a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

8.29.18

GoodTimes.SC SantaCruz.com

Field of Dreams Can a new semi-pro soccer team in Watsonville keep top talent in South County? By Lauren Hepler p20


BE ALL YOU CAN BE!

Many options to choose from

without joining the army Join one of our clubs instead

2-6

MONTHS

FREE*

3 FREE

TRAINING SESSIONS*

-ORLTS L RESUrko TOADAMo uts Wo d ore nit

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

2

or may not

workout wit Kettle

bells

-ORabout 400 FREE* classes/week

350 FREE CLASSES/WEEK

apply

Final 3 days!

Everything you need

Friendliness – Cleanliness – Personality – Support – Variety – Motivation

Nothing you don’t!

Attitude – Corporate Ways – Waiting – Loud Music – Intimidation

TOADAL FITNESS

ONE ON ONE SESSIONS

“The local alternative to the big impersonal clubs”

*Expires 8/31/18 must bring coupon to receive offer Toadal Fitness Live Oak Toadal Fitness 4 Kids 464-3764

®

Heart Rate theory ® type Affordable Orange workout

Get the support, motivation and variety only 5 local clubs provide *some restrictions may

Toadal X-Tra ining Cross Fit ty pe

Toadal Fitness Downtown Toadal Anytime

Cabrillo Fitness Aptos

423-3764

475-5979

FITNESS CLUBS

Westside Location Toadal 4 Kids II 466-3764

269 Mount Hermon Rd. Scotts Valley 430-9200


INSIDE Volume 44, No.22 Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2018

FROM CANADA, EH! PARK AND GUIDE Answers to the big questions around the library plan and the future of parking P11

Thick Mattress Sofabed $1295 Memory Foam Mattress $1495

Deep Seat Sectional: As shown: $1795

61” Round Nest Chair $895

NOT Your Father’s Recliner

Matching 98” Sofa: $995

LEATHER! Sofas, Chairs, Sectionals, Recliners & Home Theater

GOAL ORIENTED What a new semi-pro team could mean for soccer in Watsonville P20

Fabric $595 Leather $695

$695 Fabric $895 Leather

Savannah Sofa All made in North America! $1495

Amazing Power Zero Gravity Chair!

Big Sur Modern Recliner and Ottoman $1495

Power Lift Recliner $795

MAH’s interactive storytelling exhibit ‘Coyote Now’ P31 Fabric and Faux Leather $995 Leather $1195

FEATURES Opinion 4 News 11 Cover Story 20 A&E 31 Events 36

Film 50 Dining 54 Risa’s Stars 58 Classifieds 59

Unbeatable Prices on Beautiful Rugs from Sphinx/Oriental Weavers

Great fabric choices. Also available in leather.

49” Deep Cushy Sofa

Cover photo by Keana Parker. Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal. Good Times is free of charge, limited to one copy per issue per person. Entire contents copyrighted © 2018 Nuz, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in any form is prohibited without publisher’s written permission. Good Times is printed at a LEED-certified facility. Good Times office: 107 Dakota Ave., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

$395 Armchair

$445 Stylish Swivel Chair

OPEN 4 DAYS ONLY Thurs. 10-6, Fri. 10-7, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 12-5

$395 Swivel Slipper Chair

$895 Great Fabric Choices

(831) 462-4636

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

FUR SURE

3


OPINION

EDITOR’S NOTE World Cup fever came and went again this year, without appearing to make much of a lasting shift in how soccer is viewed in this country. A decade ago, soccer fans believed Americans would be joining the rest of the world in truly embracing their sport any time now, but that’s never really happened. Every four years there’s a spike in interest here when the World Cup rolls around, but it doesn’t stick. Cultural referees are constantly arguing about the reasons why, but I think this year it had a lot to do with the fact that the U.S. men’s national team didn’t qualify for the first time since 1990. People like to have

LETTERS

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

CONSPIRACY THEORY

4

Re: “Trestle Mania” (GT, 8/22): Bud Culligan, Miles Reiter and William Ow—Greenway backers—financially supported the Capitola initiative to undermine the current rail trail project. Why scrap the current plan and start from the beginning, wasting all the time and money already put into this project, costing millions of dollars more, and likely never getting a trail at all? This makes absolutely no sense. Why would a rich organization, Greenway, suddenly appear in our community with one purpose: kill railwith-trail that has been in the planning for almost 20 years with groundbreaking on the first segment within months? Especially when the current rail-trail plan essentially builds one half of the unapproved, unfunded Greenway “concept plan” with walk and bike use beginning for all of us soon! Then I read articles in the New York Times and L.A. Times in June, which outlined how the Koch brothers’ organization is winning and removing rails against communities’ desires to keep them. The big money backing removal of rails is called “Americans for Prosperity” and is a Koch-financed conservative group. This very rich and powerful organization

a home team to root for; they want to feel an emotional connection to what’s happening. That’s why the closest soccer has come to a real pop-culture breakthrough in the U.S. was probably 2004, when the American women’s team improbably won their second Olympic gold medal with a performance in Athens that stunned the world. It’s also why this semi-pro team Ville FC that Lauren Hepler writes about in our cover story this week has the potential to affect how a lot of people in Santa Cruz County feel about soccer—and they haven’t even played a real game yet! You’ll have to read the story to understand why; it’s full of interesting characters, raw talent, compelling stories and crazy dreams. And if that isn’t the best reason to follow soccer—or any sport—I don’t know what is. STEVE PALOPOLI | EDITOR

has been successful in removing rails all over the country and they focus on areas like ours. Koch companies produce gasoline, asphalt, seat belts, tires and other automotive parts. I wonder if our local individuals are being used by the Kochs. MARY MURRAY | SANTA CRUZ

ONLINE COMMENTS RE: KSCO Uh oh, it’s the Thought Police! I remember around a year ago when the same naive “journalist” proudly bragged about getting KSCO to no longer discuss such crazy things as white genocide. Now, it’s in the news daily. Speak your truth. Quit trying to make others be silent. Being a beta male doesn’t mean you can’t be a bully. — TOMMY

I am so disgusted over Zwerling’s coddling of racism and bigotry. I really enjoy Rosie & Rick in the morning, but supporting the likes of Georgia is not something I can do. Charlie is bad enough, but Georgia is an outright bigot. I am going to have to boycott the station until she is fired. It is disgusting that MZ allows it to happen. He’s as bad as his Mother was! — NANCI

>8

PHOTO CONTEST STEM RESEARCH From the dahlia show at the MAH last weekend. Photograph

by Bredette Dyer. Submit to photos@goodtimes.sc. Include information (location, etc.) and your name. Photos may be cropped. Preferably, photos should be 4 inches by 4 inches and minimum 250 dpi.

GOOD IDEA

GOOD WORK

SUBSTANTIVE SAFETY

MAJOR EARNINGS

The Harm Reduction Coalition of Santa Cruz County is organizing a vigil on International Overdose Awareness Day, the evening of Friday, Aug. 31, to honor and remember community members who died of overdose. Coalition supporters will gather on the Santa Cruz County courthouse steps at 5:30 p.m. and walk to San Lorenzo Park. Signs and photographs are welcome. The group will host guest speakers, share training information and distribute Naloxone as well as Fentanyl test strips. For more information, email hrcofscc@gmail.com.

The Santa Cruz Chamber Board of Directors has selected the 2018 Gala Award Honorees. During its Oct. 25 gala at the Cocoanut Grove, the local economic partnership will honor Carrie Birkhofer, president and CEO of Bay Federal Credit Union; Duf Fischer, chamber ambassador chair; Santa Cruz County Bank and the Downtown Streets Team. Special Legacy Awards will go to Dan Haifley and Gary Griggs for their lifetime contributions toward promoting and protecting the Monterey Bay’s ocean waters and the environmental health of our region.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Soccer isn’t the same as Bach or Buddhism. But it is often more deeply felt than religion, and just as much a part of the community’s fabric, a repository of traditions.”— FRANKLIN FOER CONTACT

GoodTimesSantaCruz

@GoodTimesSC

GTVSC

LETTERS: letters@goodtimes.sc

CALENDAR/EVENTS: calendar@goodtimes.sc

ADVERTISING: sales@goodtimes.sc

DINING: xtina@cruzio.com

NEWS: jake@goodtimes.sc

CIRCULATION: Circulation@GoodTimes.SC

ENTERTAINMENT: georgia@goodtimes.sc


LOCAL TALK

What do you think of Burning Man? BY MATTHEW COLE SCOTT

Only The Sun Will Outlast Our Panels.

It was fun in 2001, but now I have no idea. I haven’t been in 20 years. BRYAN DAWSON SANTA CRUZ | PAINTER

I wish I had gone to Burning Man 14 years ago, or at least 10 years ago. Now I feel it’s too commercialized. JEN ARMSTRONG SANTA CRUZ | PHARMACIST

I feel like it’s just become a playground for the very wealthy and elite in the Bay Area and it’s not the accessible party experience that it was when it began. SAN FRANCISCO | CONSTRUCTION ADMIN

I think that Burning Man is wasteful. We need to think about conserving and taking care of our planet instead of trashing it. REBEKAH STEVER

We’ve earned SunPower’s highly coveted “Dealer of The Year” award for providing our customers with the highest quality equipment and award-winning service at the most competitive prices.

TRAVELER | MUSICIAN

The art is amazing. Everyone should go once. EZRA MANNERS SANTA CRUZ | CARPENTER

San Ramon | Santa Cruz

CALCULATE YOUR SOLAR SAVINGS AT SOLARTECHNOLOGIES.COM OR CALL (831) 777-5881 FOR MORE INFO.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

NORA MAHAN

5


ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of August 29 ARIES Mar21–Apr19 In Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, our heroine encounters a talking caterpillar as he smokes a hookah on top of a tall mushroom. “Who are you?” he asks her. Alice is honest: “I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.” She says this with uneasiness. In the last few hours, she has twice been shrunken down to a tiny size and twice grown as big as a giant. All these transformations have unnerved her. In contrast to Alice, I’m hoping you’ll have a positive attitude about your upcoming shifts and mutations, Aries. From what I can tell, your journey through the Season of Metamorphosis should be mostly fun and educational.

TAURUS Apr20–May20

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Juan Villarino has hitchhiked more than 2,350 times in 90 countries. His free rides have carried him over 100,000 miles. He has kept detailed records, so he’s able to say with confidence that Iraq is the best place to catch a lift. Average wait time there is seven minutes. Jordan and Romania are good, too, with nine- and 12-minute waits, respectively. In telling you about his success, I don’t mean to suggest that now is a favorable time to hitchhike. But I do want you to know that the coming weeks will be prime time to solicit favors, garner gifts, and make yourself available for metaphorical equivalents of free rides. You’re extra magnetic and attractive. How could anyone resist providing you with the blessings you need and deserve?

6

maybe you have more. Home in on the phenomena that in your mind embody the glory of creation.

LIBRA Sep23–Oct 22 I foresee the withering of a hope or the disappearance of a prop or the loss of leverage. This ending may initially make you feel melancholy, but I bet it will ultimately prove beneficent—and maybe lead you to resources that were previously unavailable. Here are rituals you could perform that may help you catalyze the specific kind of relief and release you need: 1. Wander around a graveyard and sing songs you love. 2. Tie one end of a string around your ankle and the other end around an object that symbolizes an influence you want to banish from your life. Then cut the string and bury the object. 3. Say this 10 times: “The end makes the beginning possible.”

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 “If a man treats a life artistically, his brain is his heart,” wrote Oscar Wilde. I’ll translate that into a more complete version: “If a person of any gender treats life artistically, their brain is their heart.” This truth will be especially applicable for you in the coming weeks. You’ll be wise to treat your life artistically. You’ll thrive by using your heart as your brain. So I advise you to wield your intelligence with love. Understand that your most incisive insights will come when you’re feeling empathy and seeking intimacy. As you crystallize clear visions about the future, make sure they are generously suffused with ideas about how you and your people can enhance your joie de vivre.

GEMINI May21–June20

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec21

One of the big stories of 2018 concerns your effort to escape from a star-crossed trick of fate—to fix a long-running tweak that has subtly undermined your lust for life. How successful will you be in this heroic quest? That will hinge in part on your faith in the new power you’ve been developing. Another factor that will determine the outcome is your ability to identify and gain access to a resource that is virtually magical even though it appears nondescript. I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because I suspect that a key plot twist in this story will soon unfold.

“My tastes are simple,” testified Sagittarian politician Winston Churchill. “I am easily satisfied with the best.” I propose that we make that your motto for now. While it may not be a sound idea to demand only the finest of everything all the time, I think it will be wise for you to do so during the next three weeks. You will have a mandate to resist trifles and insist on excellence. Luckily, this should motivate you to raise your own standards and expect the very best from yourself.

CANCER Jun21–Jul22

Russian playwright Anton Chekhov articulated a principle he felt was essential to telling a good story: If you say early in your tale that there’s a rifle hanging on the wall, that rifle must eventually be used. “If it’s not going to be fired, it shouldn’t be hanging there,” declared Chekhov. We might wish that real life unfolded with such clear dramatic purpose. To have our future so well-foreshadowed would make it easier to plan our actions. But that’s not often the case. Many elements pop up in our personal stories that ultimately serve no purpose. Except now, that is, for you Capricorns. I suspect that in the next six weeks, plot twists will be telegraphed in advance.

Potential new allies are seeking entrance to your domain. Existing allies aspire to be closer to you. I’m worried you may be a bit overwhelmed; that you might not exercise sufficient discrimination. I therefore urge you to ask yourself these questions about each candidate. 1. Does this person understand what it means to respect your boundaries? 2. What are his or her motivations for wanting contact with you? 3. Do you truly value and need the gifts each person has to give you? 4. Everyone in the world has a dark side. Can you intuit the nature of each person’s dark side? Is it tolerable? Is it interesting?

LE0 Jul23–Aug22

CAPRICORN Dec22–Jan19

AQUARIUS Jan20–Feb18

While a young man, the future Roman leader Julius Caesar was kidnapped by Sicilian pirates. They proposed a ransom of 620 kilograms of silver. Caesar was incensed at the small size of the ransom—he believed he was worth more—and demanded that his captors raise the sum to 1,550 kilograms. I’d love to see you unleash that kind of bravado in the coming weeks, Leo—preferably without getting yourself kidnapped. In my opinion, it’s crucial that you know how valuable you are, and make sure everyone else knows, as well.

Would it be fun to roast marshmallows on long sticks over scorching volcanic vents? I suppose. Would it be safe? No! Aside from the possibility that you could get burned, the sulfuric acid in the vapors would make the cooked marshmallows taste terrible, and might cause them to explode. So I advise you to refrain from adventures like that. On the other hand, I will love it if you cultivate a playful spirit as you contemplate serious decisions. I’m in favor of you keeping a blithe attitude as you navigate your way through tricky maneuvers. I hope you’ll be jaunty in the midst of rumbling commotions.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22

PISCES Feb19–Mar20

Romanian philosopher Emil Cioran loved the music of Johann Sebastian Bach. “Without Bach, God would be a complete second-rate figure,” he testified, adding, “Bach’s music is the only argument proving the creation of the Universe cannot be regarded as a complete failure.” I invite you to emulate Cioran’s passionate clarity, Virgo. From an astrological perspective, now is an excellent time to identify people and things that consistently invigorate your excitement about your destiny. Maybe you have just one shining exemplar, like Cioran, or

People will be thinking about you more than usual, and with greater intensity. Allies and acquaintances will be revising their opinions and understandings about you, mostly in favorable ways, although not always. Loved ones and not-so-loved ones will also be reworking their images of you, coming to altered conclusions about what you mean to them and what your purpose is. Given these developments, I suggest that you be proactive about expressing your best intentions and displaying your finest attributes.

Homework: What pose would it be a relief for you to drop? How are you faking, and what could you do to stop? Freewillastrology.com.

© Copyright 2018


LOCAL CHOICE • CLEAN ENERGY • ECONOMIC VITALITY

YOUR NEW ELECTRICITY PROVIDER CLEANER ENERGY AT A LOWER COST

CLEAN ENERGY

SAME SERVICE Electricity Delivery

Greener Electricity at Lower Cost

MBCP sources carbon-free electricity.

PG&E provides reliable transmission, energy efficiency and billing services.

Choose MBCP for clean energy and local investment.

Electricity Generation

YOUR CHOICE

All residential electricity customers will be automatically enrolled with MBCP beginning July 1, 2018, with no change or interruption to normal service.

Learn more at MBcommunitypower.org.

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

As a public, not-for-profit agency created by Monterey, San Benito, and Santa Cruz Counties, Monterey Bay Community Power follows the Community Choice Energy model, allowing communities to lower electricity costs, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and keep surplus revenues local.

7


OPINION

<4

With all these double standards (when it comes to the hosts and what is allowed and not allowed), it appears as if there is an agenda at KKKSCO. How can all of Georgia’s anti-American rhetoric go ignored and unrecognized as such, but Billy gets fired for pointing out the obvious? Georgia gets to say that America is a nation based on heritage and culture, which she defines as race specific. She even parts ways with the MAGA movement and claims that America IS NOT AN IDEA. So this un-American wannabe Nazi is allowed to continue to be on the air and further confuse some, encourage

others, and disgust the rest. What do you do? KSCO: Listen, and be herded ... to the slaughter… by this Judas goat. — WILLIAM MILTON

Thank you Jacob for this article. I have filed an “Out of Bounds” report on the KSCO website. My complaint is based upon today’s “Georgia Peach” show. I believe that the verbiage and statements that she shares on the airwaves are far more detrimental than the two hosts that were fired. I do not understand why she is still on the air at KSCO. — MARILYN THERESA ROCKEY

LETTERS POLICY Letters should not exceed 300 words and may be edited for length, clarity, grammar and spelling. They should include city of residence to be considered for publication. Please direct letters to the editor, query letters and employment queries to letters@goodtimes.sc. All classified and display advertising queries should be directed to sales@GoodTimes.SC. All website-related queries, including corrections, should be directed to webmaster@GoodTimes.SC.

THE CREW PUBLISHER Dan Pulcrano x205

EDITORIAL Editor Steve Palopoli x206 Managing Editor Maria Grusauskas x216 News Editor Jacob Pierce x223

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Features Editor Georgia Johnson x221

8

Web & Calendar Editor Lauren Hepler x210

Risa D’Angeles DNA Lisa Jensen Cat Johnson Hugh McCormick Andrea Patton Matthew Renda Matthew Cole Scott June Smith Andrew Steingrube Mat Weir

ADVERTISING Advertising Director Debra Whizin x204

Contributing Editor Christina Waters

Advertising Representatives Lisa Buckley Sue Lamothe Ilana Rauch Packer Cynthia Runyon

Staff Writer Wallace Baine

OPERATIONS

Senior Contributing Editor Geoffrey Dunn

Contributors Aaron Carnes Josie Cowden Sven Davis

Accounting Sarah Puckett x202 Circulation Manager Shannen Craig circulation@goodtimes.sc Drivers Frederick Cannon Mick Freeman Bill Pooley Hunter Toedtman/Coryell Autism Center Nelson West Bill Williamson

ART & PRODUCTION Art Director Tabi Zarrinnaal

General Manager Lee May

Designers Angela Aiosa Rosie Eckerman Sean George DiAnna VanEycke

Office Manager Kari Mansfeld x200

Photographer Keana Parker

Publisher Emeritus Jeanne Howard

is published weekly at 107 Dakota Ave., Santa Cruz, CA 95060 831.458.1100

The purpose of GOOD TIMES is to be Santa Cruz County’s guide to entertainment and events, to present news of ongoing local interest, and to reflect the voice, character and spirit of our unique community. GOOD TIMES is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Only inserts listed above are authorized by GOOD TIMES. Anyone inserting, tampering with or diverting circulation will be prosecuted. The entire content of GOOD TIMES is copyright © 2018 by Nuz, Inc. No part may be reproduced in any fashion without written consent of the publisher. First-class subscriptions available at $100/year, or $3 per issue. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. Adjudicated a legal newspaper of general circulation by Municipal Court of Santa Cruz County, 1979, Decree 68833. This newspaper is printed almost entirely on recycled newsprint. Founded by Jay Shore in 1975.


AMERICAN LEATHER SLEEPER SALE TODAY THRU OCTOBER 1

15% OFF SPECIAL ORDERS

Live Inspire Relax

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

MODERN LIFE END OF LEASE SALE STORE WIDE SAVINGS THROUGHOUT SHOWROOM FLOOR

Modern Life End of Lease Sa Store Wide Savings Throughout Showr SHOPMODERNLIFE.COM 831.475.6802 15% Off Special Orders

925 41ST AVENUE | OPEN: TUES-SAT 11-6, SUN 11-4

9


Mounting Putty Studio Acrylics Art Alternatives 16oz Assorted Colors List $8.49 AAT910xx

Uhu Tac Adhesive Saunders

3

6

49

99

Newsprint Pad 18”x24”, smooth or rough Strathmore STT30718/307818 EDLP $8.99

Air Dry Clay 2.5 pounds, white Crayola CYO5750xx List $7.54

5

99

6

99

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Drawing Paper Pad

10

Economy Canvas Super Value Packs Art Alternatives

Assorted Sizes List $51.99 AAT515x

Strathmore 14”x17” Recycled STT44314 List $14.95

99 19ea

1299

#600-312 Exp. 10/8/18

Cash, check or bank card only. Limit one per customer per day. Not valid with other coupons. Must present coupon at time of purchase.

Strathmore STT4008 EDLP $12.99

999

Artist Tote Board 23”X26”, w/ clips Art Alternatives AAT17701 EDLP $13.99

999 Oil Pastels 12 Color Set Pentel PENPHN12 List $2.25

199 Prices good through October 8, 2018

Santa Cruz 1407 Pacific Avenue 427-1550 Open 7 days a week

Everything in stock... even items on sale! Valid on any purchase of $10 or more.

18”x24” Drawing Pad

Capitola 1501-K 41st Avenue 464-2700 Open 7 days a week

Thank you for shopping locally! stores.gopalace.com


NEWS THE SQUIDS ARE ALL RIGHT Despite delayed debut, new community radio station KSQD is on track BY STEVE PALOPOLI

AIR ON THE SIDE OF CAUTION Vivian Rogers, executive director of Friends of the Santa Cruz Public Libraries, says that

a new ventilation system is one of the downtown library’s bigger needs. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

Levels in the Details Answers on Santa Cruz’s library and parking structure project BY JACOB PIERCE [Editor’s note: This is the first in a two-part series on parking issues downtown. Part 2 runs next week.]

T

ransportation activist Dana Bagshaw is staring at a three-sided board plastered with a map of downtown Santa Cruz overlaid with bright purple rectangles. The shapes represent future potential housing projects and indicate the growing demand for parking downtown, according to the city of Santa Cruz. “My problem is I always see both sides of the argument,” she says at

this open house organized by the city to share information about a controversial six-story library and parking garage proposal. “The truth lies somewhere in between, but I don’t know what the balance is. I just think our public officials need to pay attention. I think they’re still living in the past, with cars.” Santa Cruz officials organized the Aug. 6 event to give a tour of the downtown Santa Cruz Public Library’s decaying branch and also share information about the city’s parking needs. Bagshaw argues that instead

of building new garages, the city could double down on promoting park-and-rides, bus transit and other transportation alternatives. Bagshaw understands there are plans to build more housing downtown, and knows that some parking spots will be going away as developments pop up. But a 600-car garage strikes her as overkill. “We don’t need that much parking,” she says. “We don’t want to encourage more cars. They’re projecting into the future on today’s model of car travel, which they need to get away from.” >12

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

When the group behind the planned Santa Cruz community radio station KSQD announced in March that it planned to start broadcasting by mid-June—meaning the all-volunteer, 100-percent grassroots, extremely DIY nonprofit Natural Bridges Media that had formed in December of last year to purchase, rebrand, raise funds for and clear bureaucratic hurdles on a new launch for the 90.7 FM frequency would be able to do so in a mere six months—it seemed impossible. And it was. In June, when NBM announced a new target date of Sept. 1, it still seemed outrageous, even though they had cleared some massive hurdles, like getting FCC approval for KSQD and finding office space in the Harvey West neighborhood through the Santa Cruz County Office of Education. And, again, it probably was. “It’s not looking good,” admits Rachel Goodman, chair of NBM’s board. “We’re delayed again.” This time, NBM was held up by a long wait for legal documents that took far longer than expected to process. The group is dealing with multiple governing bodies at once—not only the federal government and the county, but also the UC system, from whom they are leasing space on KZSC’s transmitter. “There’s a lot of legal twists and turns, and huge bureaucracies involved,” says Goodman. “It’s like pushing a boulder up a hill, and then you run into a bigger boulder.” But here’s the thing: if KSQD goes live any time this year, it would be a mightily impressive feat by any measure. So why do the people behind the new station keep giving themselves crazy deadlines? One practical reason is fundraising. NBM has had to raise a lot of money to get KSQD up and running, most of which went to buying the station and other initial costs. (They still have to raise $40,000 of what they anticipate to be $83,000 in operating costs for the first year on the air.) And they are clearly driven to deliver on their promises to a community looking to fill the hole left when KUSP went >14

11


NEWS LEVEL’S IN THE DETAILS <11 The six-story project would be on what is now the farmers market parking lot on Cathcart and Cedar streets. The weekly Wednesday market would move to a yet-to-bebuilt pavilion in the lot behind the Del Mar Theatre. GT is here to provide some answers on what has already been a complicated and sometimes confusing issue. But the biggest questions are ones of creativity and its limits. City officials and library supporters are selling a vision for a 21st-century library within a downtown Santa Cruz that has a little more housing—some of it affordable—and an increased vibrancy, without sacrificing any of our small-town charm. Activists are calling on city staffers to embrace possibilities for sustainable living and new trends in transportation.

