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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies This Modern Retort

All ethnicities capable of racism, sexism BY KEN STOUT

I

wanted to say that I found last week’s cartoon of This Modern World (Nov. 28) to be both a racist and sexist stereotype of white males. Not all white males are racist, sexist or conservative. That is politically correct BS propaganda. Is Joe Biden racist, sexist or conservative? What about Jerry Brown? I’ve noticed how quickly some people will rush to say, “Not all Muslims are terrorists.” The white male appears to be the one group of people you can get away with bashing these days. Those of the politically correct persuasion would very zealously defend anyone else. Also it has been many white males who have made the biggest contributions to our modern world. Our founding fathers gave us the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. The Wright brothers gave us the airplane. Gary Watson gave us IBM. Henry Ford gave us the automobile. Have you forgotten that domestic violence is more prevalent in South Asia and the Middle East? There is also the practice of “honor killings”—females are usually the target of these. This happens whenever they displease their fathers or husbands. Courts in those countries are very lenient in those cases. The Taliban kills women before letting them go to school. Yet the white male is always the one who gets put on the hot seat for racism and sexism. Accusing any other ethnicity of racism or sexism appears to be a serious faux pas, even if it’s true. I also know from personal experience that white people get racially discriminated against. I’ve applied at a few McDonald’s and found that out. I remember two times going in for an interview and noticing all the people working behind the counter were Mexican, mostly women. I didn’t get hired at either one. Tom Tomorrow’s cartoon is flawed and misinformed. Let’s get down to it: all ethnicities are capable of being racist and sexist. It’s only white males who you can bash for it. That’s also a racist stereotype. Please at least get that right. Ken Stout is a fifty-something white male living in the San Jose area. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Slow Drive

I would like to thank Michael Hogan for his Open Mic (“Slow Down, You’re Here,” Dec. 5). This was a kind and gentle way of saying what I have wanted to write for a while now. The roads in Sebastopol have become unsafe, and it is frightening how many near-misses I see everyday. Just last week a child did get hit on a bike in a crosswalk. Cars and trucks are heavy machinery, and we need to respect that and care about others’ safety and pace of life. I also live on a residential road that has become a thoroughfare for commuters and wine tasters. The residents on Olivet Road fear for their lives when getting their mail or trying to turn in and out of their driveway. The speed limit is not something to attain and then conquer; it is for our safety. We are all one family, and we are all trying to survive. Do we have to endanger others while we are doing it? If you moved to the North Bay to slow down, then do it. Please.

RUTHIE SAIA Sebastopol

Why Farmers Markets? I attend the Santa Rosa Certified Farmers market, and because of the diversity of products produced here in Sonoma County, I am able to get a variety of different fresh fruits, vegetables and meats. I thought going to the farmers market once a week and doing my shopping was a way of supporting local producers. Then I had a conversation with a gentleman who handles the marketing for a local organic supermarket, and he informed me that not all farmers markets are local farmers, and that many of the producers are actually from hundreds of miles away. He explained to me that one of the missions of his store was to make sure that, if possible, they purchase food produced within 50 miles of their stores.

After hearing this information I was really confused about what I considered to be my small part in saving the planet. I began doing research, trying to figure out if my strong belief system surrounding farmers markets was now a wash. I found information about the Farmers Market Program; the USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service created this program to promote the economic success of America’s small farm operators. Small farm operations are those with less than $250,000 in annual receipts, and which work and manage their own operations. An amazing 94 percent of all farms in America meet that definition, and the mission is to make sure that American “family farm” survives. Farmers markets were put in place to support small farmers and allow them to connect directly with their consumers. So my conclusion is farmers markets are still something to believe in. They support small producers and allow us to get fresh, mostly local foods.

CYNTHIA HINDE Santa Rosa

Keeping Creeks Clean I am writing to urge people to take advantage of the recent rainfall to find out how they can help with the serious problem of storm runoff. Our roads, driveways, buildings and other cleared areas create situations where water cannot infiltrate the ground, and it rushes to the nearest creek, carrying with it sediment and other contaminants. Currently, a great undertaking is being made to bring the steelhead trout, Chinook and coho salmon back to sustainable numbers. However, our landuse decisions and the overall effects of urbanization continue to undermine the ability of these species to successfully reproduce. Please visit the website of the Russian River Watershed Association to find information on how homeowners can implement storm-water and erosion control on a local level. In addition, the


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Grange Life

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The Grange is indeed growing, here in Sebastopol and throughout California, as the article (“Estranged Grange,” Nov. 28) by Rachel Dovey indicates. I joined in 2010, and find it to be a rewarding and fun group. We meet at the Grange Hall on Highway 12 on the last Tuesday of each month, starting with a potluck— great food—followed by a meeting. We are open to all. The Grange, which I used to attend at our family farm in Iowa in the middle of the 20th century, is a very family-friendly organization. People of all ages are welcome. Check it out.

SHEPHERD BLISS

Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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THE HUB Rebecca Valentine at the Share Exchange hopes to demystify the green certification process for interested businesses.

Green Makes Green Sonoma Green Business Program gets coordinator, teams up with Santa Rosa Share Exchange BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

W

hen the Santa Rosa Share Exchange filed an application this summer to become green-certified through the Sonoma Green Business Program, Rebecca Valentine was surprised to find there was nobody to process it. “Our county prides itself on its sustainability goals,” says

the business’ outreach coordinator. “To have this missing-in-action piece feels like the county is not partnering with businesses who are waiting to be part of it.” Sonoma County has one of the lowest number of green-certified businesses in the North Bay at 52, compared to Napa County’s 93 and Marin County’s whopping 432. This might be due in part to a

six-month lull this year when the position of program coordinator went unfilled in Sonoma County. At print time, a new coordinator from San Francisco has been hired and starts this month. “We’re prepared to move forward expeditiously once the new guy is on board,” says Ben Stone, director of the Sonoma County Economic Development Board. “Our goal is to be the most active program in the Bay Area.”

In the interim, there have been about 20 businesses hoping to get green-certified. “We will have sort of a pipeline of people interested in moving forward,” says Stone. Some smaller businesses, home offices included, are “pretty much self-certified” in less than a day, he adds, but to get larger businesses and manufacturers to join in takes more work. “It could take months,” says Stone, “simply because we have to work with other agencies and get them out there.” Different types of businesses receive different checklists for certification. An auto shop has a different set of standards and regulations than an office building, for example. Larger operations warrant on-site checks by PG&E, the Sonoma County Water Agency, Sonoma County Waste Management and the Department of Emergency Services. The advantages, in Stone’s eyes, are mostly economical. “It helps [businesses] become more efficient,” he says. “It helps them get prepared for increasing [environmental] regulations that may be coming.” And there’s the added benefit of using the official green-certified marketing materials, which attracts customers. Stone says despite the lack of coordinator, interest has been growing in the program. “I think companies see there’s economic benefit.” The Bay Area Green Business Program has certified more than 2,300 businesses and public agencies since 1996. The Sonoma Green Business Program is funded by the Sonoma County Water Agency to the tune of $50,000 annually, paid by waterconservation fees. After a meeting last week, Economic Development Board program manager Al Lerma said his department is looking forward to a “working partnership” with the Santa Rosa Share Exchange. Valentine said it was a step toward trying to establish connection and rapport with the EDB, and hopes to be a “downtown hub” for businesses to learn about the program from one that’s been through the process. “We want to have some kind of debriefing for small business,” says Valentine.


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On Dec. 4, the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors approved a proposal for a 10,000-case winery to be built near Mark West Creek. Henry Cornell (pictured), a wealthy Goldman Sachs partner who lives in Manhattan but owns 215 acres off St. Helena Road, released the proposal for the new winery nearly eight years ago. The supervisorial vote came after the project’s lawyers presented reports showing safeguards incorporated to protect wildlife and water. As reported by Alastair Bland in a 2011 Bohemian feature, neighbors and environmentalists protested the winery’s impact on the Mark West Watershed and the coho salmon and steelhead that once heavily populated its waters. Such protest remains, and New Old Ways Wholistically Emerging, the opposition group, is considering a legal challenge to the ruling, which they say doesn’t take the effects of a second winery upstream of Mark West Creek into consideration.

Kids on the Outside Roughly 700 homeless youth sleep on Sonoma County streets on any given night, according to recent surveys. On Dec. 14, Social Advocates for Youth promotes awareness of this reality with the SAY Sock Walk. The walk features a cell phone walking tour that enables participants to hear directly from the homeless youth served by the Sonoma County organization. At the end of the walk, hot soup and beverages from Rendez Vous Bistro, Dierk’s Parkside Café and Big River Coffee Company are served. Hear the voices of homeless teens on Friday, Dec. 14, at Courthouse Square in Santa Rosa. 5:30pm-7:45pm. Cost is one pair of socks for homeless youth with a requested donation of $10 (no one will be turned away). 707.544.3299.—Leilani Clark

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t’s fun to give someone a chicken,” quips Betty Malmgren, “or some bees.” Malmgren is a Napa volunteer for Heifer International, a nonprofit whose mission is community organizing, animal husbandry and creating viable small businesses in poor communities. Napa’s Heifer group, founded by Evie Trevethan, once sewed a quilt and raised enough to buy an ark of animals for women organizers in Nepal. (Twenty dollars buys a flock of geese, so the $5,000 ark must indeed rival that Biblical shipment). When co-organizer Nancy Evans presented the quilt in person, she was awed. “It was a very heartwarming and overwhelming experience,” she says. “When we arrived in Nepal, there were 40 women in saris with flowers. They had a three-hour ceremony where each woman stood and talked about how she had personally benefited

from Heifer International.” The women had trained the adolescents, who built a coop and raised 1,200 chicks to maturity. From his poultry earnings, one young man purchased a scooter to attend classes in Katmandu, 10 miles away. Evans keeps a photo of the Nepal Heifer group, depicting women breaking up rock with hammers to build their cement meeting place. “They had to contact the local government and the Buddhist monastery for assistance,” said Evans. “But it was the first time these women had reason to get out in the community to get things they needed. At first, they could only contribute 18 cents a month to their group, but as a result of their work, it rose to $2.” “Heifer is really about a sustainable living model that works at the community level; the focus is on training,” says Trevethan. “It’s about learning to work together as a group. And the coolest thing that happens afterward is the ‘Passing on the Gift’ ceremony, where a female offspring of a gift animal is passed to another family. It’s tremendously moving. The training is passed along, too. When the whole community has benefited, then the gift moves to other communities.” Story after story documents how individuals—mostly women and children—are transformed as a result of a Heifer gift, sometimes radically improving the lives of females. Typically, in poor countries when a family can afford to send a child to school, it is the boy who gets to go; in some places, emerging social changes include education of females. “There’s a book, Beatrice’s Goat, about a young African girl who got to go to school because of events following the gift of a kid goat,” says Trevethan. “But the real purpose of Heifer International is making whole communities become sustainable.” For more, see www.heifer.org.


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VAT AND BARREL Brendan Moylan and Tim Welch at Stillwater Spirits in Petaluma.

Hoppier Copper ‘Craft beer schnapps’ highlights the convergence of beer and distilled spirits BY KEN WEAVER

P

erhaps it was inevitable in the land of hopladen beers. But a recent rise in spirits that incorporate brewing’s main bittering elements not only highlights the surging interest in craft beer, but also serves as an inlet to better understanding the hidden overlaps between the worlds of brewing and distillation.

From Charbay Winery & Distillery’s recently released hop-flavored whiskeys, to the upcoming “beer schnapps” from Stillwater Spirits and Moylan’s Distilling Company, microdistilleries in the North Bay find themselves at the very forefront of distillers embracing the citrusy, piney and herbaceous contributions of hops.

