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Stark Difference How Mark and Terri Stark turned a dream into a Sonoma County restaurant success story By Jessica Dur-Taylor p16

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4th Annual Stroller Drive Benefits The Living Room day center for women & their children who are homeless

Drop o a baby stroller in good mechanical order and receive $10 toward the Community First account of your choice. Plus, we will deliver your stroller to The Living Room along with $10 cash!

707/ 546-6000 ☎ www.comfirstcu.org Guerneville Healdsburg Sebastopol Central Santa Rosa West Santa Rosa


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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

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Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur Taylor, Daedalus Howell, James Knight, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Juliane Poirier, Sara Sanger, Alan Sculley, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano

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Join us for our secon second nd annual

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of Mark and Terri Stark at Bravas Restaurant by Sara Sanger. Cover design by Kara Brown.


5

nb PRESTON DILLARD, MY GOD

I can’t believe it’s you here. I dreamed about it so long. A lifetime. . . . No, longer than that.

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This photo was taken on Eastshore Road in Bodega Bay. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘That’s an internal process. We do not make such things public. They’re kept within our organization.’ NEWS P8



 



 

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies The Awareness Gap

Testing, understanding and treating HIV is as important as ever BY SAM HO

T

wenty-one years ago, on Nov. 7, 1991, America was jolted with the news that basketball legend Magic Johnson had contracted HIV and would retire from the sport.

Almost immediately, Johnson began taking the antiretroviral drug AZT, and his health quickly improved. Just three months later, Johnson returned to basketball to play in the 1992 All-Star Game, where his performance earned him the MVP award. Johnson’s fans and supporters were delighted by his triumphant return. Through Johnson’s experience, mainstream America began to understand that HIV infection was no longer an automatic death sentence, but a largely treatable, chronic condition. We are fortunate that during the past two decades there has been great progress in the treatment and care of people living with HIV and AIDS. With early detection and increasingly effective treatments, Johnson’s story is now just one of many high-profile examples of how people can manage their HIV and live long, productive lives. But while proper treatment for people with HIV has become much more available and effective, only 25 percent of Americans with HIV are receiving it. At the same time, people born after AIDS first emerged in 1981 are now most at risk of becoming infected with HIV. This sad fact highlights how important awareness and education is as we mark World AIDS Day on Dec. 1. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), HIV infection rates are increasing for Americans between 13 and 30, and most of the new HIV infections reported in this country involve people under 30. Let World AIDS Day remind us that about 56,000 Americans become infected with HIV each year, and that more than 14,000 Americans with AIDS die each year. The CDC estimates that nearly 1.2 million Americans are living with HIV, and that about one in five don’t know they have the virus. As was the case with Magic Johnson and other courageous Americans 20 years ago, we can’t allow today’s more effective treatments to make us complacent or ambivalent. To learn more, or to find a place near you to get tested, visit www.actagainstaids.org. Sam Ho, M.D., is the chief medical officer for UnitedHealthcare. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Subsidizing buses with taxpayer money is just wrong.

Regulation Nation

BARBARA COOLE Santa Rosa

I love to walk, I ride a bicycle and a scooter regularly, and have never been harassed in 25 years as referenced in this article about the Vulnerable User Protection Ordinance (“Safe Streets,” Nov. 21). Every year, hundreds of good intentions are translated into new codes, rules and regulations. Unfortunately, good intentions also obey the law of unintended consequences. Let me give you an example. In the ’90s, I participated for years in a homeless feeding program in San Francisco at the Civic Center on Sundays. One day (to help), we decided to let all the people with crutches and canes go to the front of the line without having to wait. Well, within three weeks the number of people with canes and crutches more than tripled from before. When we ask for new laws, we very rarely see how they play themselves out over the years in real life. In many cases they create as many problems as they solve. We need to find wiser and saner ways to deal with our issues rather than wanting to regulate everything.

‘CHRIS’ Via online

Jets to Sonoma Has anyone noticed the increasing number of jets going in and out of our Sonoma County airport? Didn’t they bar jets because of the noise and wear and tear on the facilities? Oh, that was just for commercial jets. Private jets are still OK. The bulk of the money for the airport comes from taxpayer pockets. Know that you are welcome to fly your jet in and out of Sonoma County Airport, built and maintained with public money. But God help you if you want to take a bus from one side of town to the other.

Nuclear-Free Dream Fifty years ago this week, the world woke up to a crisis that brought the United States and the Soviet Union to the brink of a cataclysmic nuclear war. I was only 12 at the time, but I remember it well. Today, the U.S. continues to maintain over 5,000 nuclear weapons, and five additional countries have become nuclear weapon states since 1962. Our current strategy is not working. We need bold action to move the world towards the elimination of these deadly weapon. Only through mutual, verifiable reductions in nuclear weapons can we begin to reduce the nuclear weapons threat. Under John F. Kennedy, Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara remarked that all that prevented nuclear war during the Cuban Missile Crisis was luck. A National Security policy based on luck alone is not a wise strategy for this country, or the world. This is a ridiculous waste of our money. The world doesn’t need nuclear. The world needs common sense.

DEIDRE CUTHBERTSON Santa Rosa

Land Grab There are some terrible parallels between what’s happening now in Gaza and what happened in the Warsaw Ghetto during WWII. Then, the Jewish population was penned into a small ghetto, deprived of basic necessities and targeted for extermination. Some Jews fought back, though they had virtually no weapons. They also had nothing to lose. The German military, with overwhelming force, eventually destroyed the ghetto, bombing it into rubble.


THIS MODERN WORLD

I don’t believe Israel is trying to exterminate the Palestinians, but I do think they want them to go away and allow Israelis to take possession of land which many Jews see as theirs, basing their claims on Biblical times. Palestinians, having lived there for a very long time, do not agree. The often tragic history of the Jews leads me to compassion, but it’s not justification for their becoming brutal in turn. Palestinians have been backed into a corner and are desperate. Jews, of all people, should understand. All parties must meet and negotiate a viable peace. It’s time to put the weapons down and let this sad land weep.

MOSS HENRY Santa Rosa

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1

Joel McHale spotted in Sonoma County, posts “I think I might move.” Please!

2

“The Ratcatcher” at The Imaginists, clever subversion through music

3

After this year’s start, Tour of California to finish in Santa Rosa for 2013

4

Old concession stand and dugouts torn down in Napa High baseball field

5 Nude protesters storm John Boehner’s office in support of AIDS funding

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Rants

7


THE

Paper RIGHT TO KNOW The Sebastopol grange has seen membership soar, mirroring positive statewide trends—yet the California range master was suspended in August by the national grange, and many suspect it has something to do with Proposition 37.

Estranged Grange The California Grange revives against a backdrop of discord, secrecy and litigation BY RACHEL DOVEY

W

hen Lanny Cotler joined the Little Lake Grange in Willits, five people attended the meeting.

“It was a dying institution,” he recalls. When I attend a Thursdaynight meeting in the same stucco building several years later, there are 27 members and 11 new

people hoping to join. The whitebearded Cotler, now an officer in the agricultural organization, says Little Lake has been rapidly growing, with more than 60 members overall. The Willits grange isn’t alone. In California, membership in this 145-year-old agricultural institution is surging. Yannick Phillips, a legislative advocate with California State Grange, reports that though grange membership fell nationally

by over 23,000 between 2008 and 2011, the Golden State’s membership has increased by 893 people. Like Elks and Masonic lodges, grange halls have long dotted America’s rural landscapes, offering pancake breakfasts and meeting spaces for 4-H clubs. But North Bay grangers aren’t exactly the old-cronies network one might expect of a fraternal organization founded in 1867. Instead, they’re a who’s who of

Rachel Dovey

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOVEMBER 28- D EC E M BE R 4, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

8

go-local politics—organic dairy farmers, Petaluma City Council members and farm-to-table restaurateurs who have served on the Climate Protection Campaign board, founded Willits Economic Localization and assisted in the startup of West County’s muchanticipated Spiral Foods co-op. And in March of 2011, a Chico-based granger named Pamm Larry began a massive, grass-roots signaturegathering effort with hundreds of grangers participating. It became Proposition 37, the initiative that would have required labeling on GMO foods. But not all is growth and naturally sweetened political granola on the Left Coast. Proposition 37 was voted down earlier this month following a $45.6 million “No on 37” campaign, led by multinational biotech giant Monsanto. And a hushed political scuffle between California’s grange master Bob McFarland and national grange master Ed Luttrell has resulted in a lawsuit and national efforts to displace state leadership. In a time when the interests of organic farmers and large-scale agriculture clash in million-dollar ad wars, division is creeping into the historically nonpartisan grange.

Y

ou shouldn’t be able to find it,” national grange master Ed Luttrell says. He’s responding to my assertion that I can’t find any information on his reason for suspending state master Bob McFarland on Aug. 6. “That’s an internal process,” he continues. “We do not make such things public. They’re kept within our organization so no reputations are harmed until due process has been worked all the way through.” The grange is a nonprofit with several tiers—local, state and national. Each tier elects officers, who answer to the officials above them. According to court documents, Luttrell claims the suspended state master refused to cede control of the state grange to him, so the national master filed a civil court case in October. A tentative ruling from Oct. 17 denies the national grange’s plea to be awarded control of the state’s assets, building keys and computer passwords.


initiative supported by the California grange. In March of 2011, it lobbied in favor of HR 872, which sought to repeal what it termed “duplicated� regulation of pesticides and fungicides, alongside the Chemical Producers and Distributors Association and CropLife America. The latter is an arm of CropLife International, a group including Monsanto, Dow AgroSciences, DuPont, BASF and Bayer CropScience, all of whom contributed millions toward the “No on 37� campaign. Luttrell told me in our interview that the national grange did not have a position on Proposition 37. However, a transcript of a speech he gave at the National Grange Convention on Nov. 13 reads: “Americans should oppose mandatory labeling of GMO products, as such labeling falsely implies differences where none exist.�

T

he history of the grange reads like a study in opposing ideologies. Founded by Bostonian Oliver Kelly in Washington, D.C., to aid farmers in the Civil War–torn South, it was structured around freemasonry (an organization that didn’t admit women) while electing female officers and participating in the suffrage movement. In the 1870s, it declared neutrality with the capitalist-owned railways while members covertly pushed for government regulation and were accused of communism. Throughout its 145-year existence, the grange has skillfully folded the many factions of rural America into itself, and—somehow—survived. I’m reminded of this in Willits, as 11 hopeful members rise from the creaky pews surrounding the old grange hall and state their professions. They’re grocers, bakers, acupuncturists, organic farmers, puppet-makers and one student with a part-time job. Half of them look like they’re under 40. It’s a strange sight, these Mendocino dwellers in worn-in jeans and clogs participating in a highly ritualized meeting that uses staves, sashes and an open Bible as props. But at this embattled moment in the agricultural world, that’s exactly what the California grange is—a group of newcomers that don’t quite seem to ďŹ t, hoping to be let in.

