michael Gathier Duo 7p

Six String Pharmacy 7p

John Michael 3p

Ari Lennox $20/$22 8p

Mac Demarco $56/$61 8p

CAPITOLA WINE BAR 115 San Jose Ave, Capitola CATALYST 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Beat Weekend 8p

Jai Wolf $25/$30 7p

CATALYST ATRIUM 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Rumble Steelskin $7 8:30p

Carnifex $20/$25 6p

Geographer $13/$15 8:30p

CHAMINADE RESORT 1 Chaminade Ln, Santa Cruz

John Michael & Ted Welty Free 6p

CILANTROS 1934 Main St, Watsonville

Hippo Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

CORK AND FORK 312 Capitola Ave, Capitola

Open Mic Night Free 7-10p

CORRALITOS CULTURAL CENTER 127 Hames Rd., Corralitos

KPIG Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p The Beach Cowboys Free 7-10p Open Mic 7-10p

Acoustic Open Jam 3-5p

Thursday May 23 –7:30/8:30pm $15/20 Evils Powers Of Rock N’ Roll 20th Anniversary

SUPERSUCKERS

5/17 ROBYN HITCHCOCK HMML BIG SUR

Sunny & The Sunsets Michals on Main 5/17

Friday May 24 –8/9pm $20/25

Afro-Latin-Cumbia-Reggae Dance Party

B-SIDE PLAYERS Saturday May 25 –8/9pm $25/30 The Keepers Of The Flame Return

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

MELVIN SEALS & JGB

48

May 26 RUPA & THE APRIL FISHES + LOCURA May 30 GREEN LEAF RUSTLERS w/ CHRIS ROBINSON May 31 ETANA + SARITAH June 1 SPACE HEATER June 2 JAMES HARMAN June 6 MICHAEL ROSE w/ SLY & ROBBIE June 7 REAL ESTATE June 8 MIGHTY DIAMONDS June 9 WEBB WILDER BAND June 12 YELLOWMAN June 14 DUB CONGRESS June 15 COFFIS BROTHERS June 16 ROY ROGERS June 20 ROBBIE FULKS June 21 THE SAM CHASE & THE UNTRADITIONAL

WWW.MOESALLEY.COM 1535 Commercial Way Santa Cruz 831.479.1854

Fri, May 17 7:00 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle Fri, May 24 7:30 pm $27 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Women Who Rock Our World

Rio Theatre Spring 2019 Rio Theatre

In a Benefit for the SC Symphony League…

Kuumbwa

Kuumbwa

Felton Music Hall

MOE’S 5/30

(of Civil Wars) Rio 6/15

Co-promotion with Felton Music Hall

Fri, July 19 7:30 pm $25 Gen. Adv. $40 Gold Circle

Kuumbwa

BILL CALLAHAN BIG SUR 6/17 Golden State Theater

Snazzy at Michael’s On Main Tues, May 21 Wed, June 26

GREEN LEAF RUSTLERS

REAL ESTATE MOE’S 6/7 JOHN PAUL WHITE

Nigel Armstrong & Friends

Wed, July 3 8:00 pm $30 Gen. Adv.

& his Fabulous Superlatives

5/23

with Special guests “Ace of Cups”, Doug Brinkley and Wallace Baine

Wed, June 5 7:30 pm $30 Gen. Adv. $45 Gold Circle

Marty Stuart

7:30 pm 7:30 pm

Che Apalache The Singing Out Tour (Pride Month Celebration)

each side (40 seats). Additional $4 for each ticket purchased at the door. Tax is included.

$20 Adv/ $20 Door $15 Adv/ $15 Door

JACKIE GREENE BAND Friday, June 7

Monterey

Friday, July 5

Monterey

MANDOLIN ORANGE SUR ANIMAL COLLECTIVE BIG 10/13


LIVE MUSIC 5/15

THE CREPE PLACE 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz CROW’S NEST 2218 E. Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

5/16

WED Diggin’ in the Crepe w/ Alwa Gordon & more $8 9p

THU Moondoggies w/ Burning Pictures $10 9p

Yuji Tojo $3 8p

Wasted Noise $5 8p

FRI

5/17

Carsie Blanton $12/$14 9p

SAT

5/18

The Ha w/ Dominique Gomez & more $7 9p

The John Michael Band The House Rockers $6 9p $7 9:30p

5/19

SUN Quattlebaum w/ Jennifer Fox & Jessica Malone $10 9p

MON

5/20

TUE

5/21

Funk Night ft. 7 Come 11 $6 9p-12a

Live Comedy $7 9p

Ronnie Barnes & friends $5 8p

SFs Nerd Rage: The Great Debate 8p

CSI: Santa Cruz 7:30p Movie Riffing 10p

THE FISH HOUSE 972 Main St, Watsonville

Funniest Student Audition 10a Eliza Skinner 7:30&10p

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS Thursday, May 16 • 7 PM

KUUMBWA JAZZ HONOR BAND

Friday, May 17 • 7 PM

CHAMPIAN FULTON: TRIBUTE TO DINAH WASHINGTON

The Funniest Student in Santa Cruz Competition 7:30p

One of jazz’s rising-star vocalists playting homage to a legend.

Southsiders

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS

FLYNN’S CABARET 6275 Hwy 9, Felton GABRIELLA CAFE 910 Cedar St., Santa Cruz

A fresh and contemporary reimagining of classic mariachi sounds.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS

Alicia Haselton & Israel Sanchez Free 6:30-8:30p

DNA’S COMEDY LAB 155 River St, Santa Cruz

FLOR DE TOLOACHE

Showcasing our community’s remarkable local jazz talent.

DAV. ROADHOUSE 1 Davenport Ave, Davenport DISCRETION BREWING 2703 41st Ave, Soquel

Wednesday, May 15 • 7 PM

Monday, May 20 • 7 PM & 9 PM Linc Russin 7-9p

JACK O’NEILL RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 175 W Cliff Dr. Santa Cruz

ANAT COHEN TENTET – MUSIC DIRECTOR: ODED LEV-ARI

Jeannine Bonstelle & Sweeney Schragg 6:30-9:30p Matias 6:30-9:30p

KUUMBWA JAZZ 320-2 Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Flor de Toloache $26.25/$31.50 7p

MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 2591 Main St, Soquel

Diamonds in the Rough: The Swirly Girls John Prime Tribute $10 7:30p $10 7:30p

Kuumbwa Jazz Honor Band $10.50/$15.75 7p

Scott Slaughter 6:30-9:30p

A synergistic, clarinet-centered ensemble.

Firefly 6:30-9:30p

Champian Fulton: Dinah Washington Tribute $26.25/$31.50 7p Harpin’ & Clark Free 5p Soulwise & guests Sonny & the Sunsets & $10 9p more $15 8:30p

Thursday, May 23 • 7 PM

MADS TOLLING & THE MADS MEN WITH SPENCER DAY

Anat Cohen Tentet, Oded Lev-Ari $31.50/$36.75 7&9p Grateful Sunday Free 5:30p

Che Apalache $20 7:30p

Bringing the cosmopolitan and urbane style of the 1960s to the stage.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS Friday, May 24 • 7:30 PM

SLAID CLEAVES

Tickets: snazzyproductions.com Thursday, May 30 • 7 PM

UCSC JAZZ ENSEMBLES

A diverse program from the University’s esteemed jazz department.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS Sunday, June 2 • 7 PM

RALPH TOWNER: SOLO Pensive and luminous nylon and twelve-string guitar artistry. Monday, June 3 • 7 PM

JUDY CARMICHAEL WITH LARRY KOONSE Stride piano at its finest.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS Thursday, June 6 • 7 PM

The Santa Cruz debut of a new project from an acclaimed saxophonist/composer.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS Monday, June 10 • 7 PM

JAZZMEIA HORN

The RIO Theatre

Setting the scene ablaze with her dexterous vocal range and phrasing.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS Thursday, June 13 • 7 PM

TIA FULLER QUARTET

Led by a soulful, powerhouse saxophonist.

1/2 PRICE STUDENT TICKETS

Santa Cruz, CA | A Feast of Friends, a rock opera in four movements expressing our recursive existence and the evolution of birth, love, loss, healing and redemption. Encompassing the unique combination of musical genres of rock, opera, funk, and bossa nova, A Feast of Friends is a musical odyssey of the heart, mind and soul. FRIDAY, MAY 31 | Doors 7PM | Starts 8PM | Tickets $15 TICKETS AVAILABLE AT STREETLIGHT RECORDS & PULSEPRODUCTIONS.NET

Unless noted, advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org and dinner served one hour before Kuumbwa presented concerts. Premium wine & beer available. All ages welcome.

320-2 Cedar St | Santa Cruz 831.427.2227 kuumbwajazz.org

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

Rock Opera

PASCAL LE BOEUF’S LIGHT AS A WORD

49


1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-429-4135

LIVE MUSIC

Friday, May 17 • Ages 21+

RUMBLE STEELSKIN

Saturday, May 18 • Ages 16+

ARI LENNOX Sunday, May 19 • Ages 16+

CARNIFEX

plus Oceano

Monday, May 20 • Ages 16+

GEOGRAPHER

plus Manatee Commune

Thursday, May 23 • Ages 16+

HIEROGLYPHICS Friday, May 24 • Ages 16+

Saturday, May 25 • Ages 16+

Mustache Harbor

Jun 1 Ghostemane/ Ho9909 (Ages 16+) Jun 2 Planet Booty S.C. Pride Afterparty (Ages 21+) Jun 4 Dizzy Wright/ Demrick (Ages 16+) Jun 5 Chon/ d0MI x JD Beck (Ages 16+) Jun 6 Fidlar/ Tropa Magica (Ages 16+) Jun 8 Andre Nickatina/ J.Lately (Ages 16+) Jun 27 Together Pangea/ Vundabar (Ages 16+) Jun 29 Galactic ft. Erica Falls (Ages 16+) Jul 14 Toots & The Maytals (Ages 16+) Aug 13 Matisyahu (Ages 16+) Aug 16 The Original Wailers (Ages 16+) Aug 27 Protoje (Ages 16+) Sep 24 Hot Chip (Ages 16+) Oct 14 Yung Gravy (Ages 16+) Oct 23 The Distillers (Ages 16+) Nov 14 Suicide Girls Blackheart Burlesque (Ages 21+) Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating.

Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

www.catalystclub.com

WED

5/15

MOE’S ALLEY 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

Scott Pemberton Band, Fareed Haque & Flat Earth $10/$15 8:30p

Front Country & Blue Summit $10/$15 8p

Akae Beka, Blazeen & Tribe $25/$30 8p

MOTIV 1209 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

SCMF 9:30p

Libation Lab w/ King Wizard & Chief Transcend 9:30p

Trevor Williams 9:30p

99 BOTTLES 110 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz

Trivia 8p

Alex Lucero 6-9p

POET & PATRIOT 320 E. Cedar St, Santa Cruz

Raise Her Voice Female Singer/Songwriter Showcase Free 8:30p

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

50

Grateful Sunday Che Apalache

Wed. May 22 7:30pm

Love Songs of the World w/ Dror Sinai & Friends

$12 adv./$15 door seated <21 w/parent

COMING UP

Thu. May 23 The DC Trio Fri. May 24 EXTRA LARGE Sat. May 25 Ten O’clock Lunch Band w/Tammi Brown Wed. May 29 Women Songwriters in The Round

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Full Concert Calendar : MichaelsonMainMusic.com 2591 Main St, Soquel, CA 95073

MON

5/20

Rob Vye Free 6p

THE REEF 120 Union St, Santa Cruz

Variety Show w/ Toby Gray 6:30p

Acoustic Reggae Jam 6:30p

RIO THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz ROSIE MCCANN’S 1220 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

TUE

5/21

Blues Mechanics Free 6p

Sue Foley & Nick Schnebelen $20/$25 3p

Kid Vicious 9:30p

The Takeover, Hip Hop w/ DJ Marc 9:30p

Omar Spence & Friends Johnny Neri Trio 2-5p 2-5p Ugly Beauty Free 9p

Open Mic, Free, 4-7p Lanakila Iesu, Steven, Mia Free 9p

Trivia Free 7:30p

Erin Avila 6-9p Comedy Free 8p

Open Mic Free 8-11p ‘Geeks Who Drink’ Trivia Night 8p

Aloha Friday 6:30p

Featured Acts 6:30p

The Human Juke Box 6p

Open Mic 6p

Ace of Cups $25 7p Comedy Night 9p

THE SAND BAR 211 Esplanade, Capitola

ADVANCE TICKETS ON TICKETWEB WEDNESDAY 5/15 “DIGGIN’ IN THE CREPE” 9PM - $8 DOOR

THURSDAY 5/16

w/ BURNING PICTURES

9PM - $10 DOOR Harpin’ & ClarkGood Times/Metro Ad, Wed. FRIDAY 5/17 05/15

$10 adv. /$10 door Dance – ages 21 + Sun. May 19 5:30pm GRATEFUL DEAD TUNES / NO COVER Tue. May 21 7:30pm $20 adv./$20 door seated <21 w/parent

5/19

Mark Hummel & Deep Basement Shakers Free 6p

THE RED 200 Locust St, Santa Cruz

THE MOONDOGGIES

plus Wildflower & The Bees

SUN

Alex Lucero Free 10p

PARADISE BEACH 215 Esplanade, Capitola

The Swirly Girls

Soulwise

5/18

Danny Brooks & Lil Miss Debi Free 6p Shooter Jennings & Jesse Daniel $23/$28 7:30p

Taco Trivia Tuesday w/ Hive Mind 6:30p

ALWA GORDON / KHAN

Sonny & the Sunsets

SAT

NEW BOHEMIA BREWERY 1030 41st Ave, Santa Cruz

Diamonds In The Rough plus Anthony Arya Tribute to John Prine

Fri. May 17 8:30pm plus Kelley Stoltz $15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21 + Sat. May 18 w/ guests Kenny & Aaron of Thrive 9pm

5/17

Lloyd Whitley Free 6p

OPEN LATE - EVERY NIGHT!

Thu. May 16 7:30pm $10 adv. /$10 door Dance - ages 21+ Fri. May 17 5pm HAPPY HOUR / NO COVER

FRI

The Westside Sheiks Free 6-8p

THE

$10 adv/$10 door seated <21 w/parent

5/16

Blind Rick Free 6p

CREPE PLACE Wed. May 15 7:30p

THU

MISSION ST. BBQ 1618 Mission St, Santa Cruz

CARSIE BLANTON

2 AWESOME SETS - DON’T MISS THIS SHOW! 9PM - $12 ADV OR $14 DOOR

SATURDAY 5/18

THE HA!

w / DOMINIQUE GOMEZ & THE OUILTERS 9PM - $7 DOOR

SUNDAY 5/19

QUATTLEBAUM

w/ JENNER FOX & JESSICA MALONE 9PM - $10 DOOR MONDAY 5/20

MELLOW MONDAYZ w / YOU

COME DOWN AND HANG WITH US.

TUESDAY 5/21

7 COME 11

9PM UNTIL MIDNIGHT MIDTOWN SANTA CRUZ

1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz 429-6994

First & Third Celtic Jam

Live DJ

Billy Martini 7:30p

DJ Spleece 8:30p

Trivia 7:30p

Live DJ Don Karuth Open Jam 7p

Alex Lucero & Friends 7:30p

Tuesday Trivia Night 6:30p


LIVE MUSIC WED

5/15

THU

5/16

SANDERLINGS 1 Seascape Resort, Aptos

FRI

5/17

Calico 7:30p

SEABRIGHT BREWERY 519 Seabright, Santa Cruz

SAT

5/18

5/19

MON

5/20

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

Fishhook 8-11:30p

Tsunami 8-11:30p

SHADOWBROOK 1750 Wharf Rd, Capitola

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Joe Ferrara 6:30-9:30p

Claudio Melega 7-10p

Coastal Greeting 6-9p

Light the Band 6-9p

Tyler Larson 4p

Brian Fitzgerald Free 5p

Rick Stevens Free 6p

Kage O’Malley 6-9p

STEEL BONNET 20 Victor Square, Scotts Valley SUSHI GARDEN S.V. 5600 Scotts Valley Dr, Scotts Valley

Wild & Blue Free 5:30p

UGLY MUG 4640 Soquel Ave, Soquel

Ginny Mitchell $18/$20 7:30p

5/21

Upcoming Shows

JUN 05 JUN 06 JUN 08 JUN 10

Dave Nomad Miller 6-9p

Open Mic w/ Steven David 5:30p

JUN 12 JUN 15 JUN 17

VINO LOCALE 55 Municipal Wharf, Santa Cruz WHARF HOUSE 1400 Wharf Road, Capitola ZELDA’S 203 Esplanade, Capitola

TUE

MAY 17 MAY 23 MAY 27 MAY 29 MAY 31

The Joint Chiefs Don McCaslin & the Amazing Jazz Geezers 6-10p

SHANTY SHACK BREWING 138 Fern St, Santa Cruz

SUN

Sambassa 7:30p

Les Rosenthal & Friends What’s Good & Wildflower, The Bees

DJ Scott T Akrop

Otillia Dinaire & the Back Alley Boys

JUN 22 JUN 28 JUN 29 JUL 05

Ace of Cups Marty Stuart Puddles Pity Party The Winery Dogs A Feast of Friends -A Rock Opera Lecture: Natalie Batalha BLUE. The Film Rufus Wainwright Be Natural Music Camp Elizabeth Gilbert John Paul White & Band Be Natural Music Camp John Mayall John Hiatt Skerryvore Rising Appalachia

SEP 13 Kevin Nealon SEP 20 Banff Centre Mountain Film NOV 21 Built To Spill NOV 25 Kirtan with Krishna Das FEB 25 Teada Follow the Rio Theatre on Facebook & Twitter! info@riotheatre.com www.riotheatre.com

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SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

Coastin’ along since 1969.

51


FILM

BRING IN A RINGER Nicholas Hoult as J.R.R. Tolkien in the atmospheric biopic ‘Tolkien.’

Ring Master MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Fantasy author’s formative years and obsessions explored in ‘Tolkien’ BY LISA JENSEN

52

W

hen movies are made about real people— especially artist types—it’s always interesting to see what aspect of their lives the filmmakers choose to spotlight. Will the focus be on a singular event in the subject’s life? Or will the movie try to suggest in dramatic terms what inspired the subject’s work? In the atmospheric Tolkien, a movie about the celebrated fantasy author who gave us The Hobbit and The Lord Of the Rings, these two approaches are the same thing. The movie begins in the horrific trenches of the Somme, in France, during

World War I, a setting that keeps returning throughout the film. The devastation of warfare was certainly the most singular event in J.R.R. Tolkien’s life as a young man, but it also inspired him to create the epic battle between good and evil that occupies the Rings trilogy. Directed by Dome Karukoski, from a script by David Gleeson and Stephen Beresford, Tolkien tries hard to elide the author’s experiences as a schoolboy, an Oxford student and a soldier into the larger themes of quests, courage and fellowship that would dominate his later work. The filmmakers are largely successful at this; their workmanlike approach

doesn’t always create a lot of deep resonance, but it’s a satisfying look at the gestation of the creative process. As Tolkien, a feverish young officer, stumbles through the mud, blood and corpses in the trench under German artillery fire, his backstory is told in flashbacks. Young John Ronald Tolkien (an affecting Harry Gilby) and his little brother are raised in “impecunious circumstances” by their lively mother (Laura Donnelly), who feeds them a steady diet of storybook myths and legends in which she acts out all the parts. As a recently orphaned prep school lad, he can not only recite Chaucer from memory, he can

pronounce Middle English correctly. (An early example of his lifelong affinity for languages, many of which he would invent for his books.) After some scrapes, he bonds with three other boys with arty leanings, who clown around, talk and dream at a comfy neighborhood tea shop worthy of the Hogwarts gang. They consider theirs more than a friendship; it’s an invincible alliance, a brotherhood. A fellowship. Tolkien (now played by Nicholas Hoult) squeaks into Oxford on a scholarship, and continues an ardent friendship with Edith (Lily James), another orphan and livein companion to Tolkien’s foster mother. He and Edith share a love of epics (when he can’t afford tickets to see a performance of Wagner’s Ring cycle, they sneak into the basement storeroom and lark about in old costumes as the music thunders down from the stage). Only to Edith and his stalwart mates does Tolkien confess his urge to write legends of his own. But all their dreams are interrupted by the outbreak of war. This is not a portrait of the artist writing in a fever of inspiration. Instead, Tolkien is depicted as a man of very methodical, intersecting obsessions, writing stories and developing complex language systems for his own amusement. He also sketches almost constantly—fantasy landscapes, menacing figures emerging out of the shadows, dragons. (Tolkien himself provided watercolor paintings for the dust jackets and endpapers of many early editions of his work.) Years later, as an Oxford professor, he sits down to write the first page of The Hobbit in beautifully rendered, calligraphic script. The director’s thoughtful approach may drag a little in the midsection, but his themes line up with Tolkien’s stated purpose to explore “the journeys we take to prove ourselves.” Tolkien’s journey through the hell of the Somme gives the movie its action, but his inner journey through the landscape of his imagination makes the trip worthwhile. TOLKIEN *** (out of four) With Nicholas Hoult, Lily Collins, Colm Meany, and Derek Jacobi. Written by David Gleeson and Stephen Beresford. Directed by Dome Karukoski. Rated PG-13. 111 minutes.