SALE! AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Wednesday 8/29 - Monday 9/3

12

Additional 25% off all sale merchandise Includes new markdowns All sales final

Locally Owned Since 1972 Santa Cruz (831) 423-3349 • 1224 Pacific Ave Capitola (831) 476-6109 • 504C Bay Ave

Visit us on Facebook

What’s wrong with the current library? Friends of Santa Cruz Public Libraries’ Vivian Rogers gets an eerie feeling when she sets foot in the downtown branch’s heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) compartments. “I always wonder if you’re gonna see mice hanging on for dear life up there,” she says.

The system has been known to fail, as has the building’s electrical wiring. The building isn’t American Disabilities Act-compliant, either. On top of that, library supporters say other problems include inadequate bathrooms and the lack of a teen space. Rogers says the most glaring issue may be the outdated plumbing system, which also fails periodically, as it did in May of last year, when the branch was forced to close right before a May the Fourth Star Wars event that librarygoers had been excitedly anticipating. “We had all the library staff dressed like storm troopers or Darth Vader or Leia—and all these kids,” Rogers says. “We had this whole event shut down by this archaic plumbing. It breaks all the time.” Rogers envisions Library Director Susan Nemitz being able to start planning a brand new space, one that has new modern technology, teen areas, community spaces, and study rooms.

What if the city just renovates the current library? Steve Blair, a member of the Downtown Library Advisory Committee (DLAC), said at a June 19 Santa Cruz City Council meeting that he had a vision when he joined

the commission to study possible scenarios. Going in, Blair imagined the best option would be to remodel the existing building. That was before he realized that a huge amount of cash would get spent “mitigating, not resolving or remediating infrastructure problems in the existing building.” The partial remodel would have the highest operating costs. And when the 10-member DLAC voted, the members unanimously agreed to support a “mixed-use construction project” that would combine the library with a parking garage, as well as with a few offices or units of housing. If the city took the remodel route, seismic regulations would limits improvements, and the DLAC report called a partial remodel “fiscally irresponsible,” as there are many features it doesn’t include—like a modern HVAC system, a teen room or an entrance that discourages loitering or otherwise improves the flow of visitors. The most common comments in a 2017 survey about the library were about feeling unsafe due to the homeless, many of whom hang out around the branch’s only entrance. Other popular survey themes included calls for better bathrooms and dedicated parking. But the fourth-most popular >14

NEWS BRIEFS THE ART OF THE PEARL At a time when democracy’s under assault at home and abroad, one of its most consistent advocates was retired UC Santa Cruz professor Art Pearl, who passed away in Oregon at age 96 last month. “The solution to the world problems is democracy and only democracy,” Pearl wrote, arguing that democracy must be fully inclusive and

transparent to optimize its problem-solving potential. This simple maxim proved its power when Pearl, by then 92, showed up in neighboring San Benito County, along with former Santa Cruz County supervisor Gary Patton, to support a fracking ban initiative. Though advocates were heavily outspent by oil companies, local voters overwhelmingly enacted the ordinance. The popular Bronx-born professor, restaurateur and

radio personality, who ran for Oregon governor in 1970 and served as dean of education at the University of Oregon, taught at UCSC from 1972 to 2001. He served as College Eight provost towards the end of his time here. He continued teaching at WSU Vancouver and later University of Oregon in Eugene until he was 94. Friends and colleagues, including California Senator Bill Monning, gathered on Saturday at College Nine to remember the activist

Pearl intellectual. Pearl is survived by two sons and daughters, seven grandchildren and four great-granddaughters. His writings on democracy can be read at his blog, “ Art Pearl Against the World.” DAN PULCRANO


If you’re living with A-Fib, it’s time to get back the rhythm of your life.

Learn about new treatment options, including the Hybrid Maze procedure, a revolutionary treatment for Atrial Fibrillation. If you experience a racing heart or palpitations, chest discomfort, light headedness, shortness of breath and fatigue, or you’ve been diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, we have good news. Here, you’ll learn about the latest treatment options for A-Fib, including the revolutionary Hybrid Maze, a new minimally invasive procedure through small incisions on the sides of the chest. Patients benefit from better outcomes, a shorter hospital stay and quicker recovery.

Presenters Include: Gan Dunnington, MD, Cardiothoracic Surgery Peter Chang-Sing, MD, Cardiac Electrophysiology Monica Divakaruni, MD, General & Interventional Cardiology Daniel Kaiser, MD, Cardiac Electrophysiology

Join Us for a Free Seminar

REGISTER TODAY

6:00 p.m. Dinner | 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. Seminar

Hotel Paradox 611 Ocean Street Santa Cruz, CA 95060 Space is limited. Light dinner and refreshments served. www.adventistheart.org/arrhythmia

RSVP to 877.596.0644

Arrhythmia Center

A D V E N T I S T

H E A R T

&

V A S C U L

A R

I N S T I T U T E

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Tuesday, Sept. 4

13


NEWS LEVEL’S IN THE DETAILS <12 comment—from 8 percent of respondents—was not to combine the library with a parking garage. In the four options studied, the DLAC considered a full remodel, too, which was estimated to be more than $10 million more expensive than either the partial remodel or the mixed-use project, according to estimates from the architecture firm Noll & Tam. Members also looked at a total rebuild, which would be more than $20 million more expensive than the mixed-use project. City officials say the mixed-use project is more efficient because a few costs are shared with the parking district, and the library wouldn’t have to pay to host temporary facilities elsewhere.

Doesn’t Santa Cruz have enough parking? SIGNING ON Left to right: Joe Jordan, Rachel Goodman, Mary Flodin, and

Maia Rodriguez represent for KSQD.

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

SQUIDS <11

14

bankrupt and disappeared from the FM band in 2016. “The people who gave us $265,000, they’re expecting something,” says NBM’s Mathilde Rand, the board treasurer, who has been spending countless hours poring over insurance documents and other paperwork necessary to get KSQD on the air. “There’s work to be done.” For the last eight years that KUSP was on the air, Rand hosted First Person Singular, that station’s long-running series of twominute pieces that let local people tell their own stories. That’s one of several KUSP shows that will be resurrected on KSQD (with Rand once again hosting)—along with Dr. Dawn Motyka’s Ask Dr. Dawn, Charlie Lange’s blues showcase, the tech advice segment Geek Speak, Zombie Jamboree, and the former station’s daily news and current-events flagship Talk of the Bay. Bringing these shows back, Goodman says, was a no-brainer. “Everyone asked for these shows by name,” she says. But while much of the focus so far has been on the ways that KSQD will be like KUSP, it’s also important to note that NBM is actively trying not to be like KUSP in some ways. In particular, like the final years of KUSP, which saw the

station move further and further from local programming, alienating much of the community that had once supported it. “It’ll be totally different than the last 10 years of the station,” says Goodman, pointing to the almost fully local programming slate. KSQD will run a few syndicated programs—most notably Amy Goodman’s Democracy Now, which will air every weekday at 8 a.m. KSQD programmers are also trying to broaden the scope of local programming and be more inclusive than KUSP. “There will be more cultural diversity, more female voices, a lot more AfricanAmerican voices, and also more youth voices,” says Goodman. “It’ll sound more like a kaleidoscope of Santa Cruz County.” For Rand, the question of who gets a voice on the airwaves is key to KSQD’s reason for existing at all. “Building community has always been important, but now I think it’s even more important,” she says of the current political climate. “The end goal is letting voices from the community be heard.” For more information or to contribute to KSQD’s Phase II funding through GoFundMe, go to centralcoastcommunityradio.org.

It depends on who you ask. Rick Longinotti and other members of the Campaign for Sustainable Transportation have reminded city officials that planning consultants they hired two years ago suggested they exhaust all transportation alternatives before they begin planning for multi-story garages. They also pressed for other solutions, like phone applications and displays to let consumers know how full the various lots are. The city’s current models, however, assume that there will be increased demand from a few hundred new housing units and a couple hundred less parking spaces as long-standing lots get developed. City transportation planner Claire Fliesler has outlined that 234 existing spaces could be gone by 2025. That estimate is a moving targets, though. More than a couple city officials have said in recent months that public parking in the lot owned by Calvary Episcopal Church is expected to soon disappear, adding that the “red church,” as it’s commonly known, is getting ready to sign a lease with a developer for affordable housing on that site. As a result, many staffers said, the church wouldn’t be renewing its lease. Parking manager Marlin Granlund sent permit holders a

letter to that effect last month. The reality is that nothing’s quite so imminent. A church official did speak about talks with a developer at the June 19 meeting, but he was speaking as a private citizen. Scott Galloway, who serves on a church committee, says that nothing’s been decided, and the church hopes to renew its lease with the city. Even if Calvary does sign with an affordable housing developer, it could be a couple of years before the developer breaks ground and the parking goes away. “There could be a better and higher use, clearly, than a parking lot,” Galloway says of the property, which is across the street from the farmers market lot, where the library project has been proposed. “One way of looking at our lot is that open spaces are better. The other way of looking at it is that this town has a housing shortage, and it would probably be better to develop housing downtown, where there are shops and transit. It will be developed at some point, but whether that’s soon or in the distant future, we don’t know.”

How much will the new building cost the people of Santa Cruz? The cost depends on how much you drive. Santa Cruz Transportation Manager Jim Burr has laid out a plan to increase parking rates and fees to pay for the garage. While parking deficiency fees may get eliminated, hourly parking rates would more than double to $1.25 over two years, and parking passes would increase to $75 over five years. Transportation activists, like Bagshaw and Longinotti, want the city to raise those same fees and rates, but instead reinvest them in transportation alternatives to driving, like subsidized bus passes.

Do we need more parking to address affordable housing in the downtown core? Some DLAC members like the mixed-use project, in part, because it could include housing or support affordable housing off-site. As surface lots get redeveloped, downtown Santa Cruz could

>16


Select Surfboards starting at $399

FAMOUS ANNUAL O’NEILL SURF SHOP

PARKING LOT

SALE LABOR DAY WEEKEND EVERYTHING OUTSIDE 30%- 70% OFF!

Open Friday & Monday 9am-8pm, Saturday & Sunday 8am-8pm

Team Rider: Sam Coffey Photo: Nelly

Also EVERYTHING inside all three O’Neill Surf Shop locations is 10% OFF, all weekend, including surfboards! 10% OFF all the new style wetsuits, new clothing styles for the whole family, and much more!

1115 41st Avenue, Capitola • 831.475.4151

Voted best Surf Shop

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Friday August 31st Monday September 3rd

15


NEWS

National

LEVEL’S IN THE DETAILS <14

Drive Electric Day

end up with very few parking spots south of Lincoln Street—the same portion where most of the city’s new housing is expected to go. Planning Director Lee Butler says structured parking costs $45,000-$65,000 per space. Supporters hope that a new garage would leave wiggle room for more affordable housing to get proposed downtown, without forcing downtown leaders to sweat the parking impacts of approving such projects.

- Monterey Bay -

How much can we reduce demand for parking altogether?

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Please join us for this FAMILY-FRIENDLY event!

16

Saturday, September 8, 1-4pm

Cooper Street, Downtown Santa Cruz

$3 Off w/this coupon

Ancient Chinese Full Body Deep Tissue Table Massage

Pack (1) $28/hr. ~ Pack (2) $48/hr. Locally owned business serving local people living healthy lives.

China Foot Massage & Reflexology

For more information Mbeva.org

National sponsors include: Sierra Club, Plug In America, Nissan LEAF, Clipper Creek

Call for appointment 831-464-0168 4140 Ste. “T” Capitola Rd (By Big 5, Near D.M.V.) Open 7 days a week 10am–10pm

The campaign for Sustainable Transportation calls for a more robust package of transportation alternatives, like programs implemented in Boulder, Colorado and at Stanford University in Palo Alto. Only half of Stanford commuters drive alone, a 22 percent drop from 2000 levels. However, although the city’s drive-alone rate is 56.5 percent, that’s still nearly 9 points lower than Palo Alto’s. It’s also just over 5 points higher than Boulder’s. That difference can be attributed to a gap in the two cities’ work-from-home rates— Boulder’s is much higher. Be that as it may, Santa Cruz’s downtown commissioners aren’t interested in growing their work-from-home population, under the assumption that downtown employees are downtown customers. There’s a common argument against building new parking—that the growth of ride-sharing apps pending a self-driving car revolution will lead to a dramatic decline in parking demand. It’s worth pointing out that this perspective may not be able to exist in harmony with sustainability goals. A July report from transportation expert Bruce Schaller found that mobile-based ride-sharing options, like UberPool and Lyft Line, have led to more driving, not less, largely because they appeal to people who weren’t going to drive anyway. Schaller outlines a couple of tools that could be used to combat this trend, including the continued expansion of bus and bike lanes.


Aug. 29 - Sept. 4* *Cannot be combined with any other offer

2701 41st Ave & 2647 41st Ave, Soquel

(Top of 41st Ave. at Hwy 1) 831.464.2228 | sc41.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

We Pay the Sales Tax On All Purchases Storewide

17


SEPTEMBER SPECIALS: NULEAF - 20% OFF (ENTIRE LINE) MYCHELLE - 20% OFF (ENTIRE LINE) CV SCIENCE - 15% OFF (GOLD LINE) ALOE LIFE - 15% OFF (BODY HEAT) (WHILE SUPPLIES LAST)

831.685.3334 | 7506 SOQUEL DRIVE APTOS APTOSNATURALFOODS.COM

OPEN EVERYDAY 8AM TO 9PM Find us on:

COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR RENT DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

720 S.F. OR 1,440 S.F.

18

111 Dakota @ Soquel TWO GROUND FLOOR OFFICE "CONDOS" OF EQUAL SIZE, COMBINED OR SEPARATE.

Monday, September 3rd

Storewide!!!

Excludes Clothing and Jewelry, no other discounts apply

1220 A 41st Avenue Capitola, CA 95010 (831) 464-4113 • Open Daily • wayoflife.net

Co-Housing Opportunity The historic Golden Gate Villa is for sale.

This stunning work of craftsmanship — containing 10 apartments, each with kitchen and bath — is ideal for a co-housing community. Many options are possible for a lifestyle of elegance and convenience. Walk to the beach, walk to downtown. 924 Third Street at Main, Santa Cruz

#3 HAS A LOBBY, RECEPTION SPACE, A LARGE ROOM, KITCHENETTE. #4 HAS A SPACIOUS ROOM AT THE ENTRANCE, AND FOUR SMALLER ROOMS. PARKING TO BE DISCUSSED. THIS MIDCENTURY MODERN BUILDING IS LOCATED ON THE NEW RIVERWALK PATH AND FOOTBRIDGE OVER BRANCIFORTE CREEK.

Contact Jeanne Howard: jeanne@santacruz.com 831.601.1691

Info More info at zillow.com. Or call: Danny Alvarez 831.818.4181

David Lyng & Assoc. DRE #01237892

Anjelika Vassilieva 831.566.3961 Lighthouse Realty, DRE #0197770


Jewel TheaTre Company presents

THE

BEAUTY QUEEN

of Leenane by

Martin McDonagh

“a tragedy that will make you roar with laughter.” – Hollywood Reporter

Directed by: Susan Myer Silton

This Tony Award-winning dark comedy is set in the provincial Irish town of Leenane. Forty-something spinster Maureen WEDS. THURS. FRI. SAT. Folan lives with her manipulative Sept 8 Sept 5 Sept 6 Sept 7 aging mother Mag, stuck in a 2pm 7:30pm 7:30pm 8pm 8pm caretaking relationship that has them (Preview) (Preview) (Opening) both seething with resentment. Sept 13 Sept 15 Sept 14 2pm 7:30pm When a romantic encounter finally sparks 8pm (Talk-Back) 8pm Maureen’s hopes for an escape from her Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 dreary existence, Mag’s interference sets in 7:30pm 8pm 8pm (Talk-Back) motion a chain of events that is as tragically funny as it is terrifying. Written in 1996, THE Sept 27 Sept 28 Sept 29 7:30pm BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE is one of a 8pm 8pm (Talk-Back) trilogy and was the very first play from McDonagh, who is also a notable screenwriter known for In Bruges and the recently acclaimed Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.

SUN. Sept 9 2pm Sept 16 2pm Sept 23 2pm Sept 30 2pm

Tickets: Adults $50 / Seniors & Students $45 / Preview $27 all tickets

www.JewelTheatre.net (831) 425-7506

SEPTEMBER 5-30, 2018

This production is funded, in part, by grants from the following organizations:

JTC voted best theatre company in Santa Cruz!

at the Colligan theater | 1010 River Street, Santa Cruz

LivE THEATrE THrivES iN SANTA CrUZ.

THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

• 2 nights in a lodge room, cabin or bungalow • 2 bottles of Bonny Doon Vineyard flagship wines, Le Cigare Volant and Le Cigare Blanc • 2 Premium wine tasting flights at the Bonny Doon Vineyard tasting room in Davenport on scenic Highway 1 (hours 11am-5pm daily) • Free appetizer with purchase of 2 entrees at Cascade Restaurant • Packages starting at $220 for bungalows, $407 for Lodge rooms and $394 for Cabins Not valid with any other discount or special. Based on availability, some blackout dates apply. Not valid for groups. Valid: Sunday-Thursday beginning September 3 - December 31,2018

COSTANOA LODGE

Reservations 650.879.1100

Unique Accommodations • Meetings/Retreats • Relaxing Spa • California Coastal Cuisine • Specials & Packages

2001 Rossi Road at Hwy 1 Pescadero (26 miles north of Santa Cruz) | 650-879-1100 | www.costanoa.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

The Doonster package is here!

19


AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

20

There’s a Kick to It Watsonville’s talent pool has long been local soccer’s best-kept secret. Now a fledgling semi-pro team wants to give South County players a shot at the big time By Lauren Hepler


R

oberto Castaneda’s friends were used to seeing his Facebook page go into overdrive just before Tax Day. After all, the 30-year-old former Watsonville High soccer star had moved to Turlock and become a Liberty Tax franchisee. But on April 1 of this year, there was something new mixed into the usual rotation of ads for no-interest loans featuring women dressed as the Statue of Liberty: a frenzied stream of posts about starting a new

semi-professional soccer team in his former hometown. “It’s time we do something about the lack of opportunities for outstanding players in our community,” Castaneda wrote in the post. “Let’s make Watsonville a powerhouse in soccer.” Castaneda suggested that the team could play in the National Premier Soccer League (NPSL), a nationwide division four minor league team. The goal would be to provide exposure to overwhelmingly Latino local talent

that was being overlooked by college and professional scouts. Within hours, the post generated dozens of comments in English and Spanish offering time, sponsorships and emojis to the cause. “The highlevel players will be there one way or another,” one friend commented, before adding a note of caution: “It’s the support of the community that keeps projects like this from being just a two- to three-year thing.” Between Watsonville, Salinas and the Santa Cruz Breakers

development academy, the Central Coast has long been a hotbed for soccer talent. Where problems arise is fostering that talent despite the brutal economics of elite athletics, which tend to wreak havoc on working-class players who must decide between going off to college, trying to go pro, or sticking around to get a job and help their families survive. Just ask Castaneda, who had to navigate the maze of high school, club, college and professional 22>

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

FINISHING TOUCHES Dozens of Central Coast soccer players tried out for Ville FC, a new Watsonville soccer club aiming to play in the fourth-division National Premier Soccer League. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

21


THERE’S A KICK TO IT

TEAM EFFORT Ville FC Assistant Coach Isiah Castro (left) with former

Watsonville High soccer star Roberto Castaneda, who founded the team this spring. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

<21

22

soccer possibilities in California as a teenager after moving to Watsonville from the agrarian Central Mexico state of Michoacán at 7 years old. A solid, 5'10" central midfielder with obvious technical skill and unusually acute vision on the field, he became a crucial component of a Watsonville High squad ranked No. 1 in the nation in the mid-2000s. “When you see him, you think of what a smooth player he is,” San Jose State University Soccer Coach Gary St. Clair said when he signed Castaneda to a full-ride scholarship in 2006. At San Jose State, Castaneda commuted to school and practice from Watsonville, tacking on a 3-7 a.m. overnight shift at FedEx in between. Though he dropped out twice, earning an associate’s degree

and playing at Cabrillo College in the meantime, he still finished the sociology degree he never really wanted from San Jose State in four years. After school, he went on to play for a number of competitive indoor and outdoor soccer teams, sometimes for money and sometimes as a recreational outlet as he tried to claw his way into a business career. “Honestly, I feel like I could have gone professional,” says Castaneda, a fast talker with blue eyes that are prone to opening wide with enthusiasm. “I just never had a mentor.” Three weeks after Castaneda raised the idea of launching a team, he had already given that team a name. Ville FC—with black and lime green team colors—also

24>


Model Opening FROM THE HIGH $700,000s Solar-Powered Townhomes | 1,629 – 1,693 Sq. Ft. Up to 4 Bedrooms and 3½ Bathrooms 2-Car Garage | Picnic Area

Take a Tour Today! 200 Santas Village Rd., Scotts Valley, CA 95066 Open Daily 10am to 6pm 831.854.7454 | TheGrove@CityVentures.com NewHomesScottsValley.com

All renderings, floor plans, and maps are artist’s concepts and are not intended to be an actual depiction of the buildings, fencing, walkways, driveways or landscaping. Walls, windows, porches and decks vary per elevation and lot location. In a continuing effort to meet consumer expectations, City Ventures reserves the right to modify prices, floor plans, specifications, and amenities without notice or obligation. Square footages shown are approximate. Please see your Sales Manager for details. ©2018 City Ventures. All rights reserved. BRE LIC #01979736.

2017094_AdNo3_GT_9x4.84_R3_08-03-18_p.indd 1

8/3/18 11:25 AM

Whether it’s organic produce fresh from local farms, or responsibly-sourced seafood from sustainable fisheries, you can always count on New Leaf Community Markets for the highest quality. And now, New Leaf has same-day delivery on almost everything you need throughout our store!

Don't Miss These LABOR DAY DEALS! FRESH COHO SALMON FILLET Reg $15.99 per lb

SAVE $4LB

11

$ 99 LB

CALIFORNIA GROWN

CALIFORNIA GROWN

Reg 79¢ per lb

Reg $1.29 ea

ORGANIC SEEDLESS WATERMELON

59¢

LB

Use code NEWLEAF10 at checkout before 9/12 to get $10 off your first 3 orders of $35 or more!

Shop now at newleaf.com/delivery

ORGANIC CORN

69¢

EA

Capitola · Downtown · Westside · Coming Soon to Aptos! Savings valid 8/29-9/4

Delivery powered by

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Skip the Trip! We Deliver.

23


THERE’S A KICK TO IT

At San Jose State, Castaneda commuted to school and practice from Watsonville, tacking on a 3-7 a.m. overnight shift at FedEx in between. Though he dropped out twice, earning an associate’s degree and playing at Cabrillo College in the meantime, he still earned his sociology degree in four years. <22

Storewide Sale Everything is

10% off + AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

we’ll pay your sales tax!*

24

*on purchases over $999 excludes all Amish crafted furniture *

Hurry,

Sale Ends September 3rd

Queen Storage Bed $1,560 6 Drawer Chest $1,280 8 Drawer Dresser $1,500 Landscape Mirror $340 Large Nightstand $500

3131 Soquel Drive, Soquel, California

831.462.3446

Sweetswoodfurniture.com

had a copyrighted logo, a date in July set for tryouts and a hashtag: #WeAreVilleFC. Even more important was the addition of business partner Cesar Garcia, another former semi-pro player and owner of Ernesto’s Cleaning Services in Watsonville. For Garcia, 38, the push to provide more options for local soccer players—in a place where it’s easy to bide time in the weekend beer league—is personal. “I have a son who’s 16,” says Garcia, who is Ville FC’s vice president and interim coach. “I wouldn’t want to watch him play Sunday League over there at Pinto Lake, finishing playing and drinking.” Castaneda and Garcia are by no means the first to try this. The now-defunct Salinas Valley Samba also started up in the NPSL back in 2004, before folding due to financial pressures about five years later. This time around, Castaneda estimates it will take about $25,000, an expansion spot in one of the country’s fastest-growing soccer leagues, and navigating a Jenga tower of tenuous relationships between the area’s many competitive soccer clubs to make Ville FC a success. Perhaps most challenging, though, will be convincing the community that this time will be different. “People were talking all the time. No one did it,” says Fabian Martinez,

owner of the downtown Watsonville store Super Soccer. “It takes guts to do it.”

