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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating

the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Subtle Subterfuge Not-so-Sustainable Sebastopol BY UNA GLASS

S

ebastopol, long known for its conscientious, progressive approach to sustainable growth, has become the target of a ruse by a new group calling itself Sustainable Sebastopol. This group of developers and investors are the “wolf in sheep’s clothing,” poised to make a fast return on shortsighted, high-impact developments like the proposed CVS/ Chase project. It’s no surprise that this group has endorsed city council candidates Kathy Austin and Kathleen Shaffer, both of whom have received consistently low marks on their environmental scorecards by Sonoma County Conservation Action, the county’s oldest and largest conservation watchdog.

The campaign contribution reports, made public this month, show that development interests heavily funded both candidates’ campaigns, Austin topping Shaffer’s 34 percent with a whopping 57 percent! Included in this are contributions of $1,500 each from a Los Angeles real estate PAC. In January of this year, long before the planning and review process was completed, Kathleen Shaffer revealed that she had already made a decision, through an email in which she stated she was “working under the radar” to get the CVS/Chase development project passed. Shaffer, now attempting to distance herself from her support of this problematic project, says she “supports the rule of law,” a ridiculous cover that implies her fellow council members do not follow the law. The original Sustainable Sebastopol, formed in 2001, was truly an environmentally conscious group. Several of its founders recently sent a letter to the editor of Sonoma West exposing this new Sustainable Sebastopol as pro-development and pro–CVS/Chase, with no regard for environmental or local concerns. Signees of the letter included four former Sebastopol mayors. Looking at the members of this new Sustainable Sebastopol confirms that their definition of “sustainable” means sustaining the high-end lifestyles of big developers. Vote this Tuesday for your best interests, not that of big developers. Una Glass is president of Sonoma County Conservation Action and a longtime resident of Sebastopol. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Blood Money

In the letter “Maher’s Decision” (“Rhapsodies and Rants,” Oct. 17), I’m not sure exactly what Mr. Maher is being accused of specifically, but I know what the word “hypocrite” means. While the letter fails to give real specifics about the exact “hypocrisy” being committed, the writer Steve R. Finnegan asks, “Doesn’t he know where the money comes from?” He further states, “The money has blood, sweat and tears on it.” I’m assuming he is referring to the $47 million public bond and the alleged “dirty” corporate money used to build the $150 million state-ofthe-art facility called Weill Hall. When we point a finger at someone’s hypocrisy, three fingers point back at us. So I would like to ask Mr. Finnegan (and everyone) a few questions: Do you buy gasoline or drive a car? Do you fly? Do you eat meat, fish, dairy or any food that is not local? Do you use any banking services at Wells Fargo, Bank of America or Chase? Do you shop at Safeway, Home Depot, Target or Wal-Mart? Are you connected to the grid of electricity and natural gas? Do you have an AT&T, Verizon or Comcast account? So while you and others rail against Weill Hall and the evil money and power that built it, doesn’t your money have “blood, sweat and tears on it” as well?

KARIN LEASE Graton

Development Dismay Angwin, with a permanent population of just 1,500, is an unincorporated area with limited infrastructure. Angwin’s wells are being dug deeper. PG&E says Angwin’s electrical is almost maxed out. Napa County has not budgeted road improvements for the one lane in and one lane out of Angwin. Eight years ago, Angwin residents began

fighting a Pacific Union College housing development. Pacific Union College’s board—18 of 21 live outside California—voted to sell their agricultural land for the college to expand. A large housing development on Howell Mountain would rip Angwin and the upper Napa Valley at the seams, and cost all taxpayers of Napa County.

Yes on Measure U, backed by Save Rural Angwin, believes the PUC has the right to sell its land. But does the college have the right to change the character of a community? Can this college cause an explosion in population, resources and way of life so they can have more money in the bank? Vote yes on Measure U and preserve Angwin and Napa County ag land and open space. Protect Angwin from large-scale development that would ravage a community and tax its people’s resources—in more ways than one.

PAULA J. PETERSON Angwin

One Crop Mind Sixty thousand three hundred and two acres of Sonoma County are monocropped with vineyards. It’s bad for the soil, wildlife, ecological diversity and riparian zones of this region. Sonoma County is prized for its highquality wine production, but what often goes unnoticed are the environmental and social costs. The clear-cutting and removal of native grasses, which made these vineyards possible in the first place, erased the complex ecological workings between soil, plants, mushrooms and wildlife. Pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers used on vineyards run off into rivers and streams, poisoning everything in their path. The long-term effects of monocropping on the soil may also render it less fertile for future generations. Additionally, almost all of the laborers that pick and take care of these grapes are people who don’t have citizenship, and for that reason are exploited relentlessly. Often, vineyard workers have no breaks all day, no safety regulations, are exposed to toxic chemicals and sometimes just don’t get paid and are deported at their boss’ will.


THIS MODERN WORLD

In all of these ways, the intensive monocropping of grapes in Sonoma county is unethical and reects a general disregard for ancient ecological relationships, and by extension, a general disregard for the well-being of working people.

MARISA MANCILLAS

Santa Rosa

Dept. of Round A letter last week in support of roundabouts was incorrectly attributed to Zal Moxis, who, incidentally, has expressed to us his irritation with roundabouts. The comments came from Chris Lyman. We regret the error.

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1 WORLD 2 SERIES 3 CHAMPIONS 4 HELL

THE ED.

Driving in Circles

5 YEAH Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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Rants

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 31- NOV E M BE R 6, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Paper THE

I LOVE IT TOO A license plate says it all outside a public meeting on district elections in March of this year.

How We Represent It’s time for district elections in Santa Rosa BY GABE MELINE

I

drove by Sheppard Elementary the other day, just to see if a crosswalk had gone in yet. It hadn’t. For over three years, parents in the neighborhood have been asking for a crosswalk in front of their children’s school on West Avenue in southwest Santa Rosa, and it still has not been painted on the road.

I thought about this the other day when I got a robocall from the “No on Q” campaign. In the recording, a man identifying himself as a resident of Santa Rosa warns about the danger of district elections, and assures that minorities are already wellrepresented in Santa Rosa. If minorities are already wellrepresented in Santa Rosa, then why can’t parents in the city’s most predominantly Latino

neighborhood get a simple crosswalk painted on the road in front of their children’s school? District elections are on the Santa Rosa ballot this year in the form of Measure Q, and here’s what it would do. Santa Rosa would elect its city council from seven different districts of the city, ensuring an equal geographic spread of representation at city hall. Why the need? Because in the

last 30 years, only four of 30 councilmembers have come from the entire west side of Santa Rosa. None have come from the southwest quadrant, which includes Sheppard Elementary. None. A rallying cry for the “No on Q” campaign is that district elections would only allow voters to choose one council candidate instead of voting for all seven available council positions. “Protect your vote,” the many campaign signs prominent in northeast areas of town say. But if almost all council candidates come from Fountaingrove, Skyhawk, Montecito Heights or the McDonald area, what kind of vote is being protected? What kind of representation is that for someone who lives on Bellevue or Corby Avenue? Let’s face it: Santa Rosa is already divided. To ignore that fact is to be living in a midcentury idyll of Santa Rosa as a small town. We are split by the freeway and by the mall, and it’s worth noting that efforts to mitigate those very tangible dividers have been shot down by the same council majority that opposes district elections. John Sawyer? He tried to block construction of a sorely needed bicycle and pedestrian overpass over Highway 101 near Coddingtown. Ernesto Olivares? He had the gall to actually demote a board member for suggesting to the owners of the Santa Rosa Plaza that they might want to explore some proposals for creating a fulltime pedestrian walkway through the mall. So when I hear opponents of district elections, including the Press Democrat’s editorial director Paul Gullixson—incidentally, a very smart Santa Rosa resident who, ahem, lives on the east side—talk about district elections bringing “division” and echoing cries of “balkanization,” I have to do a double-take. You wanna talk balkanization? Roseland, with the largest concentrated Latino population in Santa Rosa, is still not included as an official part of the city. Santa Rosa’s city limits completely circumvent Roseland, leaving a giant doughnut hole of non-city


Gabe Meline is the editor of this paper and lives downtown, roughly one Buster Posey home-run length away from city hall.

State Propositions Summaries of our recommendations Proposition 30: Yes

Provide much-needed funding for schools and help balance the budget with a small sales tax increase and extra help from those making over $250,000 a year.

Proposition 31: No

Cumbersome package of new laws not the right fix for the state’s budget woes.

Proposition 32: No

The quintessential wolf in sheep’s clothing promises reform but would directly benefit big oil, Super PACs and billionaires.

Proposition 33: No

Another deceptive attempt by Mercury Insurance CEO George Joseph to get voters to raise their insurance rates under the guise of “discounts.”

Proposition 34: Yes

Abolishing the death penalty is not only financially sound for the state, it’s morally right.

Proposition 35: No

Well-intentioned but poorly written initiative could potentially legally infringe on sex-trafficking victims’ rights and overburden local law enforcement agencies.

Proposition 36: Yes

This sensible fix to the “three strikes” law is long overdue, and would require a third “strike” to be a serious or violent felony.

Proposition 37: Yes

Big ag, Monsanto and large chemical companies have spent millions to convince voters that they don’t need to know what’s in their food. Wonder why?

Proposition 38: No

A slightly altered version of Jerry Brown’s Proposition 30, which would have less effective results overall to the health of the state.

Proposition 39: Yes

Changes the business tax code and levels the playing field for businesses in the state, improves schools and assists the general fund.

Proposition 40: Yes

It’s as simple as this: keep the latest district lines and save the state $1 million.

Chairman Sarris Depending on present company, Graton Rancheria chairman Greg Sarris might be seen as one of Sonoma County’s few public intellectuals, as a champion of American Indian rights or as the big bad wolf behind one of California’s largest casino projects. Originally, Sarris said that “casinos are not in the picture” for the tribe’s plans, but with groundbreaking almost complete for a planned casino in Rohnert Park, his stance has obviously changed. Sarris refuses to talk with media about the deal’s plans and potential impact, but it’s clear that the casino has the potential to alter the landscape of Sonoma County—some say for good, some say for worse. Yearly revenues are projected to be around $300 million with 15,000 cars entering and exiting the parking lots each day. The tribe will give some of that money back through the Community Benefit Fund, and Sonoma County is said to receive up to $38 million per year for the county’s parks and open spaces and other environmental purposes. Sarris first received renown as a writer. His short story collection Grand Avenue, which takes Santa Rosa as setting, received acclaim when it was published in 1995. In addition to chairman and casino responsibilities, Sarris holds an endowed chair in Native American studies at SSU, and teaches classes in creative writing, American literature and American Indian literature. Greg Sarris speaks on Wednesday, Nov. 7, at Santa Rosa Junior College in the Bertolini Student Activities Center, Room 4608. 1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 2pm. Free; $4 parking fee. 707.527.4647.—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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jurisdiction on the map. Never mind that this is a community that’s been around for over a hundred years or that it has a vibrant concentration of locally owned businesses. The city doesn’t want it. Roseland lacks parks, libraries, community centers and other city amenities, and although Roseland is just one mile away from city hall, and surrounded on all sides by Santa Rosa, its residents don’t get to vote in city elections. They literally have no vote to “protect” in the first place. Could a city councilmember from the southwest area of Santa Rosa help give a much-needed voice to Roseland residents? Maybe even get a crosswalk painted on the street? Most people seem to think so. In March, at a public meeting of the Charter Review Board, 44 of 46 speakers were in favor of district elections. (One of the two opponents was Keith Woods, of the North Coast Builders Exchange, who, some may remember, helped fund the 2010 David Rabbitt mailer about Mexican immigrants coming to your picnic and murdering your family.) Here’s another thing: every candidate for city council except Olivares supports district elections. Gary Wysocky, Julie Combs and Caroline Bañuelos have been the most vocal on the issue, and, come to think of it, those might be good names to remember at the ballot box. Three separate committees have recommended district elections for Santa Rosa as a step in the right direction toward equal representation. Many other cities follow the same model, as does the County Board of Supervisors and the school board, with no catastrophic results. District elections won’t divide the city; they’ll ensure that every region of the city is represented on city council, which sounds a lot more like unity than what we’ve had for the last 30 years. Vote yes on Measure Q.


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Green Zone

Share Alike

Giving sprees pledged for Nov. 23 BY JULIANE POIRIER

L

ast month, my son Jordan and I went to a birthday party for my retired friend who, in lieu of gifts, asked guests to bring some cool object they didn’t need anymore. These treasures were then arranged on a table, and we were instructed to write our names on sticky notes and attach them to any item that thrilled us. If you brought two things, you could take two things, and so forth. I scored a set of 40-year-old kitchen bowls in their original box; I knew they were authentic because they were made in the U.S.A.—wow, an American flashback! The eclectic array of things inspired a lot of laughing and talking around the table (“Does this wig make me look fat?”) among mostly strangers. The most fun I had was seeing a woman claim the

necklace I’d brought; her eyes got so wide you’d think she’d just found the Holy Grail of accessories. At that moment, I felt really happy. I’d made someone’s day, just by parting with one piece of stuff. My excitement about sharing is universally human, though the so-called consumer culture denies it. People do not naturally fit in the “consumer” box that we have been shoved into. As we leave that box, we can now join a fun movement that takes us beyond the message in Annie Leonard’s 2008 video The Story of Stuff. Leonard’s to-the-point cartoon spelled out the mess that consumerism has created, and now she and her anti-waste team have partnered with two groups— the Center for the New American Dream (aka New Dream) and Yerdle—to spell out where we need to go: toward giving rather than consuming. One expression of this value is the Giving Spree pledge for Nov. 23, otherwise known as Black Friday, considered by many the most socially isolating, stuffconsuming day of the retail year. The emerging project Yerdle is starting to mobilize people around the San Francisco Bay Area in friendly events including house parties known as Sharing Shindigs, held with friends and family. There is also this pledge: “I pledge to join the largest ever Black Friday giving spree, Nov. 23. I will give things away via Yerdle to my friends and family. I will ask my friends and family to join me. Together we will share instead of shop this Black Friday.” For those shy of parties, shared stuff is also being aggregated for online viewing. Doesn’t it sound better than a claustrophobic trip to the bigbox store or the impersonality of Amazon? For more, see www.yerdle.com and www.newdream.org.


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Dining Jessica Dur Taylor

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ON THE GROUND Sofia Petridis-Lim was an airline attendant for 10 years before following her culinary dream.