FILM NEW RELEASES A DOG’S JOURNEY I have been accused—not entirely unfairly, I admit—of being biased against dog movies, so for this sequel to A Dog’s Purpose, in which a dog talks to the audience in voiceover some more while he deals with his owner Dennis Quaid and other humans, I asked an adorable little English bulldog named Dennis (no relation) for a review instead. Here’s what I got from him: “Woof! Woof! Rrrrrrruff! Rrrrrrr! Bow wow!” I was like,“Dude, c’mon, that’s harsh. It might not have been the best movie ever, but I’m sure it wasn’t bowwow bad!” Directed by Gail Mancuso. Co-starring Betty Gilpin, Henry Lau and Ian Chen. (PG) 108 minutes. (SP) JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 3— PARABELLUM Keanu Reeves, who in recent years has ascended to become Hollywood’s Most Likable Man, returns to his role as the world’s Most Killiest Hit Man. This time, there’s a price on his head, and he has to survive all the other hit men and hit women. Hold on, wasn’t that the plot of the last John Wick movie, too? And possibly the other before that? I’m not being facetious, they all just kind of blend together into a non-stop ballet of Reeves twirling around while he shoots people at close range. Directed by Chad Stahleski. Co-starring Halle Berry, Ian McShane and Laurence Fishburne. (R) 130 minutes. (SP)

TRIAL BY FIRE Some people might say that the case against Cameron Todd Willingham, the Texas man who was executed in 2004 for supposedly setting a fire that killed his three children, is suspicious. I mean, sure, the jailhouse snitch who was the

CONTINUING EVENT: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES Film buffs are invited Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. to downtown Santa Cruz, where each week the group discusses a different current release. For location and discussion topic, go to https://groups.google.com/group/ LTATM.

NOW PLAYING AMAZING GRACE This documentary is made up of neverbefore-released footage of Aretha Franklin recording her live album Amazing Grace at a church in Watts in 1972. Amazing Grace went on to win a Grammy and be the biggest-selling album of her career. Franklin’s label, Warner Bros., planned to put out a documentary in conjunction with the album, but director Sydney Pollack ran into technical issues that derailed the effort completely. After Pollack gave him the footage in 2008, Alan Elliott spent two years fixing it—but for reasons that aren’t entirely clear, considering that she had signed a contract for the film four decades earlier, Franklin herself fought its release for years. The New York Times had the best headline when the film debuted after her death: “Aretha Franklin Didn’t Want You to See This Movie. But You Must.” (G) 87 minutes. (SP) THE CHAPERONE There is only

a hint of Louse Brooks, the silent movie star-to-be, in this fond, factbased, yet lightly fictionalized tale of the teenaged Brooks creating her showbiz persona during the summer of 1922 in New York City. The title refers to the conservative matron charged with shepherding her to the big city from their Midwestern home, played by Elizabeth McGovern with precise decorum but a willingness to grow and adapt. She’s the one ripe for epiphany, but it’s Haley Lu Ruichardson as the coltish Brooks, eager for life, that gives the movie its moments of dazzle. Downton Abbey alumni, screenwriter Julian Fellowes and director Mchael Engler, launch the first feature film from PBS Masterpiece. (Not rated) 103 minutes. (LJ) THE CURSE OF LA LLORONA The Woman in Black. The Nun. Now La Llorona. Am I the only one who can barely tell these creepy movie ladies apart anymore? This movie is based on the Mexican folktale about a “Weeping Woman” who lost her children and now wants to steal everyone else’s. Weirdly enough, it’s supposed to be part of the “Conjuring Universe,” a fancy way of saying yet another spin-off of James Wan’s 2013 film The Conjuring, which besides the two direct sequels has already given us two boring movies about Annabelle the doll and that even worse nun movie. Directed by Michael Chaves. Starring Linda Cardellini, Raymond Cruz and Patricia Velasquez. (R) 93 minutes. (SP) HAIL SATAN? Let’s not let this go to our heads, people, but right on the heels of having our fair city featured in Jordan Peele’s Us, we’re already in another movie! Or at least the Satanic Temple Santa Cruz is featured in this new documentary about how the Satanic Temple group has used pranks and humor to fight some serious battles over the separation of church and state. Which I guess is why there’s a question mark at the end? ‘Cause they don’t really care about the devil at all? Or maybe it’s just fun to end with a question mark? Directed by Penny Lane. (R) 95 minutes. (SP) THE HUSTLE The Hustle is hard to explain. Basically, it’s Dirty

Rotten Scoundrels with con women instead of con men. Oh wait, that wasn’t hard at all! Directed by Chris Addison. Starring Rebel Wilson, Anne Hathaway and Dean Norris. (PG-13) 94 minutes. (SP) THE INTRUDER In this Fatal Attraction-style thriller, Dennis Quaid plays a guy who sells his family home to a young couple, then begins harassing them and even breaking in to their house, because he’s a psycho and still thinks it’s rightfully his. To me, a movie like this stretches way too far beyond the limits of believability. I mean, we all know Randy is the crazy one. Directed by Deon Taylor. Costarring Meagan Good and Michael Ealy. (PG-13) 102 minutes. (SP) LONG SHOT The weird rom-com tradition of Seth Rogan playing characters who would never actually have any hope of attracting the women they’re paired up with continues with Long Shot, but luckily this time they made it part of the plot rather than just pretending it was NBD. Rogan plays an unemployed journalist who hooks up with his former babysitter—who also happens to be the U.S. Secretary of State. And running for president. And played by Charlize Theron. Directed by Jonathan Levine. (R) 125 minutes. (SP) THE MUSTANG This feature film debut for director Laure de ClermontTonnerre spins a tale of wild horses, regret and redemption set in a high-security prison complex out in the middle of the Nevada desert. As part of their rehab, certain inmates are chosen to break and train the mustangs for auction, and Matthias Schoenaerts delivers a towering, if taciturn performance (it’s all in his eyes) as a prisoner who learns tenderness by bonding with his animal. The analogy between wildspirited mustangs and incarcerated men is hardly novel, yet the nuances of character, story and subtle, yet profoundly felt emotion keep viewers involved. (R) 96 minutes. (LJ) PENGUINS Disney nature documentary follows a young penguin doin’ penguin stuff. Adorbs! Narrated by Ed Helms. (G) 76 minutes. (SP)

POKEMON DETECTIVE PIKACHU I think most of us can agree that we had no desire to see this movie until we saw the preview and realized Ryan Reynolds was the voice of the Pokemon. And maybe we still don’t? As someone who has not even a basic understanding of Pokemon culture, let me tell you what I could glean about this live-action adventure-comedy from the preview: There’s a boy who wants to train Pokemon, which are little yellow monsters, duh. He needs to find his dad (or something), and discovers a Pikachu who is a detective. All of this, so far, is somehow normal in this movie, but when the boy discovers he can actually understand what the Pikachu is saying—ho ho, look out, because that is crazy! “A human who understands a Pikachu,” he said to himself, shaking his head with a smile as he sipped on his Folger’s International Coffee.“What will they think of next?” Directed by Rob Letterman. Co-starring Justice Smith, Kathryn Newton and Bill Nighy. (PG) 104 minutes. (SP) POMS Comedy about a group of women who form a cheerleading squad at their retirement home. Why tho? Directed by Zara Hayes. Starring Diane Keaton, Jacki Weaver, Pam Grier, and Rhea Perlman. (PG-13) (SP) RED JOAN Judi Dench in a British spy thriller? Yes, please! Dame Judi stars as the older Joan (with Sophie Cookson as her younger self) in this story inspired by the life of Melita Norwood, the British civil servant who spied for the KGB for four decades. Directed by Trevor Nunn. (R) 101 minutes. (SP) TOLKIEN Reviewed this issue. Directed by Dome Karukoski. Starring Nicholas Hoult, Lily Collins and Colm Meaney. (PG-13) 112 minutes. (SP) UGLY DOLLS Robert Rodriguez of From Dusk Till Dawn, Grindhouse and Spy Kidz fame came up with the story for this animated musical based on the Uglydolls line of plush toys. I know the haters out there are sarcastically thinking,“Say no more, you had me at ‘plush,’” but if you needed another reason to rage-watch this thing, it features the voices of Kelly Clarkson, Nick Jonas and Blake Shelton. (PG) 87 minutes. (SP)

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

THE SUN IS ALSO A STAR Wow, a young-adult-novel adaptation that doesn’t have a wacky sci-fi gimmick or a bleak dystopian future! I suppose it sort of has a bleak dystopian present, as it follows the story of a budding love affair between a KoreanAmerican quantum physics student and a non-native student in New York that is threatened when her family is set to be deported. Directed by Edward Zwick. Starring Josh Gad, Dennis Quaid and Marg Helgenberger. (PG-13) 127 minutes. (SP)

primary witness against him did later file a “Motion to Recant Testimony,” decare that Willingham was innocent of all charges, and ask “The statute of limitations has run out on perjury, hasn’t it?”The forensic scientist in the trail did happen to be the infamous “Dr. Death,”James Grigson, who never met a capital punishment case he didn’t like. The arson evidence was later discredited, and then-Gov. Rick Perry did pull off one of the most shocking acts of corruption in the modern history of the American death penalty. But other than that, there were only 20 or 30 unbelievable things that happened. I can’t imagine how they had enough material for this dramatized biopic about it! Directed by Edward Zwick. Starring Laura Dern, Jack O’Connell and Emily Meade. (R) 127 minutes. (SP)

53


MOVIE TIMES

May 15-21

All times are PM unless otherwise noted.