9

Council Time “Though election season has ďŹ nally wound down (with only the lingering bad aftertaste of the mysterious and possibly illegal “Anyone but Wysockyâ€? robocalls), the real work has just begun for the Santa Rosa City Council. Scheduled for the Dec. 4 council meeting agenda, new (and returning) members Ernesto Olivares, Julie Combs, Erin Carlstrom and Gary Wysocky will be sworn into the council for a full term of four years. They’ll join Jake Ours and Scott Bartley, each with two years remaining in their terms; the council will then select a mayor and vice-mayor from their ranks. Currently, it’s unclear who will replace outgoing councilmember Susan Gorin (pictured) after her victory over John Sawyer for First District Supervisor. Another point of interest at this particular meeting are two reports on Measure O, the controversial 2004 tax measure approved by voters to fund public safety efforts for police, ďŹ re and gang prevention. As ďŹ rst reported in the Bohemian in February, it’s unclear how effective the measure’s funding has been, since accurate statistical measurements of gang crime since the measure’s passage in Santa Rosa do not exist. (After the issue came to light, the department vowed to track gang “incidents,â€? a far more vague metric.) The ďŹ rst report on Tuesday involves the acceptance of the Measure O choice grant program evaluation for ďŹ scal year 2011– 2012. In addition, the council will look at the Mayor’s Gang Prevention Task Force strategic plan update for 2012–2016. One can hope that the strategic plan involves a hard look at statistics that prove the efďŹ cacy of Measure O funding in a time of steep budget cuts to most other city departments.—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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The genesis of the issue, however, is unclear: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moving party plaintiff National Grange declines to specify the offense committed by the President of the California Grange,â&#x20AC;? the record reads. The California state grange office declined to speak with me about this power shuffle, citing the lawsuit. But a letter on the California grange website calls nationalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actions â&#x20AC;&#x153;unpredictable law enforcement and arbitrary punishment.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We never imagined that national grange policies and leadership, which were created to protect and support us, would be misused to punish popularly elected state grange leaders, support interests that harm small-scale local farming and sow discord within our membership,â&#x20AC;? the letter says. Some local grangers believe that the California grangeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shifting political landscape is linked to the national rift. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The national grange is quite analogous to the national Farm Bureau or the national Chamber of Commerce,â&#x20AC;? Cotler says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The levels below it in city and county organizations become more forward-looking, but as you get closer to national, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more and more in the pocket of Big Ag.â&#x20AC;? Petaluma vice mayor and cofounder of the ďŹ&#x201A;edgling Petaluma Grange Tiffany Renee sees a similar divide. Having faced opposition from the local farm bureau for supporting GMO labeling, Renee says this divisive issue may be playing out on a larger level. â&#x20AC;&#x153;National corporations could be concerned that a more proorganic stance is taking hold in an established, respected organization like the grange,â&#x20AC;? she says. Luttrell says this is not the case, calling allusions to an ideological divide within the grange â&#x20AC;&#x153;assumptions.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We support all aspects of agriculture,â&#x20AC;? he says. According to lobbying records on its website, the national grange has historically supported agricultural issues spanning the blue-red spectrum. But it has also joined forces with some of the agricultural giants that so ďŹ ercely opposed the GMO-labeling


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 28- D EC E M BE R 4, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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The Best Revenge Labeling pseudohealth brands BY JULIANE POIRIER

P

onder this: citizens of China and over 40 other countries have the legal right to know whether their food contains genetically engineered ingredients; citizens of the United States of America do not. (Or are we calling it the United States of MonsantoPepsi yet?) If, for now, we can’t label GE foods in California, let’s label the food corporations that oppose our right to know what’s in our food; they’re hiding behind some familiar brands, including Ben & Jerry’s, Santa Cruz Organics, White Silk and Odwalla. Our purchases of these brands helped enrich the food corporations that, arm-in-arm with pesticide manufacturers, put up $47 million to confuse voters and ultimately defeat Proposition 37. The state of Washington may likely be their next target for misinformation, when the I-522 initiative comes to voters in 2013.

Other states, including Vermont, are cooking up their own rightto-know initiatives. There are presently 1.2 million signatures on a petition being circulated which seeks a nationwide federal law for labeling GE foods. Pro-labeling sources assert that at least 90 percent of Americans support GE-labeling laws. Meanwhile, the Organic Consumers Association (OCA) has announced a boycott of organic brands owned by corporate giants, including what it dubs traitor brands of “natural” foods that worked against GMO labeling laws in the California election. While the Green Zone recently “outed” major corporate donors who opposed Proposition 37, the OCA has complied a handy list of the smaller brands owned by those same opposition groups. They include Naked Juice, Tostito’s Organic and Tropicana Organic, owned by Pepsi; Boca Burgers and Back to Nature, owned by Kraft; Safeway’s “O” brand, represented by the Grocery Manufacturers Association; Honest Tea and Odwalla, owned by Coca-Cola; Muir Glen, Cascadian Farm and Larabar, owned by General Mills; Orville Redenbacher’s Organic, Hunt’s Organic, Lightlife and Alexia, owned by ConAgra; Kashi, Bear Naked, Morningstar Farms and Gardenburger, owned by Kellogg’s; R.W. Knudsen and Santa Cruz Organic, owned by Smucker’s; Ben & Jerry’s, owned by Unilever; and Horizon, Silk and WhiteWave, owned by Dean Foods. Keep this list in your wallet. Post it on Facebook. Take it to your next Meet-Up gathering. Arm yourself with this list each time you go grocery shopping, and enjoy the fact that you are not alone in blowing off manufacturers’ posturing as health-conscious. Those at greatest risk from GE ingredients can find in-depth food purchasing advice in the “True Food Shoppers Guide” published by the Center for Food Safety. For more, see www.organicconsumers.org.

Luther Burbank Home & Gardens Dec 1 & 2 Sat & Sun 10am-4pm

$2 Admission ages 12 & over Tour the historic home decorated for the holidays in Victorian style 5HIUHVKPHQWV‡([KLELWV‡6SHFLDOW\*LIWV‡5RVLHWKH7UROOH\ Santa Rosa & Sonoma Aves, Downtown Santa Rosa )5((3$5.,1*DWVW ´'µ6WV )5((5,'(6RQ´5RVLHµ between this event and the Dickens Holiday Crafts Fair

707-524-5445

www.lutherburbank.org

Luther Burbank Home & Gardens³A Registered National, State, & City Historic Landmark 501(c)(3) Nonprofit Tax ID# 26-3008405

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Green Zone

11

33rd ANNUAL HOLIDAY


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOVEMBER 28- D EC E M BE R 4, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12

MARKETPLACE @ Now Open! Order Your Holiday Gourmet Gifts…

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Dining COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

S O N O MA CO U N T Y

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

Bear Republic Brewing Co Brewpub. $-$$. Award-winning ales and pub fare. Hearty portions and friendly service. Casual dining, outside patio. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.2337. Seafood. $-$$. Cheerful, bustling, totally informal eatery serving authentic Brit fare. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 4046 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0899.

Bistro des Copains French. $$. Homey Provencal food prepared to near perfection. Desserts are house-made and stellar. 3782 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.2436.

Bistro Ralph Bistro. $$. Classic and classy–bistro food at its best. Wine bar. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 109 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.1380.

Cape Cod Fish & Chips

Custom Food & Beverage Packages Available ‡)RRG&:LQH5HFHSWLRQV ‡'DQFLQJ&/LYH(QWHUWDLQPHQW ‡+ROLGD\3DUWLHV We Offer Everything You Need to Create the Perfect Holiday Event!

96 Old Courthouse Square Santa Rosa ~ 707.528.8565 www.christysonthesquare.com

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

Betty’s Fish & Chips

Join us for a Holiday Party to Remember

53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Fish and chips. $. A dingy hole in the wall–just like a real chippy! This popular lunch spot offers perfectly cooked fish and chips to eat in or take out. Open daily. 548 E Cotati Ave, Cotati. 707.792.0982.

Carmen’s Burger Bar American. $. Excellent and innovative burgers with a Mexican flair. Beef comes fresh daily from Pacific Market next door. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 1612 Terrace (in Town and Country center), Santa Rosa. 707.579.3663.

Carneros Bistro & Wine Bar Californian. $$$$. As fancy as foie graschestnut froth parfait for dinner, as simple as huevos rancheros for breakfast, and all superb. Bre0akfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun.

1325 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.931.2042.

Central Market California cuisine. $$$. Fish is the thing at this airy spot that features local and sustainable foods. Lots of pork dishes, too–and they’re insanely good. Dinner daily. 42 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.9900.

D’s Diner Diner. $. Classic diner serving a bevy of breakfast delights, as well as delights for other meals too. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner daily. 7260 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.8080.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$.

California cuisine. $$$-$$$$. Fresh wine country cuisine from chef Charlie Palmer. Dinner daily; lunch, Fri-Sun. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

East West Cafe California

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$.

Dry Creek Kitchen

cuisine. $$. All vegetarianfriendly. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 128 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2822.

Monti’s Rotisserie & Bar California cuisine. $-$$. Small plates and a few larger entrées with emphasis on house-roasted meats. Lunch and dinner daily. 714 Village Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4404.

Roberto’s Restaurant Italian. $$. Reliable home-style Italian cooking. Dinner, TuesSun. 4776 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0260.

Rocker Oysterfeller’s American. $$-$$$. Friendly, warm service in a spot whose menu is thick with local, organic ingredients. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 14415 Coast Hwy 1, Valley Ford (at the Valley Ford Hotel). 707.876.1983.

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly, plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center,

Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900. Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists with its fresh catches. A wide


Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N TY Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Brassica Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700. Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

SMALL BITES Is there anything in the world lovelier than a bakery, breads and cakes baking away in the oven, mounds of sweet treats displayed on doilies, waiting to be devoured? Owned and operated by Dawn Zaft, who arrived at baking during a break from acupuncture school, Criminal Baking Co. and Noshery is a welcome addition to Santa Rosa’s South A district. The mini cream pies in lemon, pumpkin and coconut are pure delight tucked into a tasty shortbread crust ($5). Made with pure ingredients, a lemon bar ($3) paired with a cup of fresh-brewed Melody Coffee ($2.50) hits the spot on a rainy winter afternoon. Or how about a drunken chocolate chip cookie ($2), gluten free blueberry-coconut bar ($3) or brownie with walnuts ($3)? The Noshery offers savory options, too, which, depending on day and season, include soups made of potato and leek with bacon or a vegan coconut curry pumpkin topped with pepitas. A savory pie of locally grown potatoes, spinach, wild mushrooms and squash was a big hit on Nov. 17, the bakery’s opening day, as was the roasted red pepper focaccia and organic mixed green salad. The location also hosts classes and events, including a syrup and cordial making workshop on Wednesday, Dec. 5. Further diversifying, they’ve also signed on to become a weekly pick-up point for CSA boxes from Bloomfield Farms. What’s not to love? Criminal Baking Co. and Noshery is located at 463 Sebastopol Ave., Santa Rosa. Open Thursday–Saturday,11am–8pm. On Sundays, Baker’s Brunch is offered from 10am-2pm. 707.992.5661.—Leilani Clark

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

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Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and

dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tapas in a rustic chic setting. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

10 GIFT CERTIFICATE

$ NORTH NO ORTH BA BAY’S AY’S Y B EST INDIAN BEST RS FOOD, 22 YEARS

One certificate per table. Minimum purchase of $25 or more. Cannot be combined with other special offers. Not valid for taxes or tips. Expires 12/30/2012

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409 Mendocino Ave, Downtown Santa Rosa 40 sa 707.579.5999 707 .579.5999 ccross ros s sstreet tre et 5th 5t h 1280 1 280 Healdsburg Healdsburg Ave, Ave, Healdsburg H e ald sb u r g 707.433.2954 7 07.433.2954 ccross ros s sstreet t re et D Dry ry C Creek re ek RRoad oad

707.823.6688 799 Gravenstein Hwy South Sebastopol, behind McDonald’s

Thai House Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

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Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Grand Opening!

Nosh Out

Chocolate gift baskets— order yours now! vegan options hostess/corporate gifts Hanukkah chocolates

Chocolates C ho co lates & D Dessert esser t Cafe Ca f e 110 Petaluma 110 Pe t a lu m a Blvd B l vd North N or th Downtown Petaluma D ow ntow n P et aluma

www.vivacocolat.com w w w.v i v aco co lat .co m

707.778.9888 7 07.778 .9888

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

arvest elebrations Voted Best Chocolatier in Sonoma County 6988 McKinley St, Sebastopol (next to Whole Foods) 707.829.1181 sonomachocolatiers.com

Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Roasted Mushroom Gruyere Tartelette Petit Four Platter Full Catering Menu Available

13 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

selection of nigiri, depending on what’s fresh. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, Mon-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.3620.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 28- D EC E M BE R 4, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

킬킷


Wineries

15

S O N OM A CO U N T Y De Loach Vineyards In the 1970s, Cecil De Loach established this pioneering producer of Russian River Zinfandel and Pinot Noir par excellence.1791 Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.526.9111.

Eric K. James Vineyards Venture down to an off-the-Plaza arcade to find refuge from the maddening crowds, day-brightening Pinot Noir and Syrah, plus the prettiest Rosé in the valley. A grower’s collective for several Carneros-area vineyards. 452 First St. E., Sonoma. Open Friday, noon–8pm; Saturday– Sunday, noon–5:30pm. No fee. 707.996.1364.

Eric Ross Winery Just friendly folks pouring Pinot, Zin and Marsanne-Roussane; don’t ask about the rooster. Ask about the rooster. 14300 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Thursday-Monday 11am– 5pm.707.939.8525. Hanzell Vineyards The grand dame of Burgundianstyle Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, since 1957. The site of many California firsts; a visit is a pilgrimage. 18596 Lomita Ave., Sonoma. Tour and tasting by appointment only, $45. 707.996.3860. Pfendler Vineyards Petaluma Gap Chardonnay and Pinot have a milliondollar view, but winetasting is available at Vin Couture Lounge, 320 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. By appointment or Swirl After Six, 6–10pm, Thursday–Saturday. 707.431.8161.