STARTUP SOCCER Just before 8 p.m. on a recent cold and foggy Thursday night, two dozen soccer players age 14-30ish take the field under the lights at Watsonville High School. “¡Dale! ¡Dale!” (“Let’s go!") Garcia shouts as a blur of black, white and neon yellow cleats scatter into formation for a drill. On the sideline, Castaneda is busy sorting out details for an upcoming scrimmage against Salinas community college Hartnell College, the de facto landing spot for promising players in Monterey County who don’t quite make it to a four-year school. Castaneda and several of the roughly 30 players who survived an initial Ville FC tryout are alumni of Watsonville High, but costs and logistics like use of stadium lighting, the scoreboard and the press box are all still being ironed out as part of the team’s application to the NPSL. If all goes well, the season will start in earnest in March, likely with another round of tryouts in January. In the meantime, Castaneda is focused on setting the club up financially by recruiting sponsors like Third Generation Berry Farms and Mi Tierra Taqueria, the latter having agreed to the all-important job of feeding visiting teams as the league requires.

26>


SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

25


THERE’S A KICK TO IT

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

<24

26

SALE

20%-40% OFF

Selected sofas SOFAS and more •

SMALL SPACE SPECIALIST

See •itBEDROOM • Feel •itLAMP • Try it! DINING • SEATING SALE 20% Off Norwegian Recliners

AFFORDABLE PRICES SOFAS STARTING AT $849 Custom Sofas & Chairs in about 3 WEEKS! Made in CA

607 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz (across from Shopper’s Corner) (831) 423-4711 | www.naturalselectionfurnituresc.com Tues-Sat 10:00 am - 5:30 pm, Sun noon-4 pm, Closed Mon

“I feel like a lot of people still don’t believe that we’re gonna do this,” Castaneda says. “They’re hesitant, like, ‘Is this a tax write off?’” Castaneda is fine-tuning his social media savvy on the team’s Instagram, Twitter and Facebook accounts in hopes of attracting sponsors. He’s also considering converting the ownership model from a partnership to a nonprofit, assuming the team’s league application is accepted, to pursue donations from big local companies like Driscoll’s, Giant and Martinelli’s. For the players, the months leading up to the start of the season are all about getting in shape and trying to secure themselves a position on the team. Omar Garibay heard about Ville FC by accident. The 23-year-old left midfielder was trying to call a friend and fellow soccer player named Jesus when he accidentally called a former coach from Pajaro Valley High School, also named Jesus. “I kind of picked the wrong Jesus,” Garibay says. “I was like ‘Oh, my bad’ and hung up.” Coach Jesus called back with tryout details. Without hesitation, Garibay decided to drive the eight hours to Watsonville from Indio, where he was living and working at a Target after getting priced out of Watsonville with his mom just before he graduated high school. He played soccer briefly for Southern California’s College of the Desert, but the classes he’d hoped to take in architecture were full, and he didn’t have any financial aid. Moving back to Watsonville to join the team, Garibay hopes, will offer him another shot at earning a scholarship to pay for the architecture classes he never got to take. Though soccer is particularly youth-obsessed when it comes to moving up the professional ranks— players who compete internationally often join development teams by middle school, or at least high school—Castaneda aims for Ville FC to help get players in their twenties

into schools with extra scholarship money to give away. Though some NPSL teams pay players a modest salary, Ville FC will not, so that players retain the amateur athletic status required for college soccer. Whether players aim to go to college or to another semi-pro or professional team, Castaneda says, “Our main goal is to get these guys the hell out of here.” But even getting to Ville FC’s first season is a challenge for Garibay and some of his teammates. A former coach offered him one month at his house rentfree, plus a job in construction framing the interiors of new houses in Silicon Valley five or six days a week. He gets up at 5 a.m. to go to work in San Jose, where he works until 5 p.m. most days and 3:30—to beat traffic—on practice days. It’s “a little tough,” Garibay says, but worth the extra effort. “A lot of players from Watsonville don’t get the opportunity to try out other places. Usually you would have to go to L.A. or San Jose,” he says. “To have a team that is local, that opens a lot of doors.”

LOCAL VS. GLOBAL The Jesus that arranged Garibay’s accidental Ville FC tryout was Jesus Acuna. The 28-year-old former playmaker from Pajaro Valley High School went on to coach younger players like Garibay at his alma mater after his own soccer career was cut short. Though many teammates talked about playing in college or Major League Soccer (MLS) when he was in high school a decade ago, Acuna had no interest in the web of applications, GPA requirements and financial aid forms required to play in the U.S. Instead, he went back to Mexico, where he had lived in the Northern state of Sonora until he was 12. He played for a year on a development team at Mexico City’s storied Club América. “It was the dream I’d had since a little kid,” Acuna says. “And the only thing I was good at.” Weighing academics against athletics is a balancing act in

28>


New arrivals from

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

1320 PACIFIC AVENUE â&#x20AC;¢ DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ 831.423.4100 | DELLWILLIAMS.COM

27


Photo by Shay Hlavaty Photo by Shay Hlavaty

THERE’S A KICK TO IT

Labor Day Pollution Prevention & Cowell Beach Cleanup

We need your help at one of Santa Cruz's most iconic beaches! You can help us pass out trash bags to beach-goers, encouraging leave-no-trace, on September 3rd or volunteer at our beach cleanup on September 4th! POLLUTION PREVENTION

COWELL BEACH CLEANUP

Monday, September 3

Tuesday, September 4

10:00AM-1PM

9:00-11:00AM

Meet at Cowell Beach 21 Municipal Wharf Santa Cruz For more details please visit saveourshores.org/eventscalendar This program is funded by the City of Santa Cruz Clean River, Beaches, and Ocean Fund

Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission Innovators in Transportation Speaker Series

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Hear transportation experts discuss the innovations and trends that are shaping the future of transportation in Santa Cruz County and beyond.

28

Upcoming talks: Measuring What Matters: Transportation Planning and How it Affects People Jeffrey Tumlin Principal and Director of Strategy, Nelson Nygaard Sept. 5, 6:30 p.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz & Impacts on Emerging Technologies on Communities Becky Steckler Program Manager for Urbanism Next, University of Oregon Sept. 19, 6:30 p.m. Veterans Memorial Building, 846 Front St., Santa Cruz A Q&A will follow each talk. The Innovators in Transportation Speaker Series is free and open to the public.

For more information on the series and for dates of upcoming talks, visit www.sccrtc.org/speaker-series/

GAME FACES Former semi-pro soccer player Cesar Garcia, now vice president

and interim coach of Ville FC, gives a pep talk before a scrimmage against Hartnell College. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

<26 any sport, but in Castaneda’s experience, schools in the region are particularly bad at emphasizing education for Latino players. At Watsonville High, where 96 percent of students are Latino and 81 percent are considered “socioeconomically disadvantaged,” just over half of students who graduate are even academically eligible to go straight to a four-year college in California. When Castaneda did get to San Jose State, he found that underachieving was encouraged in the name of academic eligibility for soccer. “I wanted to be a civil engineer,” says Castaneda, who graduated with a degree in sociology. “All the Hispanic kids were history, sociology, criminal justice. All the white people were engineers, business.” Playing in Mexico, Acuna got his own education about the cutthroat business of soccer—“it was a good experience, but not what I thought it would be,” he says. After playing at América, he bounced around briefly at clubs like Querétaro and found

that he didn’t have the professional connections to last. He came back to Watsonville around age 20, where, during a tough time, he and his girlfriend soon found out their first child, a son, was on the way. “Honestly, I fell into this really hard depression when I came back,” he says. While negative stereotypes about gang involvement or low graduation rates for young Latino men are commonly discussed in the media—and increasingly, politics—medical research has found that mental health conditions like depression and anxiety are understudied in this same demographic. Limited access to health care also complicates the picture in many largely minority communities like Watsonville. Castaneda says that families struggling to get by can also have more trouble supporting young players. Because their work always came first, he says, “my parents never watched me play until the last game of college.” Acuna is now a married father of two working construction in and

30>


Chartwell School: Empowering students who think and learn differently.

Smooth Sailing for the Whole Family on the 65' TEAM O’NEILL CATAMARAN!

LABOR DAY WEEKEND SAILS AUGUST 31–SEPTEMBER 3

22+TAX 1-Hour Sails $ 33+TAX 1.5-Hour Sails $ 44+TAX Special Event Sails $

full schedule & tickets available online Private charters available for special occasions.

For students with dyslexia and other learning differences.

Prospective parents:

join us for a Tuesday Tour Tuesday, September 4 at 10:30 am. For more information call 831.394.3468 or visit www.chartwell.org Chartwell School | 2511 Numa Watson Rd. | Seaside, CA 93955

(831) 818-3645

ONEILLYACHTCHARTERS.COM

OYC’s captains and the Team O’Neill are U.S. Coast Guard licensed, insured and inspected annually. Aerial imagery ©Archer Koch of MultiRotorCam.

GoodTimes_4.34x4.84_08.29.18.indd 1

8/22/18 4:36 PM

Contact us for a FREE clas s

WHEN:

Saturday, September 15, 2018. Registration begins at 9am

WHERE: Window on the Bay Park in Monterey

(Across Del Monte Avenue from Lake El Estero) Continues on past the Monterey Bay Aquarium

The after-effects of every loss from suicide are far reaching. We offer a safe space to gather, celebrate the lives of the people lost to suicide, and find comfort within a shared experience. This gentle walk is a family-friendly event (pets are welcome!).

$25 per person (adults) Kids under 12 $15

Register at coastaltrailwalk.org. Or call 831.459.9373

All registered walkers are automatically entered in our gift drawing!

Fall Semester Begins September 17 Register Now

Sing, Dance, Play, Learn! Sign up for Music Together this semester and sing, wiggle and jam along wih your baby, toddler, or preschooler for 45 minutes every week. Save a spot for your family at a class near you!

Santa Clara & Santa Cruz Counties

musicalme.com • (831) 438-3514

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Join together to honor the memory of those we’ve lost and to support a safe community

29


<29

K

S

THERE’S A KICK TO IT

EL CRE QU E O

ANIMAL HOSPITAL CARING PEOPLE...CARING FOR PETS

IT’S NATIONAL PET MONTH

Make your pets feel special and bring them in for a

$25 Wellness Exam

We Now Offer Acupuncture with Dr. Kim Delkener

around Watsonville. Though he had a chance to go back to Mexico to play in his early twenties, he stayed to secure his U.S. citizenship. In the last two months, going back to playing with Ville FC has helped him drop 30 pounds—and more importantly, connect with a new generation of players trying to figure out where and how they might keep playing. “Never leave it as, ‘What could have happened?’” Acuna tells them. “Don’t finish like me.” Already, the youngest player on Ville FC, 14-year-old Pajaro Valley High student Kevin Rincon, has decided to make a change. He has plans to try out in early September for Mexican club Monarcas Morelia.

A CROWDED FIELD

476-1515

* Daytime Emergency Services*

2505 S. Main St., Soquel www.soquelcreekanimalhospital.com

Jason Miller, DVM

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

TOP EMPLOYERS TRUST US FOR THEIR CLEANING

30

Family Owned & Operated

NOW OFFERING

C B D MA S SAGE

& LANDSCAPING NEEDS. Our clients include local government, health care facilities, and corporations in Santa Cruz County. Our loyal employees make us the trusted, professional service of choice.

Local & Independent. Monterey Bay Green-Certified. 423-5515

mycleanbldg.com Call or email us for a quote using our online form.

Experience the physical, mental & spiritual benefits of Float Therapy

13 9 5 4 1ST AV E . C A P I T OL A , C A 8 3 1. 8 5 4 . 2 7 0 0

V I S I T U S O N L I N E AT W W W. S A G E F L O AT S PA . C O M

For most casual soccer fans, the big names in area soccer seem few and far between: the San Jose Earthquakes, the Santa Cruz Breakers, the Stanford Cardinal. But in reality, the constellation of underthe-radar clubs, community colleges and semi-pro teams operating on the Central Coast and surrounding areas is big and getting bigger. In recent years, new teams in the fourth-division NPSL, third-division Premier Development League (PDL) and second-division United Soccer League (USL)—the three tiers in U.S. soccer under Major League Soccer— have formed in cities like Fresno, Turlock, Sacramento and Sonoma, among others. In addition to putting Watsonville on that map, Garcia and Castaneda see an opportunity to climb the ladder to higher divisions, if the level of play and funding for the team proves reliable. “It’s really difficult,” Garcia concedes, though he thinks it can be done. On top of sponsorships and ticket sales, trading top players to teams willing to pay a transfer fee is the primary way soccer teams earn revenue to grow their operations. Garcia is well-acquainted with teams in the region. He left Mexico at 16 after a professional contract with the club Necaxa fell through, joining his parents in Watsonville and playing semi-professionally with

the Santa Cruz Breakers and other clubs in San Jose, San Francisco and elsewhere. He had planned to go back to the Breakers, but an injury forced him into an active retirement playing recreationally and coaching. For the clubs already up and running nearby, the new team could be seen as a threat. Since Watsonville hasn’t had its own semipro team before, local players often leave town in search of opportunity, which Ville FC hopes to change. “We want those that are from here to stay here,” Garcia says. Whether that will go over well with neighbors like the Santa Cruz Breakers, however, is an open question. “The Breakers come in and they take the best players,” Castaneda says. “We see less and less talented players come out of Watsonville.” Still, to compete for the top players needed to advance to a higher division, Ville FC would also likely have to cast a wide net and recruit from neighboring cities. “Kids are going to come from Salinas, Santa Cruz, Gilroy,” Garcia says. “I want to have 50-60 percent from here.” While it’s not difficult for the duo to imagine where Ville FC might go, they acknowledge there’s a long way to go. As a way to build goodwill at a recent scrimmage against Hartnell College, played in front of a crowd of about 450 people, the team gave away $800 in scholarships to kids who attended the game with their parents. The experience reminds Castaneda of his first few months out of college, back when even the thought of public speaking was enough to make him black out one time in class. Still, he suffered through door-to-door sales for cable, phone and internet in Watsonville until he saved enough to start his tax business. “The hardest thing about a business is starting,” he says. “Getting up off of the couch and making things happen.” INFO: futbolthebeautifulgame.com or facebook.com/VilleFutbolClub.


&

ART

OUTSIDE THE LINES It wasn’t until the coloring began that the Coyote Now exhibit took on a life of its own PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

The Museum of Art and History’s ‘Coyote Now’ brings new perspective to interactive modern art BY GEORGIA JOHNSON

T

he Museum of Art and History (MAH) is coloring outside of the lines, as evidenced by their latest exhibit “Coyote Now.” The installment is more like a life-sized coloring book plastered on the walls

HOT TICKET

than it is a traditional curation of fine art. Actually, a coloring book for the community is exactly what it is, and Santa Cruz residents have left quite a mark. Washington-based indigenous artist Ryan Feddersen is behind the

MUSIC Diego’s Umbrella gonna make you sweat P34

larger-than-life drawings that follow the mischievous tale of a coyote. She draws the images digitally, since she said hand drawing on the wall in Sharpie has proven to be stressful. Feddersen adapts each story behind the Coyote image, and this time she

says she wanted to bring Coyote’s story into the 21st century by including technology, environmental and political issues. “Indigenous culture treats art much differently than the Western perspective, where you

>32

DINING Farmers

FOODIE FILE

markets are at their farmers marketest

The Catalyst trades dollar slices for better pizza P55

P54

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Coyote In Color

31


&

36TH ANNUAL

ART

“One thing that Coyote does is show us why things are unfair, why the land and structures are the way they are. He exemplifies our bad behavior so that we can choose to do better, and he causes and creates calamities.” -RYAN FEDDERSEN <31

Artwork by Taylor Reinhold

September 8 & 9, 2018 AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Sat. 10am–6pm • Sun. 10am–5pm

32

Over 160 fine artists, wine tasting from 22 Santa Cruz Mountain wineries, Local Artisans Marketplace, Kids Art & Juice Festival, gourmet food & entertainment.

BESIDE THE BEACH IN CAPITOLA VILLAGE! Admission Free

FREE parking and shuttle at Capitola Mall on 41st Avenue in Capitola.

Hosted by the Capitola-Soquel Chamber of Commerce

831.475.6522

www.capitolaartandwine.com

might put a work of art up on a pedestal that’s not to be touched and exclusively for the wealthy,” Feddersen said at the exhibit’s grand opening. “One way that I transposed that from my own perspective is making art that can be touched, and can bring community together, something that isn’t merely a piece on the wall. Its art is happening when people are working on it, and after that it’ll just come down.” The epic story of Coyote is a North American indigenous oral folk tale based around the idea that Coyote can be reincarnated as long as there is a piece of him remaining; a whisker, scrap of fur or bone. In that way, Coyote is immortal. A fox has to jump over his remains five or three times (depending on the version of the story) to bring him back to life, like a Coyote-Beetlejuice hybrid. Feel free to stand there and scream “Coyote, Coyote, Coyote!” or just pick up one of the crayons that Feddersen has cast from real coyote bones to metaphorically bring him back to life. “One thing that Coyote does is show us why things are unfair, why the land and structures are the way they are. He exemplifies our bad behavior so that we can choose to do better, and he causes and creates calamities,” Feddersen says. But the images need explanation, the busy walls are all-consuming, especially with the variety of colors, sketches, and various stories within the piece. Coyote’s story begins on the left, where he is reborn on a nuclear reservation. He proceeds to get into a fight with his wife, a mole, and tries to eat her. She tunnels into the ground and causes a sinkhole. “It’s not fracking,” Feddersen explains. “It’s Coyote and

Mole fighting.” As the exhibition continues, Coyote goes on to visit a sweat lodge, get fired from his day job, and get hunted down by the FBI. “After he gets fired, he goes on Reddit to look for jobs and finds a forum where he can promote certain social media posts to make money through, basically, the Russian government,” Feddersen says. Months later, what was once a perfect casting of neon-hued crayons has turned into a pile of fingernail-sized pebbles—evidence of the amount of people that have lent their own hand to the Coyote legacy. The blank slate has become much more than a mere coloring project; from a smattering of political commentary to commemorative initials in hearts, it’s a living representation of individual creativity and modernday society. There are green buffalos, purple trees and rainbow clouds. Between the scrawlings of “Obey Corporate Greed,” a capitalism tractor and “The Millers Were Here,” the wall is completely filled from ceiling to floor. Coyote dies in Bears Ears National Monument when he is crushed by an oil drilling derrick—a relevant nod to the fact that Bears Ears is set to be reduced by 85 percent for oil drilling under the Trump administration. Luckily, the pile of crayon-pebbles ensures that, despite his misfortune, Coyote will return again. Coyote Now is on display through Wednesday, October 21. Museum of Art and History. 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. 429-1964. santacruzmah.org. $10 general admission, $8 students, free on First Fridays.


R E C I TA L S E R I E S Featuring Musicians of the Santa Cruz Symphony Sundays at 2pm â&#x20AC;¢ Samper Hall Cabrillo College

The first lesson is free Piano, Didgeridoo, Drums, and More (831) 902-0650 Thomaspedersenmusic.com

September 16, 2018

Brass Over Bridges November 11. 2018

In Santa Cruz Findings

Subscriptions: $120, $90 and $50 for students Single Tickets: $45, $35 and $20 for students

Tickets available at:

CabrilloVAPA.com or 831.479.6154 For more info call: 831.462.0553 Ext. 10

World of Stones & Mystics 835 Front St. (831) 316-5159

April 28, 2019

Subscribe to All Three Reserve your seat today!

OVER 800 VARIETIES

Nigel Armstrong & Friends

SantaCruzSymphony.org

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Madeline Jarzembak

33


MUSIC

RAFTER RATTLERS Diego’s Umbrella plays Moe’s Alley on Saturday, Sept. 1. PHOTO: JUSTIN HOFMAN

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Gypsy Jams

34

Diego’s Umbrella promises sweat at upcoming Moe’s Alley show BY CAT JOHNSON

J

ake Wood recently played percussion with a traveling production of Hamilton. The drummer for gypsy rock band Diego’s Umbrella, Wood says the experience was “drastically different” than what he’s used to. “I was stuck in an orchestra pit for the last six months, playing the exact same notes every night,” he says. “To come back to this, where I get to rock out and play the stuff I came up with, and have fun, and express myself in a completely different setting and manner is such a cathartic release.” A longtime drummer and percussionist, Wood holds down rhythm duties for one of the rowdiest, high-energy acts around. Comprising Vaughn Lindstrom on

acoustic guitar and vocals, Jason Kleinberg on fiddle and vocals, Kevin Gautschi on electric guitar and vocals, Red Cup on bass, and Wood on drums, Diego’s Umbrella has a gift for playing rafter-rattling songs that capture the imagination and feet. After his time on the road, Wood is thrilled to be back with the band. “I might even be feeling it more than the rest of the guys,” he says with a laugh. Blending Eastern European gypsy (Roma) sounds, Spanish flamenco, polka, ska, pop, rock and more, Diego’s Umbrella digs deep into traditional styles and brings to them a 21st century flair and spirit. Wood describes the band’s live shows as infectious.

“If people are paying any attention,” he says, “they realize that we’re having a party and they should join us. It usually works out for both parties involved.” The band members have a solid handle on a number of styles to hold the whole thing together. For Wood, this is the challenge and the joy of performing with Diego’s Umbrella. “I get to play reggae, polkas, ska, punk rock, a little bit of metal, hiphop—it’s a dream come true for a drummer,” he says. “I get to do a lot of cool stuff and flex different parts of my brain, in terms of what I’ve learned over the years. It’s not boring in the slightest.” Formed in 2001, Diego’s Umbrella released its fifth full-length album,

Edjka, last year and is gearing up to record a new batch of songs. The band treats its performances and setlists with the same care it treats its albums. As Wood explains, they run performances like a stage show, with few pauses between songs. The members, Wood explains, “cultivate a certain experience.” “We’ll decide to start off on the harder side with one crowd, then go into some mellower stuff and have the crescendo later,” he says. “Or, if the crowd isn’t arriving early, we’ll start with B-list stuff, then once we have a full crowd, we unleash the A-list stuff.” For a band that was born and raised in San Francisco, the members of Diego’s Umbrella have seen the music scene in the city change dramatically in the last 10 years. Most striking is the present lack of small venues where bands can get experience and start a fan base. “Most of the smaller venues that I came up playing in don’t exist anymore,” says Wood. “You need those small venues to cultivate a following. Without that, you’re just not going to have as many acts coming out of San Francisco. Not to mention, a lot of musicians are moving out of the city, so you don’t have as many local bands to play with anymore.” He stresses, however, that the Bay Area music scene is still alive and well. “Some artists are pretty quick to hate on San Francisco—that it’s not what it used to be,” he says. “I tell them that I’m still here and it’s my job to keep it cool. We all have to do our part so it doesn’t suck too much.” When asked what we can expect from the upcoming Diego’s Umbrella performance at Moe’s Alley, Wood says, “a whole lot of sweat.” “We expect to see a pretty big turnout of die-hard, dancing, party fans,” he says. “We’ve been playing Moe’s in Santa Cruz for years and we haven’t played a weekend in a long time. This show should be quite the dancing spectacle. That’s my prediction.” Diego’s Umbrella will perform at 9 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 1 at Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $12/adv, $15/door. 479-1854.


Grand Opening – Labor Day Weekend Open for Lunch and Dinner

starting Friday, August 31 Friday-Saturday 11am-11pm • Sunday 12pm-10pm Monday-Thursday 11am-10pm Reservations recommended 831.335.2800 Come in and enjoy a fine farm to table dining experience in our fresh new dining room and gorgeous new kitchen. Farm to Table I Sustainably Harvested | Wild Caught | Organic Ingredients Locally Sourced, to the best of our ability | Large Vegan Selection Here is a sample of our extensive new menu:

SALADS: Classic Caesar; Pearl Couscous; Fried Goat Cheese with Mixed Greens, Strawberries, Sliced Almonds & Blood Orange Vinaigrette; Wedge Salad and More MAIN DISHES: Prime Rib, Filet Mignon, New York Strip, Grilled Salmon, Diver Scallops, Pan Seared Ahi, Whole Maine Lobster, Marinated Pork Loin, BBQ Baby Back Ribs, Chicken Parmesan with Linguine, Chicken Breast with Roasted Mushrooms, King Crab, and More

VEGAN DINNER SELECTIONS: Polenta with Sautéed Vegetables, Tempeh Reuben, Green Chili Mac and Cheese, Black Bean Empanadas, Vegan Potato and Chive Gnocchi, and More SANDWICH BOARD: Hamburger, ground in-house, 8- or 10-oz with choice of toppings; Corned Beef, Pastrami, Tuna Melt, Ham and Cheese Melt, Chicken Parmesan, Black Bean Hummus Wrap, Portobello Burger and More DESSERT MENU: Homemade Molten Lava Cake, Cheesecake, Bailey’s Irish Cream Infused Crème Brulée, Sticky Toffee Rice Pudding with Figs and Sorbet, Ice Cream and More

We also feature a Kids’ Menu, Late Night Menu, and Full Bar

Dedicated to Flynn Post, for all he taught me about encouragement, positivity and business risk tolerance. For all he taught me about the value of every healthy day on this planet. I asked him what he thought about this project being named after him. We discussed it on the last day we shared together, just he and I. He told me that being forgotten was the thing that he really feared the most. Leaving the planet without making a mark…somehow. Well, buddy, you made a mark on my life. You made a mark on your family’s life. You made a mark on the friends you grew up with, you made a mark on our community. Especially, in the end when you knew it was coming, and you still smiled…as much as you could muster up. Two years and two weeks with a two-month expectation was pretty impressive. Hawaii trip, and slid into home base with all you had. – for Kelly and Leah

6275 Hwy 9, Felton | 831.335.2800 | flynnscabaret.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

APPETIZERS: Prawn Cocktail, Caprese Salad, Raw Oysters, Crab Cakes, Stuffed Cremini Mushrooms, Ahi Poke, Chicken Wings, Artichoke Arincini, Crudité with Vegan Black Bean Garlic Hummus, and More

35


CALENDAR

GREEN FIX

See hundreds more events at santacruz. com.