It’s All Greek to Me Taverna Sofia opens in Healdsburg

T

he night before her new restaurant’s opening, Sofia Petridis-Lim realized she was short on pita bread, which is imported directly from Greece. Rather than serve an inauthentic substitute, the new restaurateur insisted on getting the real thing, even though it meant asking her husband, Andy, to drive to the nearest

BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

distributor—which happens to be in San Jose. Andy was on the road by 5 o’clock the next morning, just four hours before Taverna Sofia, Healdsburg’s newest Mediterranean restaurant, opened its bright blue doors for business. And then the rain came. Even though water is pelting the wooden tables on her outdoor patio, Petridis-Lim is all sunshine when we meet at 5pm that afternoon. “This is my dream,”

she tells me, indicating both the patio and the cozy dining room, in which first-day customers sit on plush blue-and-white cushions. Andy reviews another shopping list, while their daughter, Cassandra, who’s made the drive up from Monterey State, works the takeout counter. As far as opening days go, it’s been a good one. Though she only just graduated from the SRJC culinary arts program in July—the same month she signed the lease on the space, formerly Bovolo, inside Copperfield’s Books—Petridis-

Lim’s dream has deep roots that go back to her childhood in Thessaloniki, Greece. It was there that she learned how to cook traditional Mediterranean cuisine from her grandmother, who raised her after her father died and her mother went back to work. “She taught me everything I know,” Petridis-Lim says. But despite her affinity for the regional palate, she fled Greece at 21, restless to see the world and unwilling to “get married, stay home and breed,” as expected. After living in France and England, and earning a degree in administration management, Petridis-Lim began working as a flight attendant in Saudi Arabia, where she served everyone from the royal family to pilgrims on their way to Mecca to illegal immigrants being deported. “It was extremely hard work,” she tells me, explaining that her duties ranged from taking inventory of the first-class gold cutlery to using blanket barricades to prevent misfired urine from leaking out of the bathroom during landing. Even more surprising: “The food was excellent,” Petridis-Lim insists, crediting the airline’s deep pockets. It was in the air that she met her future husband, Andy, a pilot from Hong Kong, who eventually asked her to move with him back to the United States. Yet no matter where she lived (Phoenix, Taiwan, Novato) or what else she pursued (including a second degree in international studies and a second career managing psychotherapy clinics), cooking remained her first passion. So three years ago, when Petridis-Lim found herself jobless after over a year of searching, it seemed a natural step to enroll in the SRJC’s culinary school. “I didn’t miss a single hour of class,” Petridis-Lim tells me. “I’d been cooking for so long, I thought I knew it all,” she laughs, “but there was still so much to learn.” She completed the two-year program in just 15 months, earning yet another degree and graduating with honors.


Taverna Sofia, 244 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. 707.431.1982. Open 9am– 6pm everyday except Wednesday. Catering services available.

13

CELEBRATE THE ARRIVAL OF DUNGENESS CRAB SEASON IN TOMALES BAY ng Benefiti ma lu the Peta al on Educati n tio a d n u o F

Everyone Invited!

Thai House

Do you love to catch crab?

Join us for a day of fun on Tomales Bay! Each participant receives a commemorative T-shirt and Nick’s Cove water bottle.

November 11 Competition begins at 10:00 am Prizes awarded by 4:00 pm

SPECIAL EVENTS ALL DAY! Crab-catching Competition Cooking Demonstration Dungeness Crab Tasting Menu

Hosted by CBS TV’s Liam Mayclem, host of

For more info and to register: http://crabcatch.eventbrite.com Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

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Thank you Sonoma! Best Syrah Best Winetasting Room Honorable

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Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Roasted Mushroom Gruyere Tartelette Petit Four Platter Full Catering Menu Available

Open Thurs thru Mon 10:30 to 4:30 www.woodenheadwine.com 707-887-2703

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Echoes of the culinary arts program, which Petridis-Lim hails as “magnificent,” can be felt all over Taverna Sofia: in the spotless open kitchen (“I have nothing to hide”); in the handsome display cases featuring both sweet and savory pastries like spanakopita ($7.50), bougatsa ($6.50) and Sofia’s signature baklava ($6), made with pistachios, walnuts and almonds; even in the faces of her staff, many of whom hail directly from the program. Petridis-Lim’s apparent calm on opening day belies the rocky journey it took to get here, which began with a four-month wait to meet with the landlord. After signing the lease, it took her another two months to convince the city of Healdsburg to allow an outdoor mural, by local artist Brooks Anderson, depicting the island of Santorini. “I wanted to create the feeling of a true Greek taverna,” she tells me, “where you sit outside and watch the fishermen bring in the fresh catch from the ocean.” In addition to her pita bread, Petridis-Lim imports Kalamata olives, grape leaves, feta, yogurt and orzo directly from Greece because, she says, “I can taste the difference.” When it comes to produce, however, she sources locally. “Those are from my garden,” she tells me, pointing to the tomatoes in a bowl of giouvetsi ($14), which also contains orzo and juicy pork cubes oven baked in a clay dish. Other entrées include classics like the gyro sandwich ($14), souvlaki ($15-$17), and Petridis-Lim’s famous moussaka ($14). While she isn’t permitted to offer complementary Ouzo, wine (both local and Greek) is available. “People tell me I’m crazy,” Petridis-Lim says, referring to her insistence on using mostly organic (read: more expensive) ingredients. So it’s even more impressive that no item on her menu exceeds $20. “My restaurant is not just for vacationers,” she says. “I want everyone to enjoy my food.”


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14

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Arrigoni’s Delicatessen & Cafe Deli. $. A perennial favorite with the downtown lunch crowd. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 701 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1297.

Central Market California cuisine. $$$. Fish is the thing at this airy spot that features local and sustainable foods. Lots of pork dishes, too–and they’re insanely good. Dinner daily. 42 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.9900.

Gary Chu’s Chinese. $$. Fine Chinese food in elegant setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 611 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5840.

Khoom Lanna Thai. $$. Outstanding Thai dishes and seasonal specialties with an authentic cooking style. Fresh ingredients, serene dining room, convenient Railroad Square location. Lunch and dinner daily. 107 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8424.

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Old Chicago Pizza Pizza. $$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600. Saddles Steakhouse. $$$$$$$. A steakhouse in the best American tradition, with top-quality grass-fed beef. Pies are made from fruit trees on restaurant property. Dinner daily. 29 E MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.933.3191.

Sunflower Caffe Cafe. $-$$. Excellent, satisfying food served cafeteria-style. Breakfast and lunch daily. 421 First St, Sonoma. 707.996.6645.

Three Squares Cafe Cafe. $-$$. Home-style cooking in iconic Railroad Square location. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, Tues-Sun. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4300.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$. The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Wolf House Californian.

Casa Mañana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Easy Street Cafe American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Insalata’s Mediterranean. $$$. Simple, high-impact dishes of exotic flavors. Lunch and dinner daily. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700. Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Sat-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly

$$$-$$$$. Stick with the simple, classics dishes, as they always shine. Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner, Tues-Sun; brunch, SatSun. 13740 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.996.4401.

authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Yao-Kiku Japanese.

American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

$$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Mountain Home Inn

Nick’s Cove Seafood/

executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly

Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh Thai food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some of the best fried bananas to be found. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner, Sun. (Cash only.) 809 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.458.8845.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily.


SMALL BITES

Alexis Baking Co

Life of Pi (Crust)

Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Brassica Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700. Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!� Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

C.C. Blue Japanese. $$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panĂŠed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

delicious d elicious - refreshing - alkalizing - naturally energizing energizing - boosts metabolism - promotes healthy digestion - replenishing - detoxifying

America loves controversy. Just look at the popularity of sports, reality TV shows and the polarization of political ideals. It stands to reason, then, that the most American of foods, apple pie, is a hotbed of steamy, opinionated discussion. Not the filling, mind you, so much as the crust, which most will agree is the real heart of a good pie. As a lazy patriot, I usually buy pre-made crust because (1) it’s cheap and (2) it’s hard to make. This might be why I don’t make pie very often. But a good crust can create a lingering sense of contentment, especially considering that it usually comes at the end of a good meal. With that in mind, Square Belly Food Theater is hosting a class with chef John Lyle called “The Secret Life of Pie (Crust).� Lyle, the chef behind the popular Hardcore Farm to Face’s Chosen Spot Dinner series, discusses techniques and ingredients for this seemingly simple dough. Is shortening best? Or lard? What about butter? How long should it rest? And at what temperature? An informal poll in the Bohemian office yielded five different recipes by five different people, and all swore by them as the best. John Lyle attempts to put the controversy to rest on Tuesday, Nov. 6, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 6:30pm. $20, sliding scale. 707.528.3009.—Nicolas Grizzle

TM

deliciously refreshing kombucha

sustainably created, brewe brewed, ed, fermented and bottled in Son Sonoma oma County

707.536.1193

7E˜REPROUDTO 7 E˜REPR E˜R E PROUD OUDT D TO BEVOTEDONEOF BE BEVOTE VOT E DO D ONE NEO E OF 3ONOMA#OUNTY˜S 3ONOM 3O NOM A# A # OUN OUNTY T Y˜S TY˜ La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

"EST2ESTAURANTS " ES T 2 ESTAURAN EST ES T AUR ANTS TS

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Miguel’s Mexican-

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American.

Californian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and

$-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

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Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.


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16

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY

and Pinot, to be sure. 4035 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 5pm. $10 fee. 707.431.4404.

N A PA CO U N TY

Deerfield Ranch Winery (WC) The finest wine

MARIN CO U N TY

Brown Estate Vineyards

caves this side of the highway. Twenty-thousand-square-foot underground lair is perfect for keeping wine and wine tasters cool on a summer’s day. Watch for giraffes. 10200 Sonoma Highway, Kenwood. Daily 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $10-$15. 707.833.2270.

Fetzer Vineyards Even as a corporate giant, Fetzer retains its conscience about the earth, the grapes, the land and its wine. Chardonnay is what Fetzer does especially well. The winery also has a small deli and inn. 13601 Old River Road, Hopland. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.846.8637. Mercury Geyserville No fee, 20 percent discount for Sonoma County residents and 12-pack wooden crates of mini-jug wine; two turntables, an LP record player–put on your winged shoes, it’s time to party in sleepy Geyserville! Also pickled comestibles, jam, peppers–and pretty good Pinot, Cab, Cab Franc, and Merlot. 20120 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open Thursday– Monday, 11am–6pm. No fee. 707.857.9870.

Stonestreet Late wine magnate Jess Jackson took to the hills in a big way. Eight hundred acres, 400 blocks, at elevations up to 2,000 feet. Tasting room is a fewfrills affair, while “mountain excursions” offer views plus Cab and Chardonnay, plus lunch. 7111 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily, 11am to 4:30pm. $12, $15 and $25; Mountain excursion, $75. 707.433.9463. VML Winery Acronym of Virginia Marie Lambrix, who practices organic and biodynamic winegrowing— the artist who created VML’s wacky new labels said, “Ah, so you’re a witch!” Bewitching Russian River Valley Chard

Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001. Pey-Marin Vineyards A Marin wine adventure where cow country meets conifer forest, at the historic, hospitable Olema Inn. Discover razor-lean “Shell Mound” Marin County Riesling, opaquely purple, yet eminently food-friendly “Punchdown” Syrah, and more. 10000 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Olema. Open daily from noon to 4pm. $12 fee. 415.663.9559.

Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Ross Valley Winery In existence since 1987, the Ross Valley Winery produces Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc and Zin port wines. 343 San Anselmo Ave., San Anselmo. Open Tuesday– Sunday, 1–7pm. 415.457.5157. Tam Cellars Spacious wine bar quietly distributes the soul-salve of the ages and, like its soul mate the coffee shop, passes the laptop test. Cheese plates, wine flights and comfortable seating arrangements make a nice place to convene with the companion or flat screen of one’s choice. Wine shop features international, eclectic selection at fair prices. 1803 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Open Monday–Wednesday, 4–9pm; Thursday–Saturday, 4–10pm. 415.461.9463.

(WC) A beautifully restored and converted stone and redwood barn is the winery and tasting room facility at Brown Estate. And the construction of a 6,500square-foot subterranean wine cave was completed in 2005. Visitors are currently limited to wine club members by appointment only. 3233 Sage Canyon Road, Napa. 707.963.2435.

Flora Springs Winery & Vineyards Napa Valley’s latest geotectonic eruption on Highway 29 is a stylish place to explore famous Chardonnay, Meritage blend and winery-exclusive Italian varietals. Hip but not too cool, the 30-year-old family winery surely has a sense of humor as well as sense of place. 677 S. St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. Tasting fees, $15–$25. 707.967.8032.

Mumm Cuvée Napa Californian-style fizz factory, all barn and no chateau, offers a robust account of how the bubbles get in the bottle. Sparkling winetastings offered on the patio, or take it to the next level in plush love seats on the Oak Terrace. Sparkling red is novel; DVX Brut among the best in the valley. Photography gallery includes Ansel Adams prints and other exhibits. 8445 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–5pm daily. Tasting $6–$20; Oak Terrace $30. 707.967.7700.

Round Pond Estate Estate Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc served tableside on the terrace with scrumptious food pairings. Who can’t imagine cozying up next to the big gas-burning hearth, watching the sun set and savoring that Rutherford dusk? 875 Rutherford Road, Rutherford. Tastings by appointment daily, 11am to 4pm. $25. 888.302.2575.

Day of the Good Dead Grape A thinning of the samples BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

here’s a chill in the air, the flesh quakes under autumn’s cool breath, and the eye rests with increasing interest on the Land’s End selection of fleece-wear. In the vineyard, leaves blush crimson in rage against the coming night. Left behind by the harvester’s hand, orphaned clusters of grapes droop from the cane, wasps scour out their guts, and a cold rain feeds mold spores that pull a final, black shroud over their shoulders.

Good thing that yesteryear’s wines are tucked away safely in the cellar. Or are they? For many of us, our sub-optimal “cellar” is a wine rack on the kitchen counter or underneath the shoe rack in the closet. As temperatures rise, whether due to the heat of summer or the comfort-set heaters of winter, a wine’s life will eventually be shortened, its fleshy fruit slackened, leaving a tired, diminished wine on bony tannins. It is time, then, for a thinning of the samples that good folks from various wineries thoughtfully forwarded to the Bohemian for review. Frank Family Vineyards 2011 Napa Valley Chardonnay ($34.75) Bright aromas of lemon and butterscotch, flavors of golden delicious apple marinated in lemon juice. This brand-new release is a bit tingly on the tongue and seems as if it can’t decide what it wants to be. Give it six months in any cool, dark cubbyhole. Freestone Vineyards 2009 Sonoma Coast Chardonnay ($55) Gorgeous, rich aroma, like a caramel éclair fell asleep face down in lemon custard, with an oak spliff in its hand. The palate is lean; if a bit watery, it’s not flabby or sweet. Take note: styrofoam shippers (like the one that this sample was shipped with, including ice-cold gel packs), environmental hobgoblins that they are, are excellent insulators, smoothing out temperature swings if stored in the coolest room of the house. Del Carlo 2008 Dry Creek Valley, Old Vine Zinfandel ($32) This Zin retains fresh, fruity aromas of hickory-smoked raspberries, and jammy, vanilla-raspberry flavor with fine tannins. Martin Ray 2008 Howell Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon This wine tried to make an escape and was two-thirds of its way up the cork when I caught up with it. Dense aromas of coffee grounds, dried blackberry and butcher shop. Kendall-Jackson 2008 Sonoma County, Grand Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon ($28) Vibrantly purple-tinged, yielding dark chocolate, blackberry, graham cracker and maple syrup aromas, with a nice balance of acidity. At this point, wine writers, like politicians, are supposed to promise better things in the next four years: cellar until 2016 and enjoy with osso buco. As for me, I can’t wait for the rosés of spring.


