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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Sunday S unday O Oct ct 114, 4, 2 2pm pm SR city hall 100 Santa Rosa Ave

In solidarity with Occupy Wall Street, the Arab Spring, and Los Indignados, join us in celebrating one year of resistance to greed and corruption. Bring your pots and pans and help make some noise for democracy and justice!

All Power to The 99% www.occupysantarosa.org

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ŵ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Bohemian

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor

FAIR TRADE FIRST FRIDAY

GLOBAL FASHION SHOW Friday, October 5 5–7:30pm

Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Rachel Dovey, ext. 200

Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur Taylor, Nicolas Grizzle, James Knight, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Juliane Poirier, Jonah Raskin, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

Design Director Kara Brown

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Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating

the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of Natasha Juliana by Michael Amsler. Cover design by Kara Brown.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Level the Field

No endorsements: it’s a good thing BY PETER BYRNE

A

s a working journalist and a resident of the North Bay, I am overjoyed that Halifax Media Holdings, the new corporate parent of the Press Democrat/Argus Courier, has killed editorial political endorsements. It is a journalistic conflict of interest for publishers to endorse political candidates that their reporters must cover with impartiality. Advertising-driven fish wrappers of this type wield the promise of campaign endorsements as a cudgel to bludgeon candidates who do not explicitly cater to their political agendas. Sadly, readers are often swayed by these agendized campaign advertorials. The Press Democrat/Argus Courier “newspapers” always endorse the candidates picked by the chamber of commerce. Take Petaluma: city council member Mike Healy is the political point man for the sprawling Regency Center, with its internet-outmoded, big-box store model, and the Deer Creek shopping center, which promises to solidify traffic jams for decades to come. He was a prime mover behind letting Basin Street Property off the hook for $10 million in unapproved cost overruns in building the Theater District. On Oct. 1 the Argus ran a “news” story about the county Democratic Party not endorsing Healy and his young mentee, Gabe Kearney, both of whom are running for the Petaluma City Council on what amounts to a “Pave Petaluma Now” platform. The remarkably unprofessional article was a political hit piece directed at the non-chamber-approved candidates that the party supported instead of Healy and Kearny, whom the chamber and its newspapers adore. Incredibly, with one exception, the half-dozen sources critical of this action that were quoted at length by the PD were all granted anonymity. The public cannot hold anyone accountable for these remarks. Given the political ferocity of the article, there is no guarantee that these quotes were not fictionalized. Pulling the editorial endorsement rug out from under the local political establishment in Sonoma County is wonderful news for democracy. It just might level the playing field—except for the wheelbarrows full of glossy lies and misrepresentations that the monied interests will now pour into our mailboxes to try and make up for the loss of their previously free endorsement card. Resist media. Peter Byrne is a contributor to this paper. He lives in Petaluma. Open Mic is a weekly feature. We welcome your contribution. To have your 350-word topical essay considered for publication, send it to openmic@bohemian.com.

Soylent Green

Spare us the Horatio Alger story about Ruben Armiñana (“Symphonie Fantastique,” Sept. 26). That he came to the U.S. with nothing is irrelevant to the story, and in saying he will not be stopped by the government, he exhibits a belief that he is above the law. No wonder he so admires Sandy Weill. This is actually a story of might making right. It implies that the existence of the Green Music Center is justification for its existence. Time for a course in logic all around! I assume they teach that at SSU. Nicolas Grizzle’s shoddy journalism fails on more counts than can be touched on here. The reader is never informed that the revenues from the Center will come nowhere near covering its expenses anytime soon, if ever, and that money will come from the pockets of students and/ or taxpayers or through the continued privatization of our university system in return for unethical access to students, as in the case of the MasterCard deal. Nor does Grizzle explain Sandy Weill’s role in the toxic subprime mortgage debacle that is undermining the funding of our educational system. And Armiñana hopes that we really don’t understand his deception about the “legislative executive process.” But we do, and we know that it is controlled by the corporate rich and that Weill himself bragged about his outsized influence in ending Glass-Steagall. We’ve got it straight from the horse’s mouth. The article also fails to note that a music center this expensive is totally unnecessary for the education of musicians. It was built to this scale to please nonstudents and nonresidents at the expense of students and residents. Isn’t it interesting that the smaller hall most suited to the needs of students is unfinished? Professor Phillips is correct. Dr. Armiñana should be reprimanded for impugning the reputation of one of his employees without providing any evidence to back it up, and the Bohemian should be ashamed for printing the slur.

Most important, the “bumpy road” to completion of the Center will look like smooth sailing when compared to what SSU students will be experiencing on the road to getting their degrees. Dr. Armiñana has thrown his students under the bus in exchange for some trinkets.

SUSAN C. LAMONT Santa Rosa

Sound Opinions The Green Music Center has seats with terrible acoustics! Having previously toured the facility and listened to a demonstration of acoustic live music (piano), I was impressed by the sound in all the seating areas of the venue. I looked forward to the Alison Krauss concert on Sept. 30, with seats in the choral circle area alongside the stage. It turns out that if the performance is amplified, speakers are set to cover the front of the stage forward and are mixed accordingly, leaving the choral circle alongside the stage in a terrible acoustic black hole with unintelligible vocals and a dead musical spectrum, compounded by the sound reflected from the huge outdoor crowd and loud outdoor speakers. Same for the address by the university president and venue staff. Their words could not be understood. This is not a negative comment on the actual performance, but on the dismal acoustics. Management must address the acoustic problem for the seats alongside the stage. In my opinion a significant number of the seats are unacceptable for amplified performances. Be forewarned! Apparently, venue management did not think this through. Such seats are “backstage seats.” This issue was also noticed by adjacent seat holders, and not my opinion alone.