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PENGUINS Wed 5/15, Thu 5/16 2:10 THE MUSTANG Wed 5/15, Thu 5/16 4:40, 7:20, 9:35; Fri 5/17 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30; Sat 5/18, Sun 5/19 NOON,

2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30; Mon 5/20 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30; Tue 5/21 2:20, 4:45 TOLKIEN Wed 5/15, Thu 5/16 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; Fri 5/17 2:10, 4:35, 7, 9:25; Sat 5/18, Sun 5/19 11:45, 2:10, 4:35, 7,

9:25; Mon 5/20, Tue 5/21 2:10, 4:35, 7, 9:25 POMS Wed 5/15, Thu 5/16 1:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:40; Fri 5/17 2:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:20; Sat 5/18, Sun 5/19 12:10, 2:30,

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Noon, 2:20, 4:50, 7:30, 9:30; Mon 5/20, Tue 5/21 2:20, 4:50, 7:30, 9:30 HAIL SATAN? Wed 5/15, Thu 5/16 2:30, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40; Fri 5/17 2:10, 4:40, 7:20, 9:35; Sat 5/18, Sun 5/19

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Mon 5/20, Tue 5/21 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40 POKÉMON DETECTIVE PIKACHU Wed 5/15, Thu 5/16, Fri 5/17 1:30, 4:05, 6:40, 9:15; Sat 5/18, Sun 5/19 10:55,

1:30, 4:05, 6:40, 9:15; Mon 5/20, Tue 5/21 1:30, 4:05, 6:40, 9:15 THE HUSTLE Wed 5/15, Thu 5/16, Fri 5/17 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50; Sat 5/18, Sun 5/19 10:10, 12:30, 2:50,

5:10, 7:30, 9:50; Mon 5/20, Tue 5/21 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50 AVENGERS: ENDGAME Wed 5/15, Thu 5/16 1:50, 3:45, 7:35, 9:30; Fri 5/17 1:50, 5:40, 7:40, 9:30; Sat 5/18, Sun

5/19 10, 1:50, 5:40, 7:40, 9:30; Mon 5/20, Tue 5/21 1:50, 5:40, 7:40, 9:30

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

THE CURSE OF LA LLORONA Wed 5/15, Thu 5/16 2:05, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50; Fri 5/17 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; Sat 5/18, Sun

54

5/19 11:30, 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; Mon 5/20, Tue 5/21 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 THE SUN IS ALSO A STAR Thu 5/16 4, 6:30, 9; Fri 5/17 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45; Sat 5/18, Sun 5/19 11, 1:45, 4:30,

7:15, 9:45; Mon 5/20, Tue 5/21 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45 A DOG’S JOURNEY Thu 5/16 6, 8:45; Fri 5/17 1:15, 2, 3:55, 6:35, 9:15; Sat 5/18, Sun 5/19 10:35, 11:20, 1:15, 2,

3:55, 6:35, 9:15; Mon 5/20, Tue 5/21 1:15, 2, 3:55, 6:35, 9:15 JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 3—PARABELLUM Thu 5/16 7, 10; Fri 5/17 12:55, 3:50, 4:40, 6:50, 9:50; Sat 5/18, Sun

5/19 10, 12:55, 3:50, 4:40, 6:50, 9:50; Mon 5/20, Tue 5/21 12:55, 3:50, 4:40, 6:50, 9:50

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458.1100

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

Sapporo Ramen

THANK YOU from the BOTTOM OF OUR HEARTS!

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FOOD & DRINK A braised pork belly with cannellini bean puree will be joined by an Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2014. And the finale of artisanal cheeses will join a vertical tasting of Ridge Monte Bello from 2014 and 2015 (worth the entire occasion alone!) 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 6. Persephone Restaurant, 7945 Soquel Drive, Aptos. $200/person, all inclusive. For tickets go to persephonerestaurant.com.

WINE WANDER IN APTOS

SAY ‘BEETS’ The children’s gardening nonprofit Life Lab grew from roots at the UCSC farm. PHOTO: COURTESY OF LIFE LAB

Living Lab MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Brunch for a cause with kids’ gardening program Life Lab BY CHRISTINA WATERS

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atching how much fun kids have digging around in the dirt, planting seeds, tending them, and watching actual living plants emerge from their handiwork—nothing beats it. Setting up outdoor science and gardening projects for K-12 school children is what Life Lab is all about. The incredibly inspiring Life Lab program has seeded itself all over the U.S. in the decades since it started up at the UCSC Farm property. And this Sunday, May 19, from 11 a.m.- 1:30 p.m. at the Life Lab Benefit Brunch, the public is invited to see how the garden grows

over at MacQuiddy Elementary in Watsonville. You’ll enjoy a delicious brunch prepared by Ella’s at the Airport and learn all about the school’s vibrant garden during this free reception. All your questions about Life Lab successes, here and across the country, will be answered. And you might find yourself inspired enough to make a meaningful donation toward planting school gardens in your own community. Put it on your calendar and RSVP at lifelab.org/brunch.

RIDGE WINE DINNER Even in Paris, where the wine bar is set sky high, the name “Ridge” gets

Not that you need an excuse to wander around atmospheric little Aptos Village, but if you do … then consider the June 8 Aptos Wine Wander. The concept is simple. You stop by The Mulberry Gallery at 8050 Soquel Drive to register and purchase your $40 ticket and commemorative glass. Then you continue to explore— uh, wander—and discover a favorite new wine from one of 10 Santa Cruz Mountain Wineries participating: Armitage Wines, Big Basin Vineyards, Burrell School Vineyards and Winery, Integrity Wines, Lester Estate Wines, Nicholson Vineyards, Regale Winery, Roudon Smith Winery, Sante Arcangeli Family Wines, Windy Oaks Estate, Wrights Station Vineyard. Tastings will be offered at Aptos Village businesses located on Soquel Drive and Trout Gulch Road. Proceeds benefit Mar Vista, Rio del Mar and Valencia elementary schools. Tickets ($35/adv) at scmwa.com/ events/2019-aptos-wine-wander.

CARROT CAKE CORREX respect. One of California’s most esteemed wineries, Ridge and its legendary winemaker Paul Draper set standards that still stand tall. Current winemaker Eric Baugher will be on hand to present some of the recent vintages from this outstanding winery, paired with courses created by chef Cori GoudgeAyer of Persephone Restaurant. The Aptos dining room will host the wines of Ridge on June 6 at a fivecourse winemaker dinner. Uni with favetta on crostada will be joined by an Estate Chardonnay 2017. Other dishes will include duck rillettes with honey kumquats, paired with a Ridge Geyserville Zinfandel 2016.

I was dreaming when I told you a few weeks ago that the colossal GF Carrot/Walnut mini-torte (from Manresa by way of Verve) costs a mere $4. Wrong. This gossamer, spice-laced piece of heaven is big enough for two and costs, accordingly, $5.50. So pack some extra bucks when you hit your neighborhood Verve in quest of this fabulous pastry. It is a superstar in the gluten-free galaxy.

WESTSIDE GETS VIM

Vim, the new restaurant from chef Jesikah Stolaroff, has opened at the 2238 Mission St., home of the former 831 Vietnamese. Intriguing menu, full bar—welcome to the neighborhood.


FOODIE FILE

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please add brunch Saturday and Sunday at 10am - 2pm to both locations.

ON Tap 9

Voted Best Pub & Bar Food! 9

16 ROTATING BEERS ON TAP • FULL BAR • BEST BURGERS

HAPPY HOUR TWICE A DAY!

Westside - Santa Cruz

ur o y t r o p p u S 841 Almar Ave, Santa Cruz Open everyday for lunch & dinner 11am - 2am Saturday & Sunday Brunch 10am-2pm

831.421.0507

MO’, PLEASE After finding his way to Santa Cruz from Tibet, Rabgee started

Nomad Momo earlier this year. PHOTO: LAUREN HEPLER

Nomad Momo

Tibetan dumplings with a side of serious heat BY LAUREN HEPLER

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What is a momo? RABGEE: A momo is basically a dumpling. In Asia, every country has a different style or flavor of dumpling. Here no one served Tibetan dumplings.

How did you learn to cook? Oh my god, I was a little kid. In Tibet we lived in the little village, you

8017 Soquel Dr, Aptos Open everyday for lunch & dinner 11am - Midnight Fri/Sat open until 1am Saturday & Sunday Brunch 10am-2pm

831.708.2036

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BREWERS

know, and your favorite food was a dumpling. Always your parents have you make the dumplings, so all little kids know how to cook.

Did you work in food before you started the truck? Yeah, I worked at Whole Foods. I still work at Whole Foods now. It’s crazy busy.

How fast can you make a momo? If you see it, it’s really, really fast. We make our own dough, everything by hand. We just buy flour, add water, make dough. I thought I would buy a machine, but I’m faster than the machine. Seriously, it took forever to roll. You gotta get the shape right, so that takes a little bit of time.

You serve at a lot of breweries. What beer pairs best with momos? Any kind of beer. My food is kind of light. I thought I was gonna pan fry or deep fry, but everybody likes steamed. Especially if you eat veggie. In Santa Cruz, it’s a lot of veggie and chicken. In Watsonville, a lot of beef. Instagram @nomad_momo.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

ots of food trucks throw around the word “authentic,” but when Nomad Momo rolls up with Tibetan prayer flags in the window, the one-man operation serving golf ball-sized dumplings filled with beef, chicken or veggies and packed with fresh herbs is the real deal. He goes by one name only, Rabgee, and moved to Santa Cruz in 2011 after stints in New York and India (since there isn’t a Tibetan grocery store nearby, he still uses Indian spices in his addictive, face-sweatinducing hot sauce). Rabgee has brought his momos all over Santa Cruz County since he started up three months ago, to locations like Land of Medicine Buddha, Elkhorn Slough Brewing, Steel Bonnet Brewing, and Beer Mule.

theparishpublick.com

NEW Aptos Location

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VINE TIME

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VINE & DINE

Celebrate Spring with Bubbles!