CALIFORNIA COASTAL CLEANUP DAY Join Save Our Shores for the largest Coastal Cleanup Day of the year. Santa Cruz beaches become the most polluted in the summertime, particularly on Memorial and Labor Day holidays. On Labor Day there will be Pollution Prevention Outreach where volunteers will pass out trash bags to beach-goers and encourage them to leave no trace. Tuesday is when the real cleaning begins, post Labor Day there will be (unfortunately) plenty of trash to pick up, and they will need all of the hands they can get. Locations include Cowell Beach, Sunny Cove, Del Monte, Hidden Beach and Corcoran Lagoon Beach. INFO: Monday, Sept. 3 and Tuesday, Sept. 4. Times and locations vary, check saveourshores.org/eventscalendar for meeting spots. Free.

AUGUST 29-SEPTMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

ART SEEN

36

Free calendar listings in print and online are available for community events. Listings show up online within 24 hours. Submissions of free events and those $15 or less received by Thursday at noon, six days prior to the Good Times publication date, will be prioritized for print (space available). All listings must specify a day, start time, location and price (or ‘free’ if applicable). Listings can be set to repeat every week or month, and can be edited by the poster as needed. Ongoing events must be updated quarterly. It is the responsibility of the person submitting an event to cancel or modify the listing. Register at our website at santacruz.com in order to SUBMIT EVENTS ONLINE. E-mail calendar@goodtimes.sc or call 458.1100 with any questions.

WEDNESDAY 8/29 CLASSES COGNITIVELY BASED COMPASSION TRAINING CBCT is a 10-week secular ethics training facilitated by Lisa DuPont, M.S. that is applicable to anyone in any walk of life. The program was developed at Emory University and is used in various medical and educational institutions. 6:30 p.m. Wisdom Center of Santa Cruz, 740 Front St. #155, Santa Cruz. wisdomcentersc.org.

FOOD & WINE DOWNTOWN SANTA CRUZ FARMERS MARKET In addition to a large variety of farm products, this market offers a great selection of local artisan foodstuffs, delicious baked goods, and lots of options for lunch and dinner. 1-6 p.m. Cedar and Lincoln streets, Santa Cruz. 454-0566. WEDNESDAY NIGHT TRIVIA Grab your smartest group of friends and get ready for a challenge! We’ve got the rest. Wine. Beer. Cider. Tapas. 8-10 p.m. Cantine Wine Pub, 8050 Soquel Drive, Aptos. cantinewinepub.com.

GROUPS CABRILLO ‘CATALYSTS’ The Cabrillo Art, Photography and Art History Staff and Faculty Exhibition “Catalysts” just opened last week and showcases more than 40 diverse pieces from instructors and staff at Cabrillo College. Works include woodworking, painting, ceramics, jewelry and more. Join in the artists’ reception and artists talk to hear more stories behind the making of the pieces. INFO: Show runs through Friday, Sept. 21. Artists reception and talk 5:30-7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 6. Cabrillo Gallery. Library building room #1002. 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos. 479-6308. gallery@cabrillo.edu. Free.

PRESCHOOL ADVENTURES AT THE MONTEREY BAY MARINE SANCTUARY EXPLORATION CENTER Come enjoy weekly preschool adventures at the Sanctuary Exploration Center with oceanthemed book readings, show-and-tell and crafts. Perfect for kids ages 2-5. 10-11 a.m. Monterey Bay Sanctuary Exploration Center, 35 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. montereybay.noaa.gov. Free. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SURVIVOR SUPPORT GROUP Is your partner violent or controlling? Have you survived a sexual assault? Monarch Services~Servicios Monarca offers a safe, supportive space. Childcare activities provided. 6-7:30 p.m. Monarch Services, 1509 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz. monarchscc.org. Free. NEW ECONOMY: LOCAL CAPITAL AND EMPLOYEE-OWNED COOPERATIVE

SATURDAY 9/1 CAPITOLA GARDEN SEAFOOD BRUNCH Chef Martin Höllrigl has taken a break from working in some of the best kitchens in the world to be a hotel manager in Kuwait, Florida, Austria and California, and a vintner in the Santa Cruz Mountains. He’s a culinary and hospitality master, and now he wants to share his talents and impressive bounty of organic vegetables and fruits with local meat and seafoods to match. His upcoming brunch includes locally grown oysters, caviar and Benedict-style poached eggs, fresh orange crepes and a sommelier bar. Enjoy the end of summer with good food, new friends and some smooth jazz. Proceeds benefit cancer research at UCSC. INFO: 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Capitola address available upon reservations. whatmartinsays.com. $43 standard menu sommelier additional $29.

DEVELOPMENT A New Economy is focused on our overall well-being, making our economic structures and businesses work for us, including more equitable distribution of income and wealth. It is centered around people and the environment in a democratic and participatory way. 5:30 p.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Art And History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. eventbrite.com. Free. ROBO SUMO FINALE EVENT For the last 12 weeks, kids have been working hard to

create robots using LEGO MINDSTORMS. Now they’re ready to show off what their ’bots can do at the Grand Finale Robo Sumo Wrestling Event! See what the kids created and root for your favorite robots. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Boulder Creek Public Library, 13390 West Park Ave., Boulder Creek. Free.

HEALTH B12 HAPPY HOUR Come and get your Happy Hour B12 shot. Your body

>38


events.ucsc.edu

AUG /SEP T 2 018

JOIN US AS W E SHA RE THE EXCIT EMENT OF LE ARNING

Science on Tap

Alexa Villaume about the exciting field of galactic archeology and researchers who reconstruct the “stellar fossil record.”

“Stressing out in a contaminated world: The influence of environmental and behavioral factors on California condor stress response.” With Zeka Glucs, Ph.D., Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, UC Santa Cruz.

Farm & Garden Market Cart AUGUST 31, 12–6PM CORNER OF BAY AND HIGH STREETS FREE ADMISSION

Visit the Market Cart for wonderful, fresh organic produce and beautiful flower bouquets grown at the UCSC Farm & Alan Chadwick Garden! Cash, check, and EBT/SNAP benefits accepted.

Free Arboretum & Botanic Garden Tour

Join us for a docent-led tour of the UCSC Arboretum & Botanic Garden’s extensive gardens on the first Saturday of every month. Tours leave from Norrie’s Gift and Garden Shop.

the whole family to share. For example, build a seal or sea lion puppet decorated with your own special seal nose, complete with whiskers!

Free Guided Tour of the UC Santa Cruz Farm SEPTEMBER 2, 2PM UC SANTA CRUZ HAY BARN FREE ADMISSION

Take a docent-led tour of the beautiful UCSC Farm.The Farm features tractor-worked fields, hand-worked gardens, orchards, greenhouses, a children’s garden, and a spectacular view of Monterey Bay.

Younger Lagoon Reserve Tours

SEPTEMBER 2, 1–3PM SEYMOUR MARINE DISCOVERY CENTER FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE CENTER

Make it and take it! Come create and take home a fun souvenir, an activity for

LE ARN MORE AT

SEPTEMBER 9, 7:30–9AM UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM FOR ARBORETUM FRIENDS MEMBERS AND STUDENTS ONLY. MEMBERSHIPS START AT $50.

Kevin Condon, co-founder and executive director of the Bird School Project, will help you identify the birds that call the Arboretum home.

California Native Plant Society Meeting SEPTEMBER 10, 7:30PM UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN HORTICULTURE II BUILDING FREE ADMISSION

All are welcome—from botanists and defenders of the environment to casual nature lovers. The California Native Plant Society seeks to increase appreciation and preservation of California’s native plants.

This 90-minute, behind-the-scenes hiking tour takes visitors into Younger Lagoon Reserve adjacent to the Seymour Marine Discovery Center. The reserve contains diverse coastal habitat and is home to birds of prey, migrating sea birds, bobcats, and other wildlife.

SEPTEMBER 6, 6:30PM NEW BOHEMIA BREWING COMPANY FREE ADMISSION

UCSC Professor Brant Robertson talks about how the Hubble Space Telescope aided the discovery of galaxies, as well as new plans to find earlier and more distant galaxies. We’ll also hear from

events.ucsc.edu

Writing the Space Age THROUGH JANUARY 17. OPEN DURING REGULAR LIBRARY HOURS UC SANTA CRUZ MCHENRY LIBRARY THIRD-FLOOR GALLERY FREE ADMISSION

Writing the Space Age ponders worlds and futures beyond our own in an exhibition that explores books, magazines, and comics that were created and consumed during the rise of the Space Age, with a special focus on Robert Heinlein.

Future Garden for the Central Coast of California OPEN DURING ARBORETUM HOURS UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN $0–$5 ADMISSION

A major art and science project by Newton Harrison and his late wife, Helen Mayer Harrison. The Harrisons worked with scientists and botanists to create trial gardens within the geodesic domes in which native plant species are subjected to the temperatures and water conditions that scientists see for the region in the near future.

SEPTEMBER 2 & 6, 10:30AM SEYMOUR MARINE DISCOVERY CENTER FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE CENTER

Astronomy on Tap: Galaxies Near and Far Sunday Seaside Crafts

Bird Walk with the Bird School Project

ONGOING EVENTS

Yoga and Ethnobotany in the Arboretum SEPTEMBER 12, 7:30AM UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN $8–$17/PERSON

The UCSC Arboretum & Botanic Garden merges the ancient practice of yoga with the use of plants as healing agents in an ongoing series.Yoga movements will be accessible for beginners and advanced practitioners alike. Bolsters, straps, and blankets provided; please bring your own mat.

UPCOMING EVENTS OCTOBER 2

Reyna Grande OCTOBER 3

Forest Law Opening Reception OCTOBER 12

Strange Window: The Turn of the Screw OCTOBER 20

Founders Celebration

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

SEPTEMBER 1, 11AM UC SANTA CRUZ ARBORETUM & BOTANIC GARDEN FREE WITH ADMISSION TO THE ARBORETUM

Photo Credit: GAVIN EMMONS

AUGUST 29, 7:30PM THE CREPE PLACE FREE ADMISSION. TABLE RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED.

37


CALENDAR

It was always her

will be using pastels, watercolors, dyes, wax, acrylics, wood and more. 3 p.m. Santa Cruz Adult School, 319 La Fonda Ave., Santa Cruz. waae-pajaro-ca.schoolloop.com.

CLASSES

#19

#20

SALSA DANCE: PARTNER AND SUELTA New location. No partner required. Drop-in class. Featuring Cuban-style Casino partner dancing, Salsa Suelta, and the latest in Cuban tunes. Age 16-plus. Two fun and experienced instructors. 7 p.m. Motion Pacific, 131 Front St., Santa Cruz. salsagente.com. $15.

Now keep her ... for always.

FRIDAY 8/31-MONDAY 9/3 102 Walnut Ave. at Pacific Downtown Santa Cruz 831.458.9950 stephansjewelry.com

38

Interest Free Financing Available

The end of summer means back to school, and back to school means new gear. The popular Downtown Sidewalk Sale returns this weekend with four full days of the best of summer-end deals on clothing, accessories and more from downtown stores including O’Neill Surf Shop and Pacific Wave. Stroll along Pacific Avenue and enjoy a day of shopping and people watching downtown while finding some on-sale treasures. INFO: 10 a.m.- 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31-Monday, Sept. 3. Pacific Avenue, Santa Cruz. downtownsantacruz.com. Free.

<36 needs B12 to create energy and is

i Sh

o

c

AUGUST 29-SEPTMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Open Tue-Sat. 10-5:30, Sun 11-5

LABOR DAY WEEKEND SIDEWALK SALES

ne a Light

un

seli

ng

t cen

er

DiAnna VanEycke

Marriage and Family Therapist Trainee Supervised by Melissa Fritchle, LMFC#46827

831.350.1686 Sliding-scale Counseling Services Individuals, Couples & Families Santa Cruz and Watsonville

not well absorbed from the diet or in capsule form. Everyone can benefit from a B12 shot. After B12 injections many patients feel a natural boost in energy. 3-6 p.m. Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center, 736 Chestnut St., Santa Cruz. 477-1377 or scnmc. com. $29/$17. B12 HAPPY HOUR B12 deficiencies are common, as the vitamin is used up by stress, causing fatigue, depression, anxiety, insomnia and more. Not well absorbed in the gut, B12 injections can be effective in helping to support energy, mood, sleep, immunity, metabolism and stress resilience. Come get a discounted shot from 1:30-4:30 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com/b12-injections or 515-8699. $15.

MUSIC OPEN MIC NIGHT Open Mic Night every Wednesday in Capitola Village. Join us at the new Cork and Fork Capitola. All are welcome. Always free, always fun. Awesome wines by the glass or bottle, Discretion beer on tap, handmade pizzas and great small-plate dishes. 7 p.m. Cork and Fork, 312 Capitola Ave., Capitola. corkandforkcapitola.com. Free.

THURSDAY 8/30 ARTS MIXED MEDIA ART CLASS FOR ADULTS This is a fun class that will bring your creativity. The class will introduce you to a variety of materials and techniques. You do not need any experience for this class. We

EAST COAST SWING: BEGINNING SERIES This class will get you out of your seat and on to the dance floor enjoying the upcoming events on your calendar. The class is for teens and adults, singles and couples with little or no partner dance experience. In six weeks, you will become comfortable with swing basics and be ready for summer celebrations. 6-7 p.m. Jade Street Park, 4400 Jade St., Santa Cruz. apm. activecommunities.com. $64/$50. TAI CHI FOR HEALTH This slow, mindful, low-impact movement program is designed to be safe and beneficial for those living with arthritis or other chronic conditions. This form of tai chi can be learned and practiced either seated or standing. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Live Oak Grange, 1900 17th Ave., Santa Cruz. 475-4787 or taichiforhealthinstitute.org. $50. MOM & BABY CONNECTION Nursing Mothers Counsel and Luma Yoga host a weekly Mom & Baby Connection support group. Every family presents their own unique situations and challenges. This is a time to get together with other moms in a group setting to explore and discuss the tips and tricks of successful breastfeeding, and much more. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Luma Yoga and Family Center, 1010 Center St., Santa Cruz. lumayoga.com. Free. NATURAL MIND MEDITATION IN THE DZOGCHEN TRADITION Dzogchen teaches that at a fundamental level, we all have the basic nature of enlightenment. We meet every Thursday evening to practice this simple meditation with instructions from Geshe Dangsong Namgyal. Tea and discussion afterward. 7 p.m. Wisdom Center of Santa Cruz, 740 Front St. #155, Santa Cruz. kunsanggarcenter.org. Free. STARTUP ACCOUNTING ESSENTIALS During this hour and a half presentation you’ll learn about how to implement an


CALENDAR accounting system that will grow with your company, effective payment collection processes, tax obligations, financial statements, and more. Noon. The Satellite Flexible Workspace, 325 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. satellite.communitytv.org. Free.

GROUPS SUPPORT GROUP FOR SURVIVORS OF CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE: WOMEN’S GROUP We provide a safe and supportive environment for healing from child sexual abuse. Together we break through isolation, develop healthy coping skills, reduce shame, and build healthy boundaries. 6 p.m. Family Service Agency of the Central Coast, 2901 Park Ave., Suite A3, Soquel. 423-7601. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Overeaters Anonymous is a 12-Step support program for those who wish to stop compulsive eating, including anorexia and bulimia. 1 p.m. Trinity Presbyterian Church, 420 Melrose Ave., Santa Cruz. 476-8291. Free. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILY CAREGIVERS Come share your triumphs and challenges of caregiving for your family member with others in a similar situation. Visit the park if you have time, and take a break. 2-3:30 p.m. Highlands Park Senior Center, 8500 Hwy. 9, Ben Lomond. facebook. com/SLVcaregiver. Free.

S+LAA MENS’ MEETINGS+LAA MENS’ MEETING Having trouble with compulsive sexual or emotional behavior? Recovery is possible. Our small 12-step group allows feedback and meets every Thursday. 7:30 p.m. The Barn Studio, 104 S Park Way, Santa Cruz. Free.

HEALTH B12 HAPPY HOUR B12 helps support energy, mood, sleep, immunity, metabolism and stress resilience. Since B12 is not absorbed well during digestion, and all B vitamins are depleted by stress, most Americans are deficient. Having B12 in the form of an injection bypasses the malabsorption problem, and people often feel an immediate difference. Every

MUSIC THE SANTA CRUZ TREMOLOS SINGING GROUP FOR PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON’S Singing is known to be a good voicestrengthening exercise for people with Parkinson’s disease. Santa Cruz County has an ongoing singing group for people with Parkinson’s and their caregivers. 1-2:30 p.m. The Episcopal Church, 125 Canterbury Drive, Aptos. easepd.org/singing. Free. SUMMER MUSIC SERIES Relax to the sounds of the area’s finest musicians. Wine and small bites available for purchase. No reservations required. No cover. 4-6 p.m. Taste Morgan, 204 Crossroads Blvd., Carmelby-the-Sea. morganwinery.com. Free.

FRIDAY 8/31 FOOD & WINE WATSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET This market is in the heart of the famously bountiful Pajaro Valley. Peaceful and family-oriented, the Latino heritage of this community gives this market a “mercado” feel. 2-7 p.m. 200 Main St., Watsonville.

HEALTH VITAMIN B12 FRIDAY Every Friday is B12 Happy Hour at Thrive Natural Medicine. B12 improves energy, memory, mood, immunity, sleep, metabolism and stress resilience. Come on down for a discounted shot and start your weekend off right! Walk-ins only. 3-6 p.m. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com/b12injections or 515-8699. $15.

Great Food • Beer & Wine Artisan Crafts • Piñatas • Music Dancers • Raffle FREE ADMISSION • $10 TASTING KITS ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT SANTA CRUZ MISSION STATE HISTORIC PARK, YOUR STATE PARK DOWNTOWN – 144 SCHOOL STREET CATCH THE FREE SHUTTLE – PARK DOWNTOWN!

MUSIC PAPA DOO RUN RUN Friday Night Bands on the Beach features top 40 bands from the late ’70s, ’80s, and early ’90s during two free shows at 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. at the beach bandstand. 6:30-10 p.m. Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz. beachboardwalk.com. Free. AUGUST SUN AT ABBOTT SQUARE The band was started by singer/songwriter and >40 guitarist Christian Walsh, blending

PLATINUM SPONSORS

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

THURSDAY NIGHT BINGO Thursday Night bingo, paying out up to $10,000.00 per night. All proceeds benefit local schools academics, art, theater, and athletics. When you play our children win. 4 p.m. Santa Cruz Portuguese Hall, 216 Evergreen St., Santa Cruz. falconclub.org.

Thursday morning, we offer discounted vitamin B12 by walk-in or appointment. 9 a.m.-Noon. Thrive Natural Medicine, 2840 Park Ave., Soquel. thrivenatmed.com or 515-8699. $15.

39


CALENDAR <39 folk, blues, and straight ahead rock n' roll, creating an upbeat, original classic sound with a contemporary grit from the Santa Cruz mountains of California. 6:30-9 p.m. Abbott Square and the MAH, Cooper St., Santa Cruz. SOULSHAKERS AT THE STEEL BONNET Carie and the SoulShakers deliver sultry soul, blistering blues, infectious funk and irresistible originals. Their original style evokes New Orleans and Memphis. A show not to miss. 5 p.m. Steel Bonnet Brewing Co., 20 Victor Square, Scotts Valley. carieandthesoulshakers.com. Free.

SATURDAY 9/1 CLASSES ZEN MEDITATION & DISCUSSION Ocean Gate Zen Center. Meditation and talk on Zen Buddhism. Every Saturday. All are welcome. 9 a.m. Ocean Gate Zen Center, 920 41st Ave., Suite B, Santa Cruz. 824-7900 or oceangatezen.org. Free.

AUGUST 29-SEPTMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

COME AS YOU ARE ZEN This is an informal Saturday morning program focused on investigating Buddhist teachings for creating ease and skillful response in our daily life. The program begins with meditation followed by a Dharma talk by one of our teachers: Rev. Daijaku Kinst or Rev. Shinshu Roberts. Talks are for both the beginner as well as the advanced practitioner. 9 a.m. Ocean Gate Zen, 920 41st Ave. Suite F, Santa Cruz. oceangatezen.org. Free.

40

FOOD & WINE APTOS FARMERS MARKET AT CABRILLO COLLEGE Voted Good Times best farmers market in Santa Cruz County. With more than 90 vendors, the Aptos Farmers Market offers an unmatched selection of locally grown produce and specialty foods. 8 a.m.-Noon, Saturdays, Cabrillo College. montereybayfarmers.org or akeller@ montereybayfarmers.org. Free. WESTSIDE FARMERS MARKET The Westside Farmers Market takes place every week at the corner of Highway 1 and Western Drive, situated on the northern edge of Santa Cruz’s greenbelt. This market serves the communities of the west-end of Santa Cruz including Bonny Doon, North Coast, UCSC Campus and is a short trip from downtown. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Mission Street and Western Drive, Santa Cruz. 454-0566.

PARTNER YOGA AND WINE TASTING Share sacred energy the second and fourth Saturdays of each month at Poetic Cellars Winery. Wine tasting will follow the class. 10 a.m.-Noon. Poetic Cellars, 5000 N. Rodeo Gulch Road, Soquel. 462-3478.

GROUPS YLI FALL RUMMAGE SALE Young Ladies Institute fall rummage sale. Come and get your bargains. 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Our Lady Star of the Sea Hall, 515 Frederick St., Santa Cruz. 423-8141.

HEALTH B12 HAPPY HOUR Come and get your Happy Hour B12 shot. Your body needs B12 to create energy and is not well absorbed from the diet or in capsule form. Everyone can benefit from a B12 shot! After B12 injections many patients feel a natural boost in energy. 10 a.m.-Noon. Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center, 736 Chestnut St., Santa Cruz. 477-1377 or scnmc.com. $29/$17.

VOLUNTEER VOLUNTEER TO FEED THE HUNGRY WITH FOOD NOT BOMBS We need help sharing vegan meals with the hungry every Saturday and Sunday in downtown Santa Cruz: Cooking from Noon-3 p.m, 418 Front St., Santa Cruz. 515-8234. Serving from 4-6 p.m. at the Post Office, 840 Front St., Santa Cruz.

SUNDAY 9/2 ARTS SUNDAY SEASIDE CRAFTS Make it and take it! Come create and take home a fun souvenir, an activity for the whole family to share. Join the hands-on fun in the crafts room every Sunday. 1-3 p.m. Seymour Marine Discovery Center, 100 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz. seymourcenter.ucsc.edu.

GROUPS NAR-ANON FAMILY GROUPS—SANTA CRUZ AREA OF NORTHERN CA, SUTTER HOSPITAL Nar-Anon Family Groups meet to support the friends and families of addicts. We share experience, strength and hope to reduce the stress related to living with active addiction and after that to live life on life’s terms. We are a 12-Step program. 6:30-8 p.m. Sutter Maternity

FRIDAY 8/31 A CONVERSATION WITH OUR SECRETARY OF STATE AND COUNTY CLERK What does a Secretary of State do? How does the position affect our right to free and fair elections? What is the role of County Clerks in ensuring that elections are run with accuracy, integrity, and transparency? Most people don’t know the answer to these questions, and with November elections right around the corner, now is the best chance to get some answers right from the source. Santa Cruz Indivisible presents a conversation with California Secretary of State Alex Padilla and Santa Cruz County Clerk and Registrar of Voters Gail Pellerin. Bring questions and talking points you’d like addressed. INFO: 7-9 p.m. Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. riotheatre.com. Free, register online at eventbrite.com.

Center, 2900 Chanticleer Ave., Santa Cruz. 477-2200. Free. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Tools of Recovery Study. OA is a 12-step support group to stop eating compulsively, including anorexia and bulimia. 9 a.m. Sutter Maternity and Surgery Center, 2900 Chanticleer Ave., Santa Cruz. 429-7906 or santacruzoa.org. Free.

MUSIC STEADY SUNDAZE REGGAE All-ages reggae in Santa Cruz outside on the patio at

the Jerk House with DJ Daddy Spleece and DJ Ay Que Linda plus guest DJs in the mix. 1-5 p.m. The Jerk House, 2525 Soquel Drive, Santa Cruz. 316-7575. Free. HANUMAN PROJECT & JOSS JAFFE— KIRTAN & CACAO Known for their highly accessible and deeply powerful Kirtan offerings, the Hanuman Project will sweep you up into a whirlwind of chant ecstasy and then plunge in a lake of devotional nectar. 2 p.m. Pleasure Point Yoga, 3707 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz. facebook.com/ events/1095636910617535.

>42


There is a Better Way

MIDTOWN Summer Sale! 30% OFF All Merchandise

Mediate & Move On • Avoid Court • Divorce Mediation • Family Conflicts • Dispute Resolution • Fast, Fair, Affordable

UNIQUE ORIGINAL MERMAID DESIGNS In-House Screen Printed and Embroidered Clothing, Hats, Home Decor “Shell” Phone: (831) 345-3162 • 718 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

HOURS: MON-FRI 9-5PM, SAT 12-4PM Instagram.com/The_Mermaid_Shop_ Etsy.com/shop/SantaCruzMermaidShop Facebook.com/SantaCruzMermaidShop

Free 1/2-hr. Phone Consultation

Hawaiian, Coastal and Tropical Furniture. Beach & Home Decor. Tropical Treasures & Gifts.