Stonestreet Late wine magnate Jess Jackson took to the hills in a big way. Eight hundred acres, 400 blocks, at elevations up to 2,000 feet. Tasting room is a fewfrills affair, while “mountain excursions” offer views plus Cab and Chardonnay, plus lunch. 7111 Hwy. 128,

Healdsburg. Daily, 11am to 4:30pm. $12, $15 and $25; Mountain excursion, $75. 707.433.9463.

Two Amigos Wines One of the “Vino Brothers” is a famous television commercial actor, but they look alike in plastic nose and Groucho glasses disguises. Goofy theme and good wine. Vito’s Vino Bianco is a rich Roussanne; Guido’s Vino Rosso a successful California Sangiovese. 25 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Open daily, 11am– 6pm. 707.799.7946.

N A PA CO U N T Y Acacia Vineyard Acclaimed Pinot and Chardonnay; their biggest client is Costco, but the tasting room is a hole-in-the-wall in a drab beige facility. 2750 Las Amigas Road, Napa. Monday through Saturday, 10am–4pm; Sunday, noon–4pm. $15. 707.226.9991.

Black Stallion Winery Owned by a pair of Midwest liquor-distribution barons who hired a capable winemaker and envision it to be a retaildestination winery. The wines are quite good. 4089 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.253.1400.

Chateau Boswell Winery (WC) This small, boutique winery is open by appointment only, selling most its wine directly via post to club members. 3468 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.963.5472.

Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.257.2345.

Del Dotto Vineyards (WC) Caves lined with Italian marble and ancient tiles, not to mention Venetian chandeliers and mosaic marble floors. They host candle-lit tastings, replete with cheese and chocolate, Friday–Sunday. Opera resonates until 4pm; rock rules after 4pm. 1055 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.963.2134.

Domaine Carneros Inspired by Taittinger’s Château de la Marquetterie of Champagne, this house of premium sparkling wine is a hard-to-miss landmark on the Carneros Highway. Enjoy a private Balcony Package for special occasions or taste sparkling and still wines paired with artisan cheese and caviar with the masses. Luxury bubbly Le Rêve offers a bouquet of hoary yeast and crème brûlée that just slips away like a dream. 1240 Duhig Road (at Highway 12/121), Napa. Wine flights $15; also available by the glass or bottle. Open 10am–5:45pm. 800.716.2788.

Quixote There is a sense of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stag’s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architect’s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Winemaker Cathy Corison proudly describes herself as a “Cabernet chauvinist.” 987 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.0826.

Smith-Madrone Riesling is Smith-Madrone’s main fame claim. Its Riesling has steadily gained fame while Napa Valley Riesling in general has become a rare antique. 4022 Spring Mountain Road, St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.2283.

Cuvaison Estate Wines

Summers Estate Wines

(WC) Producing some 65 percent of its product as Chardonnay, Cuvaison has a 22,000-square-foot cave. 4550 Silverado Trail N., Napa. By appointment. 707.942.6266.

Excellent Merlot and that rarest of beasts, Charbono. Small tasting room and friendly staff. 1171 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.5508.

Corison Winery

Enriquez Estate Wines Uncorking a new age BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

oasting the new year? The Bohemian’s guide to unique, small-batch sparkling wines is due on newsstands Wednesday, Dec. 26—if, that is, the finale of the Mayan “long count” calendar due on Dec. 21 leads to nothing more apocalyptic than another day of frenzied Christmas shopping. Just in case, we’ve picked out a wine to toast the end of days, too.

Featuring a ghosted image of Mexico’s iconic Chichen Itza pyramid, it’ll do if we’re just shopping by the label, anyway—and who doesn’t? May we also assume that Enriquez is among those wineries founded by a close-knit Mexican-American family whose hardworking parents migrated north for better opportunities? Naturally. When they first saw the vineyard, bordering Petaluma Airport and the Rooster Run Golf Club, it was a dream come true. “I can have my plane right there!” said aviation, golf and fine wine enthusiast Eduardo Enriquez. “Oh Dad, this is perfect,” said daughter Cecilia. “I can quit my job, move out here to California and start my own wine brand!” And that is where our assumptions end. Accomplished in the fields of internal medicine and banking, Eduardo hails from Guadalajara but grew up in South Jersey, where his father was a top cardiovascular surgeon. Millennialaged Cecilia majored in business and got a financial services job right out of school, but “absolutely hated it.” A family trip to wine country proved unexpectedly auspicious. After closing on the property in 2011, Cecilia energetically addressed herself to building a wine club and connecting with charity organizations, while learning cellar craft from Michael Carr of Roche Winery (whose facility is leased on the property). Happy to laugh about her newbie status, Enriquez explains that she designed the Mayan-themed label. “I really liked what it stood for,” she says. “They were very sophisticated and elite people, and that’s kind of what I want to do with the wine. I want it to be an exclusive, ultra-premium brand.” Tasting is by appointment only, at the vineyard’s 1930s farmhouse; we found Cecilia at Petaluma’s La Dolce Vita wine lounge, which hosts tastings of new and small wineries. A dry, floral white with a bit of tropical zest, the 2011 “Brisa” ($28) is a blend of Sauvignon Blanc, Muscat, and Chardonnay. The 2009 Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($38) is an agreeable sipper with cherry, rose, orange rind, and sweet, bright cherry flavor. The champ here is the 2009 Sonoma Coast Tempranillo ($32), a chewy mouthful of black cherry fruit; a good showing for Tempranillo, a perpetually up-and-coming alternative varietal in California. Now, there’s a new era that we can toast to. Enriquez Estate Wines, Petaluma. Tasting by appointment only; hours vary. Call for more information. 707.347.9719.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOVEMBER 28- D EC E M BE R 4, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

NO. 5 (L–R) Bravas, in the former Ravenous location in Healdsburg, specializes in tapas; the remade interior represents the Starks’ attention to design; Mark Stark hams it up outside his fifth Sonoma County restaurant.

Stark Raving On the cusp of a veritable local restaurant empire, Mark and Terri Stark remain committed to the same ideals they began with 10 years ago in Sonoma County BY JESSICA DUR-TAYLOR

W

hen Mark and Terri Stark opened Stark’s Steakhouse, their fourth restaurant, on New Year’s Eve of 2007, their intention was to create a fine dining experience where people could enjoy a high-quality cut of meat. But within months, as their numbers began to plummet alongside the stock market, the restaurateurs were in a panic.

On a trip to Seattle, Mark watched an empty bar fill with people enjoying the cheap eats of an afternoon happy hour. Inspired, he brought the idea home and

created the “Blues Buster Happy Hour Menu with Prices Good Until the Dow Hits 10,000.” Soon the bar was packed, even overflowing into the dining room. Thanks to

a traveling food blogger, Stark’s happy hour gained a reputation from Southern California to Washington state as the best afternoon nosh on the West Coast. “The day the Dow hit 10,000,” Terri tells me, “the phone was off the hook with people begging us not to stop.” Unwilling to let their customers down, the Starks revised their promise. “We said, ‘We’ll do it until your house value is back,’” Terri says, laughing. To this day, Stark’s unchanged

happy hour menu, arguably the best thing to come out of the bad economy, lives on.

Humble Beginnings Mark and Terri met at California Cafe in Palo Alto in 1995. Just a few years later, as Silicon Valley’s dot-com boom went bust, business opportunities became as scarce as Twinkies this Thanksgiving. Doors were swinging shut. “Forget


Sara Sanger

The Happy Kitchen

about even borrowing an egg from your neighbor,” Terri laughs, “this was survival of the fittest.” In 2001, tired of trying to keep up with the Joneses, the Starks left Menlo Park, where they’d been working in restaurants for years— Mark cooking, Terri catering—and moved to Sonoma County. They were immediately plugged into the culinary circuit, thanks to Terri’s well-connected mother, with roots in the county four generations deep. Within four days, acclaimed local chefs Michael Hirschberg and Lisa Hemenway were in their living room, chatting about possible opportunities. “The climate and the people really resonated with us,” Terri says. Doors started opening. Literally. One afternoon, in an effort to avoid the traffic on 101, Terri stopped for a glass of wine at the Orchard Inn on Old Redwood Highway. Charmed, she mentioned the site to Mark, who

liked how “it’s in the middle of nowhere, but it’s also in the middle of everywhere.” During a meeting with their real estate broker the next morning, they found out the building was for sale and immediately needed a thousand dollars to make a bid. “I wrote the check,” Terri says, “and then called the realtor to ask when it might get cashed.” Mark chimes in: “We didn’t even have a thousand dollars.” In fact, the couple who would go on to open five successful restaurants didn’t even have a business plan—“We had something written on a napkin,” Mark quips—but they did have a vision. Since they rarely eat entrées (“Too big a commitment”), they wanted to open a restaurant that served nothing but appetizers. “That style of sharing,” says Mark, “creates a mini-party.” And so, a year after moving

Given their impressive roster of restaurants—to which their fifth, Bravas Bar de Tapas, has just recently been added—you’d be forgiven for assuming the Starks are as highfalutin’ as their cuisine. But you couldn’t be more wrong. In stark contrast to the bottomline approach of many restaurants, Mark and Terri are first and foremost concerned about the 245 people they employ. “We’re not here to make money,” Mark tells me. “We’re here to make friends.” Proof can be found in the many employees, like Chris Smith, who have worked for them for nearly a decade, a lifetime in the restaurant business. Eager to learn the biz in the hopes of opening his own restaurant, Smith figured he’d stick around for about five years. Eight years later, after working up the ranks from line cook to sous chef to chef de cuisine to his current position as floor manager at Willi’s Seafood, he has no plans to leave anytime soon. “The amazing thing about the Starks,” Smith tells me, “is how

they help people reach their goals.” That and what he calls “the fringe benefits” of enjoying home-cooked meals and sampling new restaurants with his bosses, who have created one big extended family. Smith embodies the Stark’s commitment to promoting from within, what Terri refers to as “stocking our own pond.” All of their chefs started out working for them as cooks, and, in some cases, dishwashers. Instead of stoking the flames of competition, the Starks value cooperation and mentorship. As Mark puts it, “You didn’t come out of the womb with a sauté pan and an apron. If you are a chef, someone helped to get you here, so you’re going to turn around and do the same thing for someone else.” In a time when too many people are being devoured by vulture capitalism, the Starks’ “lift as we climb” philosophy inspires. During the worst of the economic collapse, they prioritized paying their workers over their taxes. As for the bottom line? A peek at their reservation books confirms that happy workers lead to happy customers. As Mark says, “You can’t get good food out of a miserable kitchen.”

Bravas Unlike other highly successful local restaurateurs, you won’t find the Starks opening a stadiumsized restaurant in the middle of Times Square—or anywhere outside of Sonoma County. “In big cities, there’s a huge disconnect,” says Mark, who has worked in Seattle, Washington, D.C., and New York, where he graduated as co-valedictorian from the Culinary Institute of America. “You don’t know who you’re cooking for.” He much prefers “the huge circle” of Sonoma County, where, within the first month of opening Willi’s Wine Bar, local purveyors of food and wine—Steve Kistler, Laura Chenel and Jim Reichardt of Liberty Farms— were enjoying Mark’s culinary transformation of their own products. In 2010, the Starks took their first trip to Europe, a place where culinary and ) 18 community go together

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

to the county, the Starks opened Willi’s Wine Bar in August of 2002. “There was never any plan to open more than one place,” they tell me. But after three months of filling tables, another door swung open, and they were invited to start Willi’s Seafood & Raw Bar in Healdsburg. And thus the Starks’ vision of running a little mom-and-pop restaurant—Mark cooking, Terri managing, both of them relaxing over espresso in the afternoon—was soon supplanted by a much grander reality. In just two years, they opened three restaurants, each time maxing out their credit cards and refinancing their house to meet the expenses. When it came time to name their third restaurant, a Mediterranean-style rotisserie and bar in Montgomery Village, they were determined to make use of the leftover coasters bearing the letter “W” from Willi’s. Turned upside down, they worked perfectly for the name Monti’s, a tribute to the kids who attend nearby Montgomery High.