CHARLES J. TARR Santa Rosa

Property Power When you own a piece of property, you want to be able to do as you wish. The American dream includes owning a place

THIS MODERN WORLD

of your own and working to make it better. Americans also care about their neighbors. We understand that you can’t start a retail business or build a five-story building in a residential neighborhood. Our rights to our own property have limits when our actions can harm our neighbors’ enjoyment of their property. It’s not only good manners; it’s also the law. Pacific Union College, like many developers, would like to pretend that their property rights are absolute. Napa County votes have repeatedly said that agriculture and open space are an essential part of our rural lives. We’ve fought to defend the environment. We’ve put in place laws, so that when developers put their profit above the rights of their neighbors, the law is on our side. Let’s teach the developers again to have some manners by voting yes on Measure U.

JOSEPHINE BOCK Answin

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1

Nancy Pelosi forced to listen to R. Kelly blared loudly at Green Music Center

2

Marin restaurants to vie for 15 new liquor licenses over next three years

3

Santa Rosa gets a “View from Your Window” on Andrew Sullivan’s Dish

4

Dumb Starbucks opens in downtown Napa, right near Roasting Company

5 Bay Bridge Series, A’s

and Giants, let’s do this! Bring that beat back, 1989!

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Rants

7

Paper THE

CROSS-EXAMINE Santa Rosa criminal defense attorney Steve Fabian supports Proposition 36 as a ‘minor fine-tuning’ of the law.

Struck Out

Proposition 36 would exempt nonviolent offenders from ‘three strikes’ law’s lifetime sentencing BY LEILANI CLARK

I

t all started with two murders. The tragic cases of Polly Klaas, the 12-year-old Petaluma girl who was kidnapped and murdered by parolee Richard Allen Davis on Oct. 1, 1993, and Kimber Reynolds, an 18year-old from Fresno murdered in 1992 during a pursesnatching incident, galvanized the “tough on crime” agenda

in California. In response, voters in 1994 approved Proposition 184, established to put violent career criminals behind bars for life. But in the nearly 20 years since “three strikes” went into effect, many nonviolent offenders have been swept up in an overreaching, anti-crime net. “We need prisons for people who prey upon society,” says John Abrahams, a retired

Sonoma County public defender who supports Proposition 36, a November ballot initiative that would reduce prison sentences served by qualified third-strikers whose current offense is a nonserious, nonviolent felony. “We don’t need to lock up people for life who steal pizza or bicycles from garages, or drug offenders, things like that.” Drafted by lawyers at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the Stanford Law School, the

Michael Amsler

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

initiative is modeled after successful “three strikes” sentencing policy implemented in Los Angeles County by District Attorney Steve Cooley. The Legislative Analyst’s Office estimates that Proposition 36 would save the state approximately $70 million a year in the beginning and $90 million yearly after that. Currently, there are 140,000 inmates in state prisons; 33,000 of those are second-strikers and 9,000 are third-strikers. Under Proposition 36, 2,800 thirdstrikers would be eligible for resentencing, potentially reducing their prison sentences from life in prison. Excluded from the measure are those whose previous crimes involved sex offenses, drug trafficking, homicide, firearms or weapons of mass destruction. Those fighting for “three strikes” reform say that an aging prison population is taxing the prison system, since prisoners over the age of 50 tend to have higher medical needs. The 2011 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that crowded conditions in California prisons amount to “cruel and unusual punishment” has compounded the crisis. Racial disparity in court sentencing is another area of concern, according to Elsa Chen, an associate professor of political science at Santa Clara University. At a Sept. 19 legislative hearing, Chen said that although AfricanAmericans make up just 6.2 percent of California’s population, they make up 34 percent of secondstrikers and 44 percent of thirdstrikers. African-Americans have a 47 percent higher chance of receiving third-strike sentencing than Caucasians. This disparity often originates at the county level, where the district attorney and judges have prosecutorial and judicial discretion over who receives a strike and who doesn’t. The opposition to Proposition 36 includes the California District Attorneys Association, the Peace Officers Research Association and Crime Victims United. Marc Klaas, father of Polly Klaas and founder of the KlaasKids Foundation for Children, says that while he initially thought “three strikes”

Sonoma County District Attorney Jill Ravich moderates a forum on propositions 34 and 36, with Steve Fabian, Marc Klaas and others on Sunday, Oct. 14, at Congregation Shomrei Torah, 2600 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. 3pm. Free. 707.578.5519..

Veto Machine On Sept. 30, the morning after sipping wine and hobnobbing with Sandy Weill, Nancy Pelosi and MasterCard CEO Ajaypal Singh Banga at the grand opening of the $145 million Green Music Center, Gov. Jerry Brown spent the next day denying protections for a poor, largely Latino population in vetoing the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights and the highly touted TRUST Act. Supported over the past year by marches, petitions and statements from celebrities like Amy Poehler, the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights would have legalized mandatory meal breaks, rest time and other labor protections for domestic workers, a predominantly female and immigrant workforce. The TRUST Act would have prohibited local sheriffs and police from cooperating with federal authorities to detain suspected illegal immigrants, with exceptions for those charged with a serious or violent felony. Some say Brown is using his many vetoes as leverage for Proposition 30, his November ballot initiative that would raise sales tax and impose higher tax rates on Californians making over $250,000 a year to fund education and public safety. The Los Angeles Times compared Brown’s vetoes to “a stern parent upbraiding a spendthrift child.” The bills Brown passed include one allowing young illegal immigrants to obtain driver’s licenses and one that outlaws socalled gay-to-straight “conversion” treatments. If the TRUST Act had passed, California would have been the first state in the nation to challenge the controversial Secure Communities program. The California Domestic Workers Coalition has vowed to continue pushing for labor protections for domestic workers. —Leilani Clark

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9 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

was too broad, his concerns have been addressed in multiple ways. “‘Three strikes’ is not about the final offense,” says Klaas. “‘Three strikes’ is about criminal history. Each of those individuals had a choice in their life, knowing full well that if they committed another crime they would find themselves in prison for life, but they chose to commit the crime anyway.” Klaas says the implementation of “three strikes” comes down to the ability of prosecutors to analyze the defendant’s history and determine how to prosecute. This is a system that works, he says. “The only reason for a person to vote for Proposition 36 is if they believe the criminal justice system has broken down,” adds Klaas. Steve Fabian, a Santa Rosa criminal defense attorney, says that, on the contrary, the criminal justice system is in crisis. He has concerns about the aging striker population. No “three strikes” offenders have been paroled since the law went into effect in 1994. “When you get old, the likelihood of recidivism starts dropping dramatically,” he says. “We’re warehousing people who are unlikely to commit more crimes. That’s forcing the release of young people who are more likely to commit crimes. How much do we want to spend to lock up someone who’s never committed a violent crime versus having rehabilitation programs?” If Proposition 36 becomes law, violent criminals like Richard Allen Davis would not qualify for re-sentencing. “California has the strictest and harshest ‘three strikes’ law in the country,” says Fabian. “The proposition is a minor fine-tuning of the law. If it passes, California would still have the strictest ‘three strikes’ law. It won’t overturn everything, but it will make changes.”