Marko Karakasevic, the master distiller at Charbay in St. Helena, comes from a long line of artisanal distillers and began learning the craft from his father at an early age. It was a shared interest in both distilling and homebrewing that piqued his curiosity about what would result from combining the two. “I obviously knew wine distilled into brandy,” recalls Karakasevic, “because I was distilling that with my dad already, and I was brewing beer, and I was learning more and more that

whiskey is distilled from those same grains and malts that I was using to make my beer. Except I was adding killer hops, like Chinook, Cascade, Nugget, Eroica. “And so I was, like, well, what’s the difference between using (so to speak) a ‘distiller’s beer’ or wash or any term you give it [the fermented, often beer-strength precursor that ultimately gets distilled in making spirits] versus a bottle-ready beer that’s got alcohol in it. I mean, if it’s got alcohol in it, you can distill it. And I’m not really afraid of trying to distill anything.” Karakasevic’s first commercial effort in distilling beer started back in 1999, when he and his father crafted 24 barrels of hopped whiskey from a (now-defunct) local brewery’s Pilsner. Of those barrels, only seven have so far been bottled, with an additional small offering (Release III) planned for early next year. While the hefty anticipated price tag ($450) guarantees that I will be looking elsewhere for stocking stuffers next year, this first production serves to highlight the vastly different time frames between making finished beer (often two to three weeks) and distilling a polished whiskey. Thirteen years or so along, they’ve still only released onethird of the batch. More recently, Charbay partnered up with Healdsburg’s Bear Republic Brewing Co. to create a series of double-distilled, hop-flavored whiskeys. “I went to them because, first of all, I love their beer,” says Karakasevic, “and second of all, they can produce a tanker for me.” Having an adequate supply of wash (or its finished beer equivalent) is important, especially when the distilling processes winnow the final product down to about one-tenth its original volume. In creating their pair of “R5” whiskeys from Bear Republic’s Racer 5 IPA, a 6,000-gallon tanker of beer ultimately produced about 590 gallons of distillate. That concentrated result was then aged in either ) 14

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stainless steel (â&#x20AC;&#x153;clearâ&#x20AC;?) or French oak (â&#x20AC;&#x153;agedâ&#x20AC;?) over a period of 22 months. Both versions were released in August of this year, and I received a small sample bottle of each for review. Neither their R5 Clear Whiskey ($52) nor the R5 Aged Whiskey ($75) showed anything out of the ordinary hop-wise in the aroma (the volatile hop aromatics just boil off), but hopderived ďŹ&#x201A;avors approximating citrusy pith and hints of pine came through quite clearly from those ďŹ rst sips forward. The clear version was a better showcase for the hopsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; contribution, while the aged rendition seemed softer on the approach, with additional wood sugars and toasted barrel notes throughout. Adding a drop of water opened things up in both, while an ice cube unveiled the malt underpinnings. I found both enjoyable, particularly with an ice cube tempering the ethanol; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s useful to note that for each, the hop contributions manifest as an auxiliary note, not as tonguenumbing, IPA-like bitterness. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more of a familiar flavor profile, pointing to high-quality ingredients. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get me wrong,â&#x20AC;? adds Karakasevic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you add a splash of Antica Carpano vermouth to it and a cherry, it makes an amazing Manhattan. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s designed to be consumed neat.â&#x20AC;? In addition to the R5 offerings, Charbay also recently released a hop-ďŹ&#x201A;avored whiskey called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sâ&#x20AC;? ($70), distilled from Bear Republicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assertive Big Bear black stout. Other beer-oriented projects are already in process and aging (distilling isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a profession for the impatient), with Karakasevic and Bear Republic collaborating to tweak their recipes and further improve the distillations. When asked about the future of Charbayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s involvement with beer, Karakasevic simply replies, â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s] a program Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to continue with for probably the rest of my life.â&#x20AC;? Stillwater Spirits/Moylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Distilling Company in Petaluma recently started up a beerbased distillation program of its own, taking advantage of the common ownership between the distillery and Moylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery and Restaurant in Novato. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We probably have a hundred different projects going right now,â&#x20AC;? says Brendan Moylan, speaking of the distillery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Half-ďŹ nished,â&#x20AC;? he adds, chuckling. The new Moylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brand of spirits was launched earlier in the year, using wort (unfermented beer) created at the brewery and then trucked over to the distillery. While the worts for these ďŹ rst releases are ultimately unhopped, they embody the essence of collaboration between the two entities (and are reminiscent of relations between Bear Republic and Charbay). Moylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s American Rye Whiskey and Bourbon Whiskey Cask Strength will be followed in the coming months by whiskeys ďŹ nished in orange brandy barrels and ones smoked with cherry wood. Beer schnapps will follow soon afterward. Tim Welch serves as head distiller for Stillwater and Moylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, and he currently has a variety of different barrels aging distilled Moylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beer inside of them, as well as plans to ďŹ ll more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It takes a lot of attention,â&#x20AC;? Welch says of using various hopped beers in the distillation process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re putting beer into the still, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s volatile. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like making a vodka or a brandy or grappa, or anything like that. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s volatile, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s susceptible to ďŹ&#x201A;ash boils; it takes some babying. The same is true of the single malts.â&#x20AC;? Moylan and Welch plan to bottle two of these hopped distillates in 2013, the ďŹ rst made from Moylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kilt Lifter Scotchstyle ale and their second from White Christmas, a spiced winter lager. Additional beer-based projects are in the works. While they refer to the results as â&#x20AC;&#x153;beer schnapps,â&#x20AC;? Welch emphasized that this doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t imply any technical distinction from calling it hopďŹ&#x201A;avored whiskey or otherwise. So why beer schnapps? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It kind of rolls off the tongue.â&#x20AC;?


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

SONOMA COUNTY Cape Cod Fish & Chips Fish and chips. $. A dingy hole in the wall–just like a real chippy! This popular lunch spot offers perfectly cooked fish and chips to eat in or take out. Open daily. 548 E Cotati Ave, Cotati. 707.792.0982.

Chinois Asian Bistro Asian. $$. Pan-Asian cuisine done delicious. Happy hour tapas and cocktails weekdays. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 186 Windsor River Rd, Windsor. 707.838.4667.

Dry Creek Kitchen California cuisine. $$$-$$$$. Fresh wine country cuisine from chef Charlie Palmer. Dinner daily; lunch, Fri-Sun. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Gary Chu’s Chinese. $$. Fine Chinese food in elegant setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 611 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5840.

JoJo Sushi Japanese. $-$$. Hip downtown eatery features fresh sushi, sashimi, teriyaki, and innovative specials. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 645 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8588.

Kirin Chinese. $$. Specializing in Mandarin, Szechuan and Peking styles. Kirin’s pot stickers are the best in Sonoma County. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1957.

Martha’s Old Mexico Mexican. $. Freshly prepared favorites, along with regional house specialties. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 305 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.4458.

Phyllis’ Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an oldfashioned patty. Lunch and

dinner daily. Three locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.989.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

The Red Grape Pizza. $-$$. Delectable New Havenstyle thin-crust pizzas with fresh ingredients and a dazzling array of toppings. Lunch and dinner daily. 529 First St W, Sonoma. 707.996.4103.

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly, plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Scopa Italian. $$. For true Tuscan flavors. Can be crowded, but you get to see what the neighbors ordered. Dinner, Tues-Sun. 109-A Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.5282. Stout Brothers Pub & Restaurant Irish. $$. Atmospheric, if a little faux, but a great ploughman’s lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Three Squares Cafe Cafe. $-$$. Home-style cooking in iconic Railroad Square location. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, Tues-Sun. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4300.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$. The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $.

15

'Tis the Season... We have fun stocking stuffers ~ Gourmet goodies,mugs, candles,teas, and so much more. Let us put together a Holiday Basket for that foodlover on your list! Visit Pearson & Co for your favorite comfort foods ~ *,/9Ê/,9-ÊUÊ / ,  www.pearsonandco.com 2759 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa 707.541.3868

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DammitDolls, Bacon everything, and Bozo....OH MY!

Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Sun; dinner, Fri-Sat. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

his way SSanta’s anta’s oonn his way to Tomales Bay! Sunday Dec. 16

Visit by Santa Claus: 3–5pm Restaurant hours: 10am–9pm

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions

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Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Come Meet Santa at the Nick’s Cove Holiday Boat Shack

10% of the restaurant’s net proceeds from the day donated to Marin Food Bank

23240 2 3240 H HWY WY 1 1,, M Marshall arshall nickscove.com nickscove.com 415-663-1033 415-663-1033

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 1 2-1 8, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.


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at this premier spot on Sausalitoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

N A PA CO U N T Y Brannanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Brassica Mediterranean.

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$$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcynâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

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Gilwoods Cafe Diner.

Thai House

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com Mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;F, 8amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm

oliday elebrations Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Roasted Mushroom Gruyere Tartelette Petit Four Platter Full Catering Menu Available

$-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

SMALL BITES

Novatoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Newest The newest addition to the North Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s craft-beer scene hosts its grand opening this week in Novato. Beltane Brewing officially opens on Saturday, Dec. 15, pouring seven house beers and featuring live music from A Thousand Years at Sea and food from Tavola Italian Kitchen. Beltane is headed by local brewer Alan Atha, previously highlighted in the Bohemianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2011 coverage on up-and-coming area nanobrewers; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proven to be a two-year process getting Beltane fully permitted and open. Atha and Beltaneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tasting-room manager Cathy Portje debut a variety of beers over the weekend, including Automne Eve Bruin, a Belgian-style dubbel that will serve as the base beer for some upcoming Beltane releases, and Luminesce Triple golden ale, which was previously selected by Iron Springs Brewery to be brewed commercially and entered into the Great American Beer Festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pro-Am Competition last year. Beltaneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus on Belgian-style ales is rather atypical for the region (Russian River Brewing aside) and will be supplemented by some serious hop-driven offerings, ranging from Meritage Session IPA (weighing in at 4 percent ABV) to Rumpelstiltskin Double IPA. Petaluma-based HenHouse Brewing will also have a guest tap of Oyster Stout pouring over the weekend. Beltane plans to offer daily pouring hours, with an updated schedule available on their website, following their grand opening on Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16, at 401-B Bel Marin Keys Blvd., Novato. 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm. Pay as you go. 415.883.2040.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ken Weaver

Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a

selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.


Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;WCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Arista Winery Nothing big about the wine list, just style-driven, focused wines. 7015 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Tasting room open daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 707.473.0606. Camellia Cellars Like owner Chris Lewand, the wine is just so darned approachable and easy-going. Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon are most consistently strong. 57 Front St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm. 888.404.9463.

Eric Ross Winery Just friendly folks pouring Pinot, Zin and Marsanne-Roussane; donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask about the rooster. Ask about the rooster. 14300 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Thursday-Monday 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5pm.707.939.8525.

Landmark Vineyards Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more to Landmark than Chardonnay. 101 Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm. 707.833.0053.

The Natural Process Alliance & Salinia Wine Co. A beige warehouse and a clean-cut, UC Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; trained winemaker belie the wild-eyed truth: Unusual, fruity â&#x20AC;&#x153;natural wineâ&#x20AC;? as fresh as next Friday, bottled in stainless steel Kleen Kanteens. Ask for Hardy. 3350 Coffey Lane, Santa Rosa. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday, 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6pm, or by appointment. 707.527.7063.

Portalupi Wine Husbandand-wife team went the distance, selecting Barbera cuttings from the Italian alps: their Barbera was named best in the world. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also find Vermentino, Pinot, and rusticchic two-liter milk jugs of â&#x20AC;&#x153;vino di tavolaâ&#x20AC;? in comfortable downtown lounge; wine education classes for groups. 107 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm. Tasting fee, $5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$12. 707.395.0960.

Sbragia Family Vineyards Ed Sbragia makes stellar Cab in Zin country. 9990 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5pm. 707.473.2992.