Stark Raving ( 17

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like baguettes and Brie. “We fell in love with the food in Barcelona,” says Terri. “The flavors were clean and the ingredients simplistic.” Inspiration met opportunity when a 1927 bungalow on Center Street in Healdsburg, formerly the site of Ravenous, became available for rent. “We’re never looking to open a new restaurant,” Mark and Terri insist, “but if a space opens up, we’ll look at it.” When it comes to their restaurants, the physical space shapes the culinary experience. The moody romance of the building that once housed Santa Rosa’s oldest restaurant, Michelle’s, was, according to Mark, “screaming to be a steakhouse.” In the case of Bravas, the tiny kitchen is perfectly suited to the small plates of Spanish tapas, which include local sardines with black olive ink ($10), crispy pig ears with anchovy vinaigrette ($11), chilled octopus and chickpeas ($12), tuna belly salad ($10) and Patatas Bravas ($8), a fried potato dish from which the restaurant derives its name. Hankering for a sliver of jamón ibérico or Idiazabal cheese? Allow the resident “Hamboner” to slice your fancy at Sonoma County’s first ham and cheese bar ($8–$18). In addition to beer, wine and several gin and tonic selections, a specialty cocktail menu makes the most of fun monikers like Ready, Willing and Hazel and the Dingo ($10). Bravas (Spanish for “spicy” or “wild”) dazzles both the palate and the eye: vintage psychedelic Fillmore posters grace the bright orange walls, which contrast nicely with snow-white barstools and polished wood tables. The newly renovated backyard patio includes a full bar, a fire-pit and a covered deck.

Stark Reality “It’s like having a newborn after your other kids are grownup,” Terri says about the five-year gap between opening Starks and Bravas. Though their cheerful disposition and easy camaraderie belie the stressful nature of the job, the Starks are forthcoming about their challenges. “We forget

about how hard the beginning is,” Mark says. “It takes years off your life to open a restaurant.” “Exposure is the hardest part,” says Terri, who likens a bad review to “someone telling you your kid is ugly.” Thanks to the rise of Yelp, of course, everyone can be a critic, including a disgruntled drinker (“We had to cut him off”) or a misinformed naysayer who poohpoohed the Dover sole, which isn’t even on their menu. But in 10 years, the Starks have had only one significant faux pas: in September of 2005 they opened Bar Code, a sophisticated New York City–style lounge on Mendocino Avenue in downtown Santa Rosa. Perhaps because they were out of their comfort zone serving only alcohol, not food, or perhaps because the bar would start to get busy just when Mark and Terri were ready for bed, after two years Bar Code closed its doors, the very same day that Starks opened. “Everyone thinks opening restaurants is going to be really, really fun,” says Terri, “but it’s 90 percent business.” Still, it helps to be in the biz with your family. Mark creates the menus, Terri designs the space, and both bounce ideas off the other constantly. “We’re together 24/7,” says Mark, “and we have a blast.” Even their daughter Katie, who at 18 started working in “the dish pit” just like everyone else, is now out on the floor at Bravas, serving for the first time. If their restaurants are like children, each one is special in its own distinct way: Willi’s Wine Bar gets the most press, Willi’s Seafood stays the busiest, Monti’s is the neighborhood favorite, and, thanks to the wide appeal of happy hour, Stark’s has shown the most growth. Bravas, surely, will take on its own distinct shape. And yet the full tables are not what make Mark and Terri most proud. “At least 20 employees who started out washing dishes and bussing tables now own their houses,” Mark tells me. “More than anything else, that is our greatest accomplishment.”


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19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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HOLIDAYS GOT YOU DOWN? Iris Dement sings sad songs of sorrow on Nov. 29 at the Mystic Theatre. See Concerts, p25.


ArtsIdeas Rachel Dovey

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BRIDGING THE GAP Shelly Jackson is promoting more interactive exhibits and programs addressing Marinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disparity.

Rewriting History Marin History Museum reinvents what â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;going to the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; meansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and tackles big goals in the process BY RACHEL DOVEY

S

helly Jackson is frustrated, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s messing with her sleep.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have so many things brewing, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sleep last night,â&#x20AC;? the programs manager at the Marin History Museum says, leaning toward me over a wooden desk in her San Rafael office. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have so many ideas, but I want to hatch them or launch them when I know

thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an audience.â&#x20AC;? Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ideas include oral histories, pop-up exhibits, expert panels, bilingual events, hikes and a craft-beer festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not your standard regional history fare. Central to the 28-year-oldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s REM-stealing vision is audience engagement, particularly around current events that, she points out, will soon pass into the stuff of history.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gone are the days when visitors came to a museum, paid at the ticket counter, picked up an audio guide or brochure and were basically fed information,â&#x20AC;? she says, combing her ďŹ ngers through several inches of curly red hair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to know your personal story. We want to know why you came to Marin; we want to know why your grandmother came to Marin. We also want to know what

you think about the death penalty not being repealed. We want to know if you have any questions about it from 50 or 60 years ago and how that legislation has changed through history.â&#x20AC;? But Jackson and the staff of the MHM have run into a problem with their vision of community engagement. The community, it seems, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be engaged. For example, in early October, she invited several ACLU veterans and authors to speak on the theme of individuals spurring change, from the Civil Rights era to the local Occupy movement. Four people came. Visitors have repeatedly told her that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not comfortable with interactive spotlights on current Marin issues, be they racial proďŹ ling in the justice system, immigration or Occupyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Which I did not realize was so â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;NO!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; here,â&#x20AC;? she says. But attendance at events that she describes as more â&#x20AC;&#x153;onesided or didacticâ&#x20AC;? has remained strong. In a ďŹ&#x201A;at voice, she twice remarks that the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s audience has seemed to love lectures on the Mt. Tam watershed. Part of this could simply be a lack of public knowledge on the 77-year-old museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s changing nature, director Michelle Kaufman points out. After all, the San Rafael site is currently housed in a tanand-white Victorian on an isolated corner of B Street. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People often see the exterior of this building and they think â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that little house and it has some dusty furniture in it,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But then they come in and say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh, you have all these programs.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? But Jackson, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been with MHM for nine months and grew up in Florida, associates it with a blend of cultural discomfort unique to


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the affluent North Bay county. “I knew there was a big socioeconomic, racial, regional gap in Marin, but I thought there was more of a collective ownership of that gap,” she says. “I thought there were more eyes on what we could do to make it smaller.” Whatever the reason, the museum hopes to gather a larger audience when it opens another venue in early December in San Rafael’s Court Plaza. The branch will showcase a collection of local photos taken in Steep Ravine by Depression-era great Dorothea Lange for its first exhibit and will feature an opening holidary arts fair on Dec. 14. Jackson leads me down the stairs from her office, through an exhibit called “Justice and Judgment” that, although more of your typical curated-objects setup, contains some arresting artifacts. On one wall, visitors can see San Quentin’s last, blood-splattered noose. On an iPad, scanned prison documents detail death row inmates’ final moments, including the exact length of time, down to the second, it took many of them to die. She takes me to the new Court Plaze venue. Right now, it’s decorated only with a yellow carpet, a single desk and chair, and a handful of cardboard boxes. Jackson hurries around the fluorescent-lit space, showing me how exhibit walls will be arranged and where a screen will hang. She wants to host everything from academic lectures to dance troupes and live music in this stillto-be-defined space. “In 2012, museums need to provide a forum or community hub, some kind of safe receptacle where visitors come to the museum and say, ‘Let me tell you what my story is and why it’s relevant,’” she’d told me earlier. In this empty space, I compliment her for trying to bring a vehicle of storytelling and discourse to Marin. “Do you think we can do it?” she asks, her voice full of uncertainty, determination and hope.


Stage ŠDisney

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MUSIC BY ALAN MENKEN, LYRICS BY HOWARD ASHMAN & TIM RICE, BOOK BY LINDA WOOLVERTON

NOVEMBER 23, 24, 29, 30*, DECEMBER 1, 6, 7, 8, at 7:30 PM * ASL INTERPRETED PERFORMANCES, NOV 30 AT 7:30PM AND DEC 2 AT 1:30PM

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A Late Late Q Quartet uartet R (10:45am) (10 : 45am)

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Argo A rgo R (10:45-1:45)-6:00-8:45 (10 : 45-1: 45 ) -6 : 00-8 : 45 TTuesday uesday 112/4 2 /4 oonly: nly : 66:00-8:45 : 00-8 : 45 Join uuss ffor Join or special special performances per for mances of of TThe he PPharaohâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s haraohâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Daughter Daughter Ballet Balle t on on Sunday Sunday 12/2 12 / 2 at at 11pm pm aand nd Tuesday Tuesday 12/4 12 /4 at at 6:30pm! 6 : 3 0 pm !

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BELLE OF THE BALL Brittany Law

and Zachary Hasbany in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Beast.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Be Our Guest

SRJC overcomes obstacles with magical â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Beautyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY DAVID TEMPLETON

T

he theater arts department at Santa Rosa Junior College has been struggling as of late, facing budget cuts and staff reductions, but one wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know it from the lavish, lovely treasure that is Walt Disneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Beauty and the Beast. Just opened, the production is one of the most touching and dazzling North Bay musicals of 2012.

Then again, the tale of the Beauty and the Beast has been dazzling people for over 270 years, ever since the novel, by GabrielleSuzanne Barbot de Villeneuve, was ďŹ rst published in Paris. Since then, the lurid tale of a monster in love with a beautiful maiden has evolved, morphed and mellowed.

Today, the best-known adaptation is the 1991 Disney ďŹ lm, the ďŹ rst animated ďŹ lm to be nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award. When Disney announced a lavish Broadway adaptation, many assumed the move was a crass commercial money grab. The big surprise? The stage version far surpassed the movie in its depth of character and heights of emotion. Several new songs were addedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;including the Beastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gorgeous lament â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Love Herâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and several of the smaller characters were given satisfying arcs and clever backstories. In the whimsical SRJC version, directed by Laura DowningLee with an eye-popping sense of visual spectacle, the strong, committed cast collaborates with the technical teamâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the costumes and sets are themselves worth the cost of admissionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to unveil a show that deftly transcends its occasional small opening-weekend bugs (microphone issues and occasional off-key squeaks from Richard Riccardiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s otherwise fullspirited live orchestra). As Belle, the bookish-butbeautiful oddball of her small French village, Petalumaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brittany Law is perfectly cast. Alternately charming, fearless and believably conďŹ&#x201A;icted, her Belle makes a perfect balance to Zachary Hasbanyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emotionally volatile Beast. At six-foot-seven, the actor is an imposing presence, and his impressive baritone, though struggling through his few high notes, powerfully conveys the aching heart beneath the monsterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fangs and fur. As the Beastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enchanted servants, all gradually turning into pieces of furniture and kitchenware, the ensemble is delightful, tackling the potentially ridiculous spectacle with so much joy and enthusiasm one canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but be enchanted. Kicking off the holidays, SRJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lovely and deeply moving fairy tale is a ďŹ tting transition into a season of magic and fantasy. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Beauty and the Beastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday through Dec. 8 at Santa Rosa Junior College. 1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 7:30pm; 1:30pm matinees Saturdays and Sundays. $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$18. 707.527.4343.


MAZEL TOV! ‘Hava Nagila’ is played

worldwide, but what does it mean?

Wall of Sound

Two films explore Jewish music at JFF BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

S

ometimes it’s the song, not the singer. This year’s 17th annual Sonoma County Jewish Film Festival has two documentaries on how wellcrafted tunes have lives of their own.

For a long time, “Hava Nagila” has been a familiar guest at every wedding and Bar Mitzvah. Like the blues and jazz tunes it traveled with, the song is a contradiction in terms: a downbeat, minor-key song of celebration. Originating in the 19th-century Ukraine, and initially with no words, the bitterness in the melody is as palpable as the joy. Old Jewish proverb: to the worm in the horseradish, the horseradish is sweet.

‘A.K.A. Doc Pomus’ screens Thursday, Nov. 29, at 1pm and 7:30pm; ‘Hava Nagila’ screens Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 7:30pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol. $10– $15. 707.528.4222.