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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IAN MORRIS IN CONVERSATION WITH JANE SMILEY

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A

ccording to UC Berkeley professor Ignacio Chapela, the passage of Proposition 37 will not only restore the right to choose what foods we put in our bodies, but it may restore scientific process to its rightful place—something the bioengineering industry, with full assistance from the White House, removed. “The promises made by genetic engineering have not been fulfilled,” explains Chapela, a microbial biologist who was first to exposed the fact that genetically engineered corn was contaminating ancient strains of Mexican maize via crosspollinating. “Genetic engineering has proven to be wishful thinking, a dream that has failed.” Chapela considers himself fortunate to be able to speak out freely about GMO failings, since so many other scientists have been attacked or threatened or have lost employment for approaching

genetic engineering with a critical eye. “I would like to speak for those scientists,” says Chapela, “because they cannot.” When the first Bush administration instructed federal regulatory bodies to step aside and give the GE industry free reign, Chapela explains, there was no scientific scrutiny allowed. “It has been very hard to survive as a scientist who is a critical thinker now,” Chapela says. “The central dogma embedded in K-12 science textbooks indoctrinates young people to accept that genetic engineering is an inevitable part of life. It says all living things are driven by genes encoded in DNA, and that by manipulating that DNA we can create life, and mix, match and alter it the way we want it.” But this isn’t the way it actually plays out, says Chapela. “The reality is that genetic engineering is not working, any way you look at it.” What Proposition 37 offers consumers is the promise that all GMO foods will be labeled in California. What it offers scientists is a chance to scrutinize an industry that has intimidated them— sometimes to the point of ruining their careers—for questioning the validity of genetic engineering. “The Bush administration decided in the 1980s that genetic engineering was the next wave of economic development for the U.S. and for the world,” says Chapela. “We were instructed to look the other way.” Labeling GE foods may help science, which at present cannot investigate whether GE food consumption is related to rises in disease. “We have been sitting here in the dark, forbidden from looking,” says Chapela, who believes a GMO-labeling law will give us “the simple capacity to know and to do the science for the first time. I think we deserve it.” Ignacio Chapela speaks on Tuesday, Oct. 9, following a screening of the documentary ‘Scientists Under Attack.’ Napa Valley College Community Room, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy., Napa. 7pm. Free; donations accepted. More at preservenapasag@sbcglobal.net.

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NO ORDINARY FLAPJACK Pumpkin pancakes at Three Square contain just a slight hint of the expected cinnamon flavor.

Fair and Square Former Petite Syrah now serving ‘healthy comfort food’ as Three Squares Café BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

C

hef Josh Silvers made me raise my eyebrows when he said his new restaurant would feature “healthy comfort food.” The replacement of Petite Syrah in Santa Rosa’s Railroad Square would be a breakfast, lunch and dinner cafe with an oxymoronic focus? Face it, “healthy comfort food” sounds like a bad Food Network show, or at least a terrible magazine.

But Silvers has pulled it off. The change from dinner-only fine dining to a more casual, relaxed experience was inspired by the success of Jackson’s Bar and Oven, Silvers’ other restaurant a block away, which boasts a modern atmosphere and relatively inexpensive menu. Three Squares falls right in that zone. The inviting atmosphere, large windows, high barn-style ceiling and open kitchen give a feeling of dining in someone’s home. Breakfast service began last week, and already I wish it were

available at dinnertime. If it were, I’d order a filling plate of biscuits and gravy ($10.95)—the drop biscuits are perfect and the sausage gravy doesn’t weigh me down. Or I might get the matzo brei ($10.25), prepared, as Silvers says, “like my mom used to make it,” with scrambled eggs, matzo cracker, two potato pancakes with sides of sour cream, and applesauce (although I might suggest keeping a closer eye on the eggs, which were overdone on both dishes). Pancakes don’t usually excite

me, but pumpkin pancakes ($6.75–$7.75) proved too tempting to resist. Perfect for fall, these welltextured cakes have a rich, subtle pumpkin undertone that comes full circle when topped with mixed berry compote. Dinner has a similar menu to lunch, with starters and salads outweighing sandwich and entrée options. Starters show off the healthy aspect, with options like hummus, warmed olives or brocamole with pita chips. The salads, far from afterthoughts or accoutrements, can be ordered as a half or full portion, rotating seasonally. While it’s still available, go for the TQWAF (pronounced by the staff as “tee-kwahf”), an acronym for tomato, quinoa, watermelon, arugula and feta ($6.95–$11.95). The wonderfully sweet melon counters the bitter arugula, and it’s bathed in the juice of fresh tomato and cut with the tang of feta. The quinoa soaks up the combination of the juices, a delightful finish. Silvers seems to have a thing for fried oysters, seeing how they’re available at any time of day. The hangtown fry omelette ($10.95) and oyster po’ boy ($10.25) might be wonderful for those seeking a crispened mollusk for breakfast, lunch or dinner, but I am not one of those people, so I opted for the Italian sausage ($15.95) with peppers, onion and creamy polenta for dinner. It rides the line between gut-busting comfort food and holier-than-thou healthy, with polenta falling just this side of light and sausage that doesn’t quite drip with fat but still holds its own in flavor. Don’t forget dessert. Housemade ice cream is tempting, and the chocolate brownie sundae with chocolate and salted caramel ice cream ($7.95) is a knockout. And it doesn’t have to be your birthday to order the birthday cake ($7.95), served with a candle—the menu encourages to “ask what kind we made today.” Yes, it’s a mainstay, because, as Silvers puts it, “Birthdays are awesome.” Three Squares Café, 205 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. 707.545.4300.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Nicolas Grizzle