Thomas George Estates Pinot pioneer Davis Bynum hung up the hose clamp and sold his estate, but the good wine still flows in remodeled tasting room featuring a long bar and vineyard videos. Russian River Chard, Pinot and Zin; sweet berry flavors and long-lasting finishes. Caves completed for tours in 2010. 8075 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm, daily. Tasting fee, $5. 707.431.8031.

N A PA CO U N TY Ceja Vineyards To Ceja Vineyardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; motto, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vinum, Cantus, Amor,â&#x20AC;? and when thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wine, song and love, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dance. Founded by one-time field workers, the Mexican-American-owned winery celebrates culture and wine at this sleek downtown lounge. Wine flights, light bites and one of the few full-bodied rosĂŠs â&#x20AC;&#x153;con huevosâ&#x20AC;? in the county. On Saturdays, free salsa lessons and dance party spice up the night. Bailamos! 1248 First St., Napa. Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Friday, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm, Saturday, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm; free salsa class starts at 7:30pm. Tasting fees vary. 707.226.6445.

Fantesca Estate & Winery (WC) Set on land that was the dowry gift when Charles Krug married in 1860, this estate winery specializing in Cab features a wine-aging cave built right into the side of Spring Mountain. 2920 Spring Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.968.9229.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction

building itself, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Peju Province Vineyards Talented staff, terrific food pairings and fantastic Cab. 8466 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm. 707.963.3600.

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of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stagâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Moet & Chandon Brut Imperial Risotto di Bosco creamy Arborio rice, porcini mushrooms, wild berries

2009 Grgich Hills Estate Chardonnay, Napa Valley

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Taste at Oxbow Discover refreshing white varietals AlbariĂąo and Vermentino in stylish setting across from Oxbow Market, then move on to Pinot Noir from Carneros pioneer Mahoney Vineyards; Waterstone Wines, too. 708 First St., Napa. Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm; Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.265.9600.

Breast of Duck pinot noir sauce, black cherries

2010 Trecini Cellars Pinot Noir Herb-Crusted Rack of Lamb horseradish mashed potatoes winter root vegetables

Freemark Abbey Cabernet Sauvignon

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbonsâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

MENU Dungeness Crab Cocktail

Quixote There is a sense

the tasting room crowded with a harrassed staff, but St. SupĂŠry features an interesting art gallery with changing exhibitions. 8440 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 800.942.0809.

December 31, 2012 Bar Open: 7:00pm (no host) Assorted Hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres Dinner Served: 8:00pm

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18

Bucklin Winery

The enchanting madness of Old Hill BY JAMES KNIGHT

BEST CHOCOLATIER Sonoma County

www.sonomachocolatiers.com

Vote! Vote Vote! For your favorite North Bay businesses! Dec. 12 – Jan. 11 GO TO:

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W

hen Will Bucklin set out to make wine from his family’s own vineyard, his longtime grape buyer was dubious. After all, Joel Peterson had built a hugely successful winery on the strength of old vine Zinfandel from vineyards like Old Hill. It was sort of his baby, closely identified with Ravenswood Winery. But after taking one whiff of Bucklin’s version, Peterson handed it back and simply declared, “That’s Old Hill!”

They’d worked out a fastidious system to keep the harvest on a par. Planted in 1885 by William McPherson Hill, the 12-acre plot contains a hodgepodge of grapes besides Zinfandel; any variation in the pick could alter the wine’s character. Some of the vines stand out among the rest, as Bucklin’s cat demonstrates during a tour of the vineyard. Scrambling up a massive trunk, she enjoys a perch high above the Zinfandel atop a Grenache vine. With the help of a UC Davis researcher, Bucklin developed an intricate, color-coded map of the vineyard’s resident varietals. At first glance, it might be a demographic map of lower Manhattan. Why so random? Bucklin is all too familiar with that question. Trying to guess at the overall plan is like divining meaning from the pattern of clouds—a kind of madness. Bucklin uses the map to cull Grenache from the field, resulting in the deeply colored and substantial 2010 Old Hill Ranch Grenache ($38). Adhering to the organic practices of his late stepfather Otto Teller, who donated the ranch’s conservation easement to the Sonoma Land Trust, which he founded, Bucklin farms the vineyard with minimal input. His live-and-let-live critter policy is even extended to gophers—although the cats run their own program— and deer. As Teller used to say, “Deer got to eat, too.” If the 2009 Old Hill Ranch Zinfandel ($34) is not simple, bright and jammy, it’s on target. Mixed spices and integrated, lingering flavors all play supporting roles in this complex field blend. Bucklin took cuttings from Zinfandel, Petite Sirah and Alicante Bouschet vines to create the new “Bambino” block. But the 2010 “Bambino” Zinfandel ($24) has a similar earthy-spicy aroma— cardamom, cocoa and cranberry bread—and rich, brooding fruit. The Bucklins are happy to sell their wines mainly through traditional distribution channels, rather than spend a lot of time on self-promotion. Will Bucklin prefers to stay by the vineyard and walk it daily, on the insistence of his “best tool in the vineyard,” he says, gesturing toward patiently waiting dog Tanner. There’s always something new to discover in a historic vineyard that’s as unique as a thumbprint. Bucklin Winery, 8 Old Hill Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. Visits by appointment only. 707.933.1726.


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s! rie o teg Ca

Bohemian’s Best of 2013 Readers Poll Vote online at bohemian.com (mailed ballots will not be counted)

You know the feeling. It’s that excited feeling you get walking into the lobby of your favorite theater, loading up produce from your favorite farmer’s market or finding just the right title at your favorite bookstore. It may come daily at the cafe, weekly at the nightclub or even just once a year at the framing shop. It can happen anywhere, from the bank to the feed store, from the yoga studio to the park. It’s a feeling that says you absolutely need to tell the entire world about how wonderful this one perfectly divine little thing is right now. We know. We get that same feeling pretty much constantly, and each week we get the chance to get the giddiness offour chest in print. But once a year, it’s your turn. Dear readers, it’s time to channel all those good feelings about

A few online voting rules: Complete at least one third of the ballot or it won’t be counted Include your name and a daytime phone number

everything you love and shout them from the mountaintop—or, as the case may be, our Best of the North Bay Readers Poll. The sample ballot below can be scribbled on however you see fit to prepare voting for the many places, businesses and people who make your world brighter. When you’re ready to pull the trigger, go online to www.bohemian.com between now and Friday, Jan. 11 at 5pm. Look for your picks to be printed in our annual Best Of issue, publishing on March 20, 2013. Keep in mind that any big-box corporate entities will be tossed out in favor of our prized independents; we’re all about supporting local businesses and people. Sit down with the ballot and vote for your favorites today!

Important! Check one of the following. My selections are for:

Sonoma County

Ballots are confidential, but you may be called to confirm your vote Only one entry per person is permitted Bohemian staff members, contributors, advertisers and their families may vote Dealine for online ballots is Friday, Jan 11, at 5pm

Culture Best Art Gallery Best Ballet Company Best Band Best Charity Event Best Dance Studio Best Festival Best Film Festival Best Media Personality: TV, Radio, Print Best Movie Theater Best Museum Best Music Festival Best Music Venue Best Outdoor Art Event Best Performing Arts Center Best Performing Dance Company Best Place to Dance Best Theater Troupe

Recreation Best Bike Shop Best Gym Best Health Club Best Independent Bike Frame Builder Best Martial Arts School Best Outdoor Gear Shop Best Park Best Pilates Studio

Marin County Napa County Honorable mentions will be included in the Sonoma votes!

Best Public Golf Course Best Snow/Skate/Board Shop Best Surf Shop Best Yoga Studio

Food & Drink Best Bakery Best Bar Best Bartender Best BBQ Best Breakfast Best Brew Pub Best Brunch Best Burger Best Cabernet Best Cafe/Coffeehouse Best Candy/Chocolate Shop (by location) Best Caterer Best Chardonnay Best Chef Best Chinese Best Chocolatier Best Cocktails Best Cupcakes Best Diner Best Dining After 10pm Best Dive Bar Best Farmers’ Market

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Best French Best Frozen Dessert Shop Best Happy Hour Best Indian (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Italian Best Japanese/Sushi Restaurant Best Mediterranean (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Mexican (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Micro Distillery Best Microbrew Best New Restaurant Best Organic Farm Best Outdoor Dining Best Pinot Noir Best Pizza Best Restaurant Best Sandwich Shop Best Sauvignon Blanc Best Seafood Best Server/Restaurant Best Sparkling Wine Best Spot to Dine Solo Best Syrah Best Thai (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Vegetarian Best Vietnamese Best Wine List Best Winetasting Room Best Zinfandel


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22

Pinot, Poverty And Politics

Voters reelect a supervisor who promises to use his position at ABAG to limit housing requirements in Napa— and the lawsuits fly BY RACHEL DOVEY

REPORT IN HAND Hector Olvera says vineyard

workers sometimes sleep in cars and under bridges for lack of affordable housing in Napa.

I

’m driving down Napa’s scenic Highway 29, past tasting rooms that look like castles. Coupled with cobblestone bridges and Medieval names—Pope, Church, Alpha and Omega—their wrought-iron balconies and pointed turrets seem intentionally reminiscent of feudal Europe. Everywhere, fall-colored vines stretch to the horizon in rows straight and narrow as the path to salvation.

Later that day, I’ll meet with farmworker-turned-activist Hector Olvera, who says hourly wages to pick in these fields can get as low as $5. Along with Santa Rosa–based lawyer David Grabill, Olvera founded Latinos Unidos del Valle de Napa, which advocates—and repeatedly goes to court—on issues of affordable housing for farmworkers; namely, that with roughly 1,100 units of low-income

housing and 4,000 year-round farmworkers, there isn’t enough of it. This is the story of the state housing law that is supposed to address the needs of these farmworkers. It’s the story of how this law is not only barely enforced, but is even, at times, bent to favor those who oppose it. It’s the story of a system aimed at fixing things like regional inequity and in-commuting across the Bay Area, a system that, like

the Napa landscape, isn’t quite as benevolent as it seems.

L

ike Marin, its costly, landrestricted sister county to the southwest, Napa has a commute problem. According to a report commissioned by the Napa Community Foundation, 31 percent of the county’s nativeborn workforce and 39 percent of its immigrant workforce live outside Napa, which has a median monthly rent of $1,300 and home price of nearly $400,000. The study found that immigrants comprise 73 percent of all agricultural workers and contribute between $317 million and $1.07 billion to the county’s overall gross domestic product. Meanwhile, it states, Latino immigrants commuting in make

an average of about $20,000 a year. If these workers paid Napa’s median monthly rent, it would take up 78 percent of their income. According to the state department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), this shouldn’t be a problem. In 1969, the California department enacted housing element law, which mandates that local governments plan—and, more importantly, zone—for all economic segments of their community, even those with incomes too low to rent or purchase market-rate housing. Its reasoning includes public health and environmental issues from excessive in-commuting; jobs-housing imbalances that can occur in areas with high market-rate rents; and, ultimately,


S

o you’re not a regulatory agency.” I’m sitting in a sparsely furnished office at the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), and I’m stunned. Senior regional planner Hing Wong sits across a table from me, which is covered in colorful printouts full of numbers. He’s been explaining how a critical step in the housing element process works. Every seven years, the regional planning agency receives a number from HCD, reflecting how much the region is projected to grow in the coming years. In the past, it has broken that number up for the various cities and unincorporated county governments in the bay area, based on projected household growth and census figures. That figure becomes known as the RHNA (regional housing needs assessment) number, and is given to each municipality to outline exactly how many units of abovemoderate, moderate, low and very low income housing it should zone for, theoretically helping to match jobs and population growth with ample opportunities for apartments and homes to be built. At Novato’s heated public

meetings, where I started covering issues related to housing law in early 2011, ABAG was often portrayed by those opposed to affordable housing as the long arm of Sacramento, forcing development policies on a town that didn’t want them. The term “social engineering” came up a lot. Arguments about town character were often coupled at the podium with allegations about the crime, graffiti, underperforming students and property-value plummets that would come with the low-income population the city was zoning for, which one community member described to me in an email simply as “immigrants.” Meanwhile, affordable-housing advocates more generally saw ABAG as the good guys, using numbers and formulas to combat wealthy Marin NIMBY-ism and right a situation in which 60 percent of the county’s workforce was forced to commute in. But as Wong shows me the new system, I see that it’s neither. The RHNA for 2014– 2022 is based less on some kind of fixed, omniscient data set about future growth and is more open to influence, part of what the planner refers to as a “living thing.” Over the course of meetings lasting roughly a year, dues-paying ABAG members—elected officials, planners and advocates from all over the bay—crafted a new formula to get those zoning numbers, and it’s one in which choice plays a much bigger part. For example, communities that decide they want a lot of growth can label themselves “priority development areas,” or PDAs, zone for more housing and be rewarded with transportation grants and other incentives. But areas that don’t want that don’t have to, even if their projected job growth is substantial. It’s a system that advocates for affordable housing have called arbitrary, because areas where low-income housing isn’t welcome are allowed to stay that way. That’s an oversimplification, according to Wong. “Most people in the methodology committee try to make it as low as possible for their jurisdiction,” he says.