23

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“Hava Nagila” took off in the 1950s, with popular singers such as Danny Kaye, Harry Belafonte, Connie Francis, Glen Campbell and Elvis Presley recording the song. By charting its course, the film Hava Nagila connects the song to a history of Jewish culture. For the JFF screening on Dec. 4, director Roberta Grossman will be on hand. A.K.A. Doc Pomus is also about the sweeter uses of suffering. Born Jerome Felder, this Brill Building tunesmith turns out to be one of the most genial of men, revered by performers from the little (Jimmy Smith) to the big (Joe Turner). He was a teacher as well as a singer, a man drawn to the nightlife from an early age. Pomus was a gambler, a raconteur holding court in the wee hours in the lobby of a dubious Manhattan hotel. Crippled by polio at age six, by the time he was 18 he was a successful blues singer marketing his tunes. When Elvis was caught in the sausage machine in Culver City, making four films a year, each one with 10 tunes each, Pomus came to the rescue with a number of hits, most memorably “Viva Las Vegas” and the sly and nigh incestuous “Little Sister.” A.K.A. Doc Pomus shows how much truth there is in the standard hackneyed showbiz biography. Personal heartbreak balanced processional success: divorce, hard times and confinement to a wheelchair from the mid-1960s on. Interviews here include a number of luminaries, as well as Pomus’ ex-wife Wilma, a remarkable person in her own right. She says something plaintive to the effect that their marriage could have been summed up by the space between “Save the Last Dance for Me” and “Can’t Get Used to Losing You”—both tunes were among Pomus’ gift to the world. The music in the film is of course terrific, and the documentary is laudable in its refusal to demonize Pomus’ rakish side.


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24

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Wed, Nov 28 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pmSCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE YOUTH AND FAMILY 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Thur, Nov 29 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Nov 30 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm Steve Luther DJ hosts WEST COAST SWING PARTY Sat, Dec 1

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DR. ELMO AND THE REINDEER BAND Dec 9 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeerâ&#x20AC;? Sun

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THE SUN KINGS Dec 14 A Salute to the Beatles Fri

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60s Girl Group Singing Sensations 8:30pm

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he neighborhood that I grew up in,â&#x20AC;? recalls Justin Townes Earle, â&#x20AC;&#x153;youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be standing on the corner, and that Cutlass would come by with shiny wheels on it and there would be an older gentleman behind the wheel wearing a Kangol hat listening to Al Green, just banging it out of the speakers in his car. All that Memphis stuff that came out of Stax and Royal studios and places like that, it was the ďŹ rst stuff where I ever went, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;What the fuck is that?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

Earle has obviously absorbed a lot of other musical inďŹ&#x201A;uences

since thenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Woody Guthrie chief among his musical heroesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but his latest album, Nothingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now, is the one that reďŹ&#x201A;ects that ďŹ rst excitement, strongly tipping its hat to the vibrant Memphis soul of the 1960s and early â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s. He opens for John Prine Dec. 5 at the Wells Fargo Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I kind of had been thinking about it for years,â&#x20AC;? says Earle, the son of acclaimed performer Steve Earle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People had made all these alt-country records, all these records with the roots of country infused in them, so why not the roots of soul being infused in them?â&#x20AC;? Nothingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gonna Change has a dustier, slightly more muted feel than the often bright and buoyant edge typifying much of vintage Memphis soul. It also arrived after a setback for Earle, when a substance abuse problem that began in his teens reemerged. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I made Harlem River Blues,â&#x20AC;? he explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had started drinking again, and I was doing a bunch of coke and was going crazy and ended up getting arrested right after the release of it,â&#x20AC;? says Earle, who was booked by police in September 2010 after allegedly trashing a dressing room and striking the daughter of a club owner. He canceled the tour and again checked into rehab. Earle went into the latest CD clean again and with a new perspective. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I started writing these songs for Nothingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gonna Change, was after I had cleaned up again,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think I realized after making Harlem and after the trials and tribulations that came in after that, when I look in the mirror, I see a different person now. I see an older person than I used to see. I think that, not that all of the angst has gone out of me, but a good chunk of youthful angst was taken out of me. And I ďŹ nd that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a lot more patient of a man these days.â&#x20AC;? Justin Townes Earle opens for John Prine on Wednesday, Dec. 5, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $40â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $50. 707.546.3600.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Iris Dement John Prine collaborator plays a solo concert with her acoustic guitar. Appearing with Jason Wilber. Nov 29, 8pm. $29. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Huckle â&#x20AC;&#x153;Farmageddonâ&#x20AC;? tour brings strings â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; things in food drive benefit. with Grant Farm and Mr December. Nov 30, 8:30. $10-$12. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Occidental Community Choir Join director Sarah Saulsbury and the Occidental Community Choir for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Around This Table,â&#x20AC;? a choral feast celebrating family, friends and the season. Nov 30, 8pm, Dec 1, 8pm and Dec 2, 3pm. $12-$15. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.8622.

Oleander

If a picture says a thousand words, every John Prine song is a photomosaic. Justin Townes Earle opens. Dec 5, 8pm. $40-$50. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Jonathan Richman Founder of Modern Lovers (and that guy singing in the tree in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Something About Maryâ&#x20AC;?) in a solo performance. Dec 1, 8:30pm. $15. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

SF Gay Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chorus Over 150 gay men in red suits celebrate the season in this fundraiser for Face to Face Sonoma County AIDS Network. Dec 1, 7:30pm. $25-$35. Center for Spiritual Living, 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4543.

Straight No Chaser Seriously funny a cappella with a holiday theme. Dec 2, 7:30pm. $39-$49. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Santa Rosa Symphony Soprano Christina Major and tenor Christopher Bengochea sing selections from Wagnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ringâ&#x20AC;? and Verdi arias with the SR Symphony Honor Choir. Dec 1, 8pm, Dec 2, 3pm and Dec 3, 8pm. $20-$75. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

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Grateful Dead bassist kicking off a two-week Terrapin Extravaganza. Nov 28, 8:30pm. Free. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

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Grate Room Gala with Phil Lesh Fellow Grateful Dead alum Bob Weir joins Phil Lesh, Jackie Green and others to celebrate the re-opening of the Grate Room. Nov 29, 7pm. $150. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

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Grateful Dead bassist jams with Warren Haynes, John Scofield, John Medeski and Joe Russo. Nov 30-Dec 2, 7pm. $150. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

888'-".*/(03&4035$0.&95 8 8 8' - " .*/ (0 3 & 4 03 5$ 0.           & 9 5   

Opening in December

Jill Sobule Story songs about human beings, real and imagined, with a unique and mesmerizing voice. Dec 5, 8pm. $15. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Classes Offered:

NAPA COUNTY Glen Campbell After more than 50 years, the crooner is calling it quits after this goodbye tour. Appearing with Victoria Ghost. Nov 30, 7pm. $75. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

3273 Airway Drive Suite D, Santa Rosa 707.845.5247

Dmitri Matheny Group Hard bop and West Coast cool jazz interpret ) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Soulful Sounds of

~ Ballet ~Jazz ~ Hip Hop ~ Modern ~ Contemporary Ballet ~ West African ~ Afro-Haitian ~ Samba ~ Afro-Brazilian ~ Afro-Cuban ~ Kid & Adult Classes newworldballet.com

26

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Sacto-born post grungers prove that the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s have not yet died. Appearing with Nescience and Ian Montgomery. Dec 1, 9:30pm. $13-$15. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

John Prine

Deep Dark Woods & Phil Lesh

GODDESS CRAFTS FAIRE

18 TH ANNUAL

DECEMBER 15 & 16 11AM-7PM

The Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St Suggested Donation $5 - $15 (kids free)

Featuring Delicious Food and an Exquisite Collection of hand-made gifts by local and regional women!

Fabulous Entertainment withâ&#x20AC;Ś

Afia Walking Tree, Joanne Rand, Megan McElroy, SaraTone, Sasha Rose and more! www.goddesscraftsfaire.com TKO The Punch Brothers, featuring Nickel Creekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chris Thile, play the Napa Valley

Opera House on Nov. 29.

25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

MARIN COUNTY


Music ( 25

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 28- D EC E M BE R 4, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26 Thur November 29

The Mickey Hart Band Fri November 30

Glen Campbell

The Goodbye Tour plus Victoria Ghost Sat December 1 Bestselling Author of Bird by Bird

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the Season.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dec 2 at 3:30. $20 includes free CD. Long Meadow Ranch Winery & Farmstead, 738 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.4555.

Yo el Rey Roasting and Arthouse

Mickey Hart Band Mickey Hart speaks the language of the drum with his band and his latest album, Mysterium Tremendum. Nov 29, 8pm. $35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

^ƾŜÄ&#x17E;Ä?ĎŽÍťSPECIAL CHILDRENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SHOW!

The Elves and the Shoemaker Fri December 7

Punch Brothers

Sons of Champlin

New York City-based quintet of mandolin, guitar, bass and banjo features Chris Thile of Nickel Creek. Nov 29, 8pm. $35-$40. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Special Guest: Tim Hockenberry Trio

Sat December 8

Taj Mahal Special Guest: Rowan Brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Chris & Lorin

Fri December 14

Snoop Dogg Sat December 15

Todd Snider with

1217 Washington St Downtown Calistoga www.yoelrey.com 707.942.1180

Dave Schools of Wide Spread Panic

Ba rn Barn Storm S torm III

Special Guest Nicki Bluhm and the Gramblers

Sun December 16

Chris Isaak Fri December 21

Bootsy Collins and the Funk Unity Band Fri January 4 Psychedelic Furs & The Fixx Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strap Strap o on n yyour our cchaps haps for for an an evening evening of of a art, r t, w wine, ine, ssong ong a and nd d dance!â&#x20AC;? ance!â&#x20AC;?

Opening O pening D Dec. e c. 1 a att 7 7pm pm

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Nov 30, the Machiavelvets. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Theater Nov 30, Sean Gaskell with Anthony Presti. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Nov 29, Sky I, Inner Riddim, Chris Levy, Sean Gaskell. Nov 30, Cast of Clowns. Dec 1, LuvPlanet. Dec 2, OTF/Rectifier, Abatis, Level Up Beatdown, Decomposers. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

H oliday Catering

Flamingo Lounge

www.TheOysterGirls.com

Nov 30, Bay Area Heat. Dec 1, Crossfire. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

LOCALLY GROWN DESIGNER OYSTERS 0RIVATE0ARTIESs7INERY%VENTS 7EDDINGSs(OLIDAY#ATERING

French Garden Nov 30, Haute Flash Quartet. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

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Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Nov 29, Wine Country Swing. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Galeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Central Club Dec 2, Fucktards, Punk N Rally, the Chicken Thieves, Wet and Reckless. 106 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.0118.

Hopmonk Tavern Nov 29, Milo Greene. Nov 29, Phutureprimitive. Dec 1, Jonathan Richman. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Universal Bass Phutureprimitiveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electronic downpour Flying home after an entire year of touring, Portland native Phutureprimitive, aka Rain, is gathering energy for a voyage to the pyramids of Chichen Itza on Dec. 21. As the Mayan calendar transitions into the Fifth Sun along Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s YucatĂĄn Peninsula, he will harness the universe with bass music. Before heading south of the border, though, he plays Hopmonkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Juke Joint series this week. Phutureprimitiveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lush organic tempos are showered with heavy bass distortion. Just as one emerges from the subliminal experience, the dubstep drop releases a downpour of cosmic tribal EDM. Classic electronica fans will appreciate the unique artistry of deep trance, while the mathematical duality of beat patterns and melodic phrasing blend with Rainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own hybrid of organic verses and electronic sounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love organic geometryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;ferns are a great example of this: concentric repeating patterns that slowly change and morph,â&#x20AC;? says Rain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I put subtle sounds in the background, low in the mix, that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t part of the musicality. Yet they somehow add contrast, creating a backdrop for the music to be heard. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m expressing some of the dark side I carry around. Something that is dark in nature, yet beautiful.â&#x20AC;? Explore the dark and dense palette of Phutureprimitive on Thursday, Nov. 29, at Hopmonk Tavern. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 10pm. $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$15. 707.829.7300. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jacquelynne OcaĂąa

Hotel Healdsburg Nov 30, Chris Amberger and David Udolf Duo. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room Nov 28, Brian Bergernon. Nov 29,

the Humours. Nov 30, Hand Me Down. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Dec 1, Oleander. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.