How big business wants to shrink the electorate BY ZACH HAGADONE

A

stonishing. Remarkable. Sinister. Those are words that come up again and again when confronting the wave of voter identification laws that has swept through more than 30 Republican-dominated state legislatures in recent years. The measures sound innocuous enough: when a voter shows up to the polls on Election Day, he or she must present valid photo ID in order to cast a ballot. The goal, proponents say, is to combat in-person voter fraud—claiming to be someone you’re not and entering a vote in that person’s name. But study after study, including an exhaustive investigation by the Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, has found almost no evidence that in-person voter fraud occurs. Culling through 5,000 documents over 10 weeks, the News21 project found only 10 cases of in-person voter fraud since 2000: about one

case for every 15 million eligible voters. What’s more, requiring state or federally issued ID at the polls has been repeatedly shown by independent analyses to impose a disproportionate burden on very specific demographics: the poor, the elderly, students and people of color. “We’ve heard it time and time again—it really is a solution in search of a problem,” says Stephen Spaulding, Washington D.C.–based staff counsel for the nonprofit citizens’ lobby group Common Cause.

“We do have election administration problems in the country—with machines breaking down, assuring that votes are counted accurately—and we need to focus our attention there,” he says. “This threatens everyone’s right to a free and fair election.”

Barred at the Box A symbol of what’s wrong with voter ID laws is Viviette Applewhite. At 93 years old, Applewhite is an African-American Pennsylvanian who marched with Martin Luther King Jr. and has cast her ballot in almost every election since the 1960s. Her purse was stolen years ago, and with it her Social Security card. What’s more, since she was adopted as a child, the name on her birth certificate differs from that used on other official

) 18

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Sneak Attack

documents. Her adoption itself lacks any kind of record. Under Pennsylvania’s voter ID law, which was passed in March 2012 and has since become a legal lighting rod in the battle over voting rights, Applewhite could not obtain the required identification to participate at the polls. Her case, and the case of others similarly affected by the law, was taken up by the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania, the Advancement Project, the Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia and the D.C.–based law firm Arnold & Porter. The lawsuit was granted a preliminary injunction, and as the case was being appealed in August, Applewhite received an ID using her 20-year-old Medicare card, proof of address and a state document affirming her name and Social Security number. (According to media reports, the process also required her to take two buses to the licensing office.) That’s a lot of hassle to exercise a right Applewhite has enjoyed for 60 years, but she’s not alone. According to best estimates, strict voter ID laws could effectively disenfranchise millions of voters if adopted nationwide. According to figures from the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University, as many as 11 percent of adult U.S. citizens do not have any form of governmentissued photo identification, accounting for more than 21 million people. Among that group, 18 percent of citizens 65 years of age or older don’t have a government-issued photo ID (more than 6 million seniors) and, based on 2000 U.S. Census figures, more than 5.5 million AfricanAmerican adults lack photo ID—a full 25 percent of eligible black voters. Meanwhile, U.S. citizens, regardless of ethnicity, age or gender, who make less than


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18 Voting ( 17 $35,000 “are more than twice as likely to lack current governmentissued photo identification as those earning more than $35,000 a year,” the Brennan Center reported, adding that it means at least 15 percent of voting-age Americans in the low-income bracket lack valid ID. On top of that, the Brennan Center found in its survey that as many as 7 percent of voting-age citizens (more than 13 million adults) don’t have ready access to documents proving their citizenship, making the process of getting valid ID all the more complicated. “These ID laws—and this notion that they don’t impose a cost on citizens—are farcical,” said Spaulding. “We know that in some states it costs money to get documents and get an ID. There are a number of voters who are in a catch-22; they’re 90 years old, they were born at home with a midwife and they don’t have a birth certificate. There’s the expense of getting those documents, there’s the expense—especially in rural areas—of making the trip to get the ID. This notion that these IDs are ‘free’ does not pass the smell test.” But it’s on that notion that voter ID laws have been ruled constitutional. Indiana’s restrictive voter ID law, which is seen as the test case for similar laws nationwide, was upheld by the United States Supreme Court in 2008 because it was not found to be burdensome to voters. “Clearly, that’s not the case,” Spaulding said.

No Coincidence It doesn’t take much analysis to figure out the upshot of proliferating voter ID requirements: fewer seniors, students, people of color and low-wage earners at the polls. And it doesn’t take much to see which party would most benefit from a whiter, more middle-age, affluent electorate. “I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the legislators carrying these bills are not Democrats,” said Lisa Graves, executive director of the

a single issue in the absence of a federal mandate.” Graves, meanwhile, fingers the culprit. “Suddenly, the Indiana law was dusted off the shelf and put out there as a national model that every state should be pushing,” she says, “and ALEC is behind it.”

The Bill Mill

NO VOTER ID LAW

PHOTO ID

NON-PHOTO ID

STRICT PHOTO ID

LAWS PASSED/PROPOSED TIED TO ALEC

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures, Brennan Center for Justice at New York University, Center for Media and Democracy, Common Cause, News 21

nonprofit watchdog group Center for Media and Democracy. According to Graves, whose organization has made voting rights a priority issue, this newest push to limit the franchise traces its roots to the 1990s and the enactment of the National Voter Registration Act, or “Motor Voter Act,” under President Bill Clinton. The measure did exactly what its name implies: made it easier for voters to register. African Americans, particularly, registered in high numbers, Graves says, prompting backlash among conservative states. “In response to that law, Southern states started proposing changes to the laws to make it harder to register. Those bills went nowhere; they were perceived as racist and sort of languished for a number of years,” she says. Then came the election of President George W. Bush, “and the right wing started pushing this theme of voter fraud,” Graves says. The Bush administration even tried to redirect the voting-rights section of the civil rights division to push this idea of voter fraud, she adds. “U.S. attorneys were fired because they didn’t do enough to assert nonexistent voter fraud,” Graves says. Despite pressure from the new

Bush administration, strict voter ID laws remained few and far between, with only Indiana and Georgia enacting restrictive ID measures in 2005. But, Graves says, “these things were bubbling.” When Barack Obama won the 2008 presidential election, it was in large part due to huge voter turnout in cities and among students and African Americans. Republicans, having lost the White House, also found their party losing ground in state legislatures. According to data compiled by News21, 62 voter ID bills have been introduced in 37 state legislatures since 2009, with the bulk of the measures introduced or adopted in 2011 and 2012. According to the Brennan Center and News21, a handful of states have active, strict photo ID laws for voters and more than a dozen others are pending, either hung up in court, awaiting preclearance from the Department of Justice, or too recently enacted to be in effect. “It’s remarkable,” says Jennie Bowser, Denver-based senior fellow with the National Conference of State Legislatures. “I’ve tracked election legislation since late 2000 and everything that happened in Florida, and I’ve never seen so many states take up

ALEC stands for the American Legislative Exchange Council, and according to some, it is nothing less than a shadow lawmaking body that draws its strength from an ocean of corporate money. If the Supreme Court ruling in Citizens United can be said to have opened the gates to corporate cash in American politics, then ALEC is trying to turn on the flood. “ALEC isn’t simply a think tank or a gathering of lawmakers; it is a corporate-funded operation that pushes a corporate message and a conservative message,” says Graves, whose Center for Media and Democracy in July 2011 made public 800 internal documents on its website ALECExposed.org, proving ALEC’s cloaked hand in crafting “model legislation” meant for introduction in statehouses around the country. “At its core, it is a way to take some of these ideas that a think tank might fancy and operationalize them,” she says. “And I use ‘operationalize’ very purposefully.” A call to ALEC’s media relations representative for this story went unanswered, but the organization’s ideological bent is clear. On its website, ALEC says it “works to advance the fundamental principles of free-market enterprise, limited government, and federalism at the state level through a nonpartisan public-private partnership of America’s state legislators, members of the private sector and the general public.” Registered with the Internal Revenue Service as a 501c3 nonprofit, ALEC boasts around 2,000 member legislators—the vast majority being Republicans—who pay a nominal fee for membership, and upwards of 300 corporate and other private-sector ) 19


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professionals, faith-based and community-based organizations, and the private sector as well. By embracing health-education programs, our health institutions are clearly committed to this goal. Here, too, where the Slow Food movement is so strong, we see how dedicated many North Bay companiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the

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producers and servers of none and organic foodsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are to maintaining a high standard of quality. Our region is rich with resources and newly allocated grants to give us the power to life a healthier lifestyle. These organizations come from the nonproďŹ t and private sectors, but all feed our community with unparalleled generosity! Choose Well, Eat Right, Move It, Live!

A HEALTHY EDUCATION HEALTHY CHOICES AND RESOURCES

Rosemary Olson, Publisher


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OUR REGIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NEWEST HEALTH-EDUCATION GRANTS: SONOMA COUNTY HEALTH EFFORTS

â&#x20AC;˘ Health Action is a partnership of local leaders, organizations and individuals committed to creating a healthier community through collective action. The Sonoma County Department of Health Services (DHS) convened Health Action in 2007 as a catalyst to improve the health of the community. Recognizing that large-scale social change would require signiďŹ cant crosssector coordination and collaboration, DHS set out to engage a broad spectrum of stakeholders, enrich the collective understanding of local health issues and solutions, create a shared vision for community health and offer leadership to become the healthiest county in California by 2020. People can get connected to resources and ďŹ nd ways to take action at www.sonomahealthaction.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Cradle 2 Career, arising from Health Action, aligns the community to invest in effective and achievable strategies to improve education, economic and health outcomes for our youth. This is a historic partnership that connects all segments of the educational pipeline â&#x20AC;&#x201D;early childhood, K-12, college/ technical training, careersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with broad community support to improve the educational, economic, and health outcomes for all Sonoma County youth. www.sonomahealthaction.org/cradleto-career. â&#x20AC;˘ The Maternal, Child, Adolescent Health (MCAH) program coordinates health services for children, teens and women of reproductive age. The MCAH toll-free line provides information and referrals to local community resources to help families obtain access to care. MCAH also provides health and safety consultation for childcare providers and reproductive healthcare providers, with the goals of ensuring that all children are born healthy to healthy mothers; racial/ethnic, gender, economic, and regional groups have equal care and access to health; a safe and healthy environment for women, children, adolescents, and their families; equal access for all women, children and their families to appropriate and needed care within an integrated and seamless

system; all children have opportunities to maximize their potential. The tollfree line is 800.427.8982, or visit www. sonoma-county.org/mcah. â&#x20AC;˘ The Sonoma County Network of Care is an online community for individuals, families and agencies concerned with mental and emotional wellness, substance abuse and developmental disabilities. It provides critical information, communication and advocacy tools, and ensures there is â&#x20AC;&#x153;no wrong doorâ&#x20AC;? for those navigating the system of mental health services, those working to avoid the need for formal services, and those ready to transition out of the mental health system. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance with mental health issues, the Sonoma County Network of Care ensures you will ďŹ nd what you need. This website can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset, our beautiful minds. For more information, visit www.sonoma. networkofcare.org/mh/index.aspx. â&#x20AC;˘ The county has established awardwinning partnerships with schools, providing early intervention services to indentify and prevent mental health problems among the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youth. Services include peer-to-peer training and investment in community-based programs. In addition, seriously emotionally disturbed children and adolescents to age 18 are served by a system of care that includes county staff working in partnership with schools, the Valley of the Moon childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home, juvenile health services at Los Guilicos and community partners that provides wrap-around services for children age 5 to 12 years old; assessment; case management; crisis intervention and stabilization; psychiatric evaluation; medication monitoring; enhanced mental-health services for youth in residential care; and therapy. More information can be found at www.sonoma-county.org/ health/about/behavioralhealth.asp. â&#x20AC;˘ Healthy Eating, Active Living (HEAL) is a project supported by the Department of Health Services, in partnership with the Community Activity and Nutrition Coalition of Sonoma County, and funded by Kaiser Permanente Northern California Region.

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INVESTED IN THE PROMISE OF SONOMA COUNTY

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www.sonomacf.org


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The goal of HEAL is to create a â&#x20AC;&#x153;HEAL Zone,â&#x20AC;? in Kawana Springs and Roseland neighborhoods that makes it easier for community members to eat healthier foods and be more physical activity throughout life, from infancy through adulthood, in order to prevent diseases such as diabetes and hypertension that often result from obesity. For more information, visit www.sonoma-county. org/health/meetings/heal.asp.

NAPA Live Healthy Napa County is a comprehensive, 18-month communitywide planning process to identify health issues most important to Napa County and develop speciďŹ c strategies to address those concerns. Live Healthy Napa County is the ďŹ rst iteration of a new way of assessing and improving health and well being in the county. The process includes a much higher level of community engagement and input than in the past, and incorporates a broad vision of health by addressing the societal factors that inďŹ&#x201A;uence health and well being like access to healthy food, reliable, safe and affordable transportation and education, and housing and recreation, in addition to the traditional medical model of good health. The SNAP Ed Community Nutrition Education Project is a countywide nutrition education program led by the Napa County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) that has resulted in almost 4,000 residents receiving information and/or training about healthful eating and drinking choices. The program is supported by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program/USDA funding received through the California Department of Social Services. The Napa County Breastfeeding Initiative is a ďŹ ve-year Napa County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) project designed to decrease obesity and improve health by increasing the initiation and duration of exclusive breastfeeding among clients. An extensive literature search, surveys, breastfeeding data collection, focus groups and key informant interviews have been completed for Englishand Spanish-speaking residents to explore barriers to breastfeeding. /2D3@B7A7<5AC>>:3;3<B

Breastfeeding data is being analyzed and an evidence-based curriculum is being created and taught to HHSA staff to use with clients to support exclusive breastfeeding. http://countyofnapa.org/HHSA.