Lu Haussler, J.D.

831.334.9539 mediationgroupofsc.com

shopping for a cause • Women’s fashion • Top brands and labels • Gently used/high quality

Get ready for holiday gatherings with stylish new shades and save.

McCARTY’S WINDOW FASHIONS

100

M-F: 10am-4pm Sat: By Appointment

REBATES STARTING AT

$

• Tax-deductible donations welcome Located in the King’s Plaza Shopping Center

on qualifying purchases*

1601 41st Ave. Capitola

SEPTEMBER 22– DECEMBER 10, 2018

831-462-3686 www.the-daisy.org

Proceeds benefit programs provided by Family Service Agency of the Central Coast | www.fsa-cc.org

Fl ouris h Des ign s

1224 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz 831.466.9167

mccartyswindowfashions.com Silhouette® Window Shadings

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/22/18-12/10/18 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Offer excludes HDOrigins™ and McCarty's Window Fashions Nantucket™ Window Shadings, a collection of Silhouette® Window Shadings. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 4 weeks of rebate Soquel claim approval. Funds do not expire. Subject to1224 applicable law, aAve $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month Santacard. Cruz, CA limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2018 Hunter Douglas. All thereafter. See complete terms distributed with reward Additional 10:00 amof- Hunter 4:00 pm rights reserved. All trademarks used hereinM-F: are the property Douglas or their respective owners. 18Q4NBSIC1 Sat: By Appointment Sun: Closed 831-466-9167 www.mccartyswindowfashions.com

*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/22/18–12/10/18 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Offer excludes HDOrigins™

VINTAGE

BOUTIQUE & HOME DÉCOR

1127 B Soquel Ave 831-359-8323

Located behind Childish Toy Store

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

730 Soquel Avenue Santa Cruz 831.426.6102 ElementHomeFurnishings.com

41


CALENDAR

is proud to present <40

Canta y Baila Conmigo

TM

MUSIC AND MOVEMENT IN SPANISH

Join us for an exciting new class where music learning goes hand in hand with Spanish immersion.

With Canta y Baila Conmigo you and your child will be transported as you sing, dance and play to the irresistible rhythms of Spanish speaking countries.

Canta y Baila Conmigo is:

• A class for children 0-5 and their caregivers • Perfect for both beginners and Native Speakers

FALL CLASSES BEGIN SEPTEMBER 17 Advanced Registration Required @ MusicalMe.com or call 831.438.3514

AUGUST 29-SEPTMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Register today!

42

Capitola, Los Gatos, Santa Cruz & Watsonville

Canta y Baila Conmigo MusicalMe.com

Listen local first! KSCO’s 89 local voices bring you each week: • 30 hours of full-service morning and afternoon commutes; • 22 hours of local “Free Speech Zone” radio; • 34 hours of special interest topics (agriculture to real estate).

Local News & Talk!

KSCO RADIO AM 1080 / FM 95.7, 104.1 &

OUTDOOR

WATSONVILLE NATURE WALKS Come experience the incredible bird life that the Wetlands of Watsonville have to offer. Located along the globally important Pacific Flyway, the Wetlands of Watsonville provide a resting stop for birds on their migratory journey. 1:30 p.m. City of Watsonville Nature Center, 130 Harkins Slough Road, Watsonville. cityofwatsonville.org. Free. VEG. POTLUCK & SWIM AT GARDEN OF EDEN Please bring your plate, cup, serving utensils, water and a potluck dish to share. Wear bathing suit and water shoes. Bring towel and sun protection. 11 a.m. Felton Faire Shopping Center, Graham Hill Road, Felton. kaplanks@hotmail.com. Free. GUIDED TOUR OF THE UCSC FARM Take a free, docent-led tour of the beautiful 30-acre organic UCSC Farm. Learn about the education, research, and outreach work taking place through the Center for Agroecology & Sustainable Food Systems (CASFS). 2-3:30 p.m. Cowell Ranch Historic Hay Barn, Ranch View Road, Santa Cruz. events.ucsc.edu. Free. YOUNGER LAGOON RESERVE TOUR This 90-minute, behind-the-scenes hiking tour takes visitors into Younger Lagoon Reserve adjacent to the Seymour Marine Discovery Center. Part of the University of California Natural Reserve System, Younger Lagoon Reserve contains diverse coastal habitat and is home to birds of prey, migrating sea birds, bobcats, and other wildlife. 10:30 a.m. Seymour Marine Discovery Center, 100 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz. seymourcenter. ucsc.edu.

MONDAY 9/3 ARTS POETRY OPEN MIC A project of the Legendary Collective, the weekly Santa Cruz Word Church poetry open mic is a community of local writers who recognize the power of spoken word. They gather every Monday for a community writing workshop, then host a 15-slot open mic followed by a different featured poet each week. 4 p.m. Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. santacruzmah.org. Free. READ & CRITIQUE WRITERS GROUP A meeting of published authors working on new pieces. We read our work and get

feedback from the group. 1:30 p.m. The Bagelry, 320 Cedar St. Suite A, Santa Cruz. cdbagshaw@att.net. Free.

CLASSES THICH NHAT HANH MEDITATION Santa Cruz Heart Sangha is a meditation group in the Thich Nhat Hanh tradition that meets every Monday. We welcome all to spend with us an hour in silent sitting and walking meditation followed by Dharma sharing. 7-8:45 p.m. Santa Cruz Zen Center, 113 School St., Santa Cruz. Free.

FOOD & WINE TRIVIA Discover the Joy of Trivia with your friends! Win food and beer for your otherwise trivial knowledge. 7:30 p.m. Rosie McCann’s Irish Pub, 1220 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. rosiemccanns.com. Free.

TUESDAY 9/4 ARTS ‘THE LIFE AND TRIALS OF WILHELM REICH’ In 1956 and 1960, the published books, research journals and bulletins of pioneering psychiatrist, research physician and scientist Wilhelm Reich were banned and burned in America by order of a United States Federal Court. This new documentary by Connecticut filmmakers Kevin Hinchey and Glenn Orkin is the first factually accurate documentary ever produced about Reich. 6:30 p.m. Del Mar Theater, 1124 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. loveworkknowledge.com.

CLASSES BREATHING INTO WHOLENESS— CLARITY BREATHWORK Clarity Breathwork is a method of self-healing that uses the power of deep, connected breathing along with gentle coaching and evocative music. Breathwork helps reveal and clear unconscious thoughts and beliefs that can often get in the way of our deepest happiness. 7-8:30 p.m. Breath+Oneness, 708 Capitola Ave., Capitola. breathandoneness. com/events. $20/$10. WOMENCARE: LAUGHTER YOGA Laughter yoga for women with cancer meets the second and fourth Tuesdays. Pre registration required. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Inner Light Center, 5630 Soquel Drive, Soquel. fsa-cc.org/ womencare/. Free.


Flying

Crane Spa

therapeutic massage for the whole family

Foot massage $24 Body massage $49 Sentimental Journey

“The Way We Were” “A Shout Out to Memorable Singers and Songs”

Directed by Kris Wheeler September 12, 13, 14 & 15 at 1:00pm September 14 at 7:30pm Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium Tickets: $22 Call: (831) 423-6640 Email: santacruzfollies@att.net Facebook: Santa Cruz Follies Website: santacruzfollies.net And A Little Bit of Elvis

BOOST YOUR MOOD, ENERGY & WELL-BEING

B-12 HAPPY HOUR

great stuff.

great prices.

Santa Cruz

2381 Mission St. bet. Fair & Swift

Capitola

1501 41st. Ave. #J OSH center

288-5888 687-8188

Gift certificates and discount cards available Open 7 days 10 am to 10 pm Walk-ins welcome. www.flyingcranemassage.com

Eric A. Hohn, MD Sports Medicine | General Orthopedics

great cause.

Wednesdays 3-6 PM Saturdays 10AM-12PM Walk-Ins Welcome

Now seeing patients in Capitola and Watsonville! Furniture. Building Materials. Household Goods. Appliances

736 Chestnut Street downtown Santa Cruz 831.477.1377 www.scnmc.com

719 Swift St, Santa Cruz . 831.824.4704 Open to the public Wed - Sat 9am to 5pm habitatmontereybay.org/restore

Accepting Medicare, All Major PPOs, PMG-Santa Cruz, and CCAH

Schedule your appointment today! 831-475-4024

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Santa Cruz Naturopathic Medical Center

Mt. Hermon Rd. Scotts Valley 245Q 515-8380 Safeway center

43


MUSIC CALENDAR

LOVE YOUR

LOCAL BAND

LITTLE PETIE

When Peter Michael was a kid, his family called him “Little Petie.” His dad was Peter and his grandfather was Pete, so the nickname sort of made sense. But he hated it. As he’s gotten older, though, he’s reconsidered. In fact, he’s using it for his latest musical project, Little Petie and the Mean Old Men. And the oncehated nickname has become a bit of an alter ego.

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

“He’s a little more happy-go-lucky and perhaps intentionally naïve,” Michael says. “There are times when I’m writing songs that I think, ‘Yeah, Little Petie wouldn’t say that.’ It has created a lens through which the songs are delivered.”

44

Michael spent years playing in a punk band, and then became a contemplative singer-songwriter. But he wanted to have more fun. “I enjoyed presenting those songs in the past, but there was an emotional cost that after a while I just got tired of paying,” Michael says. “I decided I would write songs that were up-tempo and catchy, not really thinky or heartbreaky.” Now he’s having a great time playing good old-fashioned riff-heavy rock music. “Our songs are in a style that is already familiar to people,” Michael says. “We’re not reinventing rock ’n’ roll. There’s nothing that’s gimmicky. It’s straightforward. I think once people start to familiarize themselves with our songs, they really appreciate and enjoy them.” AARON CARNES INFO: 9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $10. 429-6994.

BAD BAD HATS

WEDNESDAY 8/29 INDIE-POP

BAD BAD HATS Can you describe your band in three words or less? Minneapolis trio Bad Bad Hat can; they call it “sweet and sour.” In other words, ultra-catchy pop songs that straddle the line between innocent, feel good melodies and sad, reflective lyrics. It’s a combination not too uncommon with indie-pop bands, but when a band like Bad Bad Hat gets it right, it makes you feel all the feels. The band’s latest record, Lightning Round, is simultaneously more polished and looser than the one before it. It’s like a whole different category of sweet and sour. AARON CARNES

INFO: 9 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $12/adv, $14/door. 429-4135.

THURSDAY 8/30 ROCK

DANGALEROS If the Dangaleros backstory is to be believed, the “despicable six” members were so isolated in rural Mexico

that they had to form their own rock band to have something to do. And these six couldn’t be more different: border patrol agents, outlaws, cartel members, etc. You know the desire to rock was high if these guys could set aside their differences! Sure, this might all be fabricated, but in any case this six-piece puts on a fun show with a rock-oriented sound that dips into punk, funk, and spaghetti Western desert rock. AC INFO: 7:30 p.m. Flynn’s Cabaret & Steakhouse, 6275 Hwy. 9, Felton. $15/adv, $18/door. 335-2800.

JAZZ

STEVE WILSON & MONTEREY ALL-STARS Santa Cruz trombonist/vocalist Steve Wilson, a key part of Cabrillo College’s jazz program for four decades, presents a prodigious band as part of Kuumbwa’s Live & Local series. Featuring well-traveled bassist Steve Uccello, Los Angeles-transplant Gary Meek on saxophones and piano, and veteran drummer Andy Weis (who leads a larger version of this ensemble at the Monterey Jazz Festival next

month), the Monterey All-Stars combo lives up to its name. A versatile multi-instrumentalist who has toured and recorded with powerhouse drummer Dave Weckl and Brazilian stars such as Flora Purim, Airto, and Oscar Castro-Neves, Meek has added a vivifying jolt of energy to the Monterey Bay scene since relocating here in 2009. ANDREW GILBERT INFO: 7 p.m. Kuumbwa Jazz, 320-2 Cedar St., Santa Cruz. $21/adv, $26.25/door. 427-2227.

HIP-HOP

ROTATIONS Khan is a local hip-hop artist who’s been putting out EPs and mixtapes for years now. His latest EP, Occupied—a collaboration with Santa Cruz producer Ghost Hour—is sublime boom-bap. Khan has put together an evening of hip-hop/soul at the Crepe Place called “Rotations” that includes Gilroy “femcee” 1 .A.M., spinner of old-school rap DJ Los the Nexus, sweet soul singer Genoa T. Brown, and poet-turned-rapper Joseph Jason Santiago Lacour. Word on the street is there’ll be a secret surprise guest as well. AC INFO: 9 p.m. Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $8. 429-6994


MUSIC

BE OUR GUEST DEAN WEEN GROUP

THE JELLYMAN’S DAUGHTER

PUNK

REGRETTES

praise as an album that “evokes the misted plains of Great Britain … [and] remains loyal to the tradition of their homeland while expertly combining these sensibilities with a modern indie-folk twist.” CJ

INFO: 9 p.m. Moe’s Alley, 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz. $35/adv, $40/door. 479-1854.

WILLY PORTER

SUNDAY 9/2 INDIE-FOLK

INFO: 8 p.m. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $14/adv, $16/door. 429-4135.

THE JELLYMAN’S DAUGHTER

FRIDAY 8/31

Hailing from the foothills of Edinburgh, the Jellyman’s Daughter is a duo that blends American indie-rock à la Bonnie “Prince” Billy and Andrew Bird with the Scottish twang of their homeland. Comprising Emily Kelly and Graham Coe, the duo is currently touring its forthcoming album, Dead Reckoning, which drops Sept. 21. The release has already garnered

REGGAE

ISRAEL VIBRATION Are you ready to see two legendary reggae groups Voltron into one and then blow your mind away? Israel

INFO: 8 p.m. Lille Aeske, 13160 Hwy. 9, Boulder Creek. $10-$20. 703-4183.

TUESDAY 9/4 FOLK-ROCK An indie-folk rocker with finger-picking guitar skills to boot, Willy Porter has been holding down a quiet corner of the music world since his 1994 breakthrough album, Dog Eared Dream. Born in Mequon, Wisconsin, Porter garners comparison to guitar great Leo Kottke and was described by the Village Voice as capturing “the street corner ethic of acoustic performance perfectly.” In addition to boasting serious guitar chops, Porter is a thoughtful songwriter and an engaging performer. CJ INFO: 7:30 p.m. Michael’s on Main, 2591 Main St., Soquel. $17/adv, $20/door. 479-9777.

INFO: 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19. Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $25/adv, $30/door. 423-1338. WANT TO GO? Go to santacruz.com/giveaways before 11 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 10 to find out how you could win a pair of tickets to the show.

IN THE QUEUE MURA MASA

Electronic music producer and multiinstrumentalist. Wednesday at Catalyst GREEN LEAF RUSTLERS

All-star band featuring Chris Robinson, Barry Sless and more. Thursday at Moe’s Alley MUDFROG

Alternative folk and roots. Thursday at Michael’s on Main PAT HULL

Singer-songwriter out of Chico. Saturday at Crepe Place LUMINANCE ENSEMBLE

Bay Area trio blending folk and concert traditions. Sunday at Flynn’s Cabaret

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Since last December, Lin-Manuel Miranda has been dropping monthly singles for his project Hamildrops, which are basically covers of songs from the Hamilton soundtrack. This March, L.A. pop-punk band the Regrettes released their rendition of “Helpless” which is so far one of the best contributions. Like the rest of the Regrettes songs, it’s got both attitude and vulnerability. This is most apparent on the group’s debut album, Feel Your Feelings Fool. Earlier this year, the group released the more all-over-the-place, but still awesome EP Attention Seeker. AC

Vibration is a classic roots reggae singing group that formed in 1970 and started releasing classic Rastafarian albums in the late ’70s. The Roots Radics are a backing band that have played with everyone (Bunny Wailer, Eek-A-Mouse, Gregory Isaacs, etc). They’ve backed Israel Vibration on a couple of albums. And now—lucky you—they are backing the group live in concert. This will be the most reggae thing you do this week. AC

One half of alt-rock outfit Ween, Dean Ween (aka Michael Melchiondo, Jr.) has carried a torch for catchy underground music since way back in the 1980s when he and Gene Ween started making music together. He has since worked on dozens of projects with a variety of artists, including Queens of the Stone Age and Yoko Ono. These days, Dean also leads the Dean Ween Group, which released its sophomore album, Rock2, earlier this year. The record is described by Dean as representing the first time he was able to take what the band does on stage and put it on a record. “Every little thing I’ve ever learned is somewhere on here somewhere. Maybe you can find a little piece of it that means as much to you as it does to me.” CAT JOHNSON

45


LIVE MUSIC

Thursday August 30th – 8:30pm $30/35

All Star Band Debuts Moe’s - An Evening With

THE GREEN LEAF RUSTLERS FEATURING

CHRIS ROBINSON & MORE Friday August 31st – 9pm $35/40

WED

8/29

THU

8/30

FRI

ABBOTT SQUARE 118 Cooper St, Santa Cruz

8/31

Lloyd Whitley 1p Blues Mechanics 6-8p

THE APPLETON GRILL 410 Rodriguez St, Watsonville

+ KING SCHASCHA

APTOS ST. BBQ 8059 Aptos St, Aptos

Al Frisby 6-8p

Scott Miller 6-8p

Quique Gómez & Kid Andersen 6-8p

BLUE LAGOON 923 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

Live Bands 9p

Comedy Night, ’80s Night Free 8:30p

THE BLUE LOUNGE 529 Seabright Ave, Santa Cruz

Wednesdays Unplugged w/ Monica 9p

BOARDWALK BOWL 115 Cliff St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 8p-Close

Saturday September 1st – 9pm $12/15 Gypsy Rock Favorites Return

DIEGO’S UMBRELLA + COFFEE ZOMBIE COLLECTIVE

Sunday September 2nd – 9pm $7/10

Live Reggae Music – End Of Summer Bash

ANIMO CRUZ + SC REGGAE ALL-STARS Wednesday September 5th – 9pm $8/12 Reggae From Puerto Rico w/ YERBA BRUJA Singer

Funk Night w/ DJ Ed 9p

Karaoke Free 9p

Karaoke Free 9p

Comedy Night 9p

Karaoke Free 9p

Jim Lewin 7p

Karaoke 8p-Close

Cruz Patrol 9-11:45p

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 6p-Close

Karaoke 8p-Close

BOCCI’S CELLAR 140 Encinal St, Santa Cruz

Karaoke Free 8p

Swing Dance $5 5:30p

BRITANNIA ARMS 110 Monterey Ave, Capitola

Alex Lucero & Friends 8p

Karaoke 9-12:30a

SC Jazz Society Free 3:30p

JUNGLE FIRE

CHAMINADE RESORT 1 Chaminade Ln, Santa Cruz

Karaoke 9-12:30a

Common Kings $22/$25 8p Pacific Dub $12/$15 8:30p

Rico Nasty $18/$20 8:30p

The Keepers Of The Flame Return

MELVIN SEALS & JGB

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

46

THE

MICHAEL ROSE

MOESALLEY.COM

1535 Commercial Way Santa Cruz 831.479.1854

Gost $12/$15 8:30p Reckless Roots Free 5:30p

Friday September 7th – 9pm $20/25

Oct 12 Oct 13 Oct 14 Oct 20 Oct 21

Comedy Night w/ Shwa Free 8p

CAPITOLA WINE BAR 115 San Jose Ave, Capitola

The Regrettes $14/$16 7:30p

Sept 19 Sept 20 Sept 21 Sept 22 Sept 23 Sept 25 Sept 27 Sept 28 Sept 29 Oct 6 Oct 7 Oct 10

9/4

Post Punk Dance Floor 9p

Bad Bad Hats $12/$14 8:30p

Sept 15 Sept 16 Sept 16 Sept 18

TUE

The Box (Goth Night) 9p

CATALYST ATRIUM 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

RAY CHARLES PROJECT (Afternoon) LAGOONS + TIM ATLAS (Eve) ARISE ROOTS + Ancestree ORQUESTA SABORICUA + FLOR DE CAÑA ORGÓNE MATHEW CURRY (afternoon) MIKE PINTO (eve) SMOOTH HOUND SMITH + PATRICK MAGUIRE SOFT WHITE SIXTIES BON BON VIVANT + LAUREN WHAL JON CLEARY TRIO HURRICANE ROSES SELWYN BIRCHWOOD HAILU MERGIA JOHN DOE FOLK TRIO SOULWISE, RISE UP, FOR PEACE BAND HUMAN EXPERIENCE, KR3TURE WAYNE HANCOCK + DALE WATSON COCO MONTOYA MONKS OF DOOM (members of Camper Van Beethoven & Counting Crows) DICK DALE + The Mermen ERIC LINDELL – CD Release LYDIA PENSE & COLD BLOOD THE COFFIS BROTHERS CHRIS CAIN

9/3

Live Bands/Club 2000 Live VJ Dancing 9p Free 9p

Thursday September 6th – 8:30pm $12/15

Sept 9 Sept 9 Sept 13 Sept 14

MON

Mojo Mix 6-8p

Protoje $18/$20 8p

Sept 8

9/2

Aki Kumar & Little Johnny Lawton 6-8p

Mura Masa $23/$25 8p

9 Piece Funk/Soul/Latin Favorites

SUN

Andy Santana 6-8p

CATALYST 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

MISAEL + ANBESA CREW

9/1

The Dooners Free 7:30-9:30p

Jamaican Reggae Icons Return

ISRAEL VIBRATION

SAT

August Sun Free 6:30-9p

CREPE PLACE OPEN LATE - EVERY NIGHT!

ADVANCE TICKETS ON TICKETWEB WEDNESDAY 8/29

CONSERVING WILDLIFE FREE IN THE GARDEN - 5PM TO 8PM THURSDAY 8/30

“ROTATIONS” BY KHAN MULTIPAL MC’S GETTIN’ DOWN SHOW 9PM - $8 DOOR

FIND YOUR

COMMUNITY

SIGN UP NOW DISCOUNTS ON IN-STUDIO LABS & STUDIO TIME.

FRIDAY 8/31

LITTLE PETIE & MEAN OLD MEN w/ JESUS & THE DINOSAURS & YARDCOUCH SHOW 9PM - $10 DOOR SATURDAY 9/1

PAT HULL

w/ GETAWAY DOGS & JESSIE MARKS SHOW 9PM - $10 DOOR SUNDAY 9/2

OPEN BLUEGRASS JAM FREE IN THE GARDEN - 5PM TO 8PM TUESDAY 9/4

7 COME 11

9 UNTIL MIDNIGHT WEDNESDAY 9/5

WHISKEY WEDNESDAY LETS HANG OUT! THURSDAY 9/6

RECORDING STUDIOS & PRODUCER TRAINING @ 365PRODUCER.COM

1305 FAIR AVE. SANTA CRUZ CA 95060

TV HEADS

w/ EMILY AFTON& MANORLADY SHOW 9PM - $8 DOOR MIDTOWN SANTA CRUZ

1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz 429-6994


LIVE MUSIC WED

8/29

CILANTROS 1934 Main St, Watsonville

Hippo Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

CORK AND FORK 312 Capitola Ave, Capitola

Open Mic Free 7-10p

THU

8/30

CROW’S NEST 2218 E. Cliff Dr, Santa Cruz

8/31

SAT

9/1

SUN

9/2

Steve’s Jazz Kitchen Free 7-10p

DON QUIXOTE’S 6275 Hwy 9, Felton

KUUMBWA JAZZ 320-2 Cedar St, Santa Cruz

TUE

9/4

Science on Tap: Conserving Wildlife Free 7:30p

“Rotations” by Khan $8 9p

The Messiahs $3 7:30p

Extra Large Free 5:30p Live Again $5 8:30p

Little Petie & the Mean Old Men w/ Jesus & The Dinosaurs $10 9p Hank & Ella w/ The Fine Country Band $6 9p

LIVE & LOCAL: STEVE WILSON & MONTEREY JAZZ ALL-STARS An ensemble of some of the Monterey Bay’s finest jazz musicians. 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Thursday, September 6 • 7 PM

Acoustic Open Jam 3-5p

Open Mic 7-10p

Pat Hull w/ Getaway Dogs Open Bluegrass Jam & Jessie Marks $10 9p 5-8p

Funk Night ft. 7 Come 11 $6 9p-12a

Issac & the Haze $7 9:30p

John Michael Free 8p

Live Comedy $7 9p

TOMMY IGOE GROOVE CONSPIRACY This explosive, drum-led group runs the gamut, from big band jazz to rock band energy. Saturday, September 8 • 8:30 PM

SIN SISTERS BURLESQUE Tickets: eventbrite.com Monday, September 10 • 7 PM

Navaroli/Potter Free 6:30-8:30p The Dangaleros $15/$18 7:30p

Twisted Gypsy $15/$18 8p

THE FISH HOUSE 972 Main St, Watsonville GROUND CONTROL COFFEE HOUSE 10 Seascape Village Dr, Aptos JACK O’NEILL LOUNGE Santa Cruz Dream Inn 175 W Cliff Dr. Santa Cruz

9/3

The Beach Cowboys Free 7-10p

DAV. ROADHOUSE 1 Davenport Ave, Davenport DISCRETION BREWING 2703 41st Ave, Soquel

MON

KPIG Happy Hour 5:30-7:30p

CORRALITOS CULTURAL CENTER 127 Hames Rd., Corralitos THE CREPE PLACE 1134 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

FRI

Thursday, August 30 • 7 PM

Blood Relatives w/ Ted Welty & Soul Riders $15/$18 8p Mike PZ & the Associates

Brian Fitzgerald Group Free 7-10p Live & Local: Steve Wilson & Monterey Jazz All-Stars $21/$26.25 7p

Green Dog Free 7-9p

Dan Frechette 2-4p Richie The Lip & George Zaferes 7-9p

Paul Logan Free 7-10p

Brian Fitzgerald Group Free 7-10p

Luminance Ensemble $15 7p

TAYLOR MCFERRIN An intersection of contemporary jazz and electronic soul, in the style of Thundercat and Robert Glasper.