WINE TASTING SATURDAYS ALL YEAR SUNDAYS ALL SUMMER

420 HAMES RD. CORRALITOS 831.728.5172 | ALFAROWINE.COM

Wednesday-Monday 1-7 Closed Tuesday 334-C Ingalls Street • Santa Cruz www.equinoxwine.com • 831.471.8608

Drink well. Live well. Stockwell. NEWT VINTAGE Salamandre Wine Cellars takes its inspiration from the winemaker’s affinity for the Santa Cruz long-toed salamander. PHOTO: WELLS SHOEMAKER

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL WINEMAKERS!

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Santa Cruz Urban Winery Tasting room open Thursday-Sunday

1100 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz stockwellcellars.com - 831.818.9075

Salamandre A voluptuous 2013 Pinot Noir from Aptos winemakers BY JOSIE COWDEN

MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

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Lunch

11:30am to 2:00pm Wednesday through Friday Oswald Burger, Salads, Sandwiches and more

Dinner

5:00pm to close Tuesday through Sunday Seasonal Menu Craft Cocktails, Extensive Wine List, Bar Menu

OswaldRestaurant.com 121 Soquel Avenue at Front Street, Santa Cruz 831.423.7427 CLOSED MONDAY

estled in the tall redwoods near the Aptos Post Office is Salamandre Wine Cellars, where you can taste Wells Shoemaker’s beautiful wines—but it’s by invitation only. Shoemaker doesn’t have a tasting room, so you have to contact the winemaker and pediatrician to set a time. He’s been making wine for 30 years with dermatologist Dave South, and they certainly know what they’re doing when it comes to the intricacies of the grape. Take their 2013 Meadowridge Pinot Noir ($30)—a well-made, voluptuous red that Shoemaker says has matured into a fragrant and beautiful wine that he, “would happily serve to any visitor from Burgundy.” Its tantalizing red-fruit flavors of strawberry, tart cherry and pomegranate, plus earthy aromas of leather, spice and clove, are all captured in a bottle for you to enjoy. Shoemaker says this Pinot works with almost any meal, but a good pairing, he suggests, is with salmon, lemon slices and fresh dill. Situated in the sunny climes of Corralitos, Meadowridge Vineyard

was established in 2001 and gets the right amount of heat and cool for the delicate Pinot Noir grape. And why Salamanders? “Aptos is the last, lonely refuge of the Santa Cruz long-toed salamander,” says Shoemaker. He calls them slithering crusaders of the marsh, and happens to love these little creatures. He feels it’s only right to protect them. Salamandre wines are sold at local restaurants and markets, and you can contact Shoemaker about his next tasting at newt@cruzio.com. Salamandre Wine Cellars, 108 Don Carlos Drive, Aptos. 685-0321, salamandrewine.com.

CHEESE-MAKING CLASS AT LOVE APPLE FARM

Ever thought about making your own cheese? If so, then Love Apple Farm will show you how. The next class is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 25. The workshop will focus on three basic soft cheeses that are easy to recreate at home—and taste a lot better than store-bought stuff. Email loveapplefarm@gmail.com or visit growbetterveggies.com. $99.


H RISA’S STARS BY RISA D’ANGELES WESAK—BUDDHA TAURUS FULL MOON FESTIVAL Saturday, May 18, is the Wesak (Buddha) Festival, the second spring festival of the year. Since Winter Solstice, disciples around the world have been preparing for this Taurus festival. It is a momentous event. The Buddha makes an appearance as the Forces of Illumination stream into the Earth. Humanity everywhere can sense something unusual is occurring. Humanity’s aspiration for illumination increases during Taurus, and thus humanity is able to respond to the impact of this festival. Each year during Taurus (during the full moon), the Buddha makes his yearly approach to the Earth, bringing with him a great blessing from the Father, from Shamballa, where the Will of God is known. On the day of Wesak, in a valley hidden deep within the Himalayas, a magnetic field of prayer is created which attracts the Buddha. There, Disciples (the NGWS), Hierarchy (inner world government), Christ (Pisces and Aquarian World Teacher), all

world avatars, teachers, lamas, rishis, pilgrims, and holy ones gather in prayer and meditation. The Buddha remains within the Earth’s field for eight minutes. Disciples surround the Great Ones and receive the blessing of the Buddha, radiating that blessing to humanity, whose minds are then illumined. During Buddha’s yearly visits, Earth is lifted up into increased frequencies; energies of great potency are released into the etheric body of the human family. Disciples at this festival become “light bearers” and “light conductors.” The Buddha’s blessing brings hope to humanity, the hope humanity needs to overcome the present darkness. This festival supersedes time and space. If we are quiet, perhaps we can hear the words spoken at the festival, welcoming the Buddha: "We are ready Buddha, Come!”

ARIES Mar21–Apr20

LIBRA Sep23–Oct22

It’s good to assess if there are any needs you or work colleagues have that are unspoken, existing in a sort of mysterious process that comes to life only with conflict. This is a good question to ask in all relationships, but especially now due to all the world changes taking place. Are there legal papers or situations you must tend to? Make plans for implementation soon.

Make sure finances are in order, assess income and expenditures carefully. Tend to your relationships with enlightened care. It’s possible you may be a bit tired, impatient, confused and holding an old hurt. What do you need to feel safe and secure? Do you offer this to others? State clearly, in adult language, your needs and wishes. So many things hidden must be brought into the light of day. Rest more.

TAURUS Apr21–May21

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21

It will soon be time to teach others what you know. You’ve been hiding information away until the right time, and now is that time. You cannot do what you’ve been doing alone anymore for any length of time. Offer all that you have to others. You have many resources to offer. You’re entering a most spiritual time. Revelations appear, guiding your every day and night.

Your life assumes additional intensity (actually, that’s your middle name), which you try to hide. But you’re unable to at this time. To ease the discomfort of this concentrated power, this force and energy coursing through your daily life, maintain consistent exercise. A new state of self is developing. Set your sights on goals that serve others. Happiness follows.

GEMINI May 22–June 20

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec20

Is there difficulty with concentration, communication or making contact? Take this time to reflect upon what you value most in daily life. Should there be expectations placed upon you, explain you’re working slowly now, pondering your future plans. As you’re called to tasks not quite to your liking, remind yourself it’s an exercise in sacrifice (love at the center). Take it slow. Be the harmonizer wherever you find yourself.

The structure you’ve sought is finally forming, both publicly and personally. But you must discipline yourself in the right use of energy and time. Many people waste valuable time in emotional endeavors because they don’t know what to do when emotions overtake them. Stay behind the scenes. Work on your foundation and home. Plan for future endeavors or do nothing at all. You deserve rest and an affair to remember.

Esoteric Astrology as news for week of May 15, 2019

CANCER Jun21–Jul20

LE0 Jul21–Aug22 It’s time to travel. However, should you feel you cannot leave home for whatever reason, it’s OK to remain there. The incoming energies are calling you to tend to personal issues that are of value; cleaning and clearing environments; ordering and organizing, with some time spent on research. Reach out to previous friends. Is there a misunderstanding to be explained, some care and tending to be offered?

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22 Make sure you’re getting enough vitamins and minerals, especially calcium, magnesium and B complex. There can be a lessening of appetite and a change in digestion. While monetary situations continue to be favorable, you discover more and more ways to balance accounts, more ways to bring in resources. Ponder upon the nine tests Mars provides. Is something financial hidden?

Back in home town

We do catering for all events

Daily Lunch Buffet Time 11:30am to 3:00pm

Daily Menu Dinner Service 5:30pm to 9:45pm

270 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz 831.427.2400

CAPRICORN Dec21–Jan20 It’s best not to assume extra tasks, lest exhaustion undermines your immune system. You’re fully capable of holding the entire world on your shoulders, but soon this becomes unbearable and unattractive. Create a manifestation list stating hoped-for goals, wishes, needs, and priorities. This becomes a magnet. Those aspiring toward the same will appear. Delays are part of the pattern now. Tell yourself you’re flexible, adaptable and almost perfect.

AQUARIUS Jan21–Feb18 Understanding humanity’s needs and sorrows, you attempt to bring forth new ideas and messages of balance and harmony, reminding everyone to also have fun. Your ability to manifest hopes, dreams and wishes is based upon having specific goals. It’s time for financial planning. Make needed contacts, then maintain and nurture them. Among many, this is your specific talent. Tend to your home.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 Piscean teachers, travelers, publishers, writers, adventurers, and religious leaders are busy with schedules, plans, travel (careful!), cultural, and/or religious endeavors – attempting to infuse harmony, change and balance into daily life. This is a tremendous amount of work. Pray for direction, guidance and no matter what, remain curious. Safety is most important. Although travel seems fun, it may be emotional. Crowds may scare you. Maintain poise.

A Taste of New Orleans!

Authentic down home Cajun and Creole food

3555 Clares St, Ste. TT in the Brown Ranch Shopping Center, CAPITOLA 831.295.6372 • rouxdatcajuncreole.com Check out our Stew Shack kiosk Downtown in front of Bookshop SC

Free

Cajun Cornbread with purchase of any stew Must present coupon. Not valid with any other offer. Exp. 5/28/19

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | MAY 15-21, 2019

Are you tending to family these days as the world turns, changes, adjusts, and transforms? Are you sleeping enough? Are you hungry? Soon something will slip into your life creating a sense of happiness. It comes with determination and courage, and a new sense of creativity. You’ll feel inspired. Prepare for a new life to appear. It includes others. You will want to feed them, and then realize the need to be more organized.

Royal Taj Indian Cuisine

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Classifieds classifieds PhONe: 831.458.1100 | eMaIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLay DeaDLINe: THURSDAY 2PM | LINe aD DeaDLINe: FRIDAY 2PM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0000710 The following Individual is doing business as WALLTASTIC SERVICES. 1360 RUBY CT. #2, CAPITOLA, CA 95010. County of Santa Cruz. DILLON LEE HUCK. 1360 RUBY CT. #2, CAPITOLA, CA 95010. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: DILLON LEE HUCK. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 10, 2019. Apr. 24, May 1, 8, & 15.