“But they understand the whole ramification, that RHNA needs to be shared. And stakeholders like housing advocates push back.” Bits of the formula are set in place to check NIMBY zoning policies—there’s a provision for jobs and another one to add more low-income housing to excessively wealthy areas that have a shortage of it. But toward the end of our conversation, I ask about Novato, citing the violent opposition to low-income housing that I witnessed there, despite Marin’s extremely high in-commuting rate. “Novato has a third of the number they did last time,” Wong says. “They have a councilmember who wanted very low numbers.”

T

he president of ABAG’s board is Napa County supervisor Mark Luce. When I speak to him on the phone, he describes this new system as more “bottom up,” and thinks it will improve a broken process, in which, he says, costly and painful zoning battles at the city level don’t actually lead to housing. But Luce isn’t just critical of a system in which potentially empty zoning decisions can be made—as in 2011, when Novato’s city council chose sites to zone for low-income housing that had operating businesses on them. Although he presides over the board of ABAG, Luce is no fan of zoning as a regulatory measure at all—despite its central place in housing element law. “It’s not good for anyone when you enforce zoning when nobody wants it,” he says. Historically, the county supervisor has been a strong supporter of Napa’s agricultural preserve, a collection of properties on the valley floor that have been designated for agricultural and open-space use. Many of these landowners receive tax relief in exchange for the designation, per the 1968 Williamson Act, and Luce’s 2012 campaign donations show some of the same names as a list of

those property owners who are part of the Land Trust of Napa County. Luce’s position of protecting open space against development has precedent in the same set of laws that mandate regulatory housing zones, specifying that, as much as possible, they should be placed in cities, near grocery stores and bus lines. He’s also been in line with the spirit of the law, helping to craft a workforcehousing program for low-income families to buy homes, though this program is targeted at incomes well above those of the county’s many farmworkers. But in this latest election cycle, Luce, like other local officials that Wong spoke of, campaigned on a promise to use his position in the planning agency to limit housing. “Don’t be fooled,” a slogan on his campaign website reads. “Only one candidate is working to reduce the amount of housing the state requires of us and ensure slow growth in Napa County.” A sentence further down on the same page reads: “In my role as President of the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), which will continue if I am reelected, I am in a position to better protect our county’s interests.” In November, he was reelected to the second district with 52 percent of the vote. Last summer, I interviewed the supervisor about his position on the controversial Napa Pipe development, a proposed marketrate site along the Napa River with some low-income units included. Instead of advocating the 945-unit zoning recommended by Napa’s planning commission, he favored a much lower zoning of 350 for the site, which—much like Roseland in Santa Rosa—is an island of unincorporated county land surrounded by city. The figure, he told me, would fulfill the letter of housing element law. However, he admitted that that number was too low to actually interest a developer and result in any housing being built.

N

ot everyone agrees with ABAG’s new practice of giving local officials a greater role in crafting ) 24 the RHNA process. Last

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 1 2-1 8, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

a desire to combat systemized discrimination, in which those with lower incomes are excluded from the wealthy regions where, in the case of Napa or Marin, they work. But there’s a fiefdom-sized gap in the state’s socially beneficent system. Although it requires local governments to submit housing elements that contain all their plans to zone for affordable housing, it doesn’t require that any housing actually get built (such things, like independent expenditures, are the domain of the private market). And it doesn’t exactly penalize local jurisdictions that don’t cooperate. Between this state law created 43 years ago and Napa’s low-income workforce today is a convoluted chain of agencies, officials and lawsuits—a chain that sometimes works against the very principles that housing element law was created to address.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | DEC E M BE R 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Pinot, Poverty and Politics ( 23

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July, a group of lawyers, including Grabill, authored a response to the 2014–’22 method, critiquing the fact that most of the Bay Area’s projected growth is placed in priority development areas, which, remember, are voluntary. “This methodology is wholly inconsistent with the fundamental principle of housing element law that local governments all have a responsibility to accommodate their fair share of the regional need for lower income housing,” the letter states. When I meet with the housing lawyer and Olvera, on a Thursday afternoon at Starbucks in the city of Napa, he expresses frustration with a system that rewards voluntary compliance but, he says, doesn’t do much to combat institutionalized NIMBY-ism toward lower-income housing. “HCD doesn’t have any enforcement capability,” he says. “If a local government doesn’t do it right, HCD can’t go to court and say, ‘Shape up.’ There are some penalties that go along with it. Local governments can’t apply for certain kinds of affordablehousing funding if they haven’t complied with state laws, but that just makes it harder to do affordable housing in those jurisdictions that are reluctant. It’s not a great system.” It’s a system that, Luce will later point out in my interview with him, private lawyers like Grabill stand to profit from. In 2003, Grabill and three other lawyers sued Napa County for failing to update its housing element. They won, and the settlement mandated that unincorporated Napa take part in the statewide process and zone for its allocation of low-income housing units. Luce points out that this was both costly for the county and ineffective, because no new housing has been built. “We paid the private lawyer who sued us $400,000 to settle, and were required to zone rural lands in Angwin, Lake Berryessa and Coombsville for housing anyway,” he says on his website. Grabill contends that the

settlement fee was $240,000, split between three of the four lawyers who instigated the case, for what he estimates to be 1,500 hours of work. Silva Darbinian with Napa County Counsel confirms that the settlement fee was indeed $240,000, saying of the $400,000 figure, “I don’t know where that came from.” And Grabill believes that the lack of new housing in the county is less a fault of the zoning system itself and more of a pattern of discrimination on the part of county officials. He’s said this in court, in a new lawsuit filed in 2009. A judge sided with Napa County on that one, and Grabill appealed earlier this year, part of a process that, needed or not, had cost Napa County $700,000 as of last August, according to local newspaper reports. Meanwhile, although three new low-income developments have been approved in the city of Napa, two of them have been legally challenged by neighborhood groups—potentially leading to more legal fees and cries of NIMBY-ism, and, most importantly, no new housing for the farmworkers who power Napa’s economy. “Rent is very expensive here,” Olvera says in hesitant English on the afternoon when I meet with him. “And many people have to share apartments or drive two or three hours to come here.” Since immigrating to wine country 22 years ago and working as a picker, Olvera says he’s seen other farmworkers sleeping in tents, in their cars, under bridges and on church porches. To corroborate this story, he pulls out a document created by Napa Community Foundation, which shows the long commutes and crowded living conditions farmworkers deal with just to work in the county, an entire segment of the population falling through housing element law’s many holes. When he pulls it out, he says something that I don’t understand. He spells it out on his palm for me, with his finger. It says: “I don’t lie.”


Crush SEBASTOPOL

Golden Boy

For someone who is just releasing a debut album, David Luning has definitely established a reputation on the North Bay Americana circuit. Not only has he opened for the likes of Dave Alvin, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Carolyn Wonderland and Leon Russell, the young singersongwriter has been declared winner of a few West Coast songwriter’s competitions for songs like “Whiskey Bottle,” “Northern California” and “A Little Big Bad.” He’s also managed to clock some time as a ballroom dancing instructor and with a salsa troupe in New York and Los Angeles—and did I mention that he acts on occasion? Luning’s new album, Just Drop On By, drops this week; help him celebrate on Friday, Dec. 14, at Hopmonk Tavern. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8:30pm. $12–$15. 707.829.7300.

FA I R FA X

Rapper’s Delight Rappin’ 4-Tay hit it big back in the day with “Playaz Club,” a loping, groovedipped tune about a special place only accessible to in-the-know people in classy suits. (The basic message: leave the gat at home, but bring some dominoes, then take off your shoes and get a body rub.) After falling off the radar for a decade or so, the San Francisco–born rapper has been on the slow road to a comeback. The East Bay Express included the Bay Area rapper, who saw his greatest success in the early ’90s, on a list of the top-played artists at UC Berkeley frat parties (right behind Dave Matthews Band and Bob Marley’s Legend). If you missed the RBL Posse revival straight outta Rohnert Park last month, they’ll be opening. Rappin’ 4-Tay plays Saturday, Dec. 15, at 19 Broadway. 19 Broadway Blvd., Fairfax. 9pm. $15. 415.459.1091.

N A PA

Stoner Fables KLUMPIN’ AROUND Actor Rick Gomez is among the final lineup at the lastever Twisted Christmas Live!, which has tickled Santa’s funnybones for 10 years. See Events, p35.

It’s a shame that Todd Snider’s sharp-edged songs aren’t known to more people—songs like “Statistician’s Blues” or “America’s Favorite Pastime,” which tells the story of Dock Ellis pitching a nohitter for the Pittsburgh Pirates while tripping on acid. “New York Banker,” from the grim and entrancing Agnostic Hymns & Stoner Fables, is classic Snider—“Good things happen to bad people,” he sings, while relaying the story of fat-cat bankers run amok with the pensions of the working-class. Comedian and podcast host extraordinaire Marc Maron is a big fan, and probably Jimmy Buffett, too, since Snider covers his “West Nashville Grand Ballroom Gown” on the new album. Snider plays with Widespread Panic bassist Dave Schools, plus opener Nicki Bluhm and the Gramblers on Saturday, Dec. 15, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $25. 707.259.0123.

—Leilani Clark

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 1 2-1 8, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

25


ArtsIdeas Leilani Clark

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | DEC E M BE R 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

TRUE â&#x20AC;&#x2122;TIL CLOSING Khysie Horn has been a passionate champion of Sonoma County artists at Quicksilver.

Journeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s End

Quicksilver Mine Co. closes its doors after 30 years of art and community BY LEILANI CLARK

A

tour of Quicksilver Mine Co. with Khysie Horn, owner of the downtown Forestville gallery, goes beyond looking admiringly at paintings, collages and sculptures. Walking among the assemblage pieces, ceramics, pen- and-ink drawings and paintings feels like attending an elegant and spirited party, one populated by Hornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friends and mentors spanning decades.