Dining

13

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

Dining

2nd Annual

Brewmaster Dinner Series

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y

LAGUNITAS BREWING CO. FRIDAY, OCT 12 Ron Lindenbusch, Chief Marketing Officer Hors d’Oeuvre Reception “Day Time” IPA

Bear Korean Restaurant Korean. $$. Authentic Korean home cooking in informal setting. Exciting array of side-dish condiments add extra oomph. Lunch and dinner daily. 8577 Gravenstein Hwy, Cotati. 707.794.9828.

MENU Thai Prawns, IPA Pasta with Wild Boar Ragú, The Censored Golden Copper Ale Glazed Beef Tagliata, Little Sumpin’ Wild Ale Cheese Platter, Maximus IPA

Carmen’s Burger Bar American. $. Excellent and innovative burgers with a Mexican flair. Beef comes fresh daily from Pacific Market next door. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 1612 Terrace (in Town and Country center), Santa Rosa. 707.579.3663.

Dierk’s Parkside Cafe

SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. FRIDAY, OCT 26 David Cato, Brewery Liason Hors d’Oeuvre Reception Old Chico Crystal Wheat

MENU Seared Scallop, Kellerweis Hefeweizen Lemon Risotto with Duck Confit, Estate Homegrown Ale Beer Braised Short Ribs, Torpedo Extra IPA Spiced Apple Crumb with Caramel Salted Ice Cream, Ovila Dubbel Receptions: 6:30 Dinners: 7:00 $ 60 plus tax & gratuity

reservations: 707.875.3652 or: reservations@innatthetides.com

NEW MENU

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4100 Montgomery Drive Ste C Corner of Montgomery & Summerfield *Dine-in only. Offer cannot be combined with any other promotion. Exp. 10-31-12. Not valid on major holidays.

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

arvest elebrations

The Tides Wharf 835 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay www.InnattheTides.com

Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Roasted Mushroom Gruyere Tartelette Petit Four Platter Full Catering Menu Available

American. $. Classic, fresh diner food in a comfortable diner setting. Ought to be in a movie. Breakfast and lunch daily. 404 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.573.5955.

El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868. Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian. $. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

La Gare French. $$$. Dine in an elegant atmosphere of Old World charm. Dinner, Wed-Sun 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4355. Old Chicago Pizza Pizza. $$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and

delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600.

Roberto’s Restaurant Italian. $$. Reliable home-style Italian cooking. Dinner, TuesSun. 4776 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0260.

Shiso Asian $$ Extensive modern Asian menu with emphasis on sushi–sashimi, nigiri and specialty rolls–made from local ingredients. Ask for the omakase. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat. 19161 Hwy 12, Sonoma. 707.933.9331. Sushi Tozai Japanese. $$. Spare, clean ambiance and some of the freshest sushi you’ll ever eat. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 7531 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9886. Toyo Japanese Grill Japanese. $$$. Well-crafted traditional Japanese with some modern extras like deep-fried mashed potato croquettes with mayo. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8871.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$. The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$. Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West

fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Casa Mañana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Chez Pierre FrenchItalian-American. $$. A former Denny’s turned Parisian bistro, with surprisingly competent cozy French favorites like escargot and chicken Cordon Bleu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7330 Redwood Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4233.

Easy Street Cafe American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Open for dinner daily. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.

Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Kellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-salad lunches. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

Busterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destinationâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;for a reason. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot!â&#x20AC;? Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panĂŠed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Fazerratiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

FumĂŠ Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

SMALL BITES

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in

Celebrate Harvest! Celebrat H r est!

Showing the Goods The SRJC has a farm, E-I-E-I-O. And on that farm they have some wine. And olive oil. And heirloom tomatoes. And . . . well, as expected, this song fell apart just after â&#x20AC;&#x153;wine.â&#x20AC;? There will be plenty to sing about at this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shone Farm 40th anniversary Fall Festival. The Santa Rosa Junior Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 365-acre farm, situated by the Russian River near Forestville, provides students with hands-on experience in growing, maintaining and marketing everything related to farming, from root vegetables to grapes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been more of a laboratory and teaching tool for students, but new dean of agriculture Dr. Ganesan Srinivasan hopes it can also be a money maker for the school. In addition to expanding the program, Srinivasan is focusing on marketing products produced at the farm, including its award-winning olive oil. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a delicate balance, because some of the major donors to the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;wineries, for instanceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;could end up being potential competition in the marketplace. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The key will be how we do it so it enriches student learning and is not perceived as competi=ng with local businesses,â&#x20AC;? says Srinivasan. In addition to lunch prepared by students, there will be tomato tasting, wood milling, hayrides, apple pressing, pumpkin picking and scarecrow making. The free festival takes place Saturday, Oct. 6, at Shone Farm. 7450 Steve Olson Lane, Forestville. 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3pm. Free. 707.887.2173.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen

magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.

15

October 5-7,2012

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

N A PA CO U N TY

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16



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Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;WCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

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Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

SONOMA CO U N TY Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Argenzio Winery Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

HKG Estate Far-flung outpost of iconic Russian River Valley winery Hop Kiln is a vision of its future: their best estate Chard and Pinot paired with delectable small bites, all made by a small crew of young vintners and chefs. Special Friday menu. 13647 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm; Fridays to 9pm. Tasting, $5; food pairing, $22. 707.938.7622.