MARIN The Marin Countywide Healthy Eating / Active Living Strategic Framework is a countywide road map to create the community conditions, so that all residents have the opportunity for healthy eating and active living. The HEAL Framework is build upon guiding principles of reducing disparities and promoting opportunities for all, bringing together participants from various sectors, and building upon community assets. Four HEAL Implementation Teams, including the Marin Food Policy Council, the Early Childhood Wellness Collaborative, an Active Living team, and a School / After School team will be working to address the priorities identiďŹ ed in the HEAL Plan. For more information about the HEAL Strategic Framework, go to www.marinhhs.com/ heal or to get involved with these teams, contact Rebecca Smith at rsmith@ marincounty.org. The new Marin County Nutrition Wellness Program is supported by an allocation from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Network for a Healthy California in order to create public health infrastructure for obesity prevention in low-income communities. The Nutrition Wellness Program focuses efforts in low-income neighborhoods in which 50% or more households live below 185% FPL, or in schools with 50% or more students enrolled in free or reduced price meals. The program provides a variety of free services to schools and communities that meet these qualifications. Some of these services include nutrition education classes and events, train the trainer classes, promotional materials and media support related to the Rethink Your Drink campaign, and support for neighborhood-based assessments. For more information about the Nutrition Wellness Program, go to www.co.marin. ca.us or contact Rebecca Smith at rsmith@marincounty.org.


HEALTH ORGANIZATION RESOURCES: The best place to ďŹ nd KP Health Education resources is at kpsantarosa.org. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ďŹ nd lots of online tools, such as guided imagery and afďŹ rmations around weight loss, that are available to everyone. Our health education classes are also listed there. Most of them are for our members only, but quite a few can be accessed by anyone. Some have a nominal fee. We offer a Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Night Out series that is free and open to the community. The next one is Friday, Nov. 2,â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women and Mindfulness,â&#x20AC;? with Dr. Catherine Gutfreund and Shirley Gillotti, RN. PETALUMA HEALTH CENTER

The Petaluma Health Center is a non proďŹ t community health center that provides adult and family medicine, OBGYN services, a dental clinic, mental health services, integrated medicine and more. We offer sliding scale to those who are uninsured and a variety of low cost services to patients. For those who are uninsured we offer a donation-based ďŹ&#x201A;u shot clinic Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 3 to 5pm. We also offer a free resource clinic for the community each Tuesday from 11am to 1pm that connects residents with housing, food, healthcare and other resources. Petaluma Health Center also sponsors free health education events for the community. www.phealthcenter.org. QUEEN OF THE VALLEY MEDICAL CENETER

Queen of the Valley Medical Center is committed to promoting health improvement and creating healthy communities. We offer a wide range of free and low-cost health education classes and programs, many in English and Spanish. Topics include Nutrition and Diet, Perinatal Classes, Newborn Care, Infant and Child CPR, Car Seat Safety, Diabetes Wellness, Asthma Education, Yoga, Stress Management and more. We also offer support groups for individuals and families including a stroke support group, breast cancer group and writing group. For more information visit thequeen.org or call 707. 251.2000. SUTTER MEDICAL

Sutter Health offers MyLifeStages.org which is a free community website that is open for all adults but is more focused on

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offering women a personalized action plan for healthier living. This tool will identify your potential health risks, recommend screening tests, help you track progress, allow you to schedule automatic email reminders to yourself and connect you with resources in our area. At MyLifeStages we get that you know the basics, you know how to eat well, exercise, rest, reduce stress. So here we take things a step further by providing you with tools and information to take action. From tools like BMI calculators and health trackers to interactive blogs and reliable health data, MyLifeStages gives you real-life solutions to help you reach your goals. Whether you are looking after yourself, your kids, partner, parents or anyone you care about, we have tools to make that easier on MyLifeStages. MyLifeStages is one of the few places online where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ďŹ nd Northern California practicing physicians answering questions, blogging and talking about the very topics that matter most to you. And since MyLifeStages is brought to you by a trusted, not-for-proďŹ t health network, you can rest assured that it is designed with you not commercial interests in mind. Sign up today! www.MyLifeStages.org. Sutter also offers free quarterly events for womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health issues ranging from bone density, breast cancer, menopause and heart disease. When you join MyLifeStages.org, their medical experts will recommend classes and events speciďŹ c to your interests and preferred location. ST. JOSEPHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HEALTH

A six week free drop-in group for people in grief who would like additional support for getting through the holidays. For information, call Memorial Hospice in Santa Rosa at 568-1094, Hospice of Petaluma at 778-6242, or North County Hospice in Healdsburg at 431-1135. A weekly, free drop-in group for family and friends of someone with a life-threatening illness. Drop-ins are welcome; no appointment is necessary. For additional information, call Memorial Hospice in Santa Rosa at 5681094, Hospice of Petaluma at 778-6242, or North County Hospice in Healdsburg at 431-1135. /2D3@B7A7<5AC>>:3;3<B

LOCAL TV & PRODUCTIO PRODUCTION ON SERVICES FOR NOR NORTH TH BA B BAY AY Residents, Educators, Non-ProďŹ ts, Government Non-Pr oďŹ ts, Gover nmen nt

*Media Pr Productions oductions *Workshops/Training *W Workshops/T o Trraining *Equipment/Studio Use e *Cable Channel Access s

SR Comcast Ch 26,27,28,3 26,27,28,30 30 AT&T A T&T T U-verse U verse Channel 99 www.communitymedia.org www .communitymedia.org (707)569 8785 (707)569-8785


2012 NO NP R OF I T GU I DE

Peace in Medicine provides safe access to quality medicine for qualified patients in a professional and friendly environment. Peace in Medicine has successfully established itself as a role model for medical cannabis dispensaries and healing centers nationally. We at Peace in Medicine advocate and support a proactive and holistic approach to health management. In this spirit, we offer numerous services including therapeutic massage, acupuncture, guest speakers, peer counselors and empowering educational materials.

Misty Humphrey, Whole Foods Healthy Eating Specialist

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Peace in Medicine is a non-profit mutual benefit corporation with a unique business model firmly based in three overarching tenets: the importance of local support and supporting locally; the belief in patient access to alternative medicine, information and education; and an unwavering adherence to environmental integrity. Recognizing the importance of community, we reinvest a significant portion of any surplus income into local causes, community services, charities and social movements. With two locations in Sonoma County, it is easy to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Find Peace in Medicine.â&#x20AC;? Downtown Santa Rosa 1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College M, T, F, Sat 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm W, Th 12pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm, Closed Sun

Downtown Sebastopol 6771 Sebastopol Ave @ Hwy12 Mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm Sun 12pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm

707.843.3227

707.823.4206

GOOD EARTH

SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR NEW LOCAL LABYRINTH EVENTS

With your help, United Way is advancing the common good by creating opportunities for a better life for all. Be part of the change.You can Give, you can Advocate and you can Volunteer. Together, united, we can strengthen our communities to make a better place for us all.

Offers The Labyrinth Experienceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gathering, Training & Inspiring People on the Path

www.veriditas.org

@cdlV \VniZZc4 Hjeedgi^c\ndji] V\Zh&'Ă&#x201E;')

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER. www.unitedwaywinecountry.org www.facebook.com/unitedwaywinecountry

NUTRITION RESOURCES:

,%,#*+-#*-(% lll#edh^bV\Zh#dg\

Since 1969, Good Earth has been committed to the health and sustainability of our community. We were founded with the dream of offering the very best quality and most organic food that we could ďŹ nd. Never content to simply accept the status quo, we have always pushed the envelope and tried to encourage food growers and manufacturers to produce food of higher quality. Organic runs deep at Good Earth. We believe that organic foods offer us the best opportunity to heal our bodies and the earth, so throughout Good Earth you will notice that we â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go Organic.â&#x20AC;? If it is not organic, it must have some other redeeming quality that organic selections do not provide. Organic foods are grown in higher humus soils so they offer superior taste and nutrition. Organic foods are grown without chemical pesticides so they are easier on us and other creatures. Organic foods are also the best way to avoid genetically modiďŹ ed organisms (GMOs). Good Earth has several nonproďŹ t educational partners, and we help to support their educational endeavors with monetary and promotional support. Here are select nonproďŹ ts and their programs that Good Earth sponsors: Marin Organicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farm Field Studies deeply connects K-12 Bay Area students to organic farms, food, and the natural

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world. (Farm Field Studies is being transitioned from MALT to Marin Organic currently and will become an ofďŹ cial program of Marin Organic in 2013.) www.marinorganic.org/ farmďŹ eldstudies. Next Generationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Green Schools Program foster environmental education, youth leadership development and green behaviors and operations in our schools gonextgeneration.org/gsprogram. Sustainable Fairfaxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s various Classes, Workshops, & Events that educate our community on sustainable solutions, healthy lifestyles, and achieving our goal of zero waste 2020. www. sustainablefairfax.org. Apple Family Worksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Parenting and Life Skills education. www.familyworks.org. Educational Education Council of Marinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Teen Environmental Media Program & EarthScope Radio. www. earthscopemedia.com. Good Earth Natural Foods, 720 Center Blvd.,Fairfax. 415.454.0123. www.genatural.com. WHOLE FOODS MARKET AND WELLNESS

At Whole Foods Market, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve long been committed to selling the highest quality natural and organic products available. Now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re taking things a step further and promoting healthy eating education for our


2012 NONP R OF I T GU I DE

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NUTRITIONAL PROGRAMS: CERES

customers and team members. At our Coddingtown location, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve employed a full-time healthy eating specialist. She offers complimentary one-on-one nutrition consultations, store tours focusing on special diets and a variety of classes with topics ranging from kicking sugar addiction to healthy eating for seniors.For more information, visit us online at www. wholefoodsmarket.com/stores/ coddingtown, or stop by the store to pick up an events calendar. On a national level, Whole Foods Market has started the Whole Kids Foundation, a nonproďŹ t that aims to end childhood obesity. The Foundation uses collected funds to donate salad bars to schools, build community and school gardens, and provide healthy eating education to teachers in hopes that they will model behavior for their students. COMMUNITY MARKET

Community Market is a worker-run, not-for-proďŹ t natural foods store that has been a proud member of the JC community for over 37 years. We offer educational opportunities to schools, businesses and other nonproďŹ ts regarding issues concerning food safety, food sovereignty, social justice and environmental stewardship. We

have been involved with the Santa Rosa City Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Project Workability Program, which ďŹ nds local jobs for highly motivated and talented young people. We also offer volunteer opportunities for all of our staff in hopes of making long lasting relationships within our community. Community market believes that businesses can be an effective and inspirational vehicle for change and take their responsibility very seriously. Because they are a non-for-proďŹ t and worker-run, they are able to redistribute all of their proďŹ ts back into the community and into the business itself. Last year, they gave out over $150,000 worth of donations and discounts while simultaneously offering a living wage and comprehensive health coverage to all of their employees. If you would like to learn more about Community Market please visit the website at www. srcommunitymarket.com or come on down to the store. We are located in the same building as the Last Record Store, 1899 Mendocino Ave. 707.546.1806. We would be so happy to offer free nutrition seminars if people or organizations asked for them. We do offer tours for either ďŹ rst time shoppers, people who are going vegetarian or gluten free, and for schools who want to learn about natural foods.

BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.ceresproject.org or call 707.829.5833, ext. 220.

CERES COMMUNITY PROJECT

SLOW FOOD MOVEMENT

Ceres Community Project believes that the foundation of health for people and communities starts with healthy food and a caring community. The group teaches teens about growing, preparing and eating a fresh, whole and organic dietâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and about what community meansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;by giving the teens an opportunity to volunteer as gardeners and chefs. The meals they prepareâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; 40,000 this year aloneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;provide vital nourishment to individuals and families throughout Sonoma County who are dealing with a serious health challenge. Ceresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; recommends a plant based whole foods diet consistent with research from the American Institute of Cancer Research, The Block Center for Integrative Cancer Care and other institutions and physicians around the country. Fresh vegetables, especially green leafy vegetables and crucifers such as kale and cabbage, and cauliďŹ&#x201A;ower and broccoli, along with seasonal fruits, mineral-rich sea vegetables and mushrooms (shiitakes, trumpet royales and maitakes), should make up two-thirds of your plate. The other third should include organic grass-fed and/or wild caught animal products, legumes, and whole grains such as brown rice, quinoa and barley. This simple suggestion provides you with the minerals, phytonutrients, protein, healthy fats, carbohydrates and ďŹ ber the body needs to maintain and promote health. Ceres offers a number of monthly educational programs designed to support you in adopting a healthier lifestyle, including Healing Foods Basics and Tea and Talk. To learn more, visit the

Slow Food is an idea, a way of living and a way of eating. It is a global, grassroots movement with thousands of members around the world that links the pleasure of food with commitment to community and the environment. slowfoodsonomacounty.com slowfoodnapavalley.com slowfood-marin.com

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MOVE IT! EXERCISE! YMCA BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS

Napa | www.thepositiveplace.org Sonoma | www.bgccsc.org, www.bgcsonoma.org, www/ santarosaboysandgirlsclub.com Marin | www.petaluma-marinbgc.org PARKS WEBSITES

www.sonoma-county.org/parks www.marincountyparks.org www.napaoutdoors.org BIKE COALITIONS

Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition, www. bikesonoma.org Marin County Bicycle Coalition, www. marinbike.org Napa County Bicycle Coalition, www. napabike.org I WALK SONOMA

www.iwalksonoma.org NAPA VALLEY CAR FREE

http://napavalleycarfree.info/gettingto-around/walking WALK *BIKE* MARIN

www.walkbikemarin.org


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Opening in November New World Ballet is a non-profit organization providing access to professional quality dance instruction and performance opportunities for students desiring to become professional dancers, as well as those who wish to enhance their quality of life through dance.

3273 Airway Drive Suite D, Santa Rosa 707.845.5247

BALLET ~ HIP HOP ~ YOGA CONTEMPORARY ~ ADULT CLASSES KINDER BALLET newworldballet.com /2D3@B7A7<5AC>>:3;3<B


Voting ( 18

Profit Above All According to figures from ALEC’s own IRS filings from 2007 to 2009, made public by CMD, the organization raked in more than $21.6 million from corporations (with members including Exxon Mobil, Altria, GlaxoSmithKline and Pfizer); institutions like the Charles

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members who pony up between $7,000 and $25,000 for the privilege of getting together with sympathetic lawmakers at lavish retreats. Broken up into task forces focused on various aspects of public policy— from education to civil justice and the environment—ALEC members, both from the public and private sectors, get together and write model bills which are then voted on and, if ratified, carried home by ALEC legislators for introduction in their respective states. The strategy has been successful. ALEC brags on its website that each year about a thousand pieces of ALECwritten or ALEC-inspired model legislation ends up getting introduced in the states, with an average 20 percent becoming law. Despite this, and even though the organization has been active for nearly 40 years—it was established in 1973 by arch-conservative Paul Weyrich, who also cofounded the Heritage Foundation—ALEC has remained largely under the radar. Nonetheless, its impact on policy in the states reads like a greatest hits compilation of the most controversial bills in recent history, from changes to U.S. gun laws like Florida’s “stand your ground” legislation made infamous by the Trayvon Martin shooting, to statebased efforts at overturning or circumventing the Affordable Care Act, to recent measures limiting the powers of teachers’ unions and handing portions of student instruction over to for-profit education companies. Even Arizona’s hotly contested immigration law, SB 1070, started life as an ALECapproved “model” bill. “There’s a whole set of bills that are advancing that corporate agenda to privatize prisons, privatize education, and by privatize I mean profitize,” said Graves.