She points out an assemblage piece of wood, nails and a baby shoe, by Raymond Barnhart, the Sebastopol artist who died in a car accident in 1996. Next, an abstract painting by Horst Trave, Healdsburg artist and co-founder of the ďŹ rst Beat gallery in the Bay Area, who died this year at age 94. Younger artists like Hamlet Mateo and Kai Samuels-Davis also take part in the exhibit. Horn talks fondly of this art, her voice tinged with nostalgia; after 30 years of existence, Quicksilver Mine Co. will permanently close its doors on Dec. 31. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Last Hurrahâ&#x20AC;? exhibit, showing now, features nearly 90 artists and craftspeople, just a fraction of the

600 that have exhibited in the gallery since 1983. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bittersweet time, Horn admits, sitting on a ďŹ nely crafted wooden bench in the Quicksilver sculpture garden. The space has been a prime location for gallery talks, literary events, concerts and community gatherings. And though Horn remains passionate about the work, the gallery has taken up half of her life, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for a change. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing I can imagine that would be more interesting than to work with all of these people that do all of the amazing things,â&#x20AC;? she says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really go anywhere or do anything; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m essentially married to it.â&#x20AC;?

Quicksilverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s origins go back to the early â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s and its initial incarnation as a Guerneville gift shop stocked with Sonoma County food products and crafts (long before â&#x20AC;&#x153;localâ&#x20AC;? became a buzzword), along with original art displayed in the hallway of the Cinnabar building. Soon, Horn expanded into a space that provided for a â&#x20AC;&#x153;trueâ&#x20AC;? gallery. A committee of local artists, including John Chambers and Bonnie Smith, helped Horn curate shows. Later, she moved into a third location in Sebastopol. In 2001, Horn bought a building in Forestville, transforming the space into a sunlit, white-walled professional gallery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is a special place sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s designed for artists,â&#x20AC;? says Janet Charnofsky, a Sebastopol artist who has both exhibited and purchased work at Quicksilver. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you want to see everybody, you come to one of the openings. The artists gravitate toward Khysie.â&#x20AC;? Satri Pencak, West County artist and independent curator, commends Quicksilverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s professional installations and Hornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s willingness to give artists their ďŹ rst solo shows, always open to emerging artists as well as those with international reputations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over these past many years, the Quicksilver Mine Co. has been one of the best art galleries in Sonoma County, and perhaps north of the Golden Gate Bridge,â&#x20AC;? says Pencak. If she had the energy to run the gallery forever, Horn says, she probably would. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love hanging shows,â&#x20AC;? she says with a wistful smile. â&#x20AC;&#x153; I love working with the artists. I love the part of being in business for myself. But I really know itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the right decision for me.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Last Hurrahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs through Monday, Dec. 31, at Quicksilver Mine Co. 6671 Front St., Forestville. 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6pm, Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Monday. 707.887.0799.


Making Merry Area theaters get creative in the 12th month

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

do not make merry at Christmas,” said grouch Ebenezer Scrooge, “and I can’t afford to make others merry, either!”

Obviously, Scrooge didn’t live in the North Bay, where during the holidays there are many irresistible opportunities to “make merry,” and where the local theater community has earned a reputation for combining holiday stage events with a party atmosphere, presenting seasonal plays, concerts and other happenings with a huge dollop of theatrical flair. In Sebastopol, Main Stage West has found an appropriate way to hang on to its spectacular Irish Pub set from October’s run of The Weir, repurposing the theater

“Winter Succor” by Carolyn Lord

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

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27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 1 2-1 8, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

AU REVOIR Sandy and Richard Riccardi close the year on Sixth Street.

Art PAID ADVERTISING SECTION

Gallery

Stage

as an intimate publike music venue hosting a series of winter concerts and parties—including this weekend’s highly anticipated blowout with Push Button Zebco on Friday, Dec. 14 (8pm; sliding scale, $7–$25). North Bay favorites Mary Gannon Graham and Thomas Graham will sing everything from Gypsy folk songs to Christmas classics, and will be joined by local actor-singers Allison Rae Baker, Joan Hawley, Jim Peterson, Tim Sarter and Stuart Rabinowitz. Meanwhile, in Santa Rosa, the Studio at Sixth Street Playhouse has been transformed into a seasonal cabaret for a series of musical events stretching right up to New Year’s Eve. Kicking it off is a brandnew holiday show on Friday (Dec. 14–22; $25), featuring the female foursome from last year’s Marvelous Wonderettes dancing and doo-wopping through a peppy repertoire of up-tempo tunes. On Sunday, Sixth Street Improv unleashes its Naughty or Nice holiday show, with a troupe of unhinged comedians making up skits about whatever holiday likes and dislikes the audience suggests (Dec. 16, 8pm; $14). The holiday series concludes New Year’s weekend with the sensational comedy-musical duo of Sandy and Richard Riccardi, satirizing everything they can think of with their patented blend of witty lyrics and smooth lounge-act showmanship (Dec. 29–31, Friday and Saturday at 8pm; $25; two shows New Year’s Eve, 7pm and 10pm, $40–$50). And per tradition, Petaluma’s Cinnabar Theater kicks off its new year with a blow-out New Year’s Eve party and the opening-night performance of its new musical show A Couple of Blaguards, featuring Tim Kniffin and Steven Abbot as the yarn-spinning Irish brothers Frank and Malachy McCourt. Directed by Sheri Lee Miller, with musical direction by Jim Peterson, the play runs through Jan. 20, but on Dec. 31, revelers at Cinnabar get the first peek. Festivities begin at 9pm ($60–$75) with a full run of the show, followed by Champagne, desserts and New Year’s fun right up to midnight.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | DEC E M BE R 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

Film

TRAIPSING TRIO Bombur, Bofur and Bifur in Peter Jackson’s nearly three-hour film.

Dwarf Power

More monsters, less transcendence in ‘The Hobbit’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

P

eter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy was so much more than a wow-machine. The more tender lines can still be rolled over in the mind: Aragorn murmuring “I have seen the White City, long ago . . .” You’d hope for similar transcendence in the series’ prequel, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. But it’s a mosh pit of monsters, with more simple, even childish aims. Richard Armitage, stalwart but dull, plays the landless king Thorin Oakenshield. Under the advice of the wizard Gandalf, he is taking along the fussy and hardly battle-hardened Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) on a quest. Thorin and a dozen-plus cartoonish dwarves journey to their ancient mountain kingdom, currently occupied by Smaug, a dragon. Except for Cate Blanchett, sauntering in satin as Galadriel, the Lady of Lorien, The Hobbit is a female-free zone. One misses the girl-power moments from the original trilogy, such as when Liv Tyler’s Arwen gave the Ringwraiths a much-needed bath. Instead of romance, there are creatures: leprous orcs mounted on wolflike “wargs”; a goblin king with a crown of bones, bibbed with a wobbling goiter the size of a minivan; a trio of gross, ravenous trolls, who argue over the proper way to prepare hobbit for dinner. Grandest of all are stone -giants in a boulder-hurling battle on a stormy mountain peak. It’s a well-stocked menagerie, but is it more? The creatures are bad villains or good heroes here, and the most serious personal conflict is confined to one mere character, the oily, murderous Gollum (voiced again by Andy Serkis), who shows a startling range of emotions and doubt in his rolling, softball-sized eyes. The Hobbit hints at the evil of a necromancer, a minor character whose worse misdeeds are being saved for the second and third parts. Yet this movie’s biggest achievement is necromancy: burglarizing the tomb of the great Peter Lorre, the clear model for Gollum in the uneven teeth, the wateriness of gaze and the ingratiating yet grating hiss. ‘The Hobbit’ opens in wide release Friday, Dec. 14.


JAFAKINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;? Only time will tell if

Snoopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually serious about Rastafari.

Dogg or Dunce? Snoop goes from â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Doggystyleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to self-lionizing

 BY JACQUELYNNE OCANA

I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a big year for the Doggfather, as one of the founding fathers of West Coast gangster rap has been reincarnated into a Rastafarian. As Snoop Doggâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rebirth unfolds, the question arises: Is this a genuine attempt at scrapping a gangsta image for an advocate of peace, or just a publicity stunt?

Snoop Lion has star-powered supporters, namely Bunny Wailer and Sizzla, but in some circles heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accused of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jafakinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.â&#x20AC;? The Jamaica Observer led the condemnation: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rapper Snoop Doggy Dog has decided to go Rasta, in costume at least. So heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s converted from Dawg to Lion, and nuff Rasta colors to go with it. Try yuh best Snoops! It takes more than a costume to make a Lion in Zion.â&#x20AC;?

Snoop Dogg plays two totally sold-out shows this weekend at the Uptown Theatre in Napa (Dec. 14) and the Phoenix Theater in Petaluma (Dec. 15).

29 112/14 2 /14 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 112/20 2 / 20

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Music

All the while, claiming to be the next Reggae Jesus is just part of the divine decree. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have always said I was Bob Marley reincarnated,â&#x20AC;? speaking at a press conference in New York City in mid-July. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel I have always been a Rastafari. I just didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have my third eye open, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wide open right now.â&#x20AC;? But Snoopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intended nobility waned shortly after releasing the albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst single, the Diploproduced â&#x20AC;&#x153;La La La.â&#x20AC;? In August, Snoop heard Mariah Carey was pulling in $18 million a year on American Idol, so the rapperturned-Rasta announced he would be putting in a bid for judge. With no call back from the studio and still apparently pandering for international attention, Snoop found out in November that Scotlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Celtic football club had just beat Barcelona. Donning a red mink coat over a Celtic jersey, Snoop told a Scottish newspaper he was interested in investing in the team, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t catch the whole Barcelona game, but I watched the highlights.â&#x20AC;? As for Rastafarianism, Snoop Lion claims the spirit ďŹ nally called to him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had no plans on going to Jamaica, making a reggae record. The spirit called me. And, you know, anytime the spirit calls you, you gotta know that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s serious,â&#x20AC;? he said to the press in NYC. Is he serious? The notoriously uninhibited Vice Films set out to legitimize Snoopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transformation from rabid canine to king feline. Shot over 35 days in the Nyabinghi communities of Jamaicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highlands, the documentary shows promise. But the release date for Reincarnated is unknown, while the release of the new album is months overdue. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more, Snoop Dogg will be appearing as a rapper, not a Rasta, this weekend. Even so, Snoop is coming clean about his transition: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Snoop Dogg was young, and he grew into a young man. Snoop Lion is a fullgrown man, ready to become a fullgrown leader.â&#x20AC;? At least he seems proud to have found a persona more meaningful than a pimp.


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Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Bach B Minor Mass Santa Rosa Symphony and Bach Choir present choral collaboration. Dec 15, 3pm. $20-$40. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

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Soulful country music with a revealing honesty. Dec 15, 8pm. $50-$90. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY New Century Chamber Orchestra

Experimental jazz at its funkiest. Dec 18, 8pm. $17. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Violinist Nadja SalernoSonnenberg directs concert of Handel, Auerbach, Assad and Vivaldi. Dec 16, 5pm. $29-$59. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Dave Koz & Friends Dave Koz, David Benoit, Sheila E, Javier Colon and Margo Ray jam on fresh, lively arrangements of seasonal favorites. Dec 14, 8pm. $39$69. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

David Templetonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Twisted Christmas Live!

Dragonsmoke

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

Dwight Yoakam

Charlie Hunter & Scott Amendola

Tenth and final installment of subversive Christmas variety show, with comedians, actors, singers and more. Dec 15, 7:30pm. $20-$25. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381. DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

9pm. Sold out. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Eric Lindell, Ivan Neville, Stanton Moore and Robert Mercurio join forces in this New Orleans jazz jam band. Dec 15, 8:30pm. $35. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Eileen Ivers: An Irish Christmas Celebrate the season Celtic style with this brand-new holiday pops concert. Dec 16, 3pm. $37-$80. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

English Beat Old-school skankers keep the beat alive. The Dirty Dub Band opens. Dec 15, 8:30pm. $31. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Snoop Dogg An elegant evening with one of the godfathers of modern hip-hop. The skilled MC may stick to his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gin & Juiceâ&#x20AC;? roots or go with his modern Snoop Lion personaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or both. Dec 15,

Rappin 4-Tay SF rapper of started out in the early â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s with Tupac and others. RBL Posse opens. Dec 15, 10pm. $15. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Bob Weir Grateful Dead guitarist plays an acoustic show with Jackie Greene. Dec 17, 8pm. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Chris Isaak

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Dec 13, Taluna. Dec 14, Mighty Groove. Dec 15, Home Brew. Dec 16, Smart Fellers. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Dec 13, Saffell, Rhythm Rangers. Dec 14, Gravity Hill, Pat Jordan Band. Dec 15, Bellyfull, Top Shelf, Carter & Korey, One Drop. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Cameo Cinema Dec 15, Christmas Concert with St. Helena Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choir. 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3946.