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Saturday, September 15 • 7:30 PM

HERB ALPERT & LANI HALL A true legend, from The Tijuana Brass to A&M Records, featuring Hall on vocals. AT RIO THEATRE Monday, September 17 • 7 PM & 9 PM

STILL DREAMING WITH JOSHUA REDMAN, RON MILES, SCOTT COLLEY & BRIAN BLADE A sublime quartet. Thursday, September 20 • 7 PM

TRUE BLUES: COREY HARRIS & GUY DAVIS Chronicling the culture of the blues in an evening of music and conversation. 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Thursday, September 27 • 7 PM

TORD GUSTAVSEN TRIO Crystalline and ethereal melodies, with abundant space and depth.

LOGAN RICHARDSON’S BLUES PEOPLE Distinctive saxophonist and soundscape artist’s 80s-influenced new project. 1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Wednesday, October 3 • 7:30 PM

CHICK COREA: VIGILETTE WITH CARLITOS DEL PUERTO & MARCUS GILMORE A jazz icon and a master of the piano trio. AT RIO THEATRE Thursday, October 4 • 7 PM & 9 PM

STANLEY CLARKE BAND A powerful group led by one of jazz fusion’s most influential bassists. Friday, October 5 • 7 PM

COLOR OF JAZZ - PHOTOGRAPHS Unless noted advance tickets at kuumbwajazz.org Dinner served one hour before Kuumbwa prsented concerts. Premium wines & beer available. All ages welcome.

320-2 Cedar St | Santa Cruz 831.427.2227 kuumbwajazz.org

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

1/2 PRICE NIGHT FOR STUDENTS! Monday, October 1 • 7 PM

47


Thank you all for your patience and support during this last year of transition!! The official name CHANGE is happening! WE HAVE A BRAND NEW AWESOME KITCHEN! Grand Opening is set for Labor Day weekend!

Sun Sept 1

Sat Sept 8 Sun Sept 9 Tue Sept 11 Wed Sept 12

Thu Sept 13

8/30

FRI

8/31

SAT

9/1

Blue Free 5pAchilles Wheel & Sol Nova $15 9p

John Michael Band $7 8p

from both sides of the border $15 adv./$18 door Dance – ages 21+ 7:30pm

MISSION ST. BBQ 1618 Mission St, Santa Cruz

Aki Kumar & Little Jonny Lawton Free 6p

Preacher Boy Duo Free 6p

Lloyd Whitley Free 6p

Al Frisby 1p Gil De Leon Trio 6p

$15 adv./$18 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm

MOE’S ALLEY 1535 Commercial Way, Santa Cruz

Blood Relatives w/Ted Welty and Soul Riders Luminance Ensemble Original music with South American

rhythms and jazz flavors $15 adv./$15 door seated – <21w/parent 7pm Fri Sept 7

THU

Mudfrog & Southern Pacific $10 7:30p

Jazz Fusion, Reggae Music from Santa Cruz $15 adv./$18 door Dance - ages 21+ 8pm Sun Sept 2

8/29

Che Apalache $15 7:30p

Twisted Gypsy Tribute to Fleetwood Mac

Fri Aug 31

WED MICHAEL’S ON MAIN 2591 Main St, Soquel

The Dangaleros A band of nefarious hombres

Thu Aug 30

LIVE MUSIC

Extra Large w/Puffball Collective Santa Cruz’s Favorite Party Band

MOTIV 1209 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz NEW BOHEMIA BREWERY 1030 41st Ave, Santa Cruz

$20 adv./$25 door Dance – ages 21+ 8:30pm

THE RED 200 Locust St, Santa Cruz

$17 adv./$20 door seated – <21w/parent 7pm

THE REEF 120 Union St, Santa Cruz

$15 adv./$18 door seated – ages 21+ 8pm

RIO THEATRE 1205 Soquel Ave, Santa Cruz

George Kahumoku, Jr. Every performance is the essence of Aloha Bear Tread In the tradition of the Grateful Dead

Lasers Lasers Birmingham w/Davey and the Midnights High lonesome and highly

Trivia 8p

PARADISE BEACH 215 Esplanade, Capitola POET & PATRIOT 320 E. Cedar St, Santa Cruz

ROSIE MCCANN’S 1220 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz

9/2

MON

9/3

TUE

Grateful Sundays Free 5:30p

9/4

Willy Porter $17/$20 7:30p

Kid Andersen & John “Blues” Boyd Free 6p Diego’s Umbrella & Cof- Animo Cruz & Santa fee Zombie Collective Cruz Reggae All Stars $12/$15 8p $7/$10 8p

Al Frisby Free 6p

Rasta Cruz Reggae Party 9:30p-12a

Jimmy Dewrance Free 6p

Turn Up Tuesday w/ Cali King

Shotgun Suitor Free 7p

99 BOTTLES 110 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz

$15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm

House of Floyd The Music of Pink Floyd

Israel Vibration & the The Green Leaf Rustlers Roots Racids Band & $30/$35 7:30p more $35/$40 8p Libation Lab w/ Syntax, King Wizard & more 930p-12a

SUN

Taco Trivia Tuesday 6:30p

Shawn Yanez Free 10p-12a Johnny Neri 6-9p

Dennis Dove 2-5p

Johnny Neri 2-5p

Erin Avila 6-9p Comedy Open Mic 8:30p

Open Mic 4p

Open Mic 8p ‘Geeks Who Drink’ Trivia Night 8p

Traditional Hawaiian Music 6:30p Conversation w/ Our Secretary of State and County Clerk Free 7p

Acoustic Music 6:30p

Acoustic Music 6:30p

Comedy Night 9p

First and Third Celtic Jam Live DJ

Acoustic Music 12:30 & 6:30p

Live DJ

Acoustic Music 12:30 & 6p

Acoustic Music 6:30p

Acoustic Music 6:30p

Trivia 7:30p

unusual Country music $15 adv./$18 door seated – <21w/parent 7:30pm

Diggin’ Dirt w/Southern Pacific Groovin’ Soul music from Humboldt County

$15 adv./$15 door seated – ages 21+ 7:30pm Fri Sept 14

Aardvark w/Wheelhouse The Music of the Grateful Dead $15 adv./$15 door Dance - ages 21+ 8pm

Sat Sept 15

Terry Brown w/Gary Blackburn Award-winning Singer, Songwriter,

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Cowboy Entertainer $18 adv./$20 door seated – <21w/parent 8pm

48

Sun Sept 16

Poly Varghese The great Hindustani classical guitarist

Wed. Aug 29 7:30pm

Ernest Troost Kerrville New Folk Winner and Emmy-winning

composer $15 adv./$15 door seated – <21w/parent 7:30pm Wed Sept 19 Fri Sept 21

Rhinestone A salute to the songs & career of Glen Campbell

$15 adv./$15 door seated – <21w/parent 7:30pm

What The Funk! Classic R&B, Soul and Funk

$15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 8pm Sat Sept 22

$15 adv./$15 door seated <21 w/parent

Mudfrog Southern Pacific Roots Rocking Dance

$10 adv./$10 door Dance – ages 21 + Fri. Aug 31 5pm

Achilles Wheel Sol Nova

Infectious Roots & World Music $15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21 +

Sat. Sept 1 8pm Sun. Sept 2 5:30pm

Shaky Hand String Band Original music from the heart

Tues. Sept 4 7:30pm

Thu, Sep 27 Fri, Sep 28 Sat, Sep 29 Fri, Oct 5 Sat, Oct 6

Journey Unauthorized Tasche Beggar Kings Drew Harrison’s in the Spirit of Lennon w/Come Together It’s a Beautiful Day

Tickets Now Online at flynnscabaret.com 6275 Hwy 9, Felton | 831.335.2800

Rockin'Church Service Every Sunday ELEVATION at 10am-11:15am

HAPPY HOUR

Fri. Aug 31 9pm plus

Funky Joe and the Mofos w/Shawn Andrews Band & Deep Pocket Local Rock and Roll/Funk Favorites

of the Rocky Mountains $15 adv./$15 door Dance – ages 21+ 7:30pm COMIN G RIGH T U P

BLUE

NO COVER

John Michael Band

Rock, Funk, Soul, Blues &Reggae $7 adv./$7 door Dance – ages 21 +

$15 adv./$15 door seated – ages 21+ 8pm Wed Sept 26

Latingrass from Argentina, Mexico & USA

Thu. Aug 30 7:30pm plus

$15 adv./$15 door seated – <21w/parent 7pm Tue Sept 18

Che Apalache

Grateful Sunday Grateful Dead Tunes NO COVER

Wed Sept 5 7:30pm

Fall Specials begin next week on September 4th: Get ready for good deals upstairs and down!

LOCATED ON THE BEACH

Amazing waterfront deck views.

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

See live music grid for this week’s bands.

STAND-UP COMEDY

Three live comedians every Sunday night.

HAPPY HOUR

Willy Porter

Mon–Fri from 3:30pm. Wednesday all night!

$17 adv./ $20 door seated <21 w/parent

Wood-fired pizza, ice cream, unique fine gifts.

Entertaining Indie-folk Legend

Western Centuries

All Star Alt-Country Touring Artists $10 adv./$10 door Dance – ages 21 +

COMING UP

Thu Sept. 6 Cosmic Pinball Fri Sept. 7 Aki Goes To Bollywood Sat Sept. 8 Joint Chiefs

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Full Concert Calendar : MichaelsonMainMusic.com 2591 Main St, Soquel, CA 95073

VISIT OUR BEACH MARKET

BBQ BEACH PARTIES

Thursdays, 5:30pm. All are welcome.

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST

Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily

(831) 476-4560

crowsnest-santacruz.com


LIVE MUSIC WED THE SAND BAR 211 Esplanade, Capitola

8/29

The Joint Chiefs Free 8-11p

THU

8/30

Javier y Su Salsa Machin Free 8-11p

SANDERLINGS 1 Seascape Resort, Aptos

FRI

8/31

SAT

9/1

Doors To No Where & Lost Puppy $5 9p-12a

Touch’d Too Much $5 8:30p-12a

Golden Shred Free 7:30-10:30p

Sambassa w/ Jeff & Timo Free 7:30-10:30p

SUN

9/2

MON

Dennis Dove Open Jam 7-11p

9/3

TUE

9/4

Alex Lucero Free 8-11p

SEABRIGHT BREWERY 519 Seabright, Santa Cruz SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

Don McCaslin & the Amazing Jazz Geezers 6-9:30p

The Gravity 8-11:30p

Patio Acoustics 1-4p The Next Blues Band 8-11:30p

SHADOWBROOK 1750 Wharf Rd, Capitola

Ken Constable 6:30-9:30p

Joe Ferrara 7-10p

Claudio Melega 7-10p

DJ Daddy Spleece Free 6p

The Getaway Dogs Free 6p

Danger Bang Free 6p

Shady Rest Free 5p

Carie & the Soulshakers Gary Blackburn & Free 5p Friends Free 5p

SHANTY SHACK BREWING 138 Fern St., Santa Cruz

Joe Kaplow Free 6p

STEEL BONNET 20 Victor Square, Scotts Valley

Patio Acoustics w/ James Murray 2-5p

Johnny Fabulous 6-9p

Dave “Nomad” Miller Free 6p

Swirly Girls 12p, Grateful Dads 2p, Brain Food 4p, Ancestree 6p All Free

Night Creepers

The Joint Chiefs

The Vinnie Johnson Band

Ziggy Tarr 7-9p

Ziggy Tarr 7-9p

Ziggy Tarr 11a-1p

Live Again 9:30p

Pacific Roots 9:30p

DJ Scott T Akrop 9;30p

SUSHI GARDEN S.V. 5600 Scotts Valley Dr. Scotts Valley

Dave Muldawer 5:30p

UGLY MUG 4640 Soquel Ave, Soquel WHARFHOUSE 1400 Wharf Road, Capitola YOUR PLACE 1719 Mission St, Santa Cruz ZELDA’S 203 Esplanade, Capitola

Ziggy Tarr 6-8p

Willy Bacon 7:30-8:30p

1011 PACIFIC AVE. SANTA CRUZ 831-429-4135 Wednesday, August 29 • Ages 16+

MURA MASA plus Empress Of Wednesday, August 29 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

BAD BAD HATS

plus Cumulus

PROTOJE

THE REGRETTES

Follow the Rio Theatre on Facebook & Twitter! 831.423.8209 www.riotheatre.com

plus Kid Bloom

Friday, August 31 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

PACIFIC DUB

plus The Ries Brothers

Saturday, September 1 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

RICO NASTY

plus Maliibu Miitch

Sunday, Sept. 2 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+ GOST Monday, September 3 • Ages 16+

COMMON KINGS

FALL Registration Open NOW!

Sep 6 Neck Deep/ Trophy Eyes (Ages 16+) Sep 7 Shoreline Mafia (2 shows • Ages 16+) Sep 9 Steel Panther (Ages 16+) Sep 14 Said The Sky (Ages 18+) Sep 16 Honne (Ages 16+) Sep 19 Dean Ween Group (Ages 21+) Sep 20 Dirty Heads/ Just Loud (Ages 16+) Sep 22 E-40/ Nef The Pharaoh (Ages 16+) Sep 23 Houndmouth (Ages 16+) Sep 24 Johnny Marr (Ages 21+) Sep 25 DeVotchKa (Ages 16+) Sep 27 Black Tiger Sex Machine (Ages 16+) Sep 28 The Holdup (Ages 16+) Oct 3 Seven Lions/ Jason Ross (Ages 18+) Oct 4 Reel Big Fish (Ages 16+) Oct 5 & 6 Hippie Sabotage (Ages 16+) Oct 7 The Front Bottoms (Ages 16+) Oct 8 Pigeons Playing Ping Pong (Ages 16+)

Unless otherwise noted, all shows are dance shows with limited seating.

Tickets subject to city tax & service charge by phone 877-987-6487 & online

www.catalystclub.com

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Main Street Realtors

GOURMET BAKED GOODS CO. $30,000 Santa Cruz FRANCHISE SANDWICH DELI $75,000 Seaside REGIONAL SANDWICH DELI $75,000 Carmel

ICONIC BAKERY & COFFEE SHOP $425,000 Carmel ESTABLISHED RESTAURANT $499,500 Santa Cruz

DATTA KHALSA,CABB Cal DRE#01161050 831.818.0181

datta@mainstrealtors.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Thursday, August 30 Ages 16+ Thursday, August 30 • In the Atrium • Ages 16+

Upcoming Shows

AUG 31 Conversation about Elections SEP 08 International Ocean Film Tour SEP 12 Dave Mason & Steve Cropper SEP 15 Herb Alpert and Lani Hall SEP 21 Banff Mountain Film Festival SEP 22 The Head and the Heart SEP 26 Al Di Meola OCT 03 Chick Corea OCT 05-06 Santa Cruz Surf Film Festival OCT 08 Jarvis Cocker OCT 09 The Simon & Garfunkel Story OCT 12 Basia OCT 13 Get The Led Out OCT 14 Popovich Comedy Pet OCT 16 Vicente Amigo OCT 19 Lee Scratch Perry OCT 20 Simrit Live in Concert OCT 22 Ty Segall (Solo) OCT 26 Jesse Colin Young Band OCT 27 Lecture: Henry Rollins NOV 08 Todd Rundgren NOV 10 Estas Tonne NOV 11 Mountainfilm on Tour DEC 09 Mariachi Reyna

49


FILM

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMEBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

DOWNRIGHT PUZZLING Kelly Macdonald has a growing obsession in ‘Puzzle.’

50

Jigsawed Love story and family drama are pieced together unevenly in ‘Puzzle’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

t’s easy to imagine people leaving Puzzle saying, “That’s what my mother’s life was like.” That’s why it’s resistible. It takes place now, but it’s like the realm our mothers lived in, as if nothing had changed in decades. Here’s a story of a married woman’s affair, and the dynamics between her, her husband Louie (David Denman) and her sons—the way the family circle is observed is absolutely pre-sitcom. Puzzle’s put-upon Connecticut homemaker Mata, called Agnes, tells us she has no sense of humor, none, never had it, never will, but that doesn’t mean that the world around her will have gone humorless. Agnes is played by

the Scottish actress Kelly Macdonald with an unplaceable accent (she’s revealed to be Hungarian). She practically lives in Catholic purdah, chained to the duties of taking care of the house, the overweight, snoring Louie and the grown-up sons. At the beginning Agnes is the subject of a sad birthday party where the men swill beer and belch. She has to make her own cake and light her own candles, and sweep up on her hands and knees when her clumsy spouse breaks one of her favorite dishes. Piecing the broken plate together, as well as the birthday gift of a jigsaw puzzle, triggers something— she finds a flair for doing puzzles.

She encounters, via a Manhattan puzzle store, Robert (Irrfan Khan), an independently wealthy competitive jigsaw player. She lies about her trips to New York City to train for a contest; the lies are at first innocent and later on, not so much. In the background is family drama. Louie and Agnes’ eldest son Ziggy (Bubba Weiler) doesn’t want to work for the family auto body shop. He’d prefer the unmanly (according to Louie) profession of chef. Wouldn’t Louie have heard of Gordon Ramsay? Macdonald is good in the kind of part Edie Falco could have knocked home. She’s not a mouse, displaying a certain flash in her dark eyes,

along with moments of grit. Producer turned director Marc Turtletaub does a few things to place these characters in our time, referencing iPhones and son Gabe’s vegetarian girlfriend. But this movie is about a lost world, with the actors laboring to make it real in a plot that lays it on too thick. It’s distracting to try to figure out why the son who loves cooking couldn’t bother to light up his mother’s birthday cake. That Puzzle is a remake of a 2009 Argentinian movie might explain it— maybe it’s still this bad in Argentina? PUZZLE Directed by Marc Turtletaub. Starring Kelly Macdonald, David Denman and Irrfan Khan. R; 102 Mins.


MOVIE TIMES

August 29-September 4

All times are PM unless otherwise noted.

DEL MAR THEATRE

831.359.4447

CHRISTOPHER ROBIN Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30 2, 4:30, 7:15, 9:30 BLACKKKLANSMAN Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30 1, 4, 7, 9:50; Fri 8/31, Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3, Tue 9/4 12:50, 3:50,

7, 9:50 PAPILLON Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30 1:15, 4:15, 7:10, 9:55; Fri 8/31, Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 1:10, 4, 7:10, 9:55; Tue

9/4 1:10, 4, 9:55

WE DELIVER!!

SEARCHING Fri 8/31 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 noon, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40; Tue 9/4

2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40

NICKELODEON

831.359.4523

THE DOCTOR FROM INDIA Wed 8/29 7 OPERATION FINALE Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30, Fri 8/31 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:35; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 11, 1:40, 4:20,

7, 9:35; Tue 9/4 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:35 EIGHTH GRADE Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30 2:20, 4:40, 7:10, 9:30; Fri 8/31 2:20, 4:40, 7:10; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3

noon, 2:20, 4:40, 7:10; Tue 9/4 2:20, 4:40, 7:10

• CHAIN SAWS • GENERATORS • GARDEN TOOLS

• LOG SPLITTERS • FORKLIFTS • BACKHOES

• TRUCKS • TRAILERS & MORE!

www.AToolShed.com 1-800-A-TOOL-SHED

We Pay The Sales Tax On Rentals!

Santa Cruz

Watsonville

831.477.7133

831-722-0334

3700 Soquel Ave

285 W Beach St.

PUZZLE Fri 8/31 2:10, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 11:50, 2:10, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40; Tue 9/4 2:10,

4:50, 7:20, 9:40 JULIET, NAKED Fri 8/31 2:30, 5, 7:30, 9:45; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 12:10, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 9:45; Tue 9/4 2:30,

5, 7:30, 9:45

GREEN VALLEY CINEMA 9

831.761.8200

MILE 22 Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30 2, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45

LABOR DAY

CHRISTOPHER ROBIN Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30 SLENDER MAN Wed 8/29 2, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45; Thu 8/30 2, 4:45; Fri 8/31, Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3, Tue 9/4

7:30, 10 HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3: SUMMER VACATION Wed 8/29 1:15, 3:45, 6:30, 9; Thu 8/30, Fri 8/31 1:15, 3:45; Sat

9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 11, 1:15, 3:45; Tue 9/4 1:15, 3:45 AXL Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30, Fri 8/31 12:55, 3:05, 5:15, 7:30, 9:45; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 10:45, 12:55, 3:05,

5:15, 7:30, 9:45; Tue 9/4 12:55, 3:05, 5:15, 7:30, 9:45 THE HAPPYTIME MURDERS Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30, Fri 8/31 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:45, 10; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3

11, 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:45, 10; Tue 9/4 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:45, 10 ALPHA Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30, Fri 8/31 1:45, 4:15, 7, 9:30; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 11:15, 1:45, 4:15, 7, 9:30; Tue

SALE

25 -75% OFF ENTIRE STORE! ENDS 9/5/18

Bohemian Boutique has been leading the trend on the Complete Bohemian look for the last six years in Carmel. Now we have brought the trend to Santa Cruz.

9/4 1:45, 4:15, 7, 9:30 4:20, 7:10, 10; Tue 9/4 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 10

Bohemian Boutique • 1306 PACIFIC AVE, SC • 831-316-5154 • Next to Marini’s

THE MEG Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30, Fri 8/31 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 10:45, 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45; TUE 9/4 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45 YA VEREMOS Thu 8/30 7, 9:15; Fri 8/31 2, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 11:30, 2, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45;

Tue 9/4 2, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 KIN Thu 8/30 7, 9:30; Fri 8/31 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 11, 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30; Tue

9/4 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30 INCREDIBLES 2 Fri 8/31, Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3, Tue 9/4 12:50, 3:45 JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOM Fri 8/31, Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3, Tue 9/4 6:40, 9:35

CINELUX SCOTTS VALLEY CINEMA

831.438.3260

Call theater for showtimes.

CINELUX 41ST AVENUE CINEMA 831.479.3504 Call theater for showtimes.

REGAL SANTA CRUZ 9

SEPTEMBER 4th/5th 6:30PM

844.462.7342

Call theater for showtimes.

REGAL RIVERFRONT STADIUM 2 Call theater for showtimes.

THE DEL MAR THEATRE

EXCLUSIVE 2 DAY SCREENING 844.462.7342

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

CRAZY RICH ASIANS Wed 8/29, Thu 8/30, Fri 8/31 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 10; Sat 9/1, Sun 9/2, Mon 9/3 10:40, 1:30,

51


FILM NEW RELEASES

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

JULIET, NAKED If you’re familiar with Nick Hornsby tales like High Fidelity and About a Boy, you know the female lead is usually stuck with some narcissistic jackass man-boy. But not in Juliet, Naked. This time, female lead Rose Byrne has two narcissistic jackass man-boys to choose from! One is her music nerd boyfriend (played by Chris O’Dowd) and the other is the culty singer-songwriter (played by Ethan Hawke) that her boyfriend is obsessed with. What’s that you say—this bizarre love triangle is sure to lead to whimsical romantic comedy? Ah, you have seen a Nick Hornsby adaptation before! Directed by Jesse Peretz. (R) 105 minutes. (SP)

52

KIN Who’s ready for this new wave of science fiction films that use their fantastical elements as a hook to draw you deeper into complex stories about real-world drama? This is actually one of the oldest tricks in the sci-fi playbook, but it’s experiencing a Renaissance right now. These are the kinds of stories that make you go, “Wait, is this really science fiction? It seems more like (fill in appropriate other genre here”—and then go on to prove that they’re both. Sorry to Bother You was this year’s best example, but Kin may be an interesting one, too. It’s based on the well-made short film Bag Man, in which a troubled black kid takes a mysterious trip out of the city. When he gets there, we learn he’s come to test out a weapon of obviously alien origin that he’s somehow found. He gets a chance to do so in an unexpected way when he comes across a mob hit in progress. Kin attempts to answer the questions raised by the short film—how did he find that thing, anyway, and who did it belong to, and do they want it back?— while fleshing out the crime and family drama that surrounds the main character. Directed by Jonathan Baker and Josh Baker. Starring Jack Reynor, Zoe Kravitz, Dennis Quaid and James Franco. (PG-13) 102 minutes. (SP)

OPERATION FINALE It’s been almost 15 years since Ben Kingsley really got to chew his way through a bad-guy role as only he can. He was an absolutely terrifying gangster in Sexy Beast, but this time he goes

straight to the heart of evil playing Albert Eichmann in this Nazihunting drama based on the true story of the Israeli spies who tracked the notorious SS officer down in Argentina. Directed by Chris Weitz. Co-starring Oscar Isaac, Melanie Laurent and Nick Kroll. (PG-13) (SP) SEARCHING Since Crazy Rich Asians is the “surprise” hit of the summer (really Hollywood, you thought people wouldn’t go to that movie because it had an Asian cast?), it seems like as good a time as any to roll out the first mainstream thriller made in this country starring an AsianAmerican actor. John Chu plays a father whose 16-year-old girl goes missing, leading him to try to use a technological trail to find her. Directed by Aneesh Chaganty. Costarring Debra Messing and Sean O’Bryan. (PG-13) 102 minutes. (SP) CONTINUING EVENT: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES Film buffs are invited Wednesday nights at 7 p.m. to downtown Santa Cruz, where each week the group discusses a different current release. For location and discussion topic, go to https://groups.google. com/group/LTATM.