Mavericks

Mystic Theatre Nov 29, Iris Dement. Dec 1, Chris Robinson Brotherhood. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Redwood Cafe Nov 30, Burnt Reggae Band. Dec 1, Thugz. Dec 4, Rock Overtime Student Performance. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Russian River Brewing Co Dec 1, Kit and the Branded Men. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Tradewinds Nov 28, Justin Brown. Nov 30, Steve Sutherby Band. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Wells Fargo Center Dec 5, John Prine, Justin Townes Earle. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre

Nov 30, Buffall Wedding. Dec 1, Rudy Colombini Band. Dec 2, Orquesta La Moderna Tradicion. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Nov 28, King & Two Aces. Nov 30, Sam Rogers. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Friends. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Billcoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Billiards

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden International Vegetarian Buffet

Nov 29, the Stand Out State, Radio Effect, Finish Ticket. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Wed, Nov 28, 7:30pm Authentic and Unplugged

Nov 29, Nico & Sky. Nov 30, Michael Pinkimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz Jam. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant

Thurs, Nov 29, 8pm Guitar and Pedal Steel

Studio 55 Marin

Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Dec 1, Composers and Schools in Concert. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Nov 28, Mark Karan and special guests. Nov 29, Lorin Rowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rattlebox featuring Barry Sless and Doug Harman. Nov 30, Peppino Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Agostino with Jeff Campitelli. Dec 1, Brothers Comatose with the Railflowers. Dec 2, Huckle, Grant Farm and David Jacobs-Strain. Dec 5, Jill Sobule. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Nov 28, the Deep Dark Woods and Phil Lesh. Nov 29, Grate Room Gala with Phil Lesh, Bob Weir, Jackie Green and others. Nov 30-Dec 2, Phil Lesh and

Nov 30, Captain Crunch. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Dec 2, La Fiesta de la Posada. 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500.

Napa Valley Opera House Nov 29, Punch Brothers. Dec 1, Dan Hicks & the Hot Licks. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nov 28, West Coast Songwriters Competition. Nov 30, Mixed Signals. Dec 1, Deluna & Via Coma. Dec 2, Once Upon a December with Tori Anna. Dec 5, RobbieG. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Nov 29, the Mickey Hart Band. Nov 30, Glen Campbell. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Celtic Session Wine Country Swing &RI .OV PMsCeltic with a Kick

Greenhouse 3AT $EC PMsHolly Daze Party

Tommy Thomsen Sun, Dec 3, 5-8pm

Jazz Jam Thurs, Dec 6, 8pm

"Songs of Social Significance" David Rovicks, $10 cover Dinner reservations recommended &RI $EC PMsPoetry and Music

Activists' Lounge 3UN $EC  PMsBYO Sketching Stuff

Art Jam -ON $EC  PMsDine with the Authors

Literary Salon Wed, Dec 12, 7:30pm Traditional Tunes from Central France

French Session &INE"EERS7INESs$ 4 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price Buffet 7 days a week, 11:30am-9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa 707.54 4.2491 www.gaiasgardenonline.com

Dec 1, Void Where Prohibited. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Osher Marin JCC Dec 1, Blame Sally. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Osteria Divino Nov 28, Liza Silva and Voz do Brazil. Nov 29, Suzanna Smith. Nov 30, Passion Habanera. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Nov 28, Hung Like a Nun & the Clergy. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Kenny G Holiday Show If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever wondered if there was anything worse than Christmas music, well . . . Nov 28-Dec 1 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SF.

Bruce Springsteen Jerseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest brings his bristling â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wrecking Ballâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tour around for a victory lap. Nov 30 at Oracle Arena.

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

HOPMONK H OPMONK & KRSH KRSH PRESENT PRESENT IINDIE NDIE / R ROCK OCK

MILO M ILO G GREEN REEN

((FREE FREE K KRSH RSH EVENING EVENING CONCERT) CONCE E RT ) +S SPECIAL PECIAL FREE FREE EVENING EVENING SHOW SHOW FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 6PM/21+ 6PM /21+

THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NOV NOV 29 29

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT

DECADANCE D ECADANCE & JJUKE UKE JOINT JOINT PRESENT PRESENT BEAT B EAT / HIP HIP HOP HOP / ELECTRONICA ELECTRONICA

PHUTUREPRIMITIVE P HUTUREPRIMITIVE + INI INI & Z ZACK ACK D DARLING ARLING

$$10 10 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 5:30PM 5 : 30PM /21+ /21+

FRI F RI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NOV NOV 30 30

HOPMONK H OPMONK PR PRESENTS ESENTS JAM JA M / FOLK FOLK / AMERICANA AMERICANA

GRANT G RANT FARM FARM & HUCKLE HUCKLE FARMAGEDDON F ARMAGEDDON TOUR TOUR 2012! 2012 ! +M MR R DECEMBER DECEMBER

$$10 10 A ADV/$12 DV/$12 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DEC DEC 1

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS

SSINGER INGER / SO SONGWRITER NGWRITER / ACOUSTIC ACOUSTIC

JJONATHAN ONATHAN RICHMAN RICHMAN A +O OLD LD JJAWBONE AWBONE

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+ MON M ON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DEC DEC 3 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

Death Grips

Nov 30, Muddy Roses. Dec 1, Shana Morrison. Dec 2, Tiny Television. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

$3 $ 3 RED RED STRIPES STRIPES & $4 $4 JAMESON JAMESON ALL ALL NIGHT NIGHT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FFREE REE B B44 111/DOORS 1/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM/21+

TUES T UES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DEC D EC 4

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT HOSTED HOSTED BY BY E EVAN VAN FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES AGES

THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DEC DEC 6

JJUKE UKE JOINTS JOINTS & DOUBLE DOUBLE D PRESENT PRESENT GLITCH G LITCH / DUB DUB STEP STEP / ELECTRONICA ELECTRONICA

KNIGHT K NIGHT R RIDERS IDERS & SA SAMPLES MPLES

$$15 15 ADV/$18 ADV/$18 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS HIP H IP H HOP OP / JJAZZ AZZ / FFREESTYLE REEST YLE

SHOTGUN S HOTGUN W WEDDING EDDING QUINTET QUINTET

Simian Mobile Disco James Ford and Jas Shaw, analog electronic wizards, fly over from London. Dec 1 at Mezzanine.

DJJ JJACQUES D ACQUES & DJ DJ GUACAMOLE GUACAMOLE

FRI F RI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D DEC EC 7

A pillar of soul-filling anguish, backed by the Menahan Street Band. Nov 30 at Great American Music Hall.

Rancho Nicasio

Nov 29, Curtis Woodman.

TAP ROOM

Charles Bradley

Zach Hillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ferocious, major label-snubbing hip-hop project makes up for canceled date. Dec 3 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Sausalito Seahorse

THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NOV NOV 29 29

MONDAY M ONDAY N NIGHT IGHT EEDUTAINMENT DUT TAINMENT

19 Broadway Club

Old Western Saloon

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR S INGLES TO M E ET SINGLES MEET B EST BAR BAR HHONORABLE BEST ONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HONORABLE HONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC M US I C V VENUE ENUE HONORABLE HONOR ABLE

REGGAE/DANCEHALL R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL

Dec 5, Gonzalo Bergara Quartet. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Nov 28, Sam Andrew Band. Nov 29, AfriCali. Nov 30, Marshall Payne. Dec 1, Project X. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

27

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$$13/DOORS 13/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

Come see us! Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

SAT S AT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DEC DEC 8

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS JJAM AM / FO FOLK LK / R ROCK O CK

FREE F REE PE PEOPLES OPLES

+ TRAILER TRAILER PARK PARK RANGERS RANGERS JONATHAN JONATHAN WARREN WARREN AND AND THE TH E BILLY BILLY GOATS GOATS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Nov 30, Uncle Buffett with the Clean Slate. Dec 2, Counter Culture with the Decoyz. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 28- D EC E M BE R 4, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

Arts Events Galleries OPENINGS Nov 29 At 5pm. Finley Community Center, “Altered Group Exhibit” features work from Ricky Watts, Sean Nichols, Adam Springer, Saif Azzuz, Roman D’Argenzio and others. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Nov 30 At 6pm. Arts Guild of Sonoma, “December Invitational,” including new work by guild members. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

Dec 1 At 5pm. Gordon Huether Gallery, “Atatürk” series, Gordon Huether’s latest work, on display with a selection of Turkish rugs. 1465 First Street, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Lee Mendelson talk about new book “The Art and Making of Peanuts Animation.” Nov 28Apr 1, “Peanuts Celebrations” highlights 70 original strips which celebrate the major holidays throughout the year and features the history of the Peanuts-themed balloons in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

EarthRise Center Through Dec 21, “Intimations” features works on paper by Carol Duchamp. Free. 707.781.7401. 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma.

Finley Community Center Through Dec 20, “Altered Group Exhibit” features local artists creating alternative and abstract art. Featuring work from Ricky Watts, Sean Nichols, Adam Springer, Saif Azzuz, Roman D’Argenzio and others. Reception, Nov 29, 5pm. Through Dec 20, The work of ceramic artist Kathy Pallie. Reception, Nov 29, 5pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Graton Gallery

SONOMA COUNTY Art Changes Life Through Dec 31, “Deep Listening, Songs From the Earth,” mixed-media paintings by Richard K Bacon; also, paintings by Kristin Gustavson, photographs by Ananda Fierro, encaustic by Caterina Martinico and prints by Linda Shelp. 954 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Dec 31, “December Invitational,” including new work by guild members. Reception, Nov 30, 6pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Feb 3, “The Art of Peanuts Animation” features 16 never-before-displayed Peanuts drawings and cels, including five cels rescued from Schulz’s 1966 studio fire. Dec 1, Charles Solomon and

Through Dec 2, “The Great Basin” features landscapes of Nevada’s high desert, mountains and wildlife refuges. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Dec 24, “Forward” features the work of 13 contemporary conceptual artists, including Chris Beards, Seymour Bergman and others. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Museum Through Jan 6, “Magical Toyland,” nostalgic fun for anyone born from 1860 to 1960 featuring toys, games and dollhouses. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Dec 23, “Members’ Annual Exhibition,” featuring Petaluma artist David Moore. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Museum and Library Through Dec 16, Exhibit tells the story of local vets who served in the Korean War through artifacts and video presentations. $3-$5. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Quercia Gallery Through Dec 31, “Sea, Land, City” features the miniature work of 12 artists. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Dec 31, “Last Hurrah” is the final exhibition at the Quicksilver Mine Co. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Santa Rosa Junior College Through Dec 13, “Roberto Chavez Mini Blockbuster” features 50 pieces by Getty and Smithsonian-honored artist in the Robert F Agrella Gallery. 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 1.800.564.SRJC.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Jan 13, “Trees and Trinkets: Obtainable Art” features the functional tableware of Kalia Kilbana. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jan 13, “The California Landscape,” exhibition of landscape paintings from museum’s collections. Through Jan 13, “Peace at Sunset,” painting from 19th-century artist Thomas Cole, on loan from the De Young Museum in San Francisco. Through Jan 13, “Wild Land: Thomas Cole and the Birth of American Landscape Painting” uses a combination of graphics, immersive environments and images on a journey through Cole’s creative process. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Dec 30, “The Art of Handmade Paper” offers

‘THE ATATURK SERIES’ Historic Turkish and Ottoman artifacts come together

in Gordon Huether’s new exhibit opening Dec. 1. See Openings, adjacent.

glimpse into historic practice of papermaking with large display of rare Japanese papers. Through Dec 30, “Coastal Echoes” features the new works of respected painter Larry Thomas. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Bolinas Museum

University Art Gallery

Elsewhere Gallery

Through Dec 9, “Under Water” features photography, painting, prints and ceramics from various artists, plus “performing” sculpture by Mineko Grimmer. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

Through Dec 5, “Small Stories” features works by Mike Goldberg. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Dec 4-31, “Starring the Throckmorton,” fine art by Joni Bissell, Victoria Mimiaga, Francis Whitnall and Douglas Andelin. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Bay Model Visitor Center Nov 28-Jan 4, Photographer E. Loren Soderberg’s works on display. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Through Dec 30, “Slapstick,” vintage Hollywood cinema photography from the collection of Robert Flynn Johnson. Artist talk, Dec 1, 2pm. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Industrial Center Building Dec 1-2, 11am-6pm, 44th annual event features over 80 artists riffing on the musical theme of 4/4 time. Free. 480 Gate Five Rd, Sausalito.

Marin Civic Center Through Dec 10, “Marin Society of Artists: 85 years,” a nonjuried member show. 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 415.499.6400.

Marin Community Foundation Through Feb 5, “Works on Water” features the work of 30 artists exploring the aesthetics and politics of water. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin Society of Artists Through Dec 16, “Winter Holidays and Gifts” features ceramics, sculptures, paintings, photography, prints, jewelry and wearable art. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

Novato Arts Center Dec 1, 5pm, “Art by the Inch,” purchase pieces of a 100foot mural painted by artist members in this fundraiser for the museum. 500 Palm Drive, Novato.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Dec 4-27, “Art of the Spirit,” entries may address the spiritual world, politics, ecology, ritual, myth, mysticism or spiritual expression. Dec 4-27, “Dream Landscapes,” mixedmedia works by Dr Peller Marion. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Rebound Bookstore Through Jan 10, “Phases of the Moon” features various artists’ found images and abstract works in the many shapes of the moon. 1641 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.0550.