Cinnabar Theater Dec 15, Chamber Singers Holiday Concert. 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Dry Creek Kitchen Dec 17, Jim Adams and Tom Shader. Dec 18, Dick Conte and Steve Webber. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Flamingo Lounge Dec 14, Third Rail. Dec 15, Sugarfoot. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Forestville Club Dec 15, Pat Nicholson. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

SF crooner plays with his brother, Nick. Dec 16, 8pm. $75-$90. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Glaser Center

Jeff Hamilton Trio

Green Music Center

One of the best jazz drummers in America paradiddles into the North Bay. Dec 16, 4pm. $20$40. Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Dec 15, Bach B Minor Mass. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Snoop Dogg Snoop Dee-Oh-Double-Jizzle heads up to wine country for an evening of high tea and hijinks. Dec 14, 7pm. Sold out. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Todd Snider with Dave Schools After 12 albums, this storyteller hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t run out of tales. Nicki Bluhm & the Gramblers open. Dec 15, 8pm. $25. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Dec 15, David Templetonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Twisted Christmas Live! 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

The Hideaway Dec 16, Thugz. 18100 Hwy 116, Guerneville.

Hopmonk Tavern Dec 14, David Luning. Dec 15, Dragonsmoke. Dec 18, Charlie Hunter & Scott Amendola. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Isis Oasis Dec 15, Winter Solstice Ritual Concert. 20889 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville.

Jack London State Park Dec 16, Winter Piano Concert.


CRITIC’S CHOICE

Last Day Saloon

Dec 14, Push Button Zebco. Dec 15, the Skerries. Dec 16, Due Zighi Baci. 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Main Street Station Dec 12, Phat Chance. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mavericks

Ch-Ch-Changes

Dec 16, Mid Lyf Crysis. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Studio E evolves, Rock ’n’ Roll Sunday School ends

Murphy’s Irish Pub Dec 14, Larry Carlin’s Mostly Simply Bluegrass Night. Dec 15, Perfect Crime. Dec 16, Kith & Kin. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Dec 13, Motet, Afromassive, Shovelman. Dec 14, California Honeydrops, Highway Poets, Pine Needles. Dec 15, English Beat. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Jasper O’Farrell’s Wed, Brainstorm. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Dec 12, Cascada. Dec 13, Rivereens. Dec 14, Jimbo Trout. Dec 16, Easy Leaves. Dec 19, Katie Freeman & Chris Chappell. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Saturday, Dec 15

Wed, Dec 12 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pmSCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE YOUTH AND FAMILY 7–10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Thur, Dec 13 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Dec 14 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7–11pm BALLROOM, LATIN & SWING DANCE hosted by California Ballroom Sat, Dec 15 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 7–11pm Steve Luther presents BLUES BOX BAYOU BAND Sun, Dec 16 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5pm–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Dec 17 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm;a 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Dec 18 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30–10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Dec 15, Joyeux Noel with Aulos Ensemble. Dec 16, Harper’s Yuletide. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

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Phoenix Theater Dec 15, Snoop Dogg (sold out). 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

REGGAE/DANCEHALL R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL

SOLD OU

Fri December 14 T!

Snoop Dogg Sat December 15

Raven Theater Dec 15, Christmas Jug Band. 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Redwood Cafe

Todd Snider with

Special Guests Dave Schools & Paulo Bidia plus Nicki Bluhm & the Gramblers

Sun December 16

Chris Isaak

Dec 15, Full Steem. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Fri December 21

Bootsy Collins and the Funk Unity Band

Russian River Brewing Co Dec 15, the Sorentinos. Dec 16, Cloud 9. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Fri January 4 Psychedelic Furs & The Fixx Fri January 5 An Evening with

Steve Earle Fri January 18

Gregg Allman

Sebastopol Community Center

Sat January 19

Dec 14, Rob Ickes & Jim Hurst. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Society: Culture House 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

BLUES BOX BAYOU BAND

Dec 16, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School: Final Edition. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa.

Merle Haggard Fri February 1 ŶŝŶƟŵĂƚĞĞǀĞŶŝŶŐǁŝƚŚ

Clint Black Sun February 10

Lewis Black Sat February 16

Los Lobos Sun February 24

Spancky’s Dec 14, Joshua Paige Band. Dec 15, Counter Balance. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. ) 707.664.0169.

32

Alan Parsons Live Project

Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

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Main Stage West

After 130 shows at Studio E in rural Sebastopol—an orchard-bound shed which has doubled as a haven for deadhead parties and a rehearsal space for Tom Waits—Laurie Schaeffer is looking for a new venue. “I need somewhere easier to use,” the North Bay Live promoter says. “Hopefully requiring less volunteers.” Schaeffer, who began putting on concerts 15 years ago and has been at Studio E for the past eight years, says she wants to “invent” a venue starting in early 2013. “I’m looking at old buildings like granges, and I have some exciting potentials.” This week, Kinky Friedman (pictured) closes Schaeffer’s run at the iconic listening room on Friday, Dec. 14, at 8pm. $40. Directions provided with tickets; see www.northbaylive.com for details. Meanwhile, the long-running dance night Rock ’n’ Roll Sunday School this week stops just short of a mammoth 10-year run. Since its inception at the Roaring 20s dive bar in Roseland, the weekly party has made lovers out of strangers, DJs out of dancers, miracles out of martinis and rapture out of rhythm at nearly a half-dozen venues as one of the county’s most enduring institutions. Organizers say this week’s will be the last; a playlist heavy on classic jams and a bittersweet kiss to 10 years of memories is guaranteed on Sunday, Dec. 16, at Society: Culture House. 528 Seventh St., Santa Rosa. 9:30pm. 707.336.2582.—Gabe Meline

31

Dec 13, Jill Cohn, Katie Phillips, Jen Tucker. Dec 14, Voodoo Saints. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | DEC E M BE R 1 2-1 8 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Music ( 31

4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Studio E

Rancho Nicasio

Dec 14, Kinky Friedman with Brian Molnar. Address provided with tickets, rural Sebastopol. www.northbaylive.com.

Dec 14, Sun Kings. Dec 15, Coverlettes. Dec 16, Tim Cain’s Family Christmas Sing Along. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Tradewinds Dec 14, Luvplanet. Dec 19, Cadillac Phil. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Wells Fargo Center Dec 14, Dave Koz & Friends. Dec 15, Dwight Yoakam. Dec 16, Eileen Ivers: An Irish Christmas. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Dec 13, Michelle Schmitt. Dec 14, Dr Elmo and the Supersonic Reindeer Band. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

George’s Nightclub Dec 15, Reggae Christmas Fest. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Tavern Session Room Dec 14, Ghosts of Electricity. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Melvin Seals & JGB. Dec 15, the Fall Risk. Dec 16, the Shut-Ins Christmas Show. Dec 17, Bob Weir. Dec 18, Barron Edwards’ Motown & Mo’ Soul Revue. Dec 19, San Francisco Music Club. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Sausalito Seahorse Dec 13, Marianna August. Dec 14, Buffalo Wedding. Dec 15, David M’Ore. Dec 16, Mazacote. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

NAPA COUNTY Billco’s Billiards Dec 13, Audio Farm. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Sleeping Lady

Molinari Caffe

Dec 12, Finger-Style Guitar Showcase. Dec 13, Danny Click & Friends Acoustic. Dec 15, Jeff Miller & the Wisemen. Dec 16, Dave Getz Straight Up Jazz. Dec 19, Rhythmatics. Dec 14, Appleberry Jam’s Guitar Pull. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Thurs, Open Mic. 815 Main St, Napa. 707.927.3623.

Smiley’s

Silo’s

Dec 13, Bellyfull. Dec 14, Reggae Rootical. Dec 15, Dginn. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Station House Cafe Dec 16, Paul Knight & Friends. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Sweetwater Music Hall Dec 13, Will Bernard Trio. Dec 14,

Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center Dec 14, Big Band Swing. Dec 16, Instrumental Alchemy (wind ensemble). 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500. Dec 13, Kelly Ash Band. Dec 1415, Peter Sykes & the Napa School of Music. Dec 16, Jeff Hamilton Trio. Dec 12 and , Dec 19, Tim Hockenberry. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Dec 14, Snoop Dogg. Dec 15, Todd Snider with Dave Schools. Dec 16, Chris Isaak. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium Dec 16, SingersMarin present silver bells, dreidels and more. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

19 Broadway Club Dec 13, Omatic, Zelus (EpiCenter Soundsystem). Dec 14, Rockin Wayne Canney. Dec 15, Rappin 4-Tay. Dec 16, Rory McNamara’s Ring of Truth Trio. Dec 19, Bubba’s Taxi. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osher Marin JCC Dec 16, New Century Chamber Orchestra. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Osteria Divino

Free Gift Boxes

Dec 12, Jonathan Poretz. Dec 13, Tammy Hall Trio. Dec 14, Passion Habanera. Dec 15, James Moseley Trio. Dec 16, Q Morrow Duo. Dec 18, James Moseley. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Dec 12, Joan Getz Quartet . Dec 13, Wanda Stafford . Dec 16, LIP-Sticks. Dec 18, Swing Fever. Dec 19, Amanda Addleman.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Santigold Wouldn’t it be funny if the poor man’s M.I.A. outlasted the real M.I.A.? Dec 12 at the Fox Theater.

Mountain Goats Nasally smart indie-lit put to music, or, as a friend recently remarked, “Ani Difranco for dudes.” Dec 14 at the Fillmore.

2 Chainz Rapper who flaked on opening for Nicki Minaj in Oakland so he could watch the Lakers. Dec 15-16 at the Warfield.

Sunn o))) 1906 . . . 1989 . . . and 2012? It’s time for another violent rumbling in San Francisco. Dec 18 at the Mezzanine.

El Vez The Mexican Elvis in his annual “MEX-mas” show, where anything imaginable is gaily possible. Dec 18 at the Independent.

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Arts Events OPENINGS Dec 14 At 6pm. Seager Gray Gallery, “Everyday Saints,” carved wooden figures by Joe Brubaker. Reception, Dec 14, 6pm. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

SONOMA COUNTY Art Changes Life Through Dec 31, “Deep Listening, Songs from the Earth,” mixed-media paintings by Richard K Bacon; also, paintings by Kristin Gustavson, photographs by Ananda Fierro, encaustic by Caterina Martinico and prints by Linda Shelp. 954 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Dec 31, “December Invitational,” including new work by guild members. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. WedThurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Calabi Gallery Through Dec 31, “Extraordinary” features the work of various artists on the narrow theme of life and death. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Feb 3, “The Art of Peanuts Animation” features 16 never-before-displayed Peanuts drawings and cels, including five cels rescued from Schulz’s 1966 studio fire. Dec 1, Charles Solomon and Lee Mendelson talk about new book “The Art and Making of Peanuts Animation.”. Through Apr 1, “Peanuts Celebrations” highlights 70 original strips which celebrate the major holidays throughout the year and features the history of the Peanuts-themed balloons in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Doorway Gallery & Artists’ Studio Through Dec 31, “Reno Confidential: All In” features paintings, ceramics, prints and works in stone by Darryl Ponicsan. 254 First St E, Sonoma. 415.309.7440.