John Tyler Wines For decades, the Bacigalupis have been selling prized grapes to the likes of Chateau Montelena and Williams Selyem. Now, the third-generation wine growers offer the pick of the vineyard in their own tasting room, brandnew in 2011. Graceful Pinot and sublime Zin. 4353 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open dail,y 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. Tastings $10. 707.473.0115. Moondance Cellars Dogs, Cabs and cars are the focus; when a supercharged 1965 Corvette is parked in front, the vintner is in the house. Also, Port and Sherry from Sonoma Valley Portworks. 14301 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Daily 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm. $5 tasting fee. 707.938.7550.

Pfendler Vineyards Petaluma Gap Chardonnay and Pinot have a milliondollar view, but winetasting is available at Vin Couture Lounge, 320 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. By appointment or Swirl After Six, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm, Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday. 707.431.8161.

River Road Vineyards Russian River Pinot for $18 at

no-nonsense, solid producer. 5220 Ross Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only, Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Friday. 707.887.8130.

Spann Vineyards Ninety percent of Spann wines are distributed out of state, leaving a little aside for this off-thePlaza tasting room. Malbec, Mourvedre and Mayacamas Cab; the take-home bargain is a $20 blend. Photography gallery adds visual interest. 111 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Open daily, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm. Tasting fee. 707.933.8343.

Two Amigos Wines One of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vino Brothersâ&#x20AC;? is a famous television commercial actor, but they look alike in plastic nose and Groucho glasses disguises. Goofy theme and good wine. Vitoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vino Bianco is a rich Roussanne; Guidoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vino Rosso a successful California Sangiovese. 25 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Open daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6pm. 707.799.7946.

N A PA CO U N TY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday, 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Chateau Montelena The winery triumphed at the 1976 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Judgment of Parisâ&#x20AC;? tasting where French judges, quelle horreur, found that they had awarded top honors to a California contender. 1429 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 9:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm. 707.942.5105.

Folie Ă  Deux A good picnic or party wine, the MĂŠnage Ă  Troisâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;white, red and rosĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;are tasty blends. 3070 N. St. Helena Hwy, St. Helena. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 1.800.473.4454. Phifer Pavitt Wines Lots of cowgirl sass but just one wine: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Date Nightâ&#x20AC;? Cabernet Sauvignon. Hale bale seating.

4660 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4787.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hallâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodgeâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gluttonous Flightâ&#x20AC;? pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Smith-Madrone Riesling is Smith-Madroneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main fame claim. Its Riesling has steadily gained fame while Napa Valley Riesling in general has become a rare antique. 4022 Spring Mountain Road, St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.2283. Taste at Oxbow Discover refreshing white varietals AlbariĂąo and Vermentino in stylish setting across from Oxbow Market, then move on to Pinot Noir from Carneros pioneer Mahoney Vineyards; Waterstone Wines, too. 708 First St., Napa. Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm; Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.265.9600. Truchard Vineyards (WC) No matter how attentive you are to the directions, no matter how much you study the quaint, hand-drawn map found online, no matter how vigilantly you watch the street addresses numerically climb along Old Sonoma Road, you will inevitably miss Truchard Vineyards. What follows is a three-point turn on a blind, two-lane road, with a single thought in your head: â&#x20AC;&#x153;This wine had better be worth the insurance deductible.â&#x20AC;? But with Cabernet this good, it is. 3234 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.253.7153.

17 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Naked Wines

100,000 angels can’t be wrong BY JAMES KNIGHT

V

irgin. Orgasmic. Naked. Those aren’t headlines ripped from the back page ads of an alt weekly. That’s Rowan Gormley’s résumé, ripped from the pages of Wikipedia. After leaving a financialservices gig in the employ of billionaire spaceman Richard Branson, Gormley launched an outfit called Orgasmic Wines, which Branson promptly bought in to and renamed Virgin Wines. Next, the South African– born entrepreneur formed Naked Wines in 2008. Now Gormley’s worldwide, social-media-styled experiment in wine marketing has landed in little old Kenwood.

I’m actually looking for St. Anne’s Crossing Winery when I find Gormley planted behind a small bar in a corner of the tasting room, flanked by a pair of young women in Naked Wines T-shirts. “Would you like a spot of rosé?” he asks. There’s nothing doing at the St. Anne’s bar, so why not? Old-timers may remember this place as the original home of St. Francis Winery, which still owns the surrounding vineyard. Later, Blackstone Winery made its quality-driven Sonoma Reserve wines here, but the bean counters at parent company Constellation sold the old shack to Healdsburg’s Wilson Winery, which has lately added St. Anne’s Crossing to its burgeoning brood. We’ll check on them later. The Naked folks lease the production space and share the tasting room. Naked Wines is an innovative mix of Kickstarter-type investing and web marketing. Investors, called “angels,” natch, sign up to the tune of $40 a month. In turn, they receive deep discounts on wine, up to 60 percent. In turn, client winemakers receive loans to help start their business. The catch is that their product is sold only through Naked’s website, and at select locations in the U.K., Australia and Kenwood, Calif. Customers recommend their purchases to others and leave comments, which may be promptly answered by the winemakers. The smallest is a Catalonian who doles out just 120 bottles a year; the largest produces 500,000 cases. “Winemakers are a bit like chefs,” Gormley says. “They all want to do their own thing.” What they don’t want to do is marketing. This is not a vanity crush operation geared to beginners, but rather to people like Ken Deis, former winemaker of 37 years at Flora Springs, who makes a 2011 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($29.99) that’s perfectly smooth and delicious. The nicely priced Sin Fronteras 2011 Tempranillo ($11.99), from Piña assistant winemaker Macario Montoya, has bright, forward red cherry fruit. Wines from Spain, Australia and New Zealand are available, too, and you needn’t get naked to enjoy them—shedding as little as $10 gets your feet wet. Naked Wines, 8450 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Open daily, 11am– 5pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.408.0011.

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Michael Amsler

18

GROUP HOME Matt Moller, co-owner of WORK in Petaluma, mixes it up in the ‘unoffice.’