G. Koch Charitable Foundation; and nonprofits including the NRA, the Goldwater Institute and the Family Research Council. In all, private-sector contributions account for nearly 98 percent of ALEC’s funding, while the dues paid by member lawmakers, pegged at about $50, came to just more than $250,000, or about 1 percent of its haul during the same time period. In exchange for these hefty— though tax-deductible donations— ALEC’s private-sector members get to ensure that individual pieces of ALEC legislation, by and large, serve a narrow band of very specific corporate interests: education measures benefit for-profit education firms and harm unions; healthcare measures benefit insurance companies and drug manufacturers; tort reforms benefit corporations in general by limiting their liability to consumers. More “insidious,” as Graves put it, is ALEC’s drive against voting rights. “It’s deeply cynical and quite sinister—an outlandish effort by ALEC and others to make it harder for Americans to vote,” she says. “At the end of the day, depending on which analysis you’re looking at, it’s possible that these measures remove maybe 1 percent from the pool of votes that would be part of the election. You still have an election, but you’ve shaved off this percentage; you have the appearance that you have an election.” If voting rights get in the way, well, as notorious mob accountant Otto Berman once said, “Nothing personal. It’s just business.” “I think it is a little more classoriented,” says Alexander Keyssar, professor of history and social policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and a frequent speaker and writer on voting-rights issues. “The core interest in the suppression that’s going on is partisan, it’s not racial,” he says. “If African Americans voted predominately Republican, or 50–50 Republican, I don’t think their neighborhoods would be targeted for suppressive efforts. I think that it’s a community that now votes 95 percent Democrat, and if you want to knock out Democrat interests, that’s a good place to start.”


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBER 31- NOV E M BE R 6, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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The week’s events: a selective guide

CULTURE

S A N TA R O S A

P E TA L U M A

I Got a Rock

Cake Walk

If you want to see me get all teary-eyed around holiday time, either send me to Costco on Christmas Eve or, for a different sort of choking up, put the needle on the Charlie Brown Christmas soundtrack by the Vince Guaraldi Trio. Your heart would seriously have to be made of icy blue steel to not be affected by the songs on that album: “Christmastime Is Here,” “Linus and Lucy”—don’t get me started. Pianist David Benoit agrees, and that’s why he pays tribute to Guaraldi’s life and work with Derrick Bang, author of Vince Guaraldi at the Piano, in a performance coinciding with an exhibit of rare animation cels from the original Peanuts TV specials. Do the Snoopy dance to Benoit’s smooth playing when he appears on Saturday, Nov. 3, at the Schulz Museum. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 4pm. $10. 707.579.4452.

I loved the Sea and Cake from the start upon first hearing Sam Prekop’s sweet phrasing on “Jacking the Ball” from the band’s 1994 debut album. They were part of a wave of lilting, intricately trippy bands that came out of Chicago in what was called the “post-rock” era, a term that originated with the all-instrumental band Tortoise. The two bands actually share a couple of members, most notably drummer John McEntire. Since, the Sea and Cake have released several gorgeous little albums, including 2012’s Runner, which continues in the same vein of tight pop songs, with a tinge of electronica. The Sea and Cake, with opener Matthew Friedberger of the Fiery Furnaces, play on Wednesday, Nov. 7, at the Mystic Theatre. 21 N. Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma. 8pm. $16. 707.765.2121.

M I L L VA L L E Y

Piano Man

P E TA L U M A

Dire Day Fans of Lemony Snicket will be overjoyed (though the author himself would probably argue that they should be dismayed and very afraid) to find out that he’s got a new series on the horizon. Who Could It Be at This Hour?, the first in the four-book series All the Wrong Questions, acts as a prequel to the Series of Unfortunate Events, which told the story of the doomed Baudelaire family. In this particular book, 12-year-old Lemony Snicket has completed his “unusual education” and joined a secret society. His first clandestine assignment is to recover a statue of the mythical Bombinating Beast. It’s all fun and games until somebody gets hurt (and someone always gets hurts in these dastardly tales). See Lemony Snicket (aka Daniel Handler) in the flesh when he appears on Thursday, Nov. 1, at Copperfield’s Books. 140 Kentucky St., Petaluma. 7pm. Free. 707.762.0563.

BELLE DU JOUR Eight Belles, featuring Jessi Phillips, plays the Sausalito Yacht Club Nov. 2. See Clubs, p27.

A. J. Croce may resemble his dad Jim Croce in voice and looks, but over the past 20 years, he’s set himself apart musically from his famous folky father (who died in a plane crash when A. J. was only two years old). Rather than saving time in a bottle, Croce has established himself as a bedrock underground musician, mastering the ragtime piano in addition to acoustic guitar. In an interview on Italian television, the San Diego native described his career as “rocky” but rewarding, and described his sound as an eclectic mix between Ray Charles and Ray Davies, and Elvis Presley and Elvis Costello. See for yourself when the singer-songwriter plays the North Bay on Friday, Nov. 2, at the Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 9pm. $22. 415.388.3850.

—Leilani Clark


HOW I GOT OVER Tony â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Temptâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Quan, graffiti artist, is the inspirational star of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Getting Up.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Valley Focus

Leonard Maltin, Alan Cumming and penis museums at Napa Valley Film Fest BY CHRISTINA JULIAN

B

igger, better, moreâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the mantra for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Napa Valley Film Festival. Cofounder Brenda Lhormer is determined to put the kibosh on any possibility of a second-year slump for the annual event, which descends on the valley Nov. 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re coming out of the gate stronger,â&#x20AC;?

she says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;more excited, and equally as ambitious as last year.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tall order for the Bottle Shock brood (Lhormer and husband Marc produced the ďŹ lm in 2008), but fueled by Lhormerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy, they seem poised to pull it off. From the far-out and fabulous to the much-hyped mainstream, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something for every type of ďŹ lm ďŹ end in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lineup. Only in Napa would a world premiere about the grueling climb to master sommelier be considered

a coup. Somm, which kicks off the fest at the Napa Valley Opera House, tells the true tale of four wannabe sommeliers sniffing and slurping their way to the ďŹ nish line. Indie cinephiles will head straight to the Lounge at Hatt Hall in downtown Napa for some of the edgiest if not most obscure ďŹ lm fare around. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the docufeature The Final Member, which chronicles the unfolding saga of one manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quest to create a penis museum. For those who prefer some sci-ďŹ with their screen talk,

thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The History of Future Folk, a musical rhapsody set on the planet Hondo. Round out the doom with some gloom at Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Disaster, where a mundane couplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bruncha-thon turns turbulent when deathâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s door comes knocking. For star seekers hoping to bump elbows with A-listers, expected attendees include theater and ďŹ lm vet Alan Cumming (Spy Kids), 30 Rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s James Marsden, and Imogen Poots (Filth). Each will be honored during Saturday nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tribute program, hosted by Access Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Billy Bush. Other celebs expected to walk the red carpet are Heather Morris (Glee), Garret Dillahunt (Raising Hope) and Olympia Dukakis. Perhaps the festâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most inspirational screening is Getting Up: The Tempt One Story, about famed LA graffiti artist and activist Tony â&#x20AC;&#x153;Temptâ&#x20AC;? Quan, who re-learned to create art with a literal blink of his eye, following an ALS diagnosis, which left his eyes as his only moveable part. Also making its premiere during the NVFF is the opening of the Century, a 12-theater cineplex which will show sneak previews on Nov. 8 and open to the general public on Nov. 9. If the mere mention of such talk makes the eyes twitch, Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hosts a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Panels and Conversationsâ&#x20AC;? series. Pitch your ďŹ lm at the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make Your Pitchâ&#x20AC;? session on Friday. Follow that up with the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Criticsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Panelâ&#x20AC;? on Sunday hosted by big kahuna critic Leonard Maltin, who is also president of the festival jury. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re feeling brazen, schmooze your way into Round Poundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ lm industry mixer on Friday. Last year on opening night Lhormer proclaimed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope to be bigger than Sundance!â&#x20AC;? In the meantime, Napa watches the story unfold, onscreen and off. The Napa Valley Film Festival runs Nov. 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11. For full festival schedule, see www.napavalleyďŹ lmfest.org.

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ArtsIdeas

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBER 31- NOV E M BE R 6, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

ŴŴ

The 15th Annual Boho Awards!

Join us as we celebrate this year’s recipients of our Boho Awards, honoring those making significant contributions in the arts in the North Bay.

Boho Award honorees are announced in our Nov. 7 issue, with a party that same night on Wednesday, Nov. 7, at Christy’s on the Square (96 Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa). Food, drinks, speeches, toasts, and... you! Runs from 5:30-7pm, and it’s free!


MAMA TRIED Elly Lichenstein and Michael McGurk play it off legit.

By the Fire ‘So Nice’ sees songpacked premiere BY DAVID TEMPLETON

P

etaluma’s Cinnabar Theater, celebrating its 40th season this year, has established a solid reputation as a creator of new works and premieres. And in celebration of their anniversary, they’ve done it again. The world premiere of So Nice to Come Home To, by Richard B. Evans and Kate Hancock, is a commission by Cinnabar cofounder Jan Klebe. Based loosely on a pair of one-acts by J. M. Barrie, the setting has been moved from the First World War to the second. With 19 brand-new songs, written in a variety of styles, the show covers a lot of musical ground— perhaps a little too much ground. Kate Downey (in a delightfully layered performance by Elly Lichenstein) is a middle-aged

‘So Nice to Come Home To’ runs Friday–Sunday through Nov. 11 at Cinnabar Theater. 3333 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. Friday–Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays. $25–$35. 707.763.8920.

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Stage

woman living in New York City in 1944. Desperate to feel as much a part of the war effort as those with sons fighting overseas, she’s invented a son named Patrick and brags about him to her friend Jean (Valentine Osinski). When a real soldier named Patrick Downey appears (Broadway veteran Michael McGurk, thoroughly charming), the two form an uneasy bond, each with their own reasons to pretend they are mother and son. Director Ann Woodhead knows how to find all the colors and moods in a piece like this. She nicely paces the humor and sweetness of the play, without missing the underlying sadness and loss that underscores nearly every scene. The production also benefits from the magnetic presence of Michael Van Why, as a stumbling butler and vivacious Broadway star; the stiff but strong-voiced Bill Neely as Kate’s businessman exhusband; and an ebullient Stephan Walsh as a military organizer. There is an appealing sense of historical perspective in the story, with plenty of rich subtext bubbling away beneath the surface. Still, it rambles a bit, and there are a few too many songs, some of which slow down the action instead up propelling it forward. Many lean toward the operatic, and melodically, these tend to be the least memorable. The best songs here are those steeped in the sounds of the 1940s, from catchy pro-war jingles on the radio (“We’ll Never Give Up”) to USO novelty tunes (“The U.S. Army Band,” “Uncle Sam Wants You!”) to campy Broadway numbers (“Carmen Miranda,” “Rosie the Riveter”). The dialogue is straightforward and workmanlike, taking the characters through the scenes effectively enough, but a little too lacking in flash to equal the best of the songs. As far as premieres go, So Nice to Come Home To feels like a work-inprogress, which, of course, it is.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 31- NOV E M BE R 6, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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JCC Presents Jewish Community Center SONOMA COUNTY

2012 JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL

Film

Nickyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Family NOV 8, 1 & 7:30PM

Reuniting The Rubins NOV 15, 1 & 7:30PM

A.K.A. Doc Pomus NOV 29, 1 & 7:30PM

Hava Nagila DEC 4, 7:30PM

Tickets/Information www.jccsoco.org

GAME ON John C. Reilly and Sarah Silverman voice this imaginative story.

or call 707.528.4222

SCREENINGS Rialto Cinema 6868 McKinley St. Sebastopol Photo ŠJenny Jimenez

TM

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,  7 

National Theatre Live

Aladdinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Castle

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wreck it Ralphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; a consuming video-game fantasy world BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

S

tark-raving ingenuity makes the Disney 3-D animated Wreck It Ralph a rare treat, and to paraphrase Joe Bob Briggs, the fable it tells doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get in the way of the story.

It walks a ďŹ ne line between the cute and the uncanny. An ape-like 8-bit video-game heavy named Wreck It Ralph has been demolishing the same apartment house for some 30 years, quarter by quarter. Shunned by the other characters in the Fix It Felix Jr. video game, Ralph (voiced by John C. Reilly) sojourns into neighboring video games in hopes of distinguishing himself. Through mishaps, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stranded in a sticky, fer-girls racetrack game called Sugar Rush, in which adorable candy princesses race in cookie cars. This increasingly sinister Candyland is ruled over by the bulbous-headed King Candy (Alan Tudyk voices, doing a sharp Ed Wynn imitation). A reject â&#x20AC;&#x153;glitchâ&#x20AC;? girl longs to join the racers, but her participation may lead to the total destruction of the game. The metaphysics of how this arcade world works include a transit system, homeless characters from out-of-order games and graffiti (â&#x20AC;&#x153;All your base are belong to usâ&#x20AC;? is scrawled on a wall by some vandal). Yet Wreck It Ralph isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t crushed by its own concept or by in-jokes, and its central fable transcends good-vs.-evil storytelling. It honors the balance between creation and destruction. You couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t improve the balance of the characters, a match-up of the put-upon Reilly and the bratty Sarah Silverman, who voices the candy-covered gamine Vanellope. The opening cartoon is a similar jaw-drop: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Papermanâ&#x20AC;? may introduce sugared-out kids to the glory of black-and-white, dialoguefree story-telling. Set in New York City shortly before the end of elevated-rail service (1955 or so), it follows the meeting between a young white-shirted salary-man and a large-eyed girl whose lipstick kiss is the only red in the movie. On the cusp between Billy Wilder and YasujirĂ´ Ozu, this gorgeous short has one thing in common with Wreck It Ralph: both are examples of what can be done with animation through ideas that could only exist in the realm of cartoons.

TIMON OF ATHENS

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wreck it Ralphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opens in wide release on Friday, Nov. 2.


Tod Seelie

RESTART Nona Marie Invie sings of

love and loss.