NOW PLAYING A.X.L. Writer-director Oliver Daly originally made this family-friendly sci-fi story about a bike-racing boy who befriends a cutting-edge military dog robot as a seven-minute short film funded through Kickstarter. I watched it—it doesn’t make a whole lot of sense narratively, but the chrome dog looks really damn cool. Plus, there are some sweet dirt-biking scenes—which, let’s face it, is all any Hollywood exec really wants in a movie. Add in the fact that it’s basically E.T. without the Reese’s Pieces and space travel, and I can see why A.X.L. got a green light. Starring Thomas Jane, Becky G and Alex Neustaedter. (PG) 100 minutes. (SP) BLACKKKLANSMAN Remember how good Spike Lee’s last two movies Da Sweet Blood of Jesus and Chi-raq were? Of course you don’t, because you didn’t see them, and

neither did anybody else. It’s safe to say that Lee hasn’t been relevant since 2006, when he delivered both the Hurricane Katrina documentary When the Levees Broke and the twisty heist thriller Inside Man in the same year. But BlacKkKlansman, based on the story of a real-life African-American police detective who infiltrated David Duke’s Ku Klux Klan in 1979, screams “comeback film” in every way. From its cultural relevance in the age of governmentsupported white supremacists to the way it plays with questions of racial identity (as in Sorry to Bother You, an African-American protagonist has to find his “white voice”) to its showcase for his trademark mix of brutal truth and humor, this is the kind of joint Lee was born to make. Starring John David Washington, Adam Driver and Topher Grace. (R) 135 minutes. (SP) BLINDSPOTTING Writers and costars Rafael Casal and Daveed Diggs (of Hamilton fame) deliver their “love letter to Oakland” after 10 years of development. They play two former childhood friends (not a stretch, since they actually were) trying to get through the last three days of a year-long probation being served by Collin (Diggs). But his reckless friend Miles (Casal) may be the biggest threat to his freedom. Directed by Carlos Lopez Estrada. Co-starring Janina Gavankar and Wayne Knight. (R) 95 minutes. (SP) CHRISTOPHER ROBIN There are all these complicated tests out there now that are supposed to tell you if your partner is secretly a psychopath, but I have a super easy one. One morning, just casually say, “Hey, are you interested in seeing this adorable and charming new liveaction film in which Ewan MCGregor plays an adult Christopher Robin who has lost touch with his sense of childish fun, but then rediscovers Pooh, Piglet, Tigger and all of his other friends in the 100 Acre Wood?” If he or she says no, get out of the house now! Run for your life! That person is definitely going to murder you for the insurance money. Directed by Marc Forster. Co-starring Hayley Atwell and Bronte Carmichael. (PG) 104 minutes. (SP)

CRAZY RICH ASIANS Ugh, you gotta feel for the multiracial actors cast in this rom-com based on the book by Kevin Kwan. This is the first big-budget Hollywood film to feature a predominantly Asian cast in 25 years, but for some people, they’re just not Asian enough. The criticism over the casting for this movie— about a Chinese-American professor who accompanies her boyfriend to Singapore and discovers that his family is not only crazy rich, but just plain crazy—got so ridiculous that at one point a Korean American actress who had been turned down for a role complained in an interviews about the “loopholes” in ethnically conscious casting. The problem: she herself had played the Chinese character Mulan in the TV series Once Upon a Time. Directed by Jon M. Chu. Starring Constance Wu, Henry Golding, Ken Jeong and Michelle Yeoh. (PG-13) 104 minutes. (SP) THE HAPPYTIME MURDERS A lot of people seem up in arms about the idea behind this movie: putting Muppets in kid-unfriendly settings. Sesame Street even sued the producers! So, uh, they never heard of Avenue Q? Or Peter Jackson’s truly disturbed Meet the Feebles? C’mon, people, Muppets doing inappropriate things is a creepy but hilarious thing to see! Anyway, for the most part this black comedy/ crime thriller about a murder in a world where puppets co-exist with people (but are treated like second-class citizens) is really more of a dirtier riff on Who Framed Roger Rabbit? Directed by Brian Henson. Starring Melissa McCarthy, Maya Rudolph and Joel McHale. (R) 91 minutes. (SP) THE MEG Yes, we all wish this horror movie was about a giant Meg Ryan chasing people around, but you’ll have to settle for a 70-foot prehistoric shark stalking Jason Statham. Directed by Jon Turteltaub. Co-starring Ruby Rose, Rainn Wilson and Bingbing Li. (PG-13) 113 minutes. (SP) MILE 22 “You gonna keep coming at me until you kill us all? Is that the game today? That’s a weird game, but OK, I’ll play.” I can tell that’s what Mark Wahlberg, as the leader of some super-secret CIA unit, is

actually saying to a terrorist in the trailer for Mile 22. But thanks to SNL, the only thing I hear whenever that ridiculous voice comes out of his face on screen is “Hey goat! I like your beard! I had a beard like that in The Perfect Storm! Did you see that movie? Say hi to your mother for me!” Then again, I would rather watch 95 minutes of Mark Wahlberg Talks to the Animals than this 10thgeneration ripoff of better action movies about crack military teams getting “the asset” from Point A to Point B. Directed by Peter Berg. Starring Wahlberg, Ronda Rousey and John Malkovich. (R) 95 minutes. (SP) MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: FALLOUT I thought I was crazy when I first noticed that the popularity of Mission: Impossible movies seem to grow the more Tom Cruise gets hurt. To put it a little more accurately, the more the movies undercut Cruise’s veneer of action-hero flawlessness, the more people flock to them. But I’m not the only person who thinks this, because the trailer for the latest one features a scene where Cruise’s character Ethan Hunt is scared to jump out a window. And it’s really funny! For some reason, Tom Cruise getting owned just never gets tired. Hell, isn’t that why we all watched Edge of Tomorrow, to see him get killed over and over again? Directed by Christopher McQuarrie. Costarring Henry Cavill, Ving Rhames and Simon Pegg. 147 minutes. (SP) PAPILLON No prison can hold Jax from Sons of Anarchy! At least that’s the idea behind casting Charlie Hunnam in the title role of this remake of the 1973 film starring Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman. It’s all based on the memoirs of Henri “Papillon” Charriere, a safecracker who escaped from the supposedly unescapable-from Devil’s Island in French Guiana. Directed by Michael Noer. Co-starring Rami Malek, Eve Hewson and Tommy Flanagan. (R) 133 minutes. (SP) PUZZLE Reviewed this issue. Starring Kelly Macdonald, David Denman and Daniel Stewart Sherman. (R) 103 minutes.


WWW .L IVE L IKE AG REEK .COM

$1 OFF

CUT OFF COUPON FOR $1 OFF FOOD OR DRINK

$1 OFF

Listen to 90.3 kazu through the KAZU Mobile App & your Smart Speaker

OFF

$1

ONE COUPON PER PERSON

The Annual

Downtown Santa Cruz Church Street between Center & Cedar Streets ADMISSION FREE

OFF

September 7, 8, AND 9, 2018

$1

FREE ADMISSION!

A U T H E N T I C C U I S I N E • S P I R I T S • L I V E M U S I C • DAN C I N G

One Dollar Off Coupon

GREEK FESTIVAL

GREEK FESTIVAL

Santa Cruz

Santa Cruz

90.3 FM

0%

10

.3

90

FM

al

sic

las

2c

hd ws

e un

z

ka

Streaming at kazu.org

re

He

d An

w No

SINCE 1992 LUNCH DINNER DAILY NEW WEEKEND BRUNCH MENU

L d I P E U T P A DIL

Student Guide magazine Publishing date Sept. 26 Reservation deadline Sept. 4

Oaxaca Tuesdays Mandolin Wednesdays Jazz Thursdays 2$ Oyster Fridays

831.457.1677 www.gabriellacafe.com @gabriellacafe

For details and to make reservations please call 831-458-1100

ILLO UCSC | CABR STUDENT GUIDE 2017-2018 SANTACRUZ.COM GOODTIMES.SC

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Thank you Santa Cruz County for Supporting 90.3 KAZU

9/14/17 12:21 PM

DP_2017_Cover.indd

1

53


&

FOOD & DRINK APPETIZER OF THE WEEK

The pretty and utterly delicious seared ahi and avocado crostini appetizer at Oswald ($7). Two of these crunchy, sensuous crostini arrive in a single order. The crimson ahi looks stunning on the chartreuse avocado. Supple, sensuous, and topped with a garlic vinaigrette. I like mine with a bone-dry Venus No. 1 martini, not necessarily dirty. But it also makes sense with a Campari and soda. While you’re at Oswald, don’t miss the exciting show of abstract paintings by Rob Blitzer, on exhibit through August.

WINE OF THE WEEK

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

RUNNETH OVER Happy Boy Farms’ booth at the Sunday farmers market in Live Oak. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

54

Market Madness Peak season at Santa Cruz farmers markets, plus ahi crostini at Oswald and cake at Iveta BY CHRISTINA WATERS

I

t’s here. The absolute peak of summer harvest, and that means that our farmers markets are loaded with the right stuff. Figs—pale Kadota and dark Mission figs—offer their suggestive shapes and interiors as breakfast foods and as partners for evening cheese platters. This is also the moment when blueberries are abundant, offering pungent tart and sweet inflections to our table at every meal. Blackberries, raspberries, even the persistent strawberry are at their peak right now. I’ve never seen a season as

good as this for nectarines and peaches. Almost every one of them that I’ve brought home from the Santa Cruz Farmers Market has been a winner. I let them ripen for a day on my windowsill—same with dry-farmed tomatoes which will be with us for another month. It was a great summer for asparagus and little butter lettuces. But now’s the time for slender green beans and the beginning of the color circus of bell peppers in late summer hues of red, orange, yellow, and of course, green. All sorts of incredible peppers are hitting the markets right about now,

including sweet banana peppers and the addictive little padrons. You need no reminder: this is one of the top spots on the globe for dry-farmed tomatoes. We have the very best at our markets, e.g. Molino Creek, Dirty Girl. So whether your neighborhood market is in Felton, Live Oak, Aptos, downtown Santa Cruz, or the Westside, get out and treat yourself to the best of late harvests during the next few weeks. And while you’re there, check out the artisanal pastries, pastured meats, and freshcaught seafoods. Fresh local salmon if you hurry!

The 2014 Gravitas from Bonny Doon Vineyard ($16). Think of it as the companion to its red sibling, A Proper Claret. This is a lovely Bordeaux-style white blend of two of my favorite grapes— Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon. A splash of Orange Muscat adds a floral perfume. Citrus, melon and some light minerals make this an exceptionally drinkable wine, as in drink it right this very minute! The light 13.5 percent alcohol is refreshing for a wine with so much gravitas. We like to sip it all by itself, very chilled, and ideally while enjoying the late summer sunset. But it goes smartly with chicken, fish and pasta. And tacos. And hummus wraps. Available at all of your favorite places, but we find it at New Leaf and Shopper’s.

PASTRY OF THE WEEK

The fresh and warm-from-theoven nectarine buttermilk cake at Iveta. We walked in last week just as the thick, creamy tea cake was being sliced. Light and tender, yet substantial, this lovely creation was barely sweet, tangy from buttermilk, and studded with cubes of ripe nectarine. Stunning for around $3 per huge slice. Maybe it’s not there everyday. But check in often just to see if you get lucky.

TASTING ROOM UPDATE

Windy Oaks Estate’s new downtown Carmel-by-the-Sea tasting room at its Lincoln and 7th location has new hours; Friday and Saturday, noon to 7 p.m.; Sunday through Thursday, noon to 6 p.m.


FOODIE FILE

&

SLINGIN’ SLICES Besides pizza , the new Catalyst Kitchen run by former head bouncer Ivan Garcia offers offbeat items like corn dogs and deep-fried oreos. PHOTO: KEANA PARKER

Catalyst Kitchen Rockers replacement promises fresher ingredients BY GEORGIA JOHNSON

D

Are you still going to have dollar slice Tuesdays? IVAN GARCIA: No. It costs too much now to do that because of all of the fresh ingredients that we use. Everything is different, it’s all made fresh. We use cleaner ingredients now and even though the price went up very slightly, it’s still cheaper than any other slice in town—other than Little Caesars. You can’t compete with that. MEREK TEJA: We’ve been trying to come up with a way to have a discounted pizza, maybe half-slices for a dollar. Dollar Tuesday was extraordinarily popular, like nonstop for hours. We didn’t make a lot of money, but people are just too poor to afford to go out and do anything in this town anymore.

Why did Rockers close? GARCIA: The owner, Paul Gerhart, just got tired of it. He’s still an owner of the Catalyst though—one of a few. TEJA: It was a separate business before, now it’s part of the Catalyst itself. I think it might make it easier for the employees; it always felt like there was a weird buffer between us when it was separate. 1011 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz.

One item up to $25 value with two or more entree orders Must present ad with order. Cannot be combined with other offers. 1 offer per table, per visit. Dine in only. See store for more details. Good through September 26, 2018.

CAPITOLA

SCOTTS VALLEY

820 Bay Ave

5600 Scotts Valley Dr.

(Across from Nob Hill Center)

831-464-9192

(Victor Square)

831-438-9260

WATSONVILLE 1441 Main St. (Target Shopping Center)

831-728-9192

Open 7 days Lunch 11:30 - 2:30 Dinner 5:00 - 9:30 Scotts Valley & Watsonville Lunch 12 - 3 (Sat & Sun Only)

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

uring the downtown Santa Cruz witching hour, Rockers Pizza Kitchen was a comforting beacon for late nighters. The megaslices filled the holes in stomachs and hearts of post-partiers; the only concern was getting enough parmesan and chili flakes to absorb the thick oil slick before it reached the flimsy paper plate. Rockers never promised gourmet-fancy pies, but it didn’t need to. Since the new Catalyst Kitchen took over, however, the menu features quality ingredients like San Marzano tomatoes and fresh basil, and a different dough recipe that drops the onion and garlic and is more reminiscent of a New York-style pizza. They did keep some Rockers souvenirs, including the industrial guillotine-like rotating oven from the ’70s, and the Angry Samoan pizza. When the Catalyst approached their head bouncer Ivan Garcia about taking over the kitchen, he said no for months. When he finally agreed, he searched YouTube for how to make a pizza, added fried food to the menu (including deep-fried oreos and twinkies) and opened the doors for business. He is joined by Merek Teja, who worked at Rockers for 12 years and now works at Catalyst Kitchen.

Free Birthday Meal

55


VINE TIME

&

VINE & DINE

圀 䤀 一 䔀   䈀 䄀 刀   ⬀   䬀 䤀 吀䌀 䠀 䔀 一 圀䤀一䔀 뜀 䘀伀伀䐀 뜀 䈀䔀䔀刀 뜀 䌀䤀䐀䔀刀

䈀攀猀琀 匀攀氀攀挀琀椀漀渀 漀昀 匀䌀 䴀漀甀渀琀愀椀渀猀 圀椀渀攀 䰀漀挀愀琀攀搀 椀渀 匀漀焀甀攀氀 嘀椀氀氀愀最攀 㐀㤀 ㄀ 匀漀焀甀攀氀 䐀爀Ⰰ 匀漀焀甀攀氀 䌀䄀 ⠀㠀㌀㄀⤀ 㐀㈀㘀ⴀ㠀㐀㘀㘀 뜀 嘀椀渀漀挀爀甀稀⸀挀漀洀

YOGA in the Vineyard Sept 16 10:30-11:45 Includes wine tasting Sign up at Eventbrite

24250 Loma Prieta Ave., Los Gatos (just 1/4 mile off Summit Road) Open Fri-Sun 11-5 408-560-9343 • wrightsstation.com

SIERRA GROWN Bottle Jack’s Viognier 2017—made from grapes grown in the Sierra Foothills—is easy on the palate and dangerously refreshing.

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL WINEMAKERS!

Bottle Jack

Viognier 2017 is one of the best local bottles around BY JOSIE COWDEN

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

I

56

Lunch

11:30am to 2:00pm Wednesday, Thursday, Friday

Cocktail Hour

4:30pm to 6:00pm Tuesday through Saturday $7-9 Bar Bites | $6 Wine $8 Cocktails | $8 Whiskey w/ Draft Beer

OswaldRestaurant.com 121 Soquel Avenue at Front Street, Santa Cruz 831.423.7427 CLOSED MONDAY

set out some weeks ago to Bottle Jack’s tasting room on La Madrona Drive in Santa Cruz to try some of winemaker John Ritchey’s wines, especially his impressive 2017 Sierra Foothills Viognier which I had tasted at Cantine Winepub in Aptos. But I ended up with a bottle of his double-gold award-winning 2014 Syrah-Grenache and wrote about that instead. So now I’m finally writing about Ritchey’s Viognier ($25), which I found at his other tasting room on Ingalls Street, in a shared space with Silver Mountain Vineyards. Aromas of tropical fruit and honeysuckle with flavors of pineapple, pear and citrus add enormous pizzazz to this delicious white wine—one of the best local Viogniers around. “It’s a mediumbodied white that is soft on the palate yet dangerously refreshing,” says Ritchey. All three places mentioned have this heavenly honeysuckle nectar, and the two tasting rooms carry all of the other Bottle Jack wines as well. 1088 La Madrona Drive, Santa Cruz, and 402 Ingalls St., Suite 29, Santa Cruz. 227-2288, bottlejackwines.com.

AN EVENING WITH FRIENDS

Friends of Hospice is putting on a brand-new event at a splendid private estate in the hills of Corralitos. Many of you have been touched by the caring support given by Hospice of Santa Cruz County, and this is a benefit for them. The cost is only $75 per person and includes abundant appetizers, libations, live and silent auctions, and dancing under the stars to music by Extra Large. Wine has been donated by Soquel Vineyards, Muccigrosso, Bottle Jack, Pelican Ranch, Alfaro, Equinox, Bartolo, Burrell School, Wrights Station, and others. The event is from 4-9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22. Visit hospicesantacruz.org for tickets and information.

CHAMINADE DINNER

The last of this year’s al fresco dinners will be Friday, Sept. 7, with Alfaro Family Vineyards & Winery as the featured winery. Starting with passed hors d’oeuvres at 6 p.m. followed by dinner at 6:30 p.m. the event comes with lots of wine and a panoramic view of the Monterey Bay. Visit Chaminade.com for reservations.


Lively and Local

CAFÉ CRUZ APPAREL- GET YOURS NOW! HOODIES, T-SHIRTS AND TANKS

2621 41ST AVE SOQUEL RESERVATIONS WELCOME 831-476-3801

Fish Sustainably Wild Caught in American Waters High Concentrations of EPA & DHA with science-driven formulas

HANDCRAFTED FOOD, BEER & WINE LUNCH & DINNER

Bot h Loc a t i ons Open Ever y Day Brunch Saturday and Sunday 10:30-2:30 East End Only

WEST END TAP & KITCHEN EAST END GASTROPUB weste n dtap.com • S a n t a

ea ste n d p u b.co m • Ca p i to l a

The HERB ROOM 1130 Mission St. Santa Cruz 831.429.8108

FELTON NUTRITION 6239 Graham Hill Felton 831.335.5633

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

SALE All WILEY’S 30% OFF msrp

57


H RISA’S STARS BY RISA D’ANGELES island

grill

BUILD, BURN, LEAVE NO TRACE

Outdoor Seating

Esoteric Astrology as news for week of Aug. 29, 2018 We are in the time of orderly, discerning and disciplined Virgo, sign of new and higher states of awareness. As always, Virgo is just in time for Burning Man (Aug. 26-Sept. 3), the radical arts community/ temporary metropolis in the playas of Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. A vivid, flamboyant, fabulous city devoted to art and community. Burning Man, with its ethos (spirit) of freedom and culture organically begun in 1986 in San Francisco, is a field of survival (107 degrees) amidst creation—together building the new world aura/era. It’s irrational, primal, celebratory; a procession of humanity, days and nights of gritty dust under Sun and stars, individually in communion. It’s build, burn, dismantle, leave no trace. It’s shared community with rules, laws, ordinances, precepts and principles.

ARIES Mar21–Apr20

Enjoy the long weekend at Hulas! (831)

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

TAURUS Apr21–May21 Hang faceted lead crystals on a red string in all windows open to the Sun, a practical approach to gathering and dispersing the Sun’s light. Crystal-refracted prisms radiate rainbows everywhere. The colors are the Ray colors stimulating creativity, beauty and balance. Hang crystals in halls, darkened corridors and corners where energy is obstructed and unmoving. Crystals in sunlight restore health and well-being, which you need.

GEMINI May 22–June 20

426.HULA

221 Cathcart Street • Downtown Santa Cruz

58

It will be important to focus on details, to be organized and complete things. At day’s end, walk through your environments. Observe what’s out of place, astray, afoot, and generally lying about. Place everything where it belongs. Aries leaves a trail of things undone. This is natural for Aries, moving quickly, initiating each next phase, forgetting the previous one. Try this month to complete tasks as a meditation. A sense of accomplishment emerges.

www.hulastiki.com

Gemini and Pisces are not of this world. They never descend into physical matter, living instead in the etheric—the world of non-physical form where matter is first conceived in patterns of light. The information Geminis gather and disperse provides for others a new template of thinking resulting in new actions. Realize how important your communication is. Be aware of what you say and why, its veracity and intention. Always speak with loving kindness.

CANCER Jun21–Jul20

Delicious Thai Cuisine Two Locations to Serve You— By the Mountains or By the Sea

2017

2017

It’s important to be aware of spiritual impressions and perceptions. They come from the Soul and are directions for (y)our life. You are keenly sensitive, as is Leo, to higher unseen worlds, feelings, moods and sensations. Other signs are sensitive in different ways. Hiding under your shell does not decrease sensitivity. It’s important to capture the moments when such direction occurs. Many rely on your observations.

LE0 Jul21–Aug22 Leo is the sign of creative self-identity. Leo says, “Look at the work I’ve done. Here is my creation. I am this creative self!” Do you have what you need in life? It’s important to state you r values and needs. It’s important to see the self as creative. Our imagination and visualizations express our creative selves. Give unselfishly to those appreciating you and to those in need. Use your kind heart in all matters. You’re the heart of the Sun.

VIRGO Aug23–Sep22

Sawasdee Soquel 5050 Soquel Drive 831.462.5051 Sawasdee by the Sea 101 Main Street 831.466.9009

SAWASDEESOQUEL.COM Catering and to-go orders available

It’s important to know how your physical presence affects others. You pay attention to details, are ordered and organized. Excellent traits. Many are incapable of these gifts. It’s good to adapt to those less able (than you). Patiently approach the world with such purpose. Do you seek perfection in all things? It’s good to understand everyone is imperfect and perfect at the same time. They are one.

LIBRA Sep23–Oct22 What atmosphere (architecture, behaviors) are you

Burning Man’s guiding 10 principles could define each of us, were we courageous enough to live by them: inclusion; gift-giving (unconditional); no commercialization; relying on inner resources; selfexpression; communal effort; community values; creative cooperation/ collaboration; civic responsibility for public welfare; respecting laws; respect of environment, leaving it in a better state; participation, open heart, beingness through doingness; immediacy—relating to the moment, to those around us, contact with the natural world, no barriers. Burning Man is an ongoing work of performance art, a future creation. This year’s theme: I, Robot. sensitive to? An atmosphere of being challenged, of leadership, separation, boundaries, of music and art, of kindness, of noting details, of meditation, of beauty? Perhaps all of these. Attempt to define which belong to you. Recognizing these tells us what impressions, moods and tones we create around us. It’s time to bring into manifestation a new self only sensed or thought about.

SCORPIO Oct23–Nov21 Often, deep within, you realize you want to be of service. You want to speak with goodwill and kindness, extending safety and care through how you communicate. You want to improve the world, discover and share systems for the humanity’s good. You want to link groups doing good together. You wonder how you, hermit-like, would fit into such acts of service. You assess your gifts. The New Group of World Servers is always open to those who seek to serve. It’s invisible, like you.

SAGITTARIUS Nov22–Dec20 I came across a quote in the book You Are a Cosmic Traveler (untranslated) by Brazilian author and spiritual teacher Trigueirinho, founder of the Figueira monastery in Brazil. The quote concerns your world service (which you are or are not aware of.) “All that you do, your entire life, is of service. Your service is invaluable. You give what others cannot. The service you give is not yours alone. It belongs to the cosmos. You are the cosmic voyager.” Sag is always on a journey, seeking to learn, to hear music, and to serve. I wanted to give you a new self-identification.