NAPA COUNTY di Rosa

Downtown Napa Through Nov 30, , 6pm, “Art on First,” the third annual exhibition bringing art to empty storefronts in downtown Napa. Includes work by 13 Bay Area artists. Main and Third streets, Napa.

ECHO Gallery Through Dec 16, “Picture Show” showcases emerging and established photographers. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Gordon Huether Gallery Dec 1-Jan 18, “Atatürk” series, Gordon Huether’s latest work, on display with a selection of Turkish rugs. Reception, Dec. 1, 5pm. 1465 First Street, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Dec 31, “Out of the Woods,” Wood Sculpture for Home and Garden by Freeland Tanner. Dec 1, 2pm, “AS Batle Studio Trunk Show,” San Francisco artist Agelio Batle shows his exquisite line of 100 percent graphite, functional art objects that write like a pencil. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Napa Valley Museum Through Nov 30, “Tidal” and “As Above, So Below” is a twoperson exhibit featuring the paintings of Gail Chase-Bien and the photographs of Roger Jordan. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Comedy Headliner Different headliner each month. Last Fri of every month. Heritage Public House, 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Mort Sahl Where are we headed, politically? One of the greatest satirists of our time answers the question. Nov 29, 8pm. $20-$30. 142 Throckmorton

Slip-Goose Monkey Highlight performers from “Best of Sonoma County Improv 2009” tackle improvised comedic theater games on the fly. Last Thurs monthly at 7. Free. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

installment of the Buddy Club Children’s Club. Dec 2, 1pm. $8. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Calistoga Holiday Village Weekend The store becomes a theater with showing of a holiday classic movie at 5pm followed by the 17th annual Calistoga lighted tractor parade at 7pm. Dec 1. Free. Calistoga Copperfield’s Books, 1330 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.1616.

Charlie Brown’s Christmas Tree Grove

Dance

Snow flurries, 175 decorated trees and holiday music create a holly, jolly atmosphere. Dec 2-31. Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

The Nutcracker

Christmas Baazar

Dec 1, 12, 2, 5 and 6:30pm, Just Dance Academy’s performance of the holiday classic ballet. $10-$12. Dec 1-2, 5pm, The Nutcracker, Stapleton Ballet’s version of the holiday classic. $20-$32. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.499.6800.

Arts, crafts, jewelry, baked goods, candies, gourmet canned chutney, jellies, pickles and more! Dec 1, 9am-4pm. Free. Napa County Fairgrounds, 1435 N Oak St, Calistoga.

Fall Dance Concert Nov 29-Dec 1, 7:30pm and Sun, Dec 2, 2pm, Fall Dance Concert, “Water Works” draws on the theme of inland water flow as resource, theme and metaphor. Directed by Christine Cali. $10$17. SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

The Nightmare Before Christmas Nov 28-29, 7pm, Classical & Contemporary Dance with Tamara Grose presents the Tim Burton film in ballet form. $15-$20. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 707.588.3400.

Dickens Holiday Crafts Fair Over 70 local artists showcasing handcrafted goods for purchase. Dec 1, 9am-5pm and Dec 2, 10am-4pm. $2. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Handmade for the Holidays Goodies galore up for sale. Nov 28-Jan 6. Free. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Handmade for the Holidays Craft Fair Locally-made goods available for purchase. Fri, Nov 30, noon-6pm. Free. Guayakí Maté Bar, 6782 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.6644.

Events

Ho Ho Holiday Photo Booth

Books & Tea: A Holiday Gift Books Review

Have a wacky photo snapped with homemade photo props. Dec 1, 6-9pm. $5. ECHO Gallery, 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Elaine Petrocelli leads a discussion of books for the holidays. Nov 28, 1pm. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Holiday Arts Fair

Complimentary photos, music and festive fun. Sat, 9-11am. through Dec 22. Free. Costeaux French Bakery, 417 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Dining, wine, getaways, adventure, art, housewares, services and one of a kind items. Dec 1. Free. San Geronimo Valley Community Center, 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

The Bubble Lady

Holiday Barn Boutique

Big bubbles, tiny bubbles, they’re all here in this

Six local artists present their wares

Breakfast with Santa

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@ Santa Rosa High School ArtQuest Shadowing Program Through Dec 7 By Appointment Only: 707.535.4842 ArtQuest Information Night: Thursday, January 17 @ 6:30pm SRHS Multipurpose Room Priority Application Deadline: January 25, 2013 Final Application Deadline: February 15, 2013 1235 Mendocino Ave. www.artquestonline/org 707.535.4842 artquest@srcs.k12.ca.us

The 38th annual

DICKENS Holiday Crafts Fair jewelry glass art ceramics wreaths paintings wood work and more ... December 1, 9am - 5pm December 2, 10am - 4pm Finley Community Center 2060 West College Ave.

Over 70 artists selling handcrafted goods including 20+ new vendors this year! Live entertainment, prizes & food for purchase Ride “Rosie the Trolley” for FREE to the Luther Burbank Home & Garden Open House

Admission: Admis sion: $2 for adults aadults;; kkids iids 12 and under FREE! FR REE!

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For accessible acces accesss ible i ble info in info, fo , call (707) 543-3292 5 43-3292 / TDD T DD D D (707) 543-3289 (M M - F, 8am - 5pm)

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Through Jan 27, “Renaissance on Fillmore “ examines San Francisco’s upper Fillmore district through 1955-’65 with the work of 17 artists who either lived or worked in the building at 2322 Fillmore. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.


www.raventheater.org

Bear Republic Brewing Company and the Krush, 95.9 FM.

115 North St. Healdsburg

Offering a huge selection of Far Fetched originals and Indigenous clothing at 60% to 70% off retail! See you there! www.farfetched.com DIRECTIONS: Take Hwy 12 to Stony Point Rd, turn South on Stony Point Rd. Turn right on Sebastopol Rd., left on Corporate Center Parkway and left on Apollo Way

Hwy 12

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The kings of 100% acoustic folk-skiffle-swing holiday hijinks offer up their 36th Anniversary Yule Tour, with special guests Foxes in the Hen House! Sponsored in part by

Far Fetched jewelry sale in conjunction with Indigenous organic clothing!

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Christmas Jug Band!

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The people on your list already have enough

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in a festive, cozy environment. Dec 1-2, 10am-5pm. Maresca Barn Studio, 16120 Watson Rd., Guerneville.

Grand Gr and Opening Opening

Holiday Ceramics Sale Featuring functional and decorative pieces at reasonable prices. Sat, 9am-4pm. through Dec 8. Free. Sebastopol Veteran’s Auditorium, 282 S High St, Sebastopol.

December D e ce mbe r 7, 7, 2012 2 012 | 6–9pm 6 – 9pm DISCOVER A DISCOVER ART RT & THE TH E ARTISTS ARTIST TS M e m b e r s Exhibition, Members E x hib i ti o n, C Ceramics eramics Sale, S a l e, Live L i ve & S Silent ile nt A Auctions uc tions

Holiday Crafts Fair West Marin County sells its wares at this 41st annual event. Fri, Nov 30, 4-9pm, Sat, Dec 1, 10am-6pm and Sun, Dec 2, 10am-5pm. Free. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

H o r s d’ouevres, Hors d’o u ev r e s , fine f in e wines wine s & m u s i c by by Batacha Bat ac ha music

EXHIBITS E X H I B I T S | PERFORMANCES P E R F O R M A N C E S | CL C L ASSES ASSES

Holiday Open House View the home and greenhouse, and get freshbaked cookies and spiced tea. Dec 1-2, 10am-4pm. $2. Luther Burbank Home & Gardens, Santa Rosa Avenue at Sonoma Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.524.5445.

Jingle Jog Fun Run Race and events to benefit Strawberry Point Elementary School. Dec 1, 9am. $15-$35. Strawberry Village, Redwood Hwy Frontage Rd., Mill Valley.

Lights of Remembrance Candle- and tree-lighting ceremony to honor loved ones who have been lights in your life. Dec 2, 6pm. Free. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma.

Mill Valley Winterfest There’s a snow slide, skating rink, arts and crafts, holiday singers, food, hot drinks, a holiday costume contest, and, of course, Santa. Dec 2, 11am-5pm. $3. Depot Plaza, Throckmorton and Miller, Mill Valley.

Pigskin & Pinot Holiday open house and winetasting with game day nibbles and the day’s best college ball games. Dec 1, 9:30am-4pm. Novy Family Wines/Siduri Winery, 980-C Airway Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.578.3882.

Restoration Work Day Morning of restoration and clean-up. Sat, Dec 1, 9:30am. Free. Richardson Bay Audubon Center, 376 Greenwood Beach Rd, Tiburon. 415.388.2524.

River Friends Book & Bake Sale Buy used books and eat

WATER WORKS SSU presents its fall dance concert Nov. 29–Dec. 2. See Dance, p29.

baked goods. Nov 28-Dec 1. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Warm Wishes Street Pack Stuffing Day Warm Wishes needs volunteers to stuff backpacks and distribute them to the homeless. Dec 1, 8am. Free. Unity in Marin, 600 Palm Dr, Hamilton, Novato.

World AIDS Day Medatative Hour of Rememberance Candles will be lit for loved ones and for all who have been lost in the AIDS pandemic. Dec 1, 3pm. Free. Starcross Monastic Community, 34500 Annapolis Rd, Annapolis.

Zen Fest Holiday Sale Distinctive art, hand-crafted gifts, meditation supplies, Buddhas and more. Dec 2, 9am-4pm. Free. Stone Creek Zen Center, 373 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.887.1514.

Film Barrymore No longer a leading box office star, John Barrymore reckons with the ravages of his life of excess. Nov 28, 7pm. $16-$23. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

a n d… and… S e b a s t o p o l Documentary Sebastopol D o c u m e n t a r y Film Film Fe s t i va l : M Mar ar 2 21–24 1– 24 Festival:

Art A rt a att tthe he S Source ource O Open pen 282 S.. H High St., Sebastopol 2 82 S igh S t ., S e b a s to p o l S tud i o s : J Studios: June u n e 1, 1, 2, 2, 9 &10 707.829.4797 7 07. 8 29.4797 Details De t a i ls at at:: w www.sebarts.org w w. se b a r t s .or g TTickets: ickets : $2200 aadvance dvance / $2255 oonn D Dec ec 7 PPurchase urchase ttickets: ickets : www.brownpapertickets.com/event/295030 w w w.brownpaper tickets.com /event / 295030 The Award Winning Team That Brought You The Carneros Inn & Salmon Creek Conservation Center

Cult Film Series Series features four doublefeatures, including “The Thin” and “They Live” on Nov 29. Thurs, Nov 29, 7pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa.

Don Quixote Big screen showing of performance by the Dutch National Ballet. Dec 3, 7pm. $8-$10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Phone: (707)887.0700 Visit www.PersingerArchitects.com g to learn more Gallery at the Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Jewish Film Festival Series has a theme of “music.” Films include “AKA Pomus,” Nov 29; and “Hava Nagila,” Dec 4. Times vary. Thurs, Nov 29 and Tues, Dec 4, 7:30pm. $15-$66. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Miss Representation Film exposes how mainstream media contribute to the underrepresentation of women in positions of power and influence in America. Dec 4, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Mountainfilm Festival Over 30 award-winning documentaries on topics ranging from extreme adventure sports to environmental activism and awareness. Nov 30-Dec 2. $28-$95. )

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Chanticleer’s sumptuous blend of voices rings in the season with profound, peaceful and joyous music

AC Chanticleer hant ntic iccle leer C le Christmas hrisstmas December 10-23 Dec 16, 4PM & 6:30PM St. Vincent’s, Petaluma Also * Berkeley * Oakland * San Francisco * Sacramento * Carmel * Santa Clara

Dates D ates & ti tickets: ckets: w www.chanticleer.org ww.chanticleer.org 800. 407.1400 4 15.392. 4400 | 800.407.1400 415.392.4400

31 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

C e l e b r a te tthe Celebrate he N New ew C Center e n te r ffor o r the th e Arts A r t s at a t the th e Veterans Ve te r a n s Memorial M e m o r i a l Building Building


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142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

The Passenger Jack Nicholson and Maria Schneider star in Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1975 enigmatic tale of a man who assumes another man’s identity. Nov 29, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Food & Drink Cooking with Vegan Artisan Cheeses Chef Miyoko Schinner presents tasting and lessons from her cookbook “Vegan Artisan Cheeses.” Nov 28, 6:30pm. $15. Sonoma Cutlery, 130 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.6433.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Winemaker Nights Taste new releases and meet the makers. Thurs, 6-9pm. Stave Wine Lounge, 1149 First St, Napa. 707.259.5411.