Light Ahead

Dark Dark Dark make beauty of a breakup BY LEILANI CLARK

O

ne wouldn’t be remiss in expecting the music of a band calling itself Dark Dark Dark to contain a touch of gloom. Who Needs Who, the band’s third full-length album, finds singer Nona Marie Invie capturing the acute pain of love and loss, seeming to sing out of a cave of ice walls. Invie cofounded Dark Dark Dark, who play the Arlene Francis Center on Nov. 1, with Marshall LaCount in 2006. The two had a romantic relationship until early 2011. “The breakup is hard,” admits Invie, on the phone from her home in Minneapolis. “But being together unhappy in the band was hard, too.” Who Needs Who courses with the brittle nostalgia that comes of failed relationships. Lyrics like

Dark Dark Dark play on Thursday, Nov.1, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $10. 707.528.3009.

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Music

“I want to live in the time when you cherished me,” on the record’s gorgeous first single, “Tell Me,” convey that particular yearning. But, Invie adds, “people think all of the songs are about [LaCount], which isn’t the case.” At the same time, she says, the songwriting process, which consists of sending demos to band members spread across the United States, was influenced by the experience. “I was in such a writing mode when this was all happening,” she says, “before and after. It was about just letting it free flow without a filter.” In the midst of this rawness, Invie’s singing style is surprisingly controlled, imbued with a knack for bringing deep emotion. This talent comes of a pure love for singing, which Invie says she does “constantly,” and from an early age, when she’d sing Joni Mitchell and Carole King songs with her mom in the car. “My mom was really into these ’70s strong ladies,” she says. Invie, however, does put 10 years of classical piano training to work in her music. (On previous records, her main instrument was the accordion.) “I’ve always played, but I wasn’t performing or writing on it,” she says, regarding the piano’s prominence on the new recordings. “Then I started approaching it in a new way outside the classical spectrum, and it feels really good.” Invie wrote all but two songs on the album, but she’s backed up by LaCount on electric banjo and clarinet, Walt McClements on accordion and trumpet, Adam Wozniak on bass and Mark Trecka on percussion. The struggle toward realization, of finding light in darkness, is a strain that runs consistently through the avant-garde pop cabaret of Who Needs Who. Is this an album about growing up and facing the loss, either through physical or emotional death, that’s an inescapable part of being human? “It feels like part of this record is about becoming more mature,” says Invie. “Maybe that’s the simple way of putting it.”


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBER 31- NOV E M BE R 6, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Wed, Oct 31 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pmSCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE YOUTH AND FAMILY 7–10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Thur, Nov 1 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Nov 2 7–11pm Sat, Nov 3

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts WESTCOAST SWING PARTY 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 2-5pm Beth McEnery Rehearsal 7-11pm GATOR BEAT Presented by Steve Luther

Sun, Nov 4 8:30 am - 9:30 am JAZZERCISE 5 pm - 9:30 pm DJ STEVE LUTHER COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Nov 5 8:45–9:45am; 4:30-5:30pm; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Music

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Concerts

D I N N E R & A S H OW Fri

EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE Nov 2 Celebrate “Day of the Dead”

SONOMA COUNTY

8:00pm

Bennett Friedman Quartet

Sat

STEFANIE KEYS Nov 3 Americana/Rock 8:30pm

o

Ranch B OB MALONE Nov 4 John Fogerty’s Exciting PianistDebut!

Sun

4:00pm / No Cover

Sat

Nov 10

LINDA IMPERIAL BAND

WITH SPECIAL GUEST DAVID FREIBERG

8:30pm Wed RANCHO NICASIO’S Nov 15 14TH ANNIVERSARY SHOW 8:00pm Sat Nov 17 DANNY CLICK & THE HELL YEAHS! Original Americana/Texas Blues 8:30pm

Thanksgiving Dinner Thurs, Nov 22, Noon-7pm

Sat

Nov 24

THE FABULOUS

BUD E LUV ’S

8th Annual Holiday Party 8:30pm Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Jazz concert features compositions of Lee Morgan, Chick Corea, Ivan Lins and Johnny Mandel. Nov 2, 8pm. $5-$10. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 1.800.564.SRJC.

David Benoit Grammy-nominated jazz pianist and author Derrick Bang pair up to remember the Peanuts’ music of Vince Guaraldi. Nov 3, 4pm. Free with museum admission. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Jean-Philippe Collard Santa Rosa Symphony music director conducts renowned guest soloist along with American premiere of allbrass composition by Martin Matalon. Nov 3, 8pm, Nov 4, 3pm and Nov 5, 8pm. $20-$75. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Roger Bolt, Tony Gagarin & Phil Marshall. Nov 2, 6:30pm. Free. Raymond’s Bakery and B&B, 5400 Old Cazadero Highway, Cazadero. 707.540.2763.

Matt Nathanson Folk-fusion singer plays grand hall with Only 1 Noah. Nov 2, 8pm. $30. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

Larry Potts Award winning local songwriter presents one-man show. Nov 4, 4pm. $10. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Patricia Racette Soprano talks and sings over hors d’oeuvres and wine. Nov 5, 6pm, $25-$50. Congregation Shomrei Torah, 2600 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.5519.

The Sea & Cake Chicago supergroup of postrock luminaries plays with Matthew Friedberger of the Fiery Furnaces. Nov 7, 8pm. $16. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

MARIN COUNTY

Gram Parsons Tribute

Barbershop Concert

Annual event honoring legendary former Byrds member features Laughing Gravy and Antje Duvekot. Nov 3, 7pm and Nov 4, 2pm. $15-$25. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Marin Golden Gate Barbershop

Chorus in 58th annual show. Nov 4, 2pm. $10-$25. Marin Center, 10 Ave of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Prazak Quartet Leading international chamber ensemble performs selections from Haydn, Smetana and Dvorak. Nov 4, 5pm. $15-$30. Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church, 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe First Wednesday of every month, Chamber Music. First Thursday of every month, Celtic Night. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Oct 31, Halloween Open Mic. Nov 1, Stages of Sleep, Iron Sides, Soul Magnolia and Aries Fire Arts. Nov 2, Cheap Date 13, Revenant and Down with May. Nov 3, Bottleshock and Fiver Brown. Nov 4, World Peace Clowns Fundraiser. Mon, Art and Music with Stanley Mouse. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Great American Taxi Northern California bluegrass bards perform with Poor Man’s Whiskey. Nov 2, 9pm. $16. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

B B King King of the blues plays the guitar and revisits the classics at age 86. Nov 2, 8pm. $45$85. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Kraddy LA DJ and founding member of Glitch Mob plays Halloween with Dynamics. Oct 31, 8pm. $17-$20. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

The Leftovers Original and traditional Americana, boogie, blues and celtic with singer-songwriters

SEATED ROYALTY B.B. King plays the Wells Fargo

Center on Nov. 2. See Concerts, above.


Flamingo Lounge

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Nov 2, Matt Nathanson and Only 1 Noah. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

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Hopmonk Tavern Nov 1, Ill Esha. Nov 2, Diegos Umbrella and Dgiin. Nov 4, Delhi to Dublin. Nov 7, Donna the Buffalo. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, open mic. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Nov 2, Susan Sutton and Gary Digman Duo. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room Oct 31, Saffell. Nov 1, Incubators. Nov 2, JimBo Trout. Nov 3, Pine Needles. Nov 4, Stratospheres. Nov 7, WilsonHukill Blues Revue. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Nov 1, 9pm, Safety Orange. Nov 2, Black Nature of the Sierra Leoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Refugee All Stars, Arden Park Roots, Midnight Raid. Nov 4, Fog City Stompers, TRADJASS. Nov 6, Michael Schenker Group, Luvplanet, Points North. Mon, karaoke. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pick-Me-Up Revue. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Nov 3, Yancie Taylor. Mon, Greg Hester. Tues, Maple Profant piano noir. Sun, Kit Mariahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open mic. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub Nov 1, Tonewoods. Nov 4, Celtic jam. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Oct 31, Collie Buddz, New Kingston and Los Rakas. Nov 1, Dunwells and Jerry Hannan. Nov 2, Great American Taxi and Poor Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Whiskey. Nov 7, the Sea and Cake. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts Nov 4, Larry Potts. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Library Nov 3, Cascada de Flores.

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Poor Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Whiskey pay tribute to Kate Wolf

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Best known for Dark Side of the Moonshine, an entirely bluegrass version of Pink Floydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dark Side of the Moon, Poor Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Whiskey have now focused their considerable musical talent on Sonoma County folk godmother Kate Wolf. On their latest album, Like a River, the band covers eight remarkable Wolf songs, including her biggest hit, the gorgeous â&#x20AC;&#x153;Across the Great Divide.â&#x20AC;? Jason Beard, in the albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s liner notes, credits Santa Barbara bluegrass band the Cache City Drifters for introducing him and band mate Josh Brough (at the time, students at UCSB) to the songs of Wolf back in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We felt an immediate connection to those tunes,â&#x20AC;? writes Beard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It reminded us of our homes and lives in Northern California and Sonoma County.â&#x20AC;? Beard credits the beloved singer, who died of leukemia in 1986 at the age of 44, for helping to shape the Poor Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Whiskey Sound. This year, PMW has made stops at quite a few Bay Area music festivals, including Hardly Strictly and EarleFest. Appropriately, they debuted Like a River at the annual Kate Wolf Music Festival last June. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all part of paying tribute to a woman who wrote and sang about the hills of Sonoma County like no other. Poor Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Whiskey open for Great American Taxi on Friday, Nov. 2, at the Mystic Theatre. 21 Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma. 9pm. $16. 707.765.2121.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark

100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Phoenix Theater Oct 31, Kraddy, Dynamics. Nov 2, Skitzo, End the Suffering, Ariabis, Trecelence and Hemotoxin. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

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Redwood Cafe Nov 2, Prisma Tova. Nov 3, Mighty Groove. Nov 4, Organix Guitar. Nov 6, Rock Overtime Student Performance. Nov 7, Prairie Sun. First Sunday of every month, Organix Guitar. )

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 3 1- NOVE MBER 6, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Nov 2, Koncept Party Band. Nov 3, Crossfire. Tues, Swing Dancing with Lessons. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.


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8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Riverside Bistro Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

Russian River Brewing Co Nov 3, 9pm, SwampThang. Nov 4, 7pm, the Mud, the Blood & the Beer. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Society: Culture House Thurs, Casa Rasta. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann and guests. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Nov 1, Sal Valentino and Vikki Lee. Nov 7, Lady D. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Oct 31, Beso Negro, Hustler, Scrunt. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Nov 2, El Radio Fantastique. Nov 3, Stefanie Keys. Nov 4, Bob Malone. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219. Nov 2, Nourish Me Noir. Nov 2, Sugarfoot. Nov 3, James Moseley Band. Nov 4, Orquesta La Moderna Tradicion. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Oct 31, Down Dirty Shake. Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Sleeping Lady Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Oct 31, Midnight on the Water.

Mon, reggae. Wed, Larry’s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Studio 55 Marin Nov 3, Dana Land and her Sexytet. 1455 East Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Oct 31, Ghosts of Electricity Halloween Bash. Nov 2, AJ Croce. Nov 3, Commander Cody and the Modern Day Airmen. Nov 5, 8pm, Donna the Buffalo. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Oct 31, Halloween jam with Phil Lesh, Rob Barraco, Barry Sless, John Molo and Peter Rowan. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Billco’s Billiards Nov 1, Disturbing the Peace. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Silo’s Nov 2, Rick Harris and Silverado. Nov 3, Carlos Reyes. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Wells Fargo Center Nov 2, BB King. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Women’s Health Specialists confidential compassionate nonjudgmental More Than Just Health Care...

San Francisco’s City Guide

MARIN COUNTY

707.537.1171

142 Throckmorton Theatre Nov 3, Deborah Winters with the Peter Welker All-Star Band. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

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George’s Nightclub

ATION!3317 Chanate os a LOC Road W E , #2C, Santa R N www.cawhs.org

Oct 31, Pride and Joy. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

19 Broadway Club

Your first massage age only only $39! 39!

707.545.0721 21 West 7th St., Santa Rosa

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Sausalito Seahorse

Tradewinds

WESTERN FARM CENTER

Tues-Sun, live music. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277. Nov 3, Sticky Notes. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Low Cost Vaccination Clinics every Sunday, 9:30-11:30am

Osteria Divino

Sprenger’s Tap Room

Toad in the Hole Pub

FREE/Zd,KEdZK>

Nov 3, the Haggards. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Oct 31, Fenton Coolfoot and the Right Time. Nov 3, Pato Banton. Nov 4, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. Nov 4, Good Time Band. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar First Monday of every month, 8:30pm, Kimrea. Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpe’s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Old Western Saloon Nov 2, Eldon Brown Band.

Robert Glasper Experiment Progressive pianist who delivered this year’s stellar “Black Radio” plays with quartet. Nov 1 at Palace of Fine Arts.

Fred Wesley & the New J.B.’s James Brown’s right-hand man plays with Clyde Stubblefield, Jabo Starks, more. Nov 3 at Mezzanine.

METZ Noise emanates from Toronto and Ottawa, congeals, is handed rhythm, reverberates. Nov 5 at Bottom of the Hill.

Asia All original members: John Wetton, Steve Howe, Geoff Downes and Carl Palmer. Nov 7 at the Regency Ballroom.

Smoking Popes “Born to Quit,” played here in its entirety, captures a strange, underappreciated Zeitgeist. With Dr. Frank. Nov 7 at Slim’s.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


Galleries OPENINGS Nov 3 At 3pm. Quercia Gallery, “Sea, Land, City” features the miniature work of 12 artists. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243. At 3pm. EarthRise Center, “Intimations” features works on paper by Carol Duchamp. 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma. 707.781.7401. At 5pm. Doorway Gallery, “Reno Confidential: All In” features paintings, ceramics, prints and works in stone by Darryl Ponicsan. 254 First St E, Sonoma. 415.309.7440. At 6pm. Grand Hand Gallery, “Out of the Woods��� features wood sculpture of Freeland Tanner. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Nov 4 At 1pm. RiskPress Gallery, “Form” features work of Oaklandbased figurative artist Fernando Reyes. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone. At 1pm. Toby’s Feed Barn, “Pastels” features work of Nancy Stein and “Woodcraft” features work of Victor Larson. 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1223.

dogs and abstract patterns. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Doorway Gallery & Artists’ Studio Nov 3-Dec 31, “Reno Confidential: All In” features paintings, ceramics, prints and works in stone by Darryl Ponicsan. Reception, Nov 3 at 5pm. 254 First St E, Sonoma. 415.309.7440.