CAPRICORN Dec21–Jan20 You are the ultimate earth sign. Earth is a Mystery school, one of many in the cosmos. Earth school prepares us to understand how to live in form and matter. As spirits encased in matter, often we don’t know how to behave. Having forgotten our spiritual identity, we long for it. Tending gardens, working and living in nature, helps reconnect with our innate spiritual lineage. A most important profession is the gardener, a humble work. Great teachers work quietly in gardens, as nature is the body of God.

AQUARIUS Jan21–Feb18 Perhaps in your daily life you’re encountering other people’s problems, and these impact your emotional and mental field. It’s important not to shy away from these people. Instead, help them overcome and release their suffering. You have a purpose at this time while encountering intense situations. Radiate the Light of the Soul outward to these people and situations. It dissipates intensity and suffering. Others feel your service and compassion. You are a help to those in distress.

PISCES Feb19–Mar20 You’re not to give up your visions or goals, even though it seems a long time to manifest. Incorporate ideas from other sources, adding to the facet of the diamond that is your vision of community and village that serves, teaches and heals humanity. In the meantime, know that what is presently around you is your present community (for now). Be fully present to it. Be for those around you a humble and kind companion. Know that we are all in training to be Hierarchy. Training amidst the burning grounds.


Classifieds classifieds PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001136 The following Individual is doing business as PLUS 1 CATERING. 155 MADRONA ROAD, BOULDER CREEK, CA 95006. County of Santa Cruz. ERIC ADEMA. 155 MADRONA ROAD, BOULDER CREEK, CA 95006. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ERIC ADEMA. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/13/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 13, 2018. Aug 8, 15, 22, & 29.

NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001125 The following Individual is doing business as MODULAR CONSULTANTS. 55 HOLLINS DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. JASON ANDERLITE. 55 HOLLINS DRIVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA, 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: JASON ANDERLITE. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 11, 2018. Aug. 15, 22, 29, & Sept. 5.

MACKAY SPOSITO. 1325 SE TECH CENTER DRIVE SUITE 140, VANCOUVER, WA 98683. Washington state. MACKAY & SPOSITO, INC. 1325 SE TECH CENTER DRIVE SUITE 140, VANCOUVER, WA 98683. Al# 3679922. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: MACKAY & SPOSITO, INC. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on Not applicable. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July. 30, 2018. Aug. 15, 22, 29, & Sept. 5.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001177 The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as STAGIAIRE WINE. 1034 LIVE OAK AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. MAYEAUX GRAPE CLINIC, LLC. 1034 LIVE OAK AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. AI# 20110183. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: BRENT MAYEAUX. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on Not applicable. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on July 23, 2018. Aug 8, 15, 22, & 27.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001244 The following Individual is doing business as PENNE MAYER. P.O.BOX, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95061. County of Santa Cruz. PHUONG MAYER. P.O.BOX, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95061. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: PHUONG MAYER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 6, 2018. Aug. 15, 22, 29, & Sept 5.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001259 The following Corporation is doing business as SANTA CRUZ NUTRITIONALS. 2200 DELAWARE AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. HARMONY FOODS CORPORATION. 2200 DELAWARE AVE, SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. Al# 2080535. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: HARMONY FOODS CORPORATION. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/10/2006. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 6, 2018. Aug. 22, 29, Sept 5, & 12.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001315 The following Limited Liability Company is doing business as SALT BOUTIQUE. 311 LAURENT ST., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. SALT BOUTIQUE LLC. 203 NORTHROP PL., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060 AI# 22710001. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company signed: YESENIA CARDONA MULLER. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 16, 2018. Aug 22, 29, Sept. 5, & 12.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001317 The following Individual is doing business as TERESA'S ITALY. 1092 PINE FLAT RD., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060. County of Santa Cruz. TERESA PANE MOHAMED. 1092 PINE FLAT RD., SANTA CRUZ CA 95060. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: TERESA PANE MOHAMED. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 8/16/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 15, 2018. Aug. 22, 29, Sept 5, & 12.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001238 The following Corporation is doing business as SEABRIGHT DENTAL STUDIO. 1016 SOQUEL AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. County of Santa Cruz. ALANA K. THOMPSON DDS, INC. 1016 SOQUEL AVE., SANTA CRUZ, CA 95062. Al# 4176662. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: ALANA THOMPSON DDS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on August 3, 2018. Aug. 29, Sept. 5, 12, & 19.

name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING October 5, 2018 at 8:30 am, in Department 4 located at Superior Court of California, 701 Ocean Street. Santa Cruz, CA 95060. A copy of this order to show cause must be published in the Good Times, a newspaper of general circulation printed in Santa Cruz County, California, once a week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: Aug. 21,

2018. Paul P. Burdick, Judge of the Superior Court. Aug 29, Sept. 5, 12, & 19.

real estate

HAVE A LIFE… Your Way!

Kathleen M. Pouls LAc,CMP ~ Acupuncture ~ ~ Refined Bodywork ~ ~ Combination Treatments ~

A Family Practice, Pre/Postnatal Care

Job & Career Transition Coach careers@havealife.com

www.havealife.com (831)476-4078

CAREER CONSULTATION David Thiermann

Career Services

• Find a new career! • Get a better salary! • Find passion in your work! • Successful career change! • Start up a business!

John Axel Hansen, MA, JCTC Career Counselor

CHANGE OF NAME IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CRUZ. PETITION OF CLAUDIA MONASTERIO CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO.18CV02385. THE COURT FINDS that the petitioner CLAUDIA MONASTERIO has filed a Petition for Change of Name with the clerk of this court for an order changing the applicants name from: CLAUDIA MONASTERIO to: CLAUDIA MONASTERIO MONJARAS. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of

Self-assessment Explore career options n Determine your focus n Market yourself n Career management n n

831.475.8885 • 3335 Mission Drive (Doctors Plaza by Dominican Hospital) Serving Santa Cruz since 1984 Insurance accepted kpoulshealingarts.com

Since 1987

No charge for Initial Consultation santacruzuniversity.com 831.435.9321

• Antique Restorations • Furniture Design & Repair

• Wooden Boat Works • Musical Instruments • Unique Projects

831-251-0377 isaiahwilliams13@gmail.com mastercraftsman.webs.com

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 5, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001206 The following Corporation is doing business as

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001325 The following Individual is doing business as MINERAL NECTAR. 7119 SOMERSET CT., APTOS, CA 95003. County of Santa Cruz. ILANA SHEATS. 7119 SOMERSET CT., APTOS, CA 95003. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ILANA SHEATS. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above is 7/18/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 17, 2018. Aug. 22, 29, Sept. 5, & 12.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001326 The following Individual is doing business as EULOVARR GLASS. 5560 LINCOLN WAY, FELTON, CA 95018. County of Santa Cruz. ROBERT FREDERICK BARNETT. 5560 LINCOLN WAY, FELTON, CA 95018. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: ROBERT FREDERICK BARNETT. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 6/6/2018. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 17, 2018. Aug. 29, Sept. 5, 12, & 19.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 2018-0001365 The following Individual is doing business as SANTA CRUZ DRAMA ACADEMY. 3501 HILLTOP ROAD, SOQUEL, CA 95073. County of Santa Cruz. RACHEL ANN NIGH. 3501 HILLTOP ROAD, SOQUEL, CA 95073. This business is conducted by an Individual signed: RACHEL ANN NIGH. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on NOT APPLICABLE. This statement was filed with Gail L. Pellerin, County Clerk of Santa Cruz County, on Aug. 24, 2018. Aug 29, Sept. 5, 12, & 19.

59


PHONE: 831.458.1100 | EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@GOODTIMES.SC | DISPLAY DEADLINE: THURSDAY 2PM | LINE AD DEADLINE: FRIDAY 2PM

GARDENING

“Absolutely everything hAving to do with reAl estAte, shAnne does it At 1,000%.” -Client Testimonial, 7/27/18

Tom Brezsny’s

REAL ESTATE OF MIND

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

Provoking thought since 1990

60

I keep experiencing a sense of déjà vu lately. Four or five times a week, I find myself in the middle of the same conversation with completely different people! Coincidence? I think not. The scenario goes something like this: A call comes in. The person is thinking about selling their home. They wonder whether I can come over to look at their place and give them some advice about what they may need to do to prepare it for sale. They aren’t ready to sell yet. They’re just trying to get a better sense of what the big picture of real estate looks like. Where the market is and how much they might be able to sell for. All of this is great, of course. It’s what I do. Over the years I’ve had hundreds of these calls. And yet, when I get there, what’s supposed to be a simple Q&A about real estate often turns into a much broader discussion about big life issues that are bouncing around in their heads. The existential dilemmas they are feeling. All the what-ifs about the future. The litany of concerns that come with aging. Their natural resistance to change. And, just how hard it is to define what quality of life really looks like. This is the conversation that’s making the rounds out there. It’s a collective expression of a huge, silent dreaming that’s welling up from deep within the culture. The caller is usually somewhere between 55 and 75 years old. They often have aging parents and/or kids close to graduating college. They are wrestling with their own retirement issues. When to quit working? How to “movedown” and simplify life. Get rid of all the useless stuff in the garage. Maybe have fewer stairs and less property maintenance. Along with all of the above comes a list complicated questions about things like: financial planning, family trusts, capital gains and property tax transfers, Medicare, Social Security and long-term care insurance. Ultimately, all of these things relate back to home and the role it plays in our lives. For most of us, a home is the single biggest asset we’ll ever own. At the same time, it’s the physical, emotional and spiritual centering place for our lives - our refuge of safety, privacy, comfort and security. Home transitions are almost always a part of larger life transitions. Sound familiar? Today 10,000 people in the US will turn 65. More than a few of them live in Santa Cruz. Over the next five years, that number of is going to increase dramatically as the population continues to age. And that means the conversation is going to continue….

Tom Brezsny

Realtor® DRE#01063297

831-818-1431 getreal@serenogroup.com PA I D A D V E R T O R I A L

SHANNE Carvalho

In Portuguese, Carvalho means “Oak”. The mighty oak tree is an apt metaphor for Shanne Carvalho, a realtor® who has spent his career developing a reputation for hard work, dedication, integrity, and fair play with his colleagues and clients. Whether you are a buyer or seller, Shanne brings a wellspring of experience not only as a realtor®, but previously as a general contractor and mortgage broker.

REALTOR®

(831) 588-2374 shanne@serenogroup.com www.shannecarvalho.com CalBRE# 01339231

Happy Gardens Rototilling (831) 234-4341

HELP WANTED Direct Care Career Opportunities Positions available working with intellectually challenged/developmentally disabled adults in both residential and day care. No Experience necessary. We train! FT and PT positions. Flexible scheduling. $11-14 per hour with hiring bonus. Apply M – F (831) 475-0888 Activity Director Exciting work with intellectually challenged/developmentally disabled adults. FT. Hours arranged. Starting salary 50K per year. Apply M-F (831) 475-0888 West Side Boutique is hiring! Retail PT Positons, $12hr Send resume to: saltboutiquesantacruz@.gmail.com Scopazzi’s Restaurant in Boulder Creek has immediate opening for FT lunch cook & dinner cook (831)338-6441

MASSAGE

Illustration by Goretti Carvalho.

Call Curt feel good now! Muscles relaxed and moods adjusted. De-stress in my warm safe hands. Days and Evenings, CMP. Please call (831) 419-1646 or email scruzcurt@gmail. com. Delightful body to body massages! Swedish, deep tissue and soft touch included. Amy 831.462.1033 A*wonderful*Touch. Relaxing, Therapeutic, Light to Deep Swedish Massage for Men. Peaceful environment. 14 yrs. Exp. Days/Early PM. Jeff (831) 332-8594.

PERSONALS Missing parents/grandparents in your life? Want to explore new connections? Email Linda or Patrick: friendship.kinship@gmail. com. Call 209-261-7707

Place your legal notice in Good Times

Fictitious Business Name $60 • Abandon Fictitious Business Name $60 Order to Show Cause (Name Change) $90


Cosmo D’s Outrageous Edibles are the synergistic result of one man’s love for cannabis and 25 years as an Executive Chef.

TM

Lic.CDPH-T00000699 Curbstone Exchange • Treehouse • Santa Cruz Naturals • Santa Cruz Mountain Herbs

SAVE THE DATE! OCTOBER 10-17

READ US ONLINE AT

GoodTimes.SC

SANTACRUZRESTAURANTWEEK.COM

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

SANTA CRUZ RESTAURANT WEEK 2018

61


AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 | GOODTIMES.SC | SANTACRUZ.COM

62

LABOR DAY SALE!

GREAT DEALS ALL WEEKEND • FREE APTOS ST. BBQ VOUCHER WITH $150 PURCHASE (PRE TAX) 25% OFF ON SANTA CRUZ NATURALS TM 8THS FREE SANTA CRUZ NATURALS HAT & LIGHTER WITH $200 PURCHASE (PRE TAX) 11am-2pm ON SATURDAY FIRST 40 PEOPLE BOGO HEAVY HITTERS CARTRIDGE!

9077 Soquel Drive, Aptos CA • SantaCruzCannabis.com • 831.688.7266


Cannabis for you. Meet Dave • 66 years old • Grandfather to eight • Retired Attorney • Golfs 4x per week • Cannabis user “I worked my entire career to be able to enjoy my retirement as I please. I will not be kept down with age related aches and pains. Micro-dosing CBD has allowed me the freedom from these worries and I even lowered my golf handicap.”

See our complete menu kindpeoples.com

3600 Soquel Ave Santa Cruz 8am – 10pm

140 Dubois St, Suite C Santa Cruz 10am – 7pm

ID Required | Recreation 21+ | Medical 18+

Licenses: A12-17-0000002-TEMP • A10-17-0000002-TEMP • A10-17-0000003-TEMP

SANTACRUZ.COM | GOODTIMES.SC | AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Two Locations Open Daily

63


Where the locals shop since 1938. VOTED BEST BUTCHER SHOP BEST WINE SELECTION BEST CHEESE SELECTION BEST LOCALLY OWNED GROCERY STORE BEST MURAL /PUBLIC ART

Family owned & operated 80 years. 622 Soquel Avenue, Santa Cruz

OUR 80 TH YEAR

WEEKLY SPECIALS Good th r u 9/4/18

GROCERY

BUTCHER SHOP ALL NATURAL USDA Choice beef & lamb, only corn-fed Midwest pork, Rocky free-range chickens, Mary’s air-chilled chickens, wild-caught seafood, Boar’s Head products. BEEF

PAN SEARED SIRLOIN STEAK

WITH MUSHROOM SAUCE PAIRING WINE & FOOD Ingredients

FOR THE STEAKS – 4 (4 ounces each) top sirloin steaks – coarse salt and fresh ground pepper – 4 tablespoons butter divided – 1 teaspoon Italian Seasoning – 4 garlic cloves smashed

■ TOP SIRLOIN STEAK, USDA CHOICE/ 6.98 LB ■ TRI TIP USDA CHOICE/ 6.98 LB

LUNCH MEAT ■ HONEY HAM Sweet Slice/ 8.49 Lb ■ BLACK FOREST HAM Smoked Flavor/ 8.49 Lb ■ DANISH STYLE HAM Boar’s Head/ 8.49 Lb

SAUSAGE

Instructions FOR THE STEAKS 1. Prepare steaks by seasoning with salt and pepper. 2. Add 2 tablespoons butter, Italian Seasoning, and smashed garlic cloves to a cast iron skillet and melt on medium. 3. Add steaks to skillet and cook about 3 to 4 minutes per each side for medium-rare. Do not crowd the skillet - cook the steaks two at a time. 4. Remove steaks from skillet, set aside and keep covered. FOR THE MUSHROOM SAUCE 1. In the same skillet, add remaining butter and melt over medium-high heat. 2. Stir in sliced mushrooms and season with salt and pepper; cook for 2 to 3 minutes 3. Pour in the beef broth and let cook for another minute. 4. Add half and half and continue to cook for 2 more minutes, or until heated through. 5. Plate steaks and top with mushroom sauce. Garnish with dried parsley and serve. 2016 MORGAN HIGHLAND CHARDONNAY 91 POINTS WINE SPECTATOR ONE WEEK SPECIAL 18.99!!! PLUS 10% OFF ON 6 OR MORE! WINERY SUGGESTED PRICE 27.99

Best Buys, Local, Regional, International

Beer

Compare & Save

■ LATITUDE 33 “Honey Hips” or “Blood Orange” IPA, 6Pk Cans, 12 oz/ 9.99 +CRV ■ ANDERSON VALLEY Assorted 6Pks, 12oz/ 8.99 +CRV 1.25L/ .99 ■ NINKASI BREWING, Asst 6Pk Bottles, 12oz/ 9.49 +CRV ■ C20 COCONUT WATER Original & With Pulp, ■ HOPWORKS BREWING CO., Asst 6Pk Cans, 12oz/ 9.99 17.5oz/ 1.99 +CRV +CRV ■ TEAVANA ICED TEA All Kinds, 14.5oz/ 2.49 +CRV ■ WYDER’S CIDER, Pear or Raspberry, 22oz/ 3.99 +CRV ■ BROWN COW YOGURT 5.3oz/ .99

■ CRYSTAL GEYSER SPARKLING WATER

Rum

■ SAN PELLEGRINO SPARKLING JUICE 6 Pack/

■ TAHOE MOONSHINE (Reg 35.99)/ 9.99 ■ ZAYA Trinidad/ 21.99 ■ PYRAT RUM XO Reserve/ 27.99 ■ KOLOA Hawaiian Rum/ 29.99 ■ RON ZACAPA Solera Grand Reserve 23yr/ 45.99

4.99 +CRV

Local Bakeries “Fresh Daily” ■ BECKMANN’S French White Loaf, 24oz/ 3.89

■ WHOLE GRAIN Great White, 30oz/ 4.19

■ MILD ITALIAN SAUSAGE, Pork/ 5.98 Lb ■ HOT ITALIAN SAUSAGE, Pork/ 5.98 Lb ■ PORK BREAKFAST LINKS/ 4.98 Lb ■ SILVA LINGUICA LINKS/ 6.98 Lb

FOR THE MUSHROOM SAUCE 8 oz sliced baby portobello mushrooms salt and fresh ground pepper to taste 2 tablespoons low sodium beef broth 1 cup half and half dried parsley for garnish

WINE & SPIRITS

Local, Organic, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet

■ GOLDEN SHEAF Sourdough Sliced, 16oz/ 3.99

Still Summer Whites

■ 2016 SANTA RITA RESERVE Sauvignon Blanc (91JS)/ 7.99 ■ 2016 PAZO SERANTELLOS Albariño (Reg 14.99)/ 8.99 ■ 2015 DECUGNANO DEI BARBI Orvieto (90WE, Red 18.99)/ 9.99 ■ 2015 ZACA MESA Z Blanc (91WE, Reg 24.99)/ 9.99 ■ 2016 GROVE MILL Sauvignon Blanc (96D, Reg 15.99)/ 9.99

■ KELLY’S FOUR SEED, 16oz/ 4.09

■ SUMANO’S Francese Baguette, 16oz/ 3.99

FISH

Delicatessen

■ BAY SHRIMP MEAT FULLY COOKED/ 12.98 LB ■ AHI TUNA STEAKS THICK CUT/ 14.98 LB ■ PETRALE SOLE FILLET FRESH/ 14.98 LB

■ FARMER JOHN’S BACON, Premium/ 7.99

■ ORGANIC VALLEY CHEESE SHREDS, All Varieties/ ???

■ CAJUN CATFISH FILLETS MARINATED/ 10.98 LB ■ GALBANI RICOTTA All Kinds, 15oz/ 2.99 ■ FOLLOW YOUR HEART SHREDS,

PRODUCE

Reds - 90+ Points, Under $10

“Delicious”/ 4.99

California Fresh, Blemish-Free, Organic, Arrow Citrus Co., Lakeside Organics, Happy Boy Farms, Route 1 Farms ■ BANANAS, Premium Quality/ .79 Lb ■ FRESH CORN, White and Yellow/ .59 Ea. ■ SEEDLESS GRAPES, Red and Green/ 2.99 Lb ■ CLUSTER TOMATOES, Ripe on the Vine/ 1.69 Lb ■ AVOCADOS, Always Ripe/ 1.99 Ea ■ LEAF LETTUCE, Red, Green, Romaine, Butter & Iceberg/ 1.19 Ea ■ ORGANIC BANANAS, Table Ripe Ready/ .99 Lb ■ ZUCCHINI SQUASH, Organic and Conventional/ 1.19 Lb ■ TOMATOES, Roma and Large/ 1.69 Lb ■ RUSSET POTATOES, Top Quality/ .79 Lb

■ ORGANIC VALLEY RICOTTA, Great Value, 15oz/ 6.49

Cheese - Best Selection in Santa Cruz

■ 2013 ANGOVE Red Blend (92TP, Reg 17.99)/ 7.99 ■ 2012 MONTES ALPHA Syrah (92WS, Reg 25.99)/ 9.99 ■ 2015 ST HALLETT Shiraz “Faith” (90W&S)/ 9.99 ■ 2013 ZACA MESA Z Cuvée (91WE Reg 24.99)/ 9.99 ■ 2012 LAPOSTOLLE Canto Red (91WE, Reg 24.99)/ 9.99

Italian Reds - Great Values

■ MONTEREY JACK, rBST-free

■ 2015 FATTORIA DEL CERRO Chianti Colli Senesi (92JS)/ 12.99 ■ 2014 ARGIANO Rosso Toscana (90WS, Reg 21.99)/ ■ HUNGARIAN SWISS Imported/ 6.99 Lb 13.99 ■ POINT REYES BLUE CHEESE Local/ 13.99 Lb ■ 2013 VILLA ANTINORI Toscana (91JS, Reg 19.99)/ 14.99 ■ 2016 ALLEGRINI Valpolicella (90WE)/ 16.99 Shop Local First ■ JAVA BOB’S COFFEE “The Connoisseur’s Choice” ■ 2016 PECCHENINO Dolcetto (91WS)/ 16.99 Loaf Cuts/ 3.29 Lb

Average Cuts/ 3.49 Lb

■ POET’S IRISH CHEDDAR, Aged/ 7.09 Lb

Connoisseur’s Corner - Pinot Noir

12oz/ 9.99

■ MOUNTAIN GOLD HONEY 16oz/ 8.99

■ GIZDICH JAMS 11oz/ 6.99

■ FARMER FREED CULINARY SALTS 3.5oz/ 10.49 ■ TWINS KITCHEN MUSTARDS 4 Kinds, 9oz/ 5.99

■ 2013 SANTE ARCANGELI Split Rail (92WE)/ 46.99 ■ 2014 GARY FARRELL Russian River (95WE)/ 44.99 ■ 2014 FLOWERS Sonoma Coast (93WE)/ 49.99 ■ 2013 BEAUREGARD Coast Grade (93WE)/ 59.99 ■ 2014 PATZ & HALL Chenoweth Ranch (94WE)/ 59.99

RON JONES, 34-Year Customer, Santa Cruz

SHOP PER SPOTLIG HT

Occupation: Photographer, R. Jones Photography Hobbies: Textile/Oriental rug collector, traveling, cooking Astrological Sign: Scorpio What was your first impression of Shopper’s? I recall that it was the local place to go. Still is.They have everything that I need, and it’s all fresh. It’s mind-blowing! Shopper’s is my go-to store. I don’t like anything sitting long in my fridge, so I shop here every other day. I get these little organic carrots and it’s chomp, chomp, chomp — I go through them quickly. You prefer shopping local? Hands-down! Why are you even asking that question? I know the crew and I always run into people that I know. I have a good time here chatting with the butchers and joking with the checkers.They put up with me!

What do you like to cook? I keep it simple: Lots of fresh fish— really like Shopper’s salmon, shrimp and swordfish — plus veggies, rice and salads. Love their local organic produce. I’ll do some Mexican food with Shopper’s chicken and beef fajita mixes for lunch. Bam! It’s done in two minutes and I’ve got a great burrito! Another favorite is Pasta Mike’s— it’s the fresh stuff.You see Mike here quite a bit. It’s cool chatting with him. Shopper’s has great local products, like their salsas, guacamoles, tortillas and coffees. They also carry Mrs. Renfro’s canned jalapeño salsa.The best! Haven’t seen it elsewhere.

What would you say to someone new to the area about Shoppers? It’s the star of the community, it brings people together. Shopper’s is the biggest small store in town. It always surprises me that I’ll find these exotic items that my girlfriend asks me to pick up for the holidays. It’s a fun store, it’s comfortable — it’s like my second home! I like the size of the market and know what’s on every aisle. Shopper’s is fast and convenient because parking is easy and the checkers and baggers are friendly and also efficient.The butchers know me and know what I like.They do their job really well. Excellent service!

“Shopper’s is fast and convenient because parking is easy and the checkers and baggers are friendly and efficient.”

|

Corner: Soquel & Branciforte Avenues 7 Days: 6am-9pm

| Meat: (831) 423-1696 | Produce: (831) 429-1499 | Grocery: (831) 423-1398 | Wine: (831) 429-1804

Superb Products of Value: Local, Natural, Specialty, Gourmet ■ Neighborly Service for 80 Years

Profile for Weeklys

Good Times Santa Cruz 1835  

August 29 - September 4, 2018

Good Times Santa Cruz 1835  

August 29 - September 4, 2018