PIETERS. 10226 EMPIRE GRADE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business is conducted by a Married Couple signed: KYLE PIETERS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on March 25, 2019. Apr. 24, May 1, 8, & 15.

COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ.PETITION OF JORGE VEGA-TORRES CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.19CV01167. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner JORGE VEGA-TORRES has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: JORGE VEGA-TORRES to: NATHAN FLAKO VEGATORRES. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING June 3, 2019 at 8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. a copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: April 16, 2019. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Apr. 24, May 1, 8, & 15.

8:30 am, in Department 5 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. a copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: April 18, 2019. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. May 1, 8, 15, & 22.

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may15-21, 2019 | GoodTimes.sC | sanTaCruz.Com

REFILING OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE WITH CHANGE NO. 2019-0000669 The following Corporation is doing business as WAMM PHYTOTHERAPIES, INC. 540 SOQUEL AVENUE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. WO/MEN'S ALLIANCE FOR MEDICAL MARIJUANA. 815 ALMAR AVE. #2, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. AI# 1993300. This business is conducted by a Corporation signed: VALERIE CORRAL, CEO. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 11/8/2018. Original FBN number: 2019-0000616. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 4, 2019. Apr. 24, May 1, 8, & 15.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 20190000608The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as ETRE, SAIL COMMUNITY CAPITAL and SAIL MARKETING. 363 OCEAN ST., APT. A, SANTA CRUZ, CA, 95060. County of Santa Cruz. SAIL SMALL BUSINESS LLC. 363 OCEAN ST., APT. A, SANTA CRUZ, CA, 95060. AI# 7410359. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: HILLARY TALBOT, MANAGING MEMBER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on March 26, 2019. Apr. 24, May 1, 8, & 15. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0000732 The following family trust is doing business as EDGEWATER BEACH INN & SUITES. 525 SECOND ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. WINIFRED ALEXANDER. 630 LUPINE VALLEY RD., APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by a family trust signed: WINIFRED ALEXANDER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is 11/2/1994. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 15, 2019. Apr. 24, May 1, 8, & 15. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0000594 The following Married Couple is doing business as RAWAKE. 254 POTRERO ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. EMILIE PIETERS & KYLE S.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0000747 The following Individual is doing business as R.M. MAINTENANCE. 1950 KOOPMANS AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. RENE ALEJANDRO MONROY. 1950 KOOPMANS AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: RENE ALEJANDRO MONROY. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 17, 2019. Apr. 24, May 1, 8, & 15.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0000736 The following Individual is doing business as INTEGRITY HANDYMAN SERVICES. 3100 STANLEY AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95065. County of Santa Cruz. MICHAEL D. PUGH. 3100 STANLEY AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95065. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: MICHAEL D. PUGH. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 16, 2019. Apr. 24, May 1, 8, & 15. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0000667. The following Copartnership is doing business as TWO FUNGUYS. 2880 CHESTERFIELD DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. JASPER TOROIAN GARRETT & STEVEN RANDALL GARRETT JR. 2880 CHESTERFIELD DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by a Copartnership signed: STEVEN R GARRETT. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 4, 2019. Apr. 24, May 1, 8, & 15. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0000749 The following Individual is doing business as DAY BY DAY STUDIOS. 612 NATIONAL ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. DONAVON WINTERS. 612 NATIONAL ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: DONAVON WINTERS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is 1/1/2019. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 17, 2019. Apr. 24, May 1, 8, & 15. CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0000740 The following Individual is doing business as MASTERS APPAREL. 369 ROBERTS RD., BEN LOMOND, CA 95005. County of Santa Cruz. ANDREW JONATHON CHESTNUT. 369 ROBERTS RD., BEN LOMOND, CA 95005. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ANDREW CHESTNUT. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 17, 2019. Apr. 24, May 1, 8, & 15. CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ.PETITION OF SARAH ELIZABETH BANASZAK CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.19CV00763. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner SARAH ELIZABETH BANASZAK has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: SARAH ELIZABETH BANASZAK to: SARAH BAS MARIPOSA. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING June 5, 2019 at

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2019-0000764 The following Individual is doing business as HAPPY BLAZE BOX. 3320 SAMUEL PL., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. JESSE RAY RAMSEY, JR. 3320 SAMUEL PL., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: JESSE RAY RAMSEY, JR. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on April 22, 2019. May 1, 8, 15, & 22. CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ.PETITION OF CHRISTOPHER RYK ABERNETHY CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.19CV01223. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner CHRISTOPHER RYK ABERNETHY has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: CHRISTOPHER RYK ABERNETHY to: KRISTOPHER RYK ABERNETHY. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING June 7, 2019 at 8:30 am, in Department 10 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. a copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: April 23, 2019. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. May 1, 8, 15, & 22. REFILING OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT WITH CHANGE FILE NO. 2019-0000775. The following General Partnership is doing business as SOQUEL VINEYARDS AND WEST CLIFF WINES. 8063 GLEN HAVEN ROAD, SOQUEL, CA 95073 County of Santa Cruz. PAUL JOSEPH BARGETTO. 8063 GLEN HAVEN ROAD, SOQUEL, CA 95073. PETER JOHN BARGETTO. 803 PARADISO CT., SOQUEL, CA 95073. JON MORGAN. 3500 N. MAIN ST., SOQUEL, CA 95073. This business is conducted by a General Partnership signed:


Classifieds classifieds Phone: 831.458.1100 | email: classifieds@goodtimes.sc | DisPlay DeaDline: thursday 2pm | line aD DeaDline: friday 2pm

JoN morgaN. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/1/1987. original FBn number: 2013-0002042. This statement was filed with Gail l. Pellerin, County Clerk of santa Cruz County, on april 23, 2019. may 1, 8, 15, & 22.

capitola, ca 95010. County of santa Cruz. colleeN suZaNNe corrigaNarmstroNg. 408B piNe street, capitola, ca 95010. This business is conducted by an individual signed: colleeN suZaNNe corrigaNarmstroNg. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is Not applicaBle. This statement was filed with Gail l. Pellerin, County Clerk of santa Cruz County, on april 18, 2019. may 8, 15, 22, & 29.

95060. a copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: may 2, 2019. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the superior Court. may 8, 15, 22, & 29.

with Gail l. Pellerin, County Clerk of santa Cruz County, on april 23, 2019. may 15, 22, 29, & June 5.

real estate

fictitious BusiNess Name statemeNt file No. 2019-0000665 The following individual is doing business as petals By pam. 5712 plateau driVe, feltoN, ca 95018. County of santa Cruz. pamela amBris. 5712 plateau driVe, feltoN, ca 95018. This business is conducted by an individual signed: pamela amBris. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is Not applicaBle. This statement was filed with Gail l. Pellerin, County Clerk of santa Cruz County, on april 4, 2019. may 1, 8, 15, & 22. fictitious BusiNess Name statemeNt file No. 2019-0000797 The following individual is doing business as positiVe pressure massage. 501 soQuel aVe. suite h, saNta cruZ, ca 95062. County of santa Cruz. gemma depolo. 1454 mclellaN road, feltoN, ca 95018. This business is conducted by an individual signed: gemma depolo. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is Not applicaBle. This statement was filed with Gail l. Pellerin, County Clerk of santa Cruz County, on april 26, 2019. may 8, 15, 22, & 29.

fictitious BusiNess Name statemeNt file No. 2019-0000794 The following individual is doing business as cm taylor structural eNgiNeeriNg. 4870 thurBer laNe, saNta cruZ, ca 95065. County of santa Cruz. chad michael taylor. 4870 thurBer laNe, saNta cruZ, ca 95065. This business is conducted by an individual signed: chad michael taylor. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is Not applicaBle. This statement was filed with Gail l. Pellerin, County Clerk of santa Cruz County, on april 26, 2019. may 8, 15, 22, & 29. fictitious BusiNess Name statemeNt file No. 2019-0000756 The following individual is doing business as stellar Belly. 408B piNe street,

chaNge of Name iN the superior court of califorNia, for the couNty of saNta cruZ.petitioN of JohNathaN eugeNe maXey chaNge of Name case No.19cV01332. the court fiNds that the petitioner JohNathaN eugeNe maXey has filed a Petition for Change of name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: JohNathaN eugeNe maXey to: JohNathaN eugeNe ZafraN. the court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. if no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of heariNg June 21, 2019 at 8:30 am, in department 5 located at superior court of california, 701 ocean street. santa cruz, ca

statemeNt of aBaNdoNmeNt of use of fictitious BusiNess Name.The following person(s) have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: the rush iNN. 113 KNight street, saNta cruZ, ca 95060. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in saNta cruZ couNty on: 2/15/2018. the rush iNN. 113 KNight street, saNta cruZ, ca 95060. This business was conducted by an inDiViDUal :ricKy dale olseN. This statement was filed with the County Clerk- Recorder of sanTa CRUZ CoUnTy on the date indicated by the file stamp: Filed: may 08, 2019. file No.20180000328. may 15, 22, 29, & June 5. fictitious BusiNess Name statemeNt file No. 2019-0000771 The following individual is doing business as rameN sQuad. 119B christel oaKs dr., scotts Valley, ca 95066. County of santa Cruz. michelle lyNN saNtos. 119B christel oaKs dr., scotts Valley, ca 95066. This business is conducted by an individual signed: michelle lyNN saNtos. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is Not applicaBle. This statement was filed

• Antique Restorations • Furniture Design & Repair

• Wooden Boat Works • Musical Instruments • Unique Projects

831-251-0377 isaiahwilliams13@gmail.com mastercraftsman.webs.com

fictitious BusiNess Name statemeNt file No. 2019-0000835 The following individual is doing business as mid coast realty. 110 sea terrace Way, aptos, ca 95003. County of santa Cruz. guy BerNard chaNda. 110 sea terrace Way, aptos, ca 95003. This business is conducted by an individual signed: guy BerNard chaNda. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is 1/3/2018. This statement was filed with Gail l. Pellerin, County Clerk of santa Cruz County, on may 6, 2019. may 15, 22, 29, & June 5.