EarthRise Center Nov 3-Dec 21, “Intimations” features works on paper by Carol Duchamp. 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma. 707.781.7401.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Nov 24, “Did It AnyWay” features the work of Becoming Independent artists in a variety of media. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through Nov 4, “Invitational Anniversary Exhibit,” featuring 25 international artists. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Gallery 300 Through Nov 3, “Day of the Dead Juried Exhibition” features work exploring the subjects of grief and loss. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Dec 24, “Forward” features the work of 13 contemporary conceptual artists, including Chris Beards, Seymour Bergman and others. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Museum

SONOMA COUNTY Buddha’s Palm Tattoo Gallery Through Nov 30, Second annual art collective features the work of Jane Kelly, Arielle Lemons and others. 313 Main St, Sebastopol. Tues-Wed and Fri-Sat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4. 707.829.7256.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Nov 26, Lauri Luck’s paintings feature landscapes,

Through Nov 8, “Ancestors of Mexico,” artifacts, photos and more. Free. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Just For You Gallery of Fine Art Through Nov 11, “Sonoma Wonderland” features the paintings of the legendary lead singer of Jefferson Airplane Grace Slick inspired by her time in the wine country. 707.395.0322. 115 Plaza St, Healdsburg.

M.A. in Organization Development

Local Color Gallery Through Nov 12, “Transitions,” featuring Jim Butcher’s oil and pastel paintings, Wanda McManus’s watercolors and wood sculpture by Adam Bradley. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

Madrona Manor Nov 7, 5:30pm, Selected works of art juried in a silent auction followed by fine wine and dining. $130. 1001 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. Dinner daily. 707.433.4321.

Neon Raspberry Art House Through Dec 31, “Blind Passenger” fall 2012 show features Nicole Markoff’s project and new oil paintings from Colorado-based painter Erin Donnelly. Free. 3605 Main St, Occidental. 707 874 2100.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jan 6, “Nature Abstracted” features metal sculpture inspired by nature by Matt Devine, Jon Krawczyk and Rob Lorenson. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Quercia Gallery Nov 1-Dec 31, “Sea, Land, City” features the miniature work of 12 artists. Reception, Nov 3 at 3pm. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Nov 11, “Lyrical Complexities,” sculpture by Charles Fahlen, who died in 2010. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

RiskPress Gallery Nov 1-25, “Form” features the work of Oakland-based figurative artist Fernando Reyes. Reception, Nov 4 at 1pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Nov 4, “Going Going Gone,” paintings by Christine Kierstread; “Invitational Show,” featuring work from 16 different artists; “Vintage Portraits Tell Their Stories,” contemporary vintage photography by Stephanie Hamilton-Oravetz. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, )

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What Our Alumni Say… “I now bring a new set of values to the workplace including: whole systems thinking, collaboration, emotional intelligence, and compassionate leadership. This program creates huge shifts in how a person impacts a group, whether it’s an organization, a team or one’s own community. Choosing to study Organization Development at Sonoma State was the best educational decision I ever made.”

Yvonne Facedini, M.A. (Class of 2004)

Make your living making a difference. You can learn the leadership skills needed for successfully guiding an organization or community through needed change. Invest in your future with this dynamic graduate program. You gain: I Powerful new tools to be a more effective manager, leader, or consultant I Cutting-edge approaches, theories, and tools to create and sustain winning organizations and thriving communities I A wider professional network, applicable skills, and increased employment options. Our two-year MA program emphasizes mentoring and hands-on learning through actual consulting projects and internships. Classes meet two nights a week and one Saturday a month. Costs are remarkably reasonable. Attend our Information Meeting:

Saturday, November 10 3 - 5 PM , SSU Carson Hall Room 69 Call 707/664-2682 for information www.sonoma.edu/exed/orgdev

Consultant Emerson Human Capital

Hutchins School of Liberal Studies & School of Extended Education

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 3 1- NOVE MBER 6, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Events

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBER 31- NOV E M BE R 6, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sonoma County Museum Through Nov 4, Offerings and shrines for Día de los Muertos on display. Through Nov 4, “Death and Taxes in Fantasylandia,” 2-D work by Enrique Chagoya. Through Nov 4, Exhibit by Bay Area artist offers satirical slant on recession. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Dec 30, “The Art of Handmade Paper” offers glimpse into historic practice of papermaking with large display of rare Japanese papers. Through Dec 30, “Coastal Echoes” features the new works of respected painter Larry Thomas. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

November 9 – November 11 Friday & Saturday 8:00 PM Sunday 2:00 PM Spreckels Performing Arts Center 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park, CA 94928 $18 advance $15 seniors $20 at the door $15 2 for 1 offer for students with ID For information & tickets call: 510 915 5442 For more info : www.socodancetheater.org

Photo: James Wirth

Ad Design: Patti Buttitta

opens at RiskPress Gallery Nov. 1. See Openings, p29.

Verveine Verlaine Art Parlor Through Nov 17, Grand opening features works on paper by Laura Postell and objects by Miriam Kaye. 18 Crawford Court, Santa Rosa. 707.292.4233.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre

2012 Fall DANCE CONCERT

‘ROLLICKING GRACES’ Work by Fernando Reyes

Nov 1-30, “Shadow and Light” features works of contrast by Chris Shorten. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Elsewhere Gallery Through Dec 5, “Small Stories” features works by Mike Goldberg. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Gallery Bergelli Through Nov 21, “A Moment in Flight” features new paintings by Greg Ragland. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Nov 11, “Artists of the West Marin Review” features the work of artists who have appeared in the award-winning literary journal. Through Nov 11, “Duality” featuring the collaborative and individual work of Zea Morvitz and Tim Graveson. Through Nov 11, GRO presents the work

of Will Thoms in the Annex. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

The Hannah Gallery Through Nov 5, “Architects, Activists and Avengers: The Black Panther Party 1968,” photographs by Pirkle Jones and Ruth-Marion Baruch. 170 Donahue St, Marin. ThursSat, 1-5pm. 415.419.1605.

Marin Civic Center Through Dec 10, “Marin Society of Artists: 85 years,” a nonjuried member show. 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 415.499.6400.

Marin Community Foundation

Marin Society of Artists Through Nov 11, “85th Annual Members’ Show” features work by MSA artists in all media. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

Osher Marin JCC Through Nov 30, “You Did What to My Comics!?!” papercuts by Isaac Brynjegard-Bialik. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Rebound Bookstore Through Jan 10, “Phases of the Moon” features various artists’ found images and abstract works in the many shapes of the moon. 1641 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.0550.

Through Feb 5, “Works on Water” features the work of 30 artists exploring the aesthetics and politics of water. Through Feb 5, “Works on Water” features the work of 30 artists exploring the aesthetics and politics of water. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Toby’s Feed Barn

Marin MOCA

Through Nov 14, Come celebrate Vickisa’s last month with a special goodbye exhibition, and clearance sale beginning Oct 19. Closing party, Nov 14 at 5pm. 3415 Hwy 1, Stinson Beach. 415.868.9305.

Through Nov 18, “Legends of the Bay Area” features the work of San Francisco artist David Maxim. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Nov 2-28, “Pastels” features the work of Nancy Stein and “Woodcraft” features the work of Victor Larson. Reception, Nov 4 at 1pm. 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Mon-Sat, 9 to 5; Sun, 9:30 to 4. 415.663.1223.

Vickisa Art


NAPA COUNTY ECHO Gallery

Grand Hand Gallery Nov 1-Dec 31, “Out of the Woods” features the wood sculpture of Freeland Tanner. Reception, Nov 3 at 6pm. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Robert Mondavi Winery Through Nov 4, “Metal Still Matters,” sculptures by Gordon Huether. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.968.2203.

Comedy Aziz Ansari “Parks and Recreation” star and standup favorite presents an evening of bewilderment and disillusion. Nov 4, 8pm. $39. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Monkey Fight Comedy

Presidential Debate & Election Watch Parties

Fundraiser benefits the museum’s exhibit program and features cocktails, light appetizers and music by Chris Pimentel. Nov 3, 6pm. Free. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Watch the debates, share the suspense and count the cliches on the big screen this election-season. Tues, Nov 6, 6:30pm. Free. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Gospel Music Festival Afternoon of roof-raising gospel music with Wings of Glory Community Gospel Choir, Joyful Noise of Sebastopol, Umoja Gospel Choir of Richmond, Kevin Minor & Ministry Without Walls, Lighthouse Gospel Choir of Marin and San Francisco Lighthouse Gospel Choir. November 3rd, 1pm-6pm. $10$15. New Life, 1310 Clegg St, Petaluma. 707.763.4196.

Great Escape Suitcase Party Inaugural event for 20-30 Club benefits local youth and features dancing, cocktails and the chance to win an instant vacation to Vegas. Nov 2, 5:30pm. $200. Charles M Schulz Sonoma County Airport, 2290 Airport Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.565.7243.

Make a Splash

Tony Sparks hosts comedic event featuring Myles Weber, Uncle Charle Adams, Steven Thomas, Marco Antonio Alvarez and Marty Carrion. Nov 3, 8:30pm. $10. Sweet River Grill and Bar, 248 Coddingtown Center, Santa Rosa. 707.526.0400.

Reception for yearlong “Water Works” campaign in the Evert B Person theater includes panel discussion with playwright Adam Chanzit and performance of “The Great Divide.” Nov 7, 5pm. $10-$17. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Santa Rosa Comedy Nights

Mayflower Choral Gala

Comedy open mic hosted by MC Ricky Del Rosario. First Thurs of every month. Free. Heritage Public House, 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Performances of Rita Abrams’ music, foot, awards and a silent auction all go to benefit Mayflower Choral Society. Nov 3, 5:30pm. $35-$38. Corte Madera Recreation Center, 498 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Bayer Farm Tending Every Fri, 3 to 6, all ages welcome to join LandPaths for garden care. Fri, 3-6pm. Bayer Farm, 1550 West Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.524.9318.

Peace in Process

World Peace Clowns Fundraiser Fundraiser features music by L-Fiasco, Chango B, games and skits. Nov 4, 5pm. $10. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Upcoming Concerts

“…the hottest Irish acoustic group on the planet”

Lunasa

Friday, Nov. 9, 8 pm First time ever in Sebastopol, back in Sonoma County for first time since 2005, The great Irish singer…

Film

Mary Black

Cult Film Series Series features four doublefeatures, including “Dawn of the Dead” and “The Return of the Living Dead” on Nov 1, “Evil Dead” and “Evil Dead 2” on Nov 8, “Night of the Creeps” and “Humanoids” on Nov 15 and “The Thin” and “They Live” on Nov 29. 7pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0330.

Garden in the Sea Documentary on Island protection efforts in the Sea of Cortez presented by Tiburon Film Society. Nov 6, 6pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Friday, Nov. 16, 8 pm

Sebastopol

Community

Redwith Molly

Anne & Pete Sibley opening Sunday, Jan. 20, 7:30 pm

Cultural Center Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

Napa Valley Film Festival Five-day festival at various locations around the wine county features films like “Pad Yatra,” “Room 237” “SOMM” and “Love, Marilyn,” among many others, industry panels, and celebrity tributes to Alan Cumming, Imogen Poots, Leonard Maltin and others. Nov 7-11 at various venues around Napa Valley. For tickets and more information, visit napavalleyfilmfest.org.

Sunday morning workshop offers immersion into ancient modalities including holistic clinical hypnosis and primordial chigung. Nov 4, 10:30am. Donations accepted. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Otello

Preschool Storytime

Shakespeare’s lesser-known work presented by National Theatre Live. Thurs, Nov 1, 7pm. $16-$23. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

A lap sit program for infants, one day to 17 months old, accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Fri, 10:45am. free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Cumulus Presents & Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Verdi’s Shakespearean masterpiece presented as part of “The Met Opera Live in HD.” Nov 7, 1 and 7pm. $16-$23. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

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Through Dec 16, “Picture Show” showcases emerging and established photographers. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Fine Craft Auction Fundraiser


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Italian comedy follows eclectic group of accidental revolutionaries. Nov 3, 5:30 and 7:45pm. $14. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat Local 101â&#x20AC;? provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Petaluma Farmers Market

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Live music and over 50 local booths. Sat, 2-5:30pm. through Nov 17. Free. Petaluma Farmers Market, Second Street between B and D streets, Petaluma. Sat, 2-5:30pm. through Nov 17. Walnut Park, Petaluma Boulevard South and D Street, Petaluma.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

For Kids El Dia de los Muertos Storytime Songs and rhymes in Spanish and English. Nov 2, 11am. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Treat Yo Self! Aziz Ansariâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Buried Aliveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tour comes to SSU Standup comedy tends to be a hit-ormiss prospect, but actor and comedian Aziz Ansari is a natural when it comes to seeing the ridiculous in life and turning it on its head. To see this in action, check out Dangerously Delicious, a live recording of one of his standup performances that came out last spring. One of the funniest moments comes when Ansari talks about seeing rapper 50 Cent order a grapefruit soda in a club and, when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delivered, ask why the drink isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t purple. Ansari goes off on this premise, taking it to extreme heights, which is exactly why his comedy is hilarious. As the clueless, ultra-consumerist, metrosexual, sometimes pathetic, sometimes golden-hearted city employee Tom Haverford on NBCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parks and Recreation, Ansari kills it pretty much every time heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the screen, whether heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desperately trying to romance Rashida Jones or going on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Treat Yo Selfâ&#x20AC;? shopping sprees with the amazing Retta Sirleaf (as Donna Meagle). If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever seen him make the talk show rounds, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see a quick, sarcastic wit in action. Though Ansari was born to a Muslim family in South Carolina, race and religion rarely show up in his comedy. Instead, the 29-year-old focuses on the important issues facing todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s twenty-somethings: text ďŹ&#x201A;irting, bad dating advice and why 50 Cent could be driven to shoot up a posse of innocent grapefruits. Aziz Ansari talks smack on Sunday, Nov.4, at the Green Music Center. 1801 East Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 7pm. $39. 866.955.6040.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark

Phil Ackerly Popular Bay Area magician performs tricks, nay, illusions, for children. Nov 4, 1pm. $7-$8. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Lectures California Glaciers Tribute by photographer

Tim Palmer documents the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last glaciers. Nov 7, 8:30pm. Free. REI Corte Madera, 213 Corte Madera )

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Greg Sarris Graton Rancheria chairman, SSU professor and author speaks as part of Native American Heritage month. Nov 7, 2pm. $4. Bertolini Student Center, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4266.