Workers United

Coworking: where ‘do-it-yourself’ becomes ‘do-it-together’ BY LEILANI CLARK

I

t’s a bright morning in September, and WORK, a new coworking space in downtown Petaluma, bustles with members busy on projects and tasks. At one desk, a book editor combs through his latest batch of manuscripts. At a large white table nearby, an event planner maps out details for a client. Everybody here works under the same roof, yet they’re performing seemingly unrelated jobs, with no apparent job supervisor.

It’s all in a day’s work in the sunny and spacious former law office, decorated in midcentury modern décor, where Stereolab plays in the lobby and tall windows look out to the world beyond. Like many a good idea, WORK was born of necessity. After struggling to find alternatives to the traditional office, which can be expensive to rent and maintain individually, Natasha Juliana— who owns the space with her husband, Matt Moller—thought the time was right to implement coworking in her hometown. “I first heard about coworking on NPR a couple of years ago,” says Juliana, as we talk over

pastries and coffee at a communal table in the cheery main room. “I started doing some research and saw how booming and popular cowork spaces were in the Bay Area. I looked at the demographic of the people we knew in Petaluma, and there were a lot of ex–San Franciscans, people who were commuting or working from home or starting their own businesses.” But what exactly is coworking? According to online magazine Deskmag, coworking is the use of a shared workspace by independent entrepreneurs, freelancers and creative and tech professionals as their place of business. In other words, it’s a way

to get out of the house and into an environment that can be more productive, for reasons including access to a wider community and an environment focused on getting things done. The cost for a coworking space ranges from $100 to $400 a month, depending on the choice of membership level. That’s a price that usually includes Wi-Fi, coffee, copies, fax, mailing services, designated desk space and, last but not least, companionship with other workers, even if they aren’t in the same business. “If you’re looking for a community of fellow entrepreneurs to be around, coworking spaces are ideal places to work,” says Genevieve DeGuzman, co-author of Working in the ‘UnOffice’: A Guide to Coworking for Indie Workers, Small Businesses, and Nonprofits. “It’s the camaraderie that sets it apart from other remote work locations. You’re no longer just getting that startup or freelance career off in your lonely little bubble. Now you have a tribe—people to be around without the office politics.”

C

oworking is a trend that’s only growing, in part attributed to the fact that more people in the new century are either working for themselves or telecommuting to their jobs. Environmental consciousness and economic realities have led many people on the path to commuting less and using time once spent in the car to work more efficiently. According to the Second Annual Global Coworking Survey, in 2006 there were only 30 coworking spaces in operation in the world. As of 2012, there are now 1,779 around the globe. Considering its history of innovative, creative and technological thought experiments—the type of thinking that leads to Facebook, Google and Twitter, all headquartered in the Bay—it’s no surprise that coworking has taken off in San Francisco. The origin myth credits Brad Neuberg, a computer programmer who now works for Google, as the first to coin the word “cowork” when he initiated

O

nce the jump is made into a more communal space, the results seem to turn coworkers into evangelists for the cause. Ralph Scott, a book editor who became a member at WORK in Petaluma when it opened in July 2012, says that his productivity has gone up at least 35 percent. “If someone is dealing with a work-related problem or creative hold-up, you’ve got a brain trust in here that can probably figure it out,” says Scott. Barry Stump, 35, lives in

Michael Amsler

Petaluma with his wife and kids. He’s a mobile app developer whose most recent project, Smart Ride, was crowned by Time magazine as one of the 50 best iPhone Apps for 2012. Stump says that after struggling to be productive in his home office, and suffering the social isolation of not getting out of the house much, the coworking experience has been a refreshing change. “It’s been nice to get up, go somewhere else and get my work done.” Inspiration from other WORK members is another plus. Stump describes how a woman who was working on a locationbased mobile gaming company wandered in one day; she was tired of working out of coffee shops. He ended up getting into a discussion with her about her project, learning new concepts along the way. “It’s really cool, the stuff that people are working on,” says Stump. “And occasionally, something will come up that I have knowledge about and I can say, ‘Here, let me help you.’” Kelly Rajala of the Share Exchange, a cowork/small business incubator in downtown Santa Rosa with about 20 active members, says that it’s been a slow go for the North Bay to embrace the idea of working outside the home. “We’re at the beginning stage,” says Rajala. “It’s hard to be at the beginning of the curve.” Still, Rajala maintains faith that coworking will pick up speed. By press time, the Share Exchange coworking space will have expanded next door into a 3,000square-foot location formerly home to the Exchange Bank’s auditing department. It will boast three conference rooms, private offices for rent and more dedicated desk space. Rajala says that the expansion opens up possibilities for current members, which include graphic designers, an economist, a civil engineer, a sustainability consultant, a fiction writer, a venture capitalist and leaders from the North Bay Organizing Project—a list of talents that could very well change the world. It will also allow for the development of

19

COFFEE BREAK Among the benefits of coworking is the opportunity to bounce one’s ideas off of other professionals in different fields.

new memberships; she’d like to see the number rise to 50. While some remain attached to working at home, people can be more productive when they change scenery, says Rajala. “It’s definitely more productive and more focused,” she explains. “They save money since coworking is less expensive than renting an office space. It provides great networking. People form new relationships. They make new business contacts.” Another possibly unforeseen benefit of coworking is the promise of “accelerated or planned serendipity.” That’s something Michael Newell, the outgoing executive director at North Bay iHub, sees quite often at the Sonoma Mountain Business Cluster coworking space. “We can’t tell you how or when it’s going to happen, but it will,” says Newell. “We’re starting to see all kinds of interesting people, and they’re starting to work together.” Newell tells the story of two members, a sport-board enthusiast and a wine exporter who’ve embarked on a joint project and are now “joined at the hip.” “It’s more flexible than the traditional office space,” says Kari Danskin, North Bay iHub’s office manager. Like most cowork

businesses, there’s a room with a printer, fax machine and mail system. Donated cubicles and long, wide tables make up the workspace. A few casual chairs and tables are available for informal meetings, and a flatscreen TV displays the latest Wall Street statistics on a ticker.