HOUSING WANTED small Cottage/studio Wanted $$$+ Trade/ Caretaker. 30yrs carpentry exp. + yard maint. Can complete unfinished rental project. Good References. 831-234-4341 mature working professional looking for 1 or 2 bdrm - private rental Good credit + local refs. – Craig (831) 435-0484

HELP WANTED aide direct care. $500 hiring bonus. full and pt positions available. Work with intellectually challenged adults. No exp. necessary. We train. up to $14 per hr. to start. Join our team and make a difference! apply m – f 9am-3pm (831) 475-0888 Joby aero santa Cruz, Ca seeks structural analyst to select & create Fem models, conduct structural analysis of aircraft components. Bs in aeronautical or aerospace eng. or rltd. 6 months exp as aerospace or aeronautical eng. or intern or rltd. exp. working in aeronautical industry and experience using Fem or CFD software. must have Bs coursework in aircraft Design and aircraft structure. hr@jobyaviation.com eoe. no Calls.

SantaCruz.Com | GoodtimeS.SC | may 15-21, 2019

fictitious BusiNess Name statemeNt file No. 2019-0000809 The following individual is doing business as 4a electric. 1822 harper st. #3, saNta cruZ, ca 95062. County of santa Cruz. BriaN Vale foraKer.1822 harper st. #3, saNta cruZ, ca 95062. This business is conducted by an individual signed: BriaN Vale foraKer. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is Not applicaBle. This statement was filed with Gail l. Pellerin, County Clerk of santa Cruz County, on april 30, 2019. may 8, 15, 22, & 29.

chaNge of Name iN the superior court of califorNia, for the couNty of saNta cruZ.petitioN of tory laVe BaKer chaNge of Name case No.19cV01322. the court fiNds that the petitioner tory laVe BaKer has filed a Petition for Change of name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: tory laVe BaKer to: tory laVe coNroy. the court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. if no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of heariNg June 17, 2019 at 8:30 am, in department 10 located at superior court of california, 701 ocean street. santa cruz, ca 95060. a copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: may 1, 2019. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the superior Court. may 8, 15, 22 & 29.

fictitious BusiNess Name statemeNt file No. 2019-0000844 The following individual is doing business as JacKey BeleW. 311 daKeN BrooK driVe, BeN lomoNd, ca 95005. County of santa Cruz. JacKey lee haNNah ViZZier. 311 daKeN BrooK driVe, BeN lomoNd, ca 95005. This business is conducted by an individual signed: JacKey lee haNNah ViZZier. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is Not applicaBle. This statement was filed with Gail l. Pellerin, County Clerk of santa Cruz County, on may 7, 2019. may 15, 22, 29, & June 5.

fictitious BusiNess Name statemeNt file No. 2019-0000851 The following Corporation is doing business as the rush iNN. 113 KNight st., saNta cruZ, ca 95060. County of santa Cruz. shiNiNg tWiNs. 1899 16th aVe, saNta cruZ, ca 95062. al# 4241922. This business is conducted by a Corporation signed: shiNiNg tWiNs. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on Not applicaBle. This statement was filed with Gail l. Pellerin, County Clerk of santa Cruz County, on may 8, 2019. may 15, 22, 29, & June 5.

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services

Phone: 831.458.1100 | email: classifieds@goodtimes.sc | DisPlay DeaDline: thursday 2pm | line aD DeaDline: friday 2pm

WINDOW cleaNING & GUTTeR cleaRING

clear VieW Window cleaning & gutter clearing BONDED & INSURED, LOCAL, GREEN CERTIFIED

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PaINTING

SHELTON PAINTING (831) 435-0563 “Bryan infuses his sense of artistic design and high work ethic into each task, from live-in painting projects to brand new construction”

bryan@bryansheltonpainting.com liC #1050210

all OccasION FlORIsT

PETALS BY PAM

(831) 325-2827

spencer (906) 362-0820

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loCal grading excavation & underground trenching contractor, demolition, trucking, residential & commercial. *BonDeD*

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MassaGe

call curt feel good now!

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muscles relaxed and moods adjusted. De-stress in my warm safe hands. Days and evenings, CmP.

tangomango.org

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GeNeRal cONTRacTOR

scruzcurt@gmail.com saGe

CENTrAL COAST CONSTrUCTION

Jose (831) 210-6532

your local dirt artist!

SPENCEr JOSEPH PHOTOGrAPHY Professional Headshots on location or in studio• Santa Cruz County

pam (831) 246-4497 GRaDING & excavaTION

PhOTOGRaPhy

call Jonathan

Flower Design petalsbypam2019@gmail.com

may 15-21, 2019 | GoodTimes.sC | sanTaCruz.Com

help make your TV, Phones, WiFi and Computers easier to operate.

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Wedding & special events

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in need of some extra help cleaning and maintaining your vacation rental or your air BNB?

$40 hr , 10 yrs exp. We are honest,reliable and meticulous with our duties!

Jenny at (831) 325-1955 *references apon request *green cleaning available upon request!

hOUse cleaNING

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(831)325-1062

MassaGe

A*wonderful*Touch.

aFFORDable Web DesIGN

saNta cruZ WeB factory

“if you can dream it, we can help you create it!”

arlon (831) 531-4127 Corporate Sites•Business Sites•Personal Sites•Photo Album Sites•Game Sites •Custom Web Applications

GOT A SERVICE? Make your business easy to find! Get listed in our Services Directory Call 831.458.1100 X 200 Email kmansfeld@GoodTimes.sc

Relaxing, therapeutic, light to Deep swedish massage for men. Peaceful environment. 14 yrs. exp.

JEFF (831) 332-8594s bODy TO bODy MassaGe Delightful body to body massages!

TOP EMPLOYERS TRUST US FOR THEIR CLEANING

swedish, deep tissue and soft touch included.

AMY (831) 462-1033 haUlING

affordaBle hauliNg & clean up (831) 460-0237 Demolition•dumping•yard clean up •concrete and dirt removal

affordablehauling831@gmail.com

aRbORIsT

NatiVe tree care all phases of tree work... Stump grinding • Poison oak removal • Fruit tree pruning • Palm tree pruning

Julian (831) 335-5175 *Certified arborist since 1974 *Iinsured PLPD $2M

& LANDSCAPING NEEDS. Our clients include local government, health care facilities, and corporations in Santa Cruz County. Our loyal employees make us the trusted, professional service of choice.

Local & Independent. Monterey Bay Green-Certified. 423-5515

mycleanbldg.com Call or email us for a quote using our online form.


Phone: 831.458.1100 | email: classifieds@goodtimes.sc | DisPlay DeaDline: thursday 2pm | line aD DeaDline: friday 2pm

Leave the conducting to us!

We’ll make sure everyone plays their part, keeps time, and stays on the same page.

Tom Brezsny’s

REAL ESTATE OF MIND

EC TO

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ESTABLISHED RESTAURANT $499,500 Santa Cruz

Provoking thought since 1990

FRANCHISE SANDWICH DELI $75,000 Seaside

ST A

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D O SI G TT ER

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IN SP

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Main Street Realtors

A smooth transition in real estate requires great organizing skills.

PH

O TO

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DATTA KHALSA,CABB PA H C OU LE S A E N ER

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• 831-818-1431

TERRY BALLANTYNE terry@serenogroup.com • 831-588-8485 Daniel Wolford CalBRE# 02050043

dwolford@serenogroup.com (415) 250-6344

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www.scanimalshelter.org Learn how our new license can help keep YOUR dog safe.

Next week: more on the hows and whys of staging.

Tom Brezsny

Realtor® DRE#01063297

831-818-1431 getreal@serenogroup.com PA I D A D V E R T O R I A L

SantaCruz.Com | GoodtimeS.SC | may 15-21, 2019

Is Going to the Dogs!

BrezsnyBallantyne.com

Today’s Question: How did we ever manage to sell homes back in the days before staging was a big “thing?” When sellers and agents weren’t inclined to put much effort into painting and primping new listings before they went on the market? Did all those places I sold back in the ‘90s and 2000s just sell themselves? By today’s standards, they were a motley assortment of fixer-uppers and former rentals that had been rode hard and put on the market even harder. Ranch homes that hadn’t been updated in a bazillion years. Victorians that had about as much charm as a bag of hammers. Aging Craftsmen whose better days were buried beneath 37 layers of paint. But back then sellers and agents thought differently. They subscribed to what can only be called a “staging- light” approach (as in ultra-light.) We did the basics but not much more. The general goal was to spend as little time, effort and money as possible. Most sellers were okay with paring down belongings and doing modest de-cluttering. They were fine with house cleaners and carpet cleaners. Every once in awhile they’d even hire a handyman or painter to blot out all memory of a hideous wall color that was going to bum the collective chi of every buyer who came through. They were also open to the concept of “Curb Appeal” back in those days. They grokked that curious buyers would be driving by their home and intrinsically understood that if those people didn’t like what they saw from the outside, they weren’t going to make an effort to get inside. When it came to rearranging things on the interior, sellers were much more resistant to suggestion. Somehow inside changes felt like criticisms or judgments about their personal choices. Think back to those wonderful scenes in the1999 movie American Beauty. Annette Bening is the struggling Realtor scrambling around in her slip, frantically trying to get things ready before the big open house. She’s using a toothbrush to clean the thick brown grout between the 1970s tile. And she’s using a few cheesy tiki torches in the pool area as stage props, to create a lush “Tahitian atmosphere” at an otherwise awful middle class home. It’s classic. And more or less what constituted staging back in the day. Today, all of this seems quaint. Almost inconceivable at a time when prices are higher than they’ve ever been and the Internet is the arbiter of public perception about what homes and hearths should look like. Staging isn’t seen as a choice anymore. It’s a necessity if sellers want to get top dollar.

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The THC Experience A cozy, family-operated cannabis boutique in the heart of Soquel Village promoting an effective alternative and holistic approach to your wellness needs through cannabis, one customer at a time.