Richard Standard Bay Area artist and photographer talks about symbolism and composition in art. Nov 6, 7:30pm. Free. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Science Buzz Cafe Nov 1, “Althsheimer’s: Current and Future Research” with Dr. Alan Bernstein; Nov 8, “The Nanotechnology Story: New Developments” with Karen Frindell. Thurs, 7pm. $4. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Readings Book Passage Nov 1, 7pm, “Indian Voices” with Alison Owings. Nov 2, 7pm, “Dreaming Mill Valley” with Christie Nelson. Nov 3, 4pm, “I’m a Good Dog: Pit Bulls, America’s Most Beautiful (and Misunderstood) Pet” with Ken Foster. Nov 3, 5:30pm, “Czechmate: The Spy Who Played Jazz” with Bill Moody. Nov 3, 7pm, “Jerusalem: A Cookbook” with Yotam Ottelenghi. Nov 4, 7pm, “In 2020, I Want A Woman President” with Lolu Adebayo. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Nov 1, 3:30pm, “Dangerously Ever After” with Dashka Slater. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Nov 1, 7pm, “Who Could It Be at This Hour?” with Lemony Snicket. Nov 3, 1:30pm, “Glass Palace” with Andy Weisskoff. Nov 6, 6pm, “Mr. Penubra’s 24-Hour Bookstore” with Robin Sloan. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Occidental Center for the Arts Nov 2, “Occupy and Other Love Stories” with Daniel Coshnear. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Sebastopol Community Church Nov 1, 7pm, “An Unknown World: Notes on the Meaning of the Earth” with Jacob Needleman. 1000 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol.

features Brad Zimmerman in a one-man show. Nov 1, 8pm. $20-$23. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Paranormal Activity You’ll wish this staging of the spooky film were only makebelieve. Through Oct 31, 7:30pm. Free. Fire Escape Productions, 2800 Cleveland Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.526.6465.

Rabbit Hole

Theater August: Osage County When the family unexpectedly reunites after Dad disappears, their Oklahoman ways are rocked by repressed truths and unsettling secrets. ThursSun through Nov 4. $20$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Calaveras del Monton Day of the Dead celebration is presented in English and Spanish. Nov 1-2, 8pm. $5-$20. Imaginists Theatre Collective, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe Porchlight Theater Company presents Gothic Halloween party in honor of morose writer featuring refreshments and audience participation. Oct 31, 8pm. $15-$20. Falkirk Cultural Center, 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Free Land Hip-hop journey from the streets of Oakland to the wild, wild West is performed solo by writer Ariel Luckey. Nov 1, 7:30pm. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

The Great Divide Fractured family dynamics mirror those of a divided Colorado town in this political thriller. Various dates and times. Nov 1-10. $10-$17. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Harvey Raven Players present classic about gigantic, invisible rabbit. Various dates and times. Through Nov 4. $23. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

My Son the Waiter This comedic Jewish tragedy

When a life-shattering accident turns their world upside down, a couple is left drifting perilously apart. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Nov 11. $15$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Snow White & the Family Dwarf Fairy tale presented by Actors Theater for Children features spin on classic story. Various dates and times. Nov 2-9. $5. Steele Lane Community Center. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3282.

So Nice to Come Home To This World War II musical comedy is a world premiere. A middle-aged woman is determined to become part of America’s war effort. Dates and times vary. Through Nov 11. $25-$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Vagina Monoloques Independent Cabaret Productions presents Eve Ensler’s classic about the misunderstood lady-spot. Nov 4, 4pm. $22. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

The Wier

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of October 31

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Big opportunities are coming up for you. Even if you cash in on them, though, they aren’t likely to make an immediate practical impact. They are subtle and deep, these prospects. They have the potential of catalyzing monumental shifts in your long-term unfolding, but will take a while to transform your day-to-day rhythm. So what are these openings? Here are my guesses: 1. You could root out a bad seed that got embedded in your subconscious mind before you knew any better. 2. You could reinterpret the meaning of certain turning points in your past, thereby revising the flow of your life story. 3. You could forgive yourself for an old sin you thought you’d never let go of. 4. You could receive a friendly shock that will diminish some sadness you’ve carried for a long time. TAURUS (April 20–May 20) This would be a good time to get introspective and meditative about your urge to merge . . . to think objectively about the way you approach togetherness . . . to be honest with yourself about what strengths and weaknesses you bring to the art of collaboration. The most important question you can ask yourself during this inventory is this: “How do I personally contribute, either knowingly or unconsciously, to the problems I experience in relationships.” Here’s another query you might consider: “How hard am I willing to work to create the kinds of intimacy and alliances I say I want?”

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “Dear Rob: I seem to be marooned in an interesting limbo. The sights and sounds are not exactly pretty, but they keep me perversely entertained. I’m sampling tastes that are more sour than sweet, thinking that sooner or later the sweetness will start to prevail—but it never does. Sometimes I feel like I’m in a trance, unable to do what’s best for me. Can you offer any help—like maybe give me a password that would break me out of the trance?”—Meandering Gemini. Dear Meandering: This is one of those rare times when you have cosmic permission to favor what’s calming and reassuring rather than what’s amusing and stimulating. Your password is “sanctuary.” CANCER (June 21–July 22) On Sept. 22, the San Francisco Giants played a baseball game against the San Diego Padres. In the fourth inning, Giants’ third baseman Pablo Sandoval sprinted to the edge of the field, then hurled himself over a railing and into the crowd in order to snag a foul pop-up. The fact that he landed upside down but perfectly unhurt wasn’t the most impressive aspect of his feat. Nor was his improbable ability to wield such precise concentration while invoking so much raw force. Even more amazing was the pink bubble that Sandoval blew with his chewing gum nanoseconds before he dived. It was a supremely playful and successful Zen moment. That’s the spirit I hope you will bring to your efforts in the coming days.

Conor McPherson’s dark, lyrical play set in a Dublin pub stars Peter Downey, Ilana Niernberger and others. Various dates and times. Through Nov 11. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

LEO (July 23–August 22) Your unconscious mind will be more accessible than usual in the coming weeks. It will reveal its agendas more clearly and play more of an active role in your life. Is that a good thing or a bad thing? It will depend on how open-minded you are toward the surprises your secret self will reveal. If you try to ignore or repress its eruptions, they’ll probably wreak chaos. If, on the other hand, you treat this other part of you as an unpredictable but generous ally, you may be able to work out a collaboration that serves you both.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Urbandictionary.com defines “SkyMall solution” as “an absurdly single-purposed tool or solution that solves a problem you don’t actually have.” The term is derived from the famous SkyMall catalogue, which sells unusual specialty products. According to my analysis of the current astrological omens, you should be wary of any attraction you might have to SkyMall solutions. Do you really need a King Tut tissue box cover or an ice cube tray that makes ice in the shape of dachshunds or a stencil set for putting messages on your bundt cake? I doubt it. Nor do you need their metaphorical equivalents.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22)

Right before

I woke up this morning, I had a dream that one of my teeth fell out. As I lay there groggily in bed, my mind searched for its meaning. “What does losing a tooth symbolize?” I asked myself. “What is its psychological meaning?” I promised myself that when I got up, I would google that question. But my rumination was interrupted by a dull ache in the back of my mouth, and it was only then that I remembered: yesterday, in actual waking life, I had a real tooth yanked out by a real dentist. The moral of the story, Libra: be wary of making up elaborate stories and mythic assumptions about events that have simple, mundane explanations.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) This is an excellent time to explore the frontiers of wise foolishness. I’m hoping you will take full advantage of learning opportunities that might require you to shed your excess dignity and acknowledge how much you don’t know. Are you brave enough to disavow cynical thoughts and jaded attitudes that muffle your lust for life? Are you smart enough to understand how healthy it would be to go out and play like an innocent wild child? Make yourself available for delightful surprises.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Zombies used to be terrifying. But then they became a featured motif in pop culture, often in humorous contexts, and now there’s a growing acceptance and even affection for them. Here’s the view of Max Brooks, author of The Zombie Survival Guide: “Eventually rock and roll morphs from Sid Vicious to the Jonas Brothers. Same thing with vampires: We went from Dracula to Twilight to make them peachy and G-rated. I guarantee you someone is working on a way to take the fear out of zombies and market them to children.” Your assignment, Scorpio, is to do to your personal fears what the entertainment industry has done to zombies: turn them into amusing caricatures that don’t trouble you so much. For example, visualize an adversary singing a duet with Justin Bieber.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “You must learn from the mistakes of others,” said humorist Sam Levenson. “You can’t possibly live long enough to make them all yourself.” That’s excellent advice for you right now, Capricorn. In order to glean the teachings you need most, you won’t have to bumble through a single wrong turn or bad decision yourself. There will be plenty of blundering role models who will be providing you with the precise inspiration you need. Study them carefully. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Every November, thousands of writers participate in National Novel Writing Month. They pledge to compose at least 50,000 words of a new novel in that 30-day period. In accordance with the astrological omens, Aquarius, I propose that you commit yourself to a comparable project in your own field. Is there a potential masterpiece on which you could get a substantial amount of work done? Is there a major transformation you’ve long wanted to undertake but have always had some excuse to avoid? I predict that you will attract unexpected help and luck if you summon the willpower to focus on that task. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

Don’t believe the climate is changing? Go ask the birds what they think. Sixty percent of all the feathered species in North America have moved north in the past 46 years. Scientists are pretty sure their migration is a response to the warming trend that’s afoot. I like the idea of tuning in to how animals behave in order to get accurate information about the state of the world. Would you consider doing more of that, Pisces? According to my astrological analysis, the coming months will be a time when you can learn a lot from nonhuman intelligences.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


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Meditations of Compassion Wednesdays, 7:00-8:15 pm, $10.00. Sundays, Prayers for World Peace, 10:30-11:45 a.m., Free Saturday, 11:30-12n, $5.00. Compassion Kadampa Buddhist Center, 436 Larkfield Center (south side near Vet), 477-2264, www.meditateinsantarosa.com. Everyone welcome.

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We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxycontin and Vicodin using Methadone.

We’re here to help you help yourself.

• Subutex/Suboxone available • Confidentiality assured

1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B • Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 • www.srtp.net

Donate Your Auto 800.322.4234

SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxycontin, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal!

We do all DMV. Free pick up- running or not. Live operators—7 days! Help the Polly Klaas Foundation Confidential Program. 707.576.1919 provide safety information and assist families in bringing kids home safely.

• Providing Treatment since 1984 • MediCal accepted

MEGA CHURCH GARAGE SALE! 1100 University Ave., Healdsburg. Saturday, Nov. 3rd, 8-3.

2 for 1 Entrees Buy 1 entree + 2 drinks, receive a 2nd entree for free. Lunch or dinner. Mention Bohemian special. Ganesha Indian Restaurant, 535 Ross St, Downtown Santa Rosa, next to Bananas Music.

Move In Specials /ŵĂŐŝŶĞ>ŝĨĞǁŝƚŚŽƵƚĞƉƌĞƐƐŝŽŶ /ŵĂŐ ŝŶĞ >ŝĨĨĞ ǁŝƚŚŽƵƚĞƉƌĞƐƐƐŝŽŶ

Church Holiday Boutique

xx EŽŶEŽŶ-/ŶǀĂƐŝǀĞ /ŶǀĂƐŝǀĞ xx DĞĚŝĐ DĞĚŝĐĂůůLJWƌŽǀĞŶ^ĂĨĞĂŶĚīĞĐƟǀĞ ĂůůLJWƌŽǀĞŶ ǀ ^ĂĨĨĞĂŶĚ Ğ īĞĐƟ Ğ ƟǀĞ

The Bohemian, Warren Miller and Lagunitas are cohosting a free pre-party. FREE pre-party raffle giveaways include movie tix for the Nov. 17 film at Marin Center, Heavenly trip for 2, Spyder Jacket giveaway, winter snow gear, Lagunitas swag, and more. Pint specials all night long! Party with our ski babes and dudes! Wed, Nov. 14, 6–8pm at Lagunitas Tap Room & Beer Sanctuary. 1280 N. McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. info: 707.527.1200.

xx ĂůůĨ ĂůůĨŽƌĨƌĞĞƐĐƌĞĞŶŝŶŐ ĨŽ ŽƌĨƌĞĞ ƐĐĐƌĞĞŶŝŶŐ

tĞůůDŝŶĚĞŶƚĞƌ͘ĐŽŵ t ĞůůDŝŶĚĞŶƚĞƌ͘ĐŽŵ ͘ ϳϬϳ-ϱϲϲ-ϵϯϱϱ ϳϬϳ-ϱϲϲ-ϵϯ ϱϱ Know a gay teen?

1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College Ave. Santa Rosa CA 95401 — Great Prices! Visit our online menu at – www.PeaceinMedicine.org

3205 Dutton Ave | 1435 Sebastopol Ave Santa Rosa | Locally Owned & Operated

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS

:ĞŶŶŝĨĞƌĞĐŬ͕D͘͘ :ĞŶŶŝĨ ĨĞĞƌĞĐŬ͕͕D͘͘

Supporting youth ages 12–24 Positive Images www.posimages.org

PEACE IN MEDICINE IS NOW OPEN IN SANTA ROSA

starting as low as $ 75 per month

707-546-0000 707-578-3299

xx & &ƉƉƌŽǀĞĚ ƉƉ  ƌŽǀĞĚ Ě Warren Miller FLOW State pre-party Wed, Nov.14!

10 X 10…

We sell boxes, packaging and other moving supplies

xx ůƚ ůƚĞƌŶĂƟǀĞƚŽDĞĚŝĐĂƟŽŶƐ ĞƌŶĂƟǀĞƚŽDĞĚŝĐĂƟŽŶƐ 707.546.4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

starting as low as $ 30 per month

EĞǁdƌĞĂƚŵĞŶƚKƉƟŽŶ EĞ ǁdƌĞĂƚŵĞŶƚKƉƟŽŶ

1100 University Ave, Healdsburg. Saturday Nov 3, 9:30–3

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE — BUY, SELL, TRADE

5 X 10…

ƉĂŝĚŵŽĚĞů Ɖ ĂŝĚŵŽĚĞů

Rebound Bookstore "Phases of the Moon" through Jan. 10. 1641 Fourth St,. San Rafael 415.482.0550

Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

•Led by Dr. Hanya Barth •Real Care—Real Doctors •24/7 Safe Verification •Totally Confidential

We’ll Match Any Local Price

Guitar Lessons w/ Hank Levine formerly w/Collins & Levine Band All ages. Super patient, fun, creative, positive & nurturing 707.583.6386

JCC Presents 2012 Jewish Film Festival Tickets/Information www.jccsoco.org or call 707.528.4222

Quality ID Cards

1.707.568.0420

www.GREEN215.com

Downtown Santa Rosa: 741 5th St @ E St

The 15th Annual Boho Awards! Join us as we celebrate this year’s recipients of our Boho Awards, honoring those making significant contributions in the arts in the North Bay. Boho Award honorees are announced in our Nov. 7 issue, with a party that same night on Wednesday, Nov. 7, at Christy’s on the Square (96 Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa). Food, drinks, speeches, toasts, and... you! Runs from 5:30-7pm, and it’s free!


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