EarthRise Center Through Dec 21, “Intimations” features works on paper by Carol Duchamp. Free. 707.781.7401. 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma.

Finley Community Center Through Dec 20, “Altered Group Exhibit” features local artists creating alternative and abstract art. Featuring work from Ricky Watts, Sean Nichols, Adam Springer, Saif Azzuz, Roman D’Argenzio and others. Through Dec 20, The work of ceramic artist Kathy Pallie. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Feb 2, “Holiday Lights Exhibit and Sale,” Becoming Independent’s two- and threedimensional arts and crafts. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Graton Gallery Through Jan 13, “Prelude 2013,” featuring work by Bruce Hopkins, James Freed, Sandra Rubin and others. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Dec 24, “Forward” features the work of 13 contemporary conceptual artists, including Chris Beards, Seymour Bergman and others. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Museum Through Jan 6, “Magical Toyland,” nostalgic fun for anyone born from 1860 to 1960 featuring toys, games and dollhouses. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Neon Raspberry Art House Through Dec 31, 6pm, “Blind Passenger” fall 2012 show features Nicole Markoff’s

project and new oil paintings from Colorado-based painter Erin Donnelly. Free. 3605 Main St, Occidental. 707 874 2100.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jan 6, “Nature Abstracted” features metal sculpture inspired by nature by Matt Devine, Jon Krawczyk and Rob Lorenson. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Dec 23, “Members’ Annual Exhibition,” featuring Petaluma artist David Moore. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Museum Through Dec 16, Exhibit tells the story of local vets who served in the Korean War through artifacts and video presentations. $3-$5. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Quercia Gallery Through Dec 31, “Sea, Land, City” features the miniature work of 12 artists. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Dec 31, “Last Hurrah” is the final exhibition at the Quicksilver Mine Co. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

RiskPress Gallery Through Dec 23, “Seen, Heard,” photographs by Nick Smith and recordings by Donna Tauscher. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jan 6, “California Photo Adventures,” photographs by Lance Kuehne. Through Jan 6, “Wildlife as Art,” photographs by Jim Coda. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Santa Rosa Junior College Through Dec 13, “Roberto Chavez Mini Blockbuster” features 50 pieces by Getty and Smithsonian-honored artist in the Robert F Agrella Gallery. )

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Afro-Haitian ~ Tues, Dec 18th 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:30pm

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1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 1.800.564.SRJC.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Jan 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trees and Trinkets: Obtainable Artâ&#x20AC;? features the functional tableware of Kalia Kilbana. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jan 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The California Landscape,â&#x20AC;? exhibition of landscape paintings from museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collections. Through Jan 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peace at Sunset,â&#x20AC;? painting from 19th-century artist Thomas Cole, on loan from the De Young Museum BALLPLAYERS Shooty Babbit and Bip Roberts talk in San Francisco. Through Jan baseball at 142 Throckmorton Dec. 19. See Lectures, p38. 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wild Land: Thomas Cole and the Birth of American Landscape Paintingâ&#x20AC;? uses Gallery Bergelli San Geronimo Valley a combination of graphics, Community Center Through Jan 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winter Group immersive environments and Through Dec 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Show,â&#x20AC;? new work by gallery images on a journey through Our Family: Portraits of All artists Alberto Ludwig, Braulio Coleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creative process. Kinds of Families,â&#x20AC;? by Delgado, James Leonard and 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. photographer Gigi Kaeser others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500. with text written by Peggy Larkspur. 415.945.9454. Sonoma Valley Gillespie and Rebekah Museum of Art Marin MOCA Boyd. 6350 Sir Francis Through Dec 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art Through Jan 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Actuality, Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. of Handmade Paperâ&#x20AC;? offers Reminiscence and Fabrication,â&#x20AC;? 415.488.8888. glimpse into historical practice new photography by Deborah Seager Gray Gallery of papermaking with large Sullivan. Novato Arts Center, Through Dec 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyday display of rare Japanese Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Saints,â&#x20AC;? carved wooden figures papers. Through Dec 30, Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. by Joe Brubaker. Reception, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coastal Echoesâ&#x20AC;? features 415.506.0137. Dec 14, 6pm. 23 Sunnyside the new works of respected Marin Society Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to painter Larry Thomas. of Artists 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedThrough Dec 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winter 415.384.8288. Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA. Holidays and Giftsâ&#x20AC;? features ceramics, sculptures, paintings, NAPA COUNTY MARIN COUNTY photography, prints, jewelry and wearable art. 30 Sir Francis di Rosa 142 Throckmorton Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, Through Jan 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Renaissance Theatre 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. on Fillmoreâ&#x20AC;? examines San Through Dec 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starring 415.454.9561. Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s upper Fillmore the Throckmorton,â&#x20AC;? fine art by Joni Bissell, Victoria Mimiaga, Francis Whitnall and Douglas Andelin. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts

district through 1955-â&#x20AC;&#x2122;65 with the work of 17 artists who either lived or worked in the building at 2322 Fillmore. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Through Dec 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Slapstick,â&#x20AC;? vintage Hollywood cinema photography from the collection of Robert Flynn Johnson. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Through Dec 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art of the Spirit,â&#x20AC;? entries may address the spiritual world, politics, ecology, ritual, myth, mysticism or spiritual expression. Through Dec 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dream Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media works by Dr Peller Marion. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Book Passage

Rebound Bookstore

Gordon Huether Gallery

Through Feb 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tom Killion Woodcut Prints,â&#x20AC;? Marin County artist and owned of Quail Press. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Through Jan 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Phases of the Moonâ&#x20AC;? features various artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; found images and abstract works in the many shapes of the moon. 1641 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.0550.

Through Jan 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;AtatĂźrkâ&#x20AC;? series, Gordon Huetherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest work, on display with a selection of Turkish rugs. 1465 First Street, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Bolinas Museum

ECHO Gallery Through Dec 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Picture Showâ&#x20AC;? showcases emerging and established photographers. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.


Hess Collection Winery Ongoing, outstanding private collection featuring work by Franz Gertsch, Robert Motherwell and other modern masters. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. Daily, 10 to 5:15. 707.255.1144.

Comedy Comedy Open Mic Adult content, $4 minimum purchase. Dec 19, 9pm. Gaia’s Garden, 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Socofu Monthly Comedy Series Standup series brings the comedy underground to Sonoma County. Third Sun of every month, 7pm. $10. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Marin Center Dec 15, 2 and 5:30pm, Tapcracker, Tapdance version of Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker by Sherry Studio. $12-$22. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.499.6800.

Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium Dec 15, 1 and 5pm, Sophie and the Enchanted Toyshop, Marin Dance Theater ballet performance features over 125 dancers along with professional guest artists. $27-$36. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.499.6800.

Monroe Dance Hall Dec 14, 7:30pm, Holiday Dance, Beginning and intermediate dance lessons followed by a mixer. $10. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa 707.529.5450.

Spreckels Performing Arts Center Fri, Dec 14, 7pm, Sat, Dec 15, 2 and 7pm and Sun, Dec 16, 2pm, “The Nutcracker,” Santa Rosa Dance Theater performance. $20-$25. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Events

Through Jan 6, 2013. Free. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Handmade for the Holidays Craft Fair Locally made goods available for purchase. Fri, Dec 14, 3-8pm. Free. Guayakí Maté Bar, 6782 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.6644.

Marin Handmade Holiday Craft Fair

Enjoy the costume contest in this 1k or 5k run for charity. Dec 15, 9am. Marin Fairgrounds, Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael.

Featuring crafters and artists from Marin and the Bay Area. A portion of each sale benefits the Marin History Museum. Dec 14, 5pm. Free. Downtown San Rafael, Fifth and A streets, San Rafael.

Artisan Trunk Show

Holiday Extravaganza

“Artisan Trunk Show,” featuring hundreds of handmade items from indie artists. Music by Buttercream Gang and others on Friday. Dec 14, 6pm and Dec 15, 10am-6pm. ECHO Gallery, 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Music, magic and more. Dec 15-16, 2pm. $8-$10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Arthritis Foundation’s Jingle Bell Run

Breakfast with Santa Complimentary photos, music and festive fun. Sat, 9-11am. through Dec 22. Free. Costeaux French Bakery, 417 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Charlie Brown’s Christmas Tree Grove Snow flurries, 175 decorated trees and holiday music create a holly, jolly atmosphere. Through Dec 31. Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

David Templeton’s Twisted Christmas Live! Tenth and final installment of subversive, melodic and funny Christmas variety show, with comedians, actors, singers and more. Dec 15, 7:30pm. $20$25. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Fete de Noel Napa Valley Ballet and Napa Valley Youth Symphony team for two shows in one day. Dec 16, 3:30 and 6:30pm. $10$15. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Gingerbread Doghouse Class Kids can assemble and decorate Snoopy’s doghouse out of gingerbread. Times vary. Dec 15-16. $25. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Handmade for the Holidays Healdsburg Goodies galore up for sale.

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Through Dec 31, “Out of the Woods,” Wood Sculpture for Home and Garden by Freeland Tanner. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

HIstory Holiday Handmade Craft Fair Jewelry, accessories and more. Enjoy tasty treats and holiday cider, festive music and a drop-by craft table to make handmade holiday gifts. Dec 14, 5pm. Free. Marin History Museum History Center Gallery, 1026 Court St, San Rafael.

Holiday Trunk Show & Shop Sale Jewelers Karen Murad, Michael Byrne, Celia Cooledge and Sam Diamond bring their collections to the Museum for a special one-day sale. Dec 15, 11am. Free. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

FUNCTIONAL ART

Late Night Art Collaborative art-making, ambient music, food and insightful discussion. Dec 13, 7pm. $25-$35. Dhyana Center Lofts, 186 N Main St, Sebastopol. 800.796.6863.

Marin Singles Holiday Dance Party sponsored by Society of Single Professionals, the world’s largest nonprofit singles organization. Dec 15, 8pm. $10. Embassy Suites Hotel, 101 McInnis Pkwy, San Rafael.

Music in the Air Local choirs sing Christmas Carols in downtown stores. Dec 15, 1-4pm. Free. West End Village, Fourth St, San Rafael.

Photos with Santa The big man himself arrives with his lovely lady to pose for photos with children of all ages. Dec 16, 1pm. )

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The Holiday Spirit is Here Beautiful Handmade gifts for under $20

fine & fashion jewelry 146 N. Main Street, Sebastopol • 707.829.3036 artisanafunctionalart.com

necklace by Kristina Kada

Grand Hand Gallery


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CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Free. Graton Community Club, 8996 Graton Rd, Graton.

Puppet Show for Preschoolers Rebecah Freeling, master storyteller, draws on folk and fairytale traditions. Dec 15, 11am. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Santa Kelley Photo-Op Made Local Marketplace cofounder Kelley Rajala dons a Santa suit and poses for pictures. Thurs, 3-6pm and Sun, 1-4pm. through Dec 23. Free. The Share Exchange, 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.331.6850.

Santa Visit Hang with S Claus in his â&#x20AC;&#x153;water sleigh,â&#x20AC;? and bring a canned food donation for 15 percent off any purchase. Dec 16, 3pm. Free. Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cove, 23240 Hwy 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Senior Ballroom Dance Featuring music by Steve Balich Band (Holiday Formal Dance) on Dec 12, Steve Luther DJ on Dec 19. 1pm. $7. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Sonoma County Music & Artes Faire

Spreckels Performing Arts Center 5409 Snyder Snydder Lane, Rohnert Park 6SUHFNHOV%R[2IÂżFHÂ&#x2021;VSUHFNHOVRQOLQHFRP 6SUHFNHOV 6SUHFNHOV%R[2IÂżFH S %R[ 2IÂżFHHÂ&#x2021;VSUHFNHOVRQ H  Â&#x2021; VSUHFNHOVRQ S QOLQHFRP QOLQHFRP

Local women artists, musicians and community groups share skills, sell their wares and more. Bring cookbooks for a cookbook exchange. Dec 13, 3pm. Free. Druids Hall, 1011 College Ave, Santa Rosa.