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In The

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66 MAY 15-21, 2019 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM


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Dubois Street location now closed. Licenses: A-10-17-0000003-TEMP • A-10-17-0000002-TEMP

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Where the locals shop since 1938. VOTED BEST BUTCHER SHOP BEST WINE SELECTION BEST CHEESE SELECTION BEST LOCALLY OWNED GROCERY STORE BEST MURAL /PUBLIC ART

Family owned & operated 80 years. 622 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz

OUR 80 TH YEAR

WEEKLY SPECIALS Good th r u 5/21 /19

BUTCHER SHOP

GROCERY

ALL NATURAL USDA Choice beef & lamb,

Local, Organic, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet

Best Buys, Local, Regional, International

only corn-fed Midwest pork, Rocky free-range

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Beer

chickens, Mary’s air-chilled chickens,

■ C20 COCONUT WATER Original & With Pulp

wild-caught seafood, Boar’s Head products.

NEW YORK WITH WINE &STEAK FOOD PAIRING HORSERADISH-MINT GLAZE INGREDIENTS:

■ NEW YORK STEAKS, USDA Choice/ 12.98 Lb ■ BEEF HANGER STEAKS, USDA Choice/ 6.98 Lb ■ VEAL RIB CHOPS, Pasture Fed/ 12.98 Lb ■ BEEF FLAT IRON STEAKS, USDA Choice/ 6.98 Lb

For the Glaze: 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoons prepared horseradish, drained 3 mint leaves, finely chopped Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper For the Steaks: 2 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper ½ teaspoon ancho chili powder or red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon kosher salt 2 New York steaks, 10 ounces each 2 tablespoons canola oil Preparation To make the glaze, whisk together mustard, honey, horseradish and mint in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.

SAUSAGE ■ SHOPPERS CHORIZO/ 3.98 LB ■ SHOPPERS COUNTRY SAUSAGE/ 3.98 Lb ■ SHOPPERS ITALIAN SAUSAGE/ 3.98 Lb

MARINATED TUMBLED MEATS ■ BLACK PEPPER LONDON BROIL/ 5.98 Lb ■ SANTA MARIA LONDON BROIL/ 5.98 Lb ■ BLOODY MARY PORK STEAKS/ 3.98 Lb

FISH ■ PACIFIC RED SNAPPER FILLETS, Fresh/ 6.39 Lb ■ SALMON LOX TRIMMINGS/ 10.98 Lb ■ COOKED PRAWNS Peeled & Deveined/12.98 Lb

Heat oven to 425 degrees. In a small bowl, combine black pepper, red pepper flakes and salt. Rub one side of each steak with the mixture. Place a medium ovenproof sauté pan over high heat, and heat oil until smoking. Place steaks in pan, rub-side down, and sear for 35 to 40 seconds. Salt the non-rub side while the steaks are searing. Turn steaks over and place pan in oven until steaks are medium rare, 8 to 10 minutes, brushing with glaze during the last 2 minutes. Remove steaks from oven, and brush again with glaze. Allow to rest for 5 minutes before serving.

Santa Rita Medalla Real | Cabernet Sauvignon 2013 92 Points James Suckling Reg 21.99 An absolute steal for 11.99!!

BEEF

PRODUCE

WINE & SPIRITS

17.5oz 1.99 ■ HANSENS Pure Cane Soda 12oz Cans 6Pk/ 2.99 + CRV ■ HI BALL ENERGY DRINK Select Flavors,

■ MODELO Negra or Especial, 6Pk Btls, 12oz/ 7.99 ■ TECATE 12Pk Cans, 12oz/ 9.99 ■ CORONA Extra or Familiar, 12Pk Btls, 12oz/ 14.99 +CRV ■ NORTH COAST BREWING CO. Scrimshaw or Red Seal, 6Pk Btls, 12oz/ 7.99 +CRV ■ STEM CIDER Chili Guava, 4Pk Cans, 12oz/ 8.99

■ ODWALLA ORANGE JUICE 1.8Qt/ 4.99

Quality Gin

17.5oz/ 1.99

■ IZZE SPARKLING JUICE 4Pk, 12oz/ 4.99

Local Bakeries “Fresh Daily” ■ BECKMANN’S Multigrain/ 4.19

■ WHOLE GRAIN Walnut Cinnamon/ 4.19 ■ KELLY’S 4 Seed Compagnon/ 4.19 ■ SUMANO’S, 9 Grain Loaf/ 3.99

■ SUMANO’S, Francese Baguette/ 3.99

Delicatessen ■ MASTER MAMA EMMA GNOCCHI, All Flavors/ 4.99

■ THE HUMMUS GUY, Organic/ 3.99

■ BELLA CHI CHA PESTO SAUCE, Local Product/ 5.99

■ SUNNY VALLEY BACON Great Quality/ 7.99

■ HANA Premium Selection of Botanicals (94WE)/ 14.99 ■ FORDS London Dry (96USC)/ 22.99 ■ JUNIPERO Hot Price (94BTI)/ 22.99 ■ AVIATION American Gin (97WE)/ 23.99 ■ VENUS NO.1 Made in Santa Cruz/ 29.99

Best Buy Whites ■ 2016 SECRET RESERVE Sauvignon Blanc (91JS, Reg 12.99)/ 7.99 ■ 2016 NOBILO Chardonnay “Tropical Flavors” (Reg 17.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2016 GUENOC Sauvignon Blanc (Gold Medal, Reg 15.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2017 PAZO SERANTELLOS Albariño (Reg 15.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2015 ZACA MESA “Z Blanc” (91WE, Reg 24.99)/ 8.99

California Fresh, Blemish-Free, Organic,

■ NIMAN RANCH SAUSAGES All Kinds/ 6.29

BBQ Reds

Arrow Citrus Co., Lakeside Organics,

Cheese - Best Selection in Santa Cruz

Happy Boy Farms

■ MONTEREY JACK “rBST-Free”

■ 2014 BV Zinfandel (Reg 11.99)/ 3.99 ■ 2015 LOVE NOIR Pinot Noir (Reg 14.99)/ 5.99 ■ 2013 WILD HORSE GSM (Reg 23.99)/ 6.99 ■ 2013 TRUVÉE Red Blend (Reg 20.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2015 ST HALLETT “Faith” Shiraz (90W&S, Reg 17.99)/ 9.99

■ BANANAS Always Ripe/ .79 Lb ■ AVOCADOS, Ripe and Ready to Eat/ 1.89 Ea ■ YELLOW ONIONS Premium Quality/ .59 Lb ■ LEAF LETTUCE, Red, Green, Romaine, Butter & Iceberg/1.29 Ea

Loaf Cuts/ 3.29 Lb Average Cuts/ 3.49 Lb

■ DOMESTIC FONTINA Great Melting Cheese/ 5.99 Lb

■ DANISH BLUE CHEESE Imported/ 7.49 Lb

■ STELLA PARMESAN Whole Wheel Cuts/ 7.39 Lb

■ GREEN BEANS, Fresh and Tender/ 1.49 Lb

Clover Sonoma - Best Price in Town

■ STRAWBERRIES 1 Lb Clamshell/2.99 Ea

■ ORGANIC LOWFAT YOGURT 6oz/ .89

■ ORGANIC BANANAS A Healthy Snack/ .99 Lb ■ TOMATOES Roma and Large/ 1.49 Lb ■ CLUSTER TOMATOES Ripe on the Vine/ 1.99 Lb

■ ORGANIC CREAM TOP YOGURT 6oz/ .89 ■ ORGANIC BUTTER 1/2Lb/ 3.29

■ ORGANIC MILK 1/2 Gallon/ 3.89

■ BROCCOLI CROWNS Fresh from the Field/ 2.29 Lb ■ BUTTER Lb/ 4.49

Connoisseur’s Corner - Pinot Noir from the Santa Cruz Mountains

■ 2017 SOQUEL VINEYARDS Saveria (94WE)/ 36.99 ■ 2014 SANTE ARCANGELI Split Rail (93WE, Editors Choice)/ 46.99 ■ 2015 BIG BASIN Lester (94WA)/ 55.99 ■ 2014 BEAUREGARD Coast Grade (92WE)/ 59.99 ■ 2014 MOUNT EDEN Estate (93V)/ 65.99

ANNA POWLESON, 2-Year Customer, Santa Cruz

SHOP PER ’S SPOTLIG HT

Occupation: Flower processor Hobbies: Drawing/painting, roller blading, movies, baking How often do you shop here? Every day. There’s a wholesomeness about Shopper’s which I like, and there’s a feeling of community. I prefer smaller, family-owned markets such as Shopper’s because the emphasis is on quality. I also appreciate the employees; they seem to like their jobs and stay put. I’ve had friends who’ve worked at the type of chain stores where it felt like they were just a number and were totally disposable. Everyone who works at Shopper’s is really warm and welcoming. Seems like there are familial relationships where they all get along, and that adds to Shopper’s positive environment.

What’s usually on your shopping list? I’ve worked in produce. I think Shopper’s produce is tops, and they continually rotate in fresh products. Here, you’ll find every type of cheese of you’d want, along with many local goodies such as Beckmann’s asiago bread, Glaum eggs, and, again, the produce. I’ve worked as a chocolatier so I’m picky. Shopper’s sells Donnelly Chocolates (local), Monk Chocolates, and Tony’s Giant Milk Bar, three of my faves! They have a great variety of alcoholic beverages with friendly pricing, same with their coffees. Oh — Halo Top ice cream is low-cal and frick’n’ good!

What would you tell someone who is new to the area about Shopper’s? If you want to get connected to the community, Shopper’s is a good start.You’ll find countless, high-quality specialty items that are priced fairly; even the everyday necessities, like coffee filters and TP, are actually inexpensive.You feel good after walking into Shopper’s — it’s the vibe.The store is nicely lit, Christmas lights are up during the holiday season, you see other people whom you know from the neighborhood — it just feels good. It’s not chaotic:There are always as many checkers as there need to be. Shopper’s is super convenient!

“I prefer smaller, family-owned markets such as Shopper’s because the emphasis is on quality. And it’s not chaotic!

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Corner: Soquel & Branciforte Avenues 7 Days: 6am-9pm

| Meat: (831) 423-1696 | Produce: (831) 429-1499 | Grocery: (831) 423-1398 | Wine: (831) 429-1804

Superb Products of Value: Local, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ■ Neighborly Service for 80 Years

Profile for Metro Publishing

Good Times Santa Cruz May 15-21, 2019  

Good Times Santa Cruz May 15-21, 2019

Good Times Santa Cruz May 15-21, 2019  

Good Times Santa Cruz May 15-21, 2019