O

n the day that I visit the Sebastopol Entrepreneurs Project (SEP), a small cowork space located in the bowels of the United Methodist Church, Santa Rosa resident Jared White is deeply focused on his new business, a self-serve webpublishing platform. White says that he looked at a few different cowork spaces and settled on this one because of the location and price. The ability to work outside the home has made him more productive and has even resulted in collaboration with another coworker, he says. “There’s a feeling of being part of a tribe, even if you just get to know someone a little bit,” explains White. “It’s like, ‘Hey, I’m trying to run a business and you’re trying to run a business, and we’re all in this big pond together.’ People who are self-employed can feel really isolated ) 20 and disconnected, and

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

the Spiral Muse CoWorking Group in 2005. The group offered eight desks, meditation classes, group lunches and yoga. San Francisco now has more than 20 active coworking spaces, with names like Citizen Space, Sandbox Suites and the Hatchery. As coworking takes off in urban centers, is the more suburban and spread-out North Bay ready to get in on the action? Sonoma County is currently home to four official cowork spaces, so signs point to yes, though two earlier attempts, SoCo Depot in Penngrove and Bzhive in Marin, closed within two years of opening. Anthony Tusler, a 65-year-old Penngrove resident, was one of the founders of SoCo Dept, which closed its doors in 2009. Tusler says that the space fell victim to a bad economy, but he still believes that the coworking model is effective. “The biggest thing that I found out is how productive I am in that setting,” says Tusler. “For me, it’s not about doing the dishes or doing the gardening at home that distracts me. There’s just something about being at home that makes it hard for me to get into that hardcore work mode.” The challenges to keeping a space going are economics, getting the word out and getting people in the door, Tusler says, adding that it can be a hurdle for people to leave their home office because then they have to admit that something, somewhere, is lacking. “It’s a major commitment, because it’s a shift in how you see who you are and how you work,” he says.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

20

Coworking in the North Bay WORK Petaluma Membership rates run $125 to $375 monthly; day pass, $20. Members have 24/7 access; meetings rooms available for rent. 10 Fourth St., Petaluma. 707.721.6540. The Share Exchange Membership rates, $100–$400 for a private office; day passes for $20. Access for members is 24/7; meeting room rentals. 533 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. 707.583.7667. North Bay iHub Membership rates run from $175–$300 monthly; $15 day pass. Full members have 24/7 access; meeting room rentals available. 1300 Valley House Drive, Rohnert Park. 707.794.1240. Sebastopol Entrepreneurs Project Membership rate is $130 for long-term monthly rental; day pass, $7. Members have 24/7 access. 500 N. Main St., Sebastopol. 707.829.0669.

Workers United ( 19 coworking is a solution to that.” Kathleen Shaffer, a Sebastopol City Council member and one of the founders of SEP, says that the idea initially came from David Hehman of the North Bay Angels, a group of executives and professionals that supports entrepreneurship. “He said, I don’t understand why you don’t have some kind of incubator, cowork space in Sebastopol, because you have lots of people working out of their homes. And we do—we have lots of entrepreneurs, lots of small businesses and lots of ideas floating around out there,” says Shaffer. Sebastopol Entrepreneurs Project offers monthly classes and discussion groups on topics like Quickbooks and time management. Classes are held at the O’Reilly Media headquarters. Shaffer says that since the space opened in July 2011, they’ve attracted fewer flexible dayworkers and more clientele with serious business ideas and a need for long-term, affordable office space. A key to coworking success is building a community that goes

beyond the idea of work. Like SEP, WORK in Petaluma not only offers classes but also happy hour mixers, where members can get to know each other more casually over Moscow Mules and music on the stereo. The Share Exchange provides free business mentoring on certain days of the week and classes on the legal and financial aspects of owning a small business. Programs and events are a huge factor in the success of a coworking space, says Genevieve DeGuzman. And really, collaboration and community truly do transform work from drudgery into fun. It’s a new way of looking at how to work, in the midst of a tech revolution that has freed many former “desk jockeys” from the traditional office space. “It’s great for people seeking to get out of the hermetic enclosures of their homes, who need to be around people to work and want to plant roots in a community of fellow entrepreneurs,” says DeGuzman. “Coworking is really about getting away from the old model of working and looking at work and life more collaboratively. Great ideas come out of the churn of working alongside others.”

Crush O C C I D E N TA L

GLEN ELLEN

Flapper Fancy

White Beard

Doris Bailey Murphy was a beloved figure around Occidental when she died in 2011. But before moving out West, Murphy lived a life of adventure from early on. Amazingly, Occidental’s late grand dame began keeping diaries when she was just 15 years old—by her own account, a wild, skirt-raising, boychasing child of the Roaring Twenties. Murphy’s grand-niece, journalist and blogger Julia Park Tracey, has taken on the task of preserving her aunt’s legacy by collecting those early journals, along with commentary, footnotes and original photos from Murphy’s fun-filled days of yore during the prime years of the Jazz Age. The result is the book I’ve Got Some Lovin’ to Do: The Diary of a Roaring Twenties Teen 1925–1926. Celebrate the book on Sunday, Oct. 7, at the Occidental Center for the Arts. 3850 Doris Murphy Court, Occidental. 4pm. Free. 707.874.9392.

You know how everybody has at least one star impersonation that they can pull out as party entertainment? I’m just gonna come out and humble-brag about my damn good Michael McDonald, especially from the “What a Fool Believes” era. It’s a crowd pleaser. Of course, the Michael McDonald played by the dude on “Yacht Rock” blows my Michael out of the water, but he kind of cheats since he gets to lip-sync his way through the “World’s Greatest Back-Up Singer.” (That’s true, by the way—just listen to Steely Dan’s “Peg.”) Try it for yourself! Close up your throat a little and force those notes to come out low, deep and smooth. Or just go see the real Michael McDonald when he sings with the Doobie Brothers for the first time in years on Saturday, Oct. 6, at the B.R. Cohn Fall Music Festival. (Festival runs Oct. 6–7; other performers include Buddy Guy, Kenny Loggins, Dave Mason and others.) 15000 Sonoma Hwy., Glen Ellen. 11:15am-6pm. $85. 888.330.4064.