Lectures Finding Your Voice: An Introduction to the World of Voiceover Entertaining introduction to the world of voiceover, led by Voicetrax founder Samantha Paris. Dec 1, 9:45am. $45. Voicetrax San Francisco, 1207-D Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.8800.

Hong Kong: From British Rule to PRC Dr David Wolf of the Sonoma County Board of Education discusses changes in Hong Kong since its change in government and how education in China differs from the US. Dec 4, 7:30pm. $5. Spring Lake

Fierce Disobedience Poet Alice Notley reads at SSU Poet Brian Teare once wrote of Alice Notley, “She’s freed herself from any single notion of what poetry should be so that she can go ahead and write what poetry can be.” Indeed. While Notley might not have the name recognition as Billy Collins or Kay Ryan, she has published 25 books of poetry. A Pulitzer Prize nominee, Notley was active in the 1970s New York scene, along with first husband Ted Berrigan. She now lives an “isolated” (her own word) life in Paris, where she’s been since 1992. Though Notley may live an ocean away from Needles, Calif., where she was born, the poet continues to be informed by the desert and the outlier culture of her homeland. Her work is fierce, honest and willing to challenge conventions of language as a way to get at deeper sociopolitical and personal truths. From “How Spring Comes,” published in 1976, “ . . . I make chow. I contemplate / semicolons. I despair as a mother. I scream at that / kid I’m gonna crack open your big walnut if you don’t / go to sleep. Theories of grace, that it implies no / surprise no shock . . .” This month, Notley flies from Paris to visit SSU as part of the “Writers at Sonoma” series. Alice Notley, one of poetry’s most brave, tenacious and innovative voices, reads from her work on Thursday, Nov. 29, in the Prelude space at the Green Music Center. 1801 East Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 7pm. Free. 707.664.3919.—Leilani Clark

Village Auditorium, 5555 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa.

JT Snow Former Giants first baseman in

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conversation with Bruce Macgowan. Nov 28, 7:30pm. $12-$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Karen Peterson Psychic medium focusing on teaching others how to communicate with the dead on their own. Dec 2, 2pm. $45. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Science Buzz Cafe Nov 29, “Art and Science of Democracy” with Gus diZegera; Dec 6, “Earth: Geological Past and Future” with Richard Ely; Dec 20, and “The Sacred Market” with Daniel Osmer and Robert Porter. Thurs, Nov 29, 6:30pm. $4. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Snow Camping Basics REI snowcamping specialist Johnny Walker will show how enjoyable snow camping can be. Dec 5, 7pm. Free. REI Corte Madera, 213 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.927.1938.

TEDx Napa Valley Independently organized evening of insightful speeches featuring Dianne Aigaki, Jean Arnold, Mario Chiodo and others. Dec 2, 11am. Free. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Readings Book Passage Nov 28, 7pm, “Far from the Tree” with Andrew Solomon. Nov 29, 7pm, “Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power” with John Meacham. Nov 30, “Kin to the Wind” with Moro Buddy Bohn. Dec 1, 1pm, “Because You Have To: A Writing Life” with Joan Frank. Dec 1, 4pm, “Grandmother Power” with Paola Gianturco. Dec 1, 7pm, “Emotional Well-Being: Embracing the Gift of Life” with Dr. Neil Kobrin. Dec 2, 1pm, “Joy After FIfty: A Woman’s Guide to Passion, Purpose and Lasting Happiness” with Connie Clark. Dec 2, 4pm, “Fearless Women: Visions of a New World” with Mary Ann Halpin. Dec 2, 7pm, “Drinking Diaries: Women Serve Their Stories Straight Up” with Caren Gerszberg, Leah Epstein & contributors. Dec 2, 7pm, “Houses and Origins” with

David Wilson. Dec 3, 7pm, “Better Than Fiction: True Travel Tales from Great Fiction Writers” with Isabel Allende, Don George and Joe Yogerst. Dec 4, 7pm, “Skulls: An Exploration of Alan Dudley’s Curious Collection” with Simon Winchester. Dec 5, 7pm, “Royal Cities of the Ancient Maya” with Barry Brukoff. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

It’s a Wonderful Life Live Radio Play

Glaser Center

Jacob Marley was dead, to begin with, but what happens to Scrooge’s mean, sour, pruny old business partner after that? Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Dec 23. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Nov 28, 7pm, “Why the World Doesn’t End: Tales of Renewal in Times of Loss” with Michael Meade. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Uptown Theatre Dec 1, 7pm, “Some Assembly Required: A Journal of My Son’s First Son” with Anne Lamott. $30. 1350 Third St, Napa 707.259.0123.

Theater Beauty & the Beast Classic story about beautiful maiden Belle and the fierce Beast who holds her captive in his enchanted castle. Fri-Sat, 7:30pm and Sat-Sun, 1:30pm. through Dec 8. $10-$18. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

A Christmas Carol Based closely on Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” this musical version hews close to the original story. Times vary. Thurs-Sat, 8pm. through Dec 15. $12-$20. St Vincent’s School, 1 St Vincent Dr, San Rafael.

DIY Dickens Interactive, read-along version of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.” Sun, 2pm. through Dec 16. $12-$16. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

The Elves & the Shoemaker Two merry elves arrive at a small village in the Black Forest to discover a poor shoemaker who clearly needs assistance. Dec 2, 1pm. $18. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

It’s a Wonderful Life Musical play based on the classic movie. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Dec 23. $15-$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Adapted from the 1946 holiday film, this version premiered in 1996 and has been produced around the country. Directed by Jon Tracy. Times vary. Tues-Thurs-Sun through Dec 16. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol

The Mouse That Roared A rag-tag bunch of Medieval archers defeats the United States in a battle for the Alpine Duchy of Grand Fenwick. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Dec 16. $10-$20. Studio Theatre, College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

The Ratcatcher Part town hall meeting, part cabaret, this is an original adaptation of the Pied Piper legend. Music by the Crux. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through Dec 16. $15-$18. Imaginists Theatre Collective, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

The Santaland Diaries David Yen reprises his role in the David Sedaris story of working as an elf in Macy’s Santaland. Fri-Sat, 8pm. through Dec 15. $20-$24. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

You Can’t Take It with You Ross Valley Players presents story about encounter between conservative family and lunatic household. Various times. Through Dec 16. $20-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of November 28

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “They are trying to make me into a fixed star,” complained religious leader Martin Luther a few centuries ago. “I am an irregular planet.” I invite you to use that declaration as your own in the coming weeks. You have every right to avoid being pinned down, pigeonholed and forced to be consistent. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you need abundant freedom to mutate your identity. You deserve a poetic license that allows you to play a variety of different roles and explore the pleasures of unpredictable self-expression. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

“The Star-Spangled Banner” is America’s national anthem. It features the lyrics of a patriotic poem written by Francis Scott Key. But the melody itself is entirely lifted from a bawdy old song that celebrates Bacchus, the ancient god of wine and ecstatic dancing. I love it when things are repurposed as dramatically as that. Do you? The coming weeks will be prime time to repurpose stuff with creative abandon. Make the past useful for the future, Taurus. Turn good old ideas into fantastic new ones. Don’t just recycle; transform.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) I’m guessing that in the coming weeks you will be receiving a multitude of inquiries, invitations and temptations—probably more than you feel capable of responding to, and certainly more than you should respond to. A few of these opportunities might be appealing and lead to interesting adventures. But some will be useless, diversionary or trivial. Will you be able to tell the difference? That’s your big challenge. If you’d like help dodging unwanted solicitations, give out this phone number as your own: 212.479.7990. It’s a free service provide by “The Rejection Line” at Rejectionline.com. People calling that number will be politely told you aren’t available. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

For millennia, the plant known as the yellow avalanche lily has thrived on mountain slopes and meadows throughout western North America. It blooms early in the spring, just in time for broad-tailed hummingbirds that migrate from Central America to sip the flower’s nectar. But now there’s a problem with that ancient arrangement. Due to global warming, the lily now blossoms 17 days earlier than it used to. But the hummingbirds haven’t made an adjustment in their schedule, so they’re barely showing up in time to get their full allotment of nectar. I suspect this is a metaphor for a shift you may be facing in your own life rhythm. Fortunately, you’ve been forewarned, and you can adjust better than the hummingbirds.

LEO (July 23–August 22)

In our calendar, there is no special holiday devoted to honoring the joy and power of rebellion. This oversight confounds me. All my experience tells me that the urge to revolt is a fundamental human need. Every one of us has a sacred duty to regularly rise up and overthrow a stale status quo that is oppressing us, whether that’s an organized group effort we’re part of or our own deadening routine. I’m telling you this, Leo, because it’s an excellent time to celebrate your own Rebellion Jubilee. Your vitality will soar as you shed numbing habits and decaying traditions.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

Recently you’ve had resemblances to an eight-year-old kid wearing the pajamas you loved when you were five. Your bare arms are jutting out beyond where the sleeves end, and there’s a similar thing going on with your legs. The fabric is ripped here and there because it can’t accommodate how much you’ve grown. You’re feeling discomfort in places where the overly tight fit is squeezing your flesh. All of this is somewhat cute but mostly alarming. I wish you would wean yourself of the past and update your approach.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) A lot of leopard frogs live on Staten Island, one of New York City’s five boroughs. Most of them make a sound that resembles a long snore or a rapid chuckle. But over the years, biologists have also detected a third type of frogly expression: a clipped, repetitive croak. Just this year, they finally figured out that this belonged to an entirely distinct species of leopard frog that they

had never before identified. It’s still so new it doesn’t have a name yet. I expect a metaphorically similar development in your life, Libra. You will become aware of a secret that has been hiding in plain sight. You will “find” something that actually revealed itself to you some time ago.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) Tom Tolbert is a sports talk show host on San Francisco radio station KNBR. I am amazingly neutral about him. Nothing he says fascinates me or mirrors my own thoughts. On the other hand, he never makes me mad and he’s not boring. I neither like him nor dislike him. I simply see him for who he is, without any regard for what he can do for me. He has become a symbol of the possibility that I’m able to look at a human being with complete impartiality, having no wish for him to be different from what he is. In the coming week, I suggest you try to achieve this enlightened state of mind on a regular basis. It’s prime time, astrologically speaking, to ripen your mastery of the art of objectivity.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) If you say “rabbit rabbit rabbit” as soon as you wake up on the first day of the month, you will have good luck for the next 30 to 31 days. At least that’s how reality works according to a British superstition. But judging from your astrological omens, I don’t think you will have to resort to magic tricks like that to stimulate your good fortune. In the next four weeks, I suspect you will be the beneficiary of a flood of cosmic mojo, as well as a surge of divine woowoo, a shower of astral juju and an upwelling of universal googoo gaga. If it would give you even more confidence to invoke your favorite superstitions, though, go right ahead. Even scientists say that kind of thing works: tinyurl.com/ SuperstitiousBoost. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) According to Greek myth, Perseus cut off the head of Medusa. She was the creature whose hair was composed of snakes and whose gaze could turn a person into stone. The immortal winged horse Pegasus was instantaneously born from Medusa’s blood. He ultimately became an ally to the nine Muses, and Zeus relied on him to carry thunder and lightning. I predict that while you’re sleeping, Capricorn, you will have a dream that contains elements of this myth. Here’s a preliminary interpretation of that dream: You are undergoing a transition that could in a sense give you the power of flight and a more abundant access to a muse. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) It’s time for you to be leader of the pack, Aquarius; to take your gang to the next level; to make sure the group mind isn’t suppressing innovation and enforcing peer pressure but is rather inspiring every member of the tribe to be as creative as they dare to be. And if it’s not realistic for you to wield that much power, then do whatever you can to synergize the alliances that hold your posse together. Build team morale. Gossip constructively. Conspire to animate an influx of fresh magic. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

If you’re a food company that wants to sell chicken in the shape of a chicken wing, it must have actual chicken wing meat in it. Otherwise, the law says you’ve got to call your product “wyngz.” I’ve always thought that there’s a lot of information the media presents as “news” that is really as fake as wyngz. That’s why I advocate calling the bogus stuff “newzak” (rhymes with “muzak”). Your assignment in the coming weeks, Pisces, is to make sure you’re not putting out any wyngz- or newzaklike stuff in your own chosen field. The fates will help you rather dramatically if you put a high premium on authenticity.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


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