West Coast Live with Anne Lamott Radio broadcast with guests Anne Lamott and Mike Greensill. Dec 15, 10am. $12$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Field Trips

No Fooling Magician Penn Jillette believes you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe in God Penn Jillette could not have a better job for his personality. The outspoken atheist has made a living making people believe the impossible is possible through his magic act, Penn & Teller. Then there was his TV show, Bullshit, in which he and Teller savagely debunked untrue popular beliefs. His latest offering is a book, Every Day Is an Atheist Holiday, which he is promoting, controversially, during the holiday season. In an interview with G4TV.com last month, he talked about excluding religious holidays from his familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. Not that he is bashing the celebrationsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like anything thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about joy and fun and having a good timeâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but he is vehemently against the idea of a life ruled by religion. About the idea of replacing the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Christmasâ&#x20AC;? with â&#x20AC;&#x153;holidayâ&#x20AC;? being taken as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;war on Christmas,â&#x20AC;? Jillette says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a war on Christmas; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just trying to get more people in on fun.â&#x20AC;? With recent polls showing 30 percent of those under the age of 30 claiming no religion, he has a strong argument. Penn Jillette appears on Wednesday, Dec. 12, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 7pm. Free. 415.927.0960.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

Nature Walk Led by Petaluma Wetlands Alliance. Sat, Dec 15, 10am. Free. Shollenberger Park, Parking lot, Petaluma.

is Comin to Town,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Year Without a Santa Claus,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Scrooged.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; $10. Roxy Stadium 14, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.7699.

Film

White Christmas

Cult Film Series Dec 13 at 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Santa Claus

The 1954 holiday classic revived on the big screen. Mon, Dec 17, 7pm and Wed, Dec 19, 1pm. $8. Sebastiani

Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat

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For your favorite North Bay businesses!

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Vote! Vote! Vote!

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Dec. 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jan. 11 Go to www.bohemian.com The Bohemianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Of The North Bay will be revealed March 2013!

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Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Lectures Balance Method Workshop About 80 percent of the US population will experience severe low-back pain at some point in their lives. Learn movement patterns to avoid discomfort. Dec 13, 7:15pm. Free. Sonoma Body Balance, 210 Vallejo St, Ste C, Petaluma. 707.658.2599.

Mayan Galactic Alignment Ancient mysteries researcher Dan Craig-Morse presents an overview of the cosmology and significance of this galactic turning point. Dec 18. $5-$10. Dhyana Center Lofts, 186 N Main St, Sebastopol. 800.796.6863.

Science Buzz Cafe “Rare Earth Elements and Nanocomposite Magnets” with Karen Frindell-Teuscher. Wed, Dec 12, 6pm. $10. Ions, 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma. Dec 20, and “The Sacred Market” with Daniel Osmer and Robert Porter. Wed, Dec 12, 6:30pm. $4. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Shooty Babbitt & Bip Roberts Baseball players in conversation with Bruce Macgowan. Dec 19, 7:30pm. $12-$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Readings

Dec 16. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Book Passage

Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol

Dec 12, 7pm, “Every Day Is an Atheist Holiday” with Penn Jillette. Dec 15, 1pm, “Andrew’s Wish” with Jan Klyce. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

North Bay Poetry Slam Dec 16, 8pm, North Bay Poetry Slam Two-Year Anniversary, featuring the top 12 NBSP Poets of 2012. $10. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.7300.

Petaluma Library Dec 15, 2pm, “Cancer Time Bomb” with Joelle Burnette. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma 707.763.9801.

Studio 333 Second Thursday of every month, 7pm, Why There Are Words, reading series presents various writers on a theme. $5. 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito 415.331.8272.

Theater A Christmas Carol Musical version hews close to the original story. Times vary. Thurs-Sat, 8pm. through Dec 15. $12-$20. St Vincent’s School, 1 St Vincent Dr, San Rafael.

DIY Dickens Interactive, read-along version of Charles Dickens’ “Christmas Carol.” Sun, 2pm and Thurs, 7:30pm. through Dec 13. $12$16. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Improv Holidaze A playful look at all the things we love and love to hate about the holidays. Dec 16, 8pm. $14. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

It’s a Wonderful Life Musical play based on the classic movie. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Dec 23. $15-$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

It’s a Wonderful Life Live Radio Play Adapted from the 1946 holiday film, this version premiered in 1996 and has been produced around the country. Directed by Jon Tracy. Times vary. TuesThurs-Sun through

Jacob Marley was dead, to begin with, but what happens to Scrooge’s mean, sour, pruny old business partner after that? Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Dec 23. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Lil & Dash Staged reading of new play by Lynne Kaufman. Dec 12, 7:30pm. $10-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

The Mouse That Roared A rag-tag bunch of Medieval archers defeats the United States in a battle for the Alpine Duchy of Grand Fenwick. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Dec 16. $10-$20. Studio Theatre, College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

The Ratcatcher Part town hall meeting, part cabaret, this is an original adaptation of the Pied Piper legend. Music by the Crux. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through Dec 16. $15-$18. Imaginists Theatre Collective, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

The Santaland Diaries David Yen reprises his role in the David Sedaris story of working as an elf in Macy’s Santaland. Fri-Sat, 8pm. through Dec 15. $20-$24. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

You Can’t Take It with You Ross Valley Players presents story about encounter between conservative family and lunatic household. Various times. Through Dec 16. $20-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of December 12

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Can you manage to be both highly alert and deeply relaxed? Could you be wildly curious and yet also serenely reflective? Can you imagine yourself being extra hungry to crack life’s secrets but also at peace with your destiny exactly the way it is? If you can honestly answer yes to those questions, you’ll get a lot of help in the coming week. The universe may even seem to be conspiring to educate you and heal you. You will receive a steady flow of clues about how to get closer to living your dreams. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

In the coming week, you would be wise to deal with your vulnerability, your fallibility and your own personal share of the world’s darkness. If you refuse to do that, either out of laziness or fear, I’m worried that you will reinforce a status quo that needs to be overthrown. You may end up rationalizing your mistakes, clinging to false pride and running away from challenges that could make you smarter and stronger. Don’t do that, Taurus! Be brave. Be willing to see what’s difficult to see. There will be big rewards if you choose to explore the weaker and less mature parts of your personality.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) In the 1968 Olympics, Bob Beamon broke the world record for the long jump. His leap was so far beyond the previous mark that the optical device designed to calculate it didn’t work. Officials had to resort to an old-fashioned measuring tape. After that, the word “Beamonesque” came to signify a feat that vastly outstripped all previous efforts. According to my analysis, you Geminis will have an excellent chance to be Beamonesque in 2013. I expect that you will at least surpass your own peak levels of accomplishment. If you have not yet launched your ascent, get started now. CANCER (June 21–July 22) The fire ants that invaded the southern Unite States back in the 1930s are an annoyance. They swarm and bite and sting. The venom they inject makes their victims feel like they’ve been burned. Two communities have decided to make the best of the situation. Auburn, Ga., and Marshall, Texas, both stage annual Fire Ant Festivals, with events like the Fire Ant Call, the Fire Ant Round-Up and the Fire Ant Chili Cook-Off. (To win the latter, your dish must contain at least one fire ant.) Maybe their example could inspire you, Cancerian. Is there any pest you could develop a more playful and festive relationship with? Could you possibly turn into the equivalent of a Fire Ant Whisperer?

LEO (July 23–August 22)

While reading William Kittredge’s book The Nature of Generosity, I learned about the oldest known sentence written in ancient Greek. It was inscribed on a wine jug that dates back to 740 B.C.E. Translated into English, it says, “Who now of all dancers sports most playfully?” Another possible translation is “Which of these dancers plays most delicately?” I’d love to make something like that be your mantra in the coming week, Leo. The time is right for you to do more dancing and playing and sporting than usual—and to seek out companions who’d like to help you achieve record-breaking levels of those recreational activities.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

In the movie Groundhog Day, Bill Murray plays a man who gets trapped in a time loop. Over and over again, he experiences the same 24 hours. When he wakes up each morning, it’s still Feb. 2. At first it drives him crazy, pushing him to the verge of suicide. But eventually he decides to use his time wisely. He becomes a skilled pianist and a fluent French-speaker. He does good deeds and saves people’s lives. He even learns what he needs to do to win the heart of the woman he desires. This transformation turns out to be the key to gaining his freedom. Near the end of the film, he escapes to Feb. 3. A comparable opportunity is looming for you, Virgo. You have a chance to break a spell you’ve been under or slip away from a rut you’ve been in. Generosity may play a major role.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Events in the immediate future may have resemblances to reading a boring book that’s packed with highly useful information. You might feel that there’s a disjunction

between the critical clues you need to gather and the ho-hum style in which they are offered. It’s OK to be a bit disgruntled by this problem, as long as you promise to remain alert for the partially disguised goodies. Don’t fall asleep in the middle of the unspectacular lesson.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

“Instinct tells us that sharks are more deadly than delicious fatty foods,” writes Jason Daley in Discover magazine. But “instinct is wrong,” he adds. In fact, eating food that tastes good but is actually bad for us is a far greater threat than shark bites. That’s just one example of how our uneducated urges can sometimes lead us astray. I invite you to keep this possibility in mind during the coming week, Scorpio. It’s by no means certain that you will be misled by your natural inclinations, but it is crucial that you monitor them with acute discernment.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) For the last six decades of his life, Pablo Picasso created art that was adventurous and experimental. He didn’t invent abstract painting, but he was instrumental in popularizing it. And yet in his early years he was a master of realism, and had an impressive ability to capture the nuances of human anatomy. Commenting on Picasso’s evolution, travel writer Rick Steves says that when he was young, “he learned the rules he would later so skillfully break.” I suspect you’re in a phase of your own development when you could profit from doing the same thing. So I ask you, Sagittarius: What are the rules that are so ripe for you to bend and twist as you graduate to a more mature level of self-expression? CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Through some cosmic intervention, a sad or bad or mad story will get tweaked prior to the final turn of the plot. Just as you’re getting ready to nurse your regrets, an X-factor or wild card will appear, transforming the meaning of a series of puzzling events. This may not generate a perfectly happy ending, but it will at least result in an interesting and redemptive climax. What is the precise nature of that X-factor or wild card? Perhaps a big secret will be revealed or some missing evidence will arrive or a mental block will crumble. And it’s likely that you will have an epiphany abut how valuable your problem has actually been. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Be honest. Have you had any of the following symptoms? 1. Lack of interest in trivial matters and a yearning for big, holy mysteries. 2. Unfamiliar but interesting impulses rising up in you and demanding consideration. 3. Fresh insights into people and situations you’ve known a long time. 4. An altered sense of the flow of time. 5. Out-of-the-blue recall of long-forgotten memories. If you haven’t experienced any of the above, Aquarius, I must be totally off in my analysis and this horoscope isn’t for you. But if you’ve had even two of these symptoms, you are on schedule to get what those of us in the consciousness industry call a “religious experience.” PISCES (February 19–March 20) You just might be able to teach a statue to talk this week—or at least coax a useful message out of a stonelike person. You could also probably extract a delicious clue from out of the darkness or wrangle a tricky blessing from an adversary or find a small treasure hidden in a big mess. In short, Pisces, you now have a knack for accessing beauty and truth in unexpected sources. You can see what everyone else is blind to and love what everyone else has given up on. You’re practically a superhero. Use your powers wisely, my friend. Be benevolently unpredictable.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


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