SA N R A FA E L

Learn Hard One of my least favorite songs from the ’80s has got to be “Word Up!” by Cameo. When I hear that synthesized Wild West whistle leading into an ugly “ow,” followed by the painfully affected singing of Larry Blackmon, it’s time to change the station. Luckily, the Word Up! Fair at the Marin Center Exhibit Hall has nothing to do with Cameo and everything to do with an appreciation of lifelong learning. The festival features five “Learning Lounges,” and this year’s speakers include Ian Morris and Jane Smiley. It’s all sponsored by Literacyworks. Book it to the Word Up! Fair on Sunday, Oct. 7, at the Marin Center. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. Free. 11am–5pm. 707.981.8086.

FORESTVILLE

Gourd Season In the words of the McSweeney’s column by Colin Nissan, it’s decorative gourd season, motherfuckers! It’s time to get out those multicolored leaves and fill the house with mutant squash. It’s time to jam a wicker basket with an insanely ornate assortment of shellacked vegetables. It’s time to make that shit look so seasonal. But it’s also time to get serious and go see some actual gourd art, all to benefit Food for Thought, the HIV/ AIDS food bank. Calabash: A Festival of Gourds, Art and Gardens gets underway on Sunday, Oct. 7, at Food for Thought. 6550 Railroad Ave., Forestville. 1pm. $45–$50. 707.887.1647.

—Leilani Clark GOLD DUST WOMAN Stevie Nicks comes to the Mill Valley Film Fest Oct. 12. See Film, p31.

21 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

22

ArtsIdeas VAMPIRES TO VAGABONDS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Twilightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; star Kristen Stewart has been cast in a ďŹ lm adaptation of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;On the Road.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

The Myth Endures Jack Kerouac is poised to become the all-time iconic American writer BY JONAH RASKIN

W

hat is it about Jack Kerouac? Why have generations ďŹ&#x201A;ocked repeatedly to his landmark On the Road for inspiration ever since it was ďŹ rst published? Why do biographers continue to write books about him? And why have moviemakers always sought to turn his novels into ďŹ lms?

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no better time than now to answer these questions about the man. Kerouac was born in 1922 and died from internal bleeding in 1969 at the age of 47 in the house he shared with his third wife, Stella, and his mother, Gabrielle, who taught him how to tell a good story. Fifty-ďŹ ve years after it became a bestseller, On the Road comes to movie screens later this year, when teens ďŹ&#x201A;ocking to see Kristen Stewartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s topless scenes will be

exposed to the author anew. A cinematic version of Kerouacâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Sur is on its way, too, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a forthcoming feature ďŹ lm, Kill Your Darlings, about Kerouac and his buddies that stars Jack Huston as Jack Kerouac, and Daniel Radcliffe as Allen Ginsberg. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a new biography out by Kerouacâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ex-lover Joyce Johnson titled The Voice Is All (Viking; $32.95), which recounts his evolution as a writer but doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell all about his personal

life. Johnson did that already in her memoir, Minor Characters, and in a collection of her correspondence with Kerouac called Door Wide Open. In one of her letters to him, Johnson wrote, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m your girl, your mistress, or whatever.â&#x20AC;? She added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The door is still open always.â&#x20AC;? Johnson was not the only woman to feel so intensely about him. Even when he was living with Johnson in her New York apartment, he pursued other women. Married three times, with dozens of girlfriends, mistresses and whatever, Kerouac appealed to women because they could see him as the little boy who needed to be rescued from his own worst habits or the handsome lover who promised the wildest nights of uninhibited sex and existential adventures. He also appealed to men, to whom he might seem like an older brother they always wanted to have. In On the Road, he advertised himself and his friends as saintly outlaws who wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t and couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop doing whatever they did. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time,â&#x20AC;? he wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars.â&#x20AC;? Kerouac was a roman candle who exploded from too much sex, too much travel, too many illicit drugs, especially speed, and too much writing. Like Jack London, whom he revered and wanted to emulate, he burned himself up and burned himself out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would rather be ashes than dust,â&#x20AC;? London said. Kerouac felt exactly the same way.

23 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

London died at 40. Kerouac lived seven more years than London and wrote books until the end, most of which are in print and most of them widely unread, including masterpieces like Visions of Cody in which he experimented with the English language, writing long sentences like “But the latest and perhaps really, next to Mexico and the jazz tea high I’ll tell in a minute, best, vision, along on high, but under entirely different circumstances, was the vision I had of Cody.” Speaking by phone to the Bohemian, Joyce Johnson says she wishes Americans would turn to Visions of Cody, Dr. Sax and The Subterraneans. “They’re all really wonderful novels,” she says. “Perhaps the movies about Jack and my biography will encourage readers to discover the vast library of books that he wrote.” Kerouac fans have usually read his novels as fictionalized autobiographies, a habit he encouraged when he described his work as “true-story novels.” Biographers have on the whole added to the myths about the man, and though Johnson tries very hard in her biography to separate fact from fiction, it’s too late in the game for that. The forthcoming movies seem guaranteed to magnify the myths and turn Kerouac even more than ever before into an American icon. Maybe that’s a good thing. After all, Jack Kerouac is our Dostoevsky, our Marcel Proust. He was also a major con artist who may even have conned himself into believing that he wrote his novels spontaneously and never changed a word. If you want proof that he revised, you have only to compare the “scroll edition” of On the Road with the standard edition first published in 1957. There’s a world of difference. William Burroughs once said that Kerouac sold “a million pairs of Levis.” Indeed, his lifestyle was contagious. He also knew how to write a bestseller. On The Road keeps on selling, its appeal assured, with no end in sight.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

by

Alice Childress

October 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, at 8:00 PM October 6, 7, 13, 14, at 2:00 PM Recommended for age 14 and above.

Santa Rosa Junior College, Newman Auditorium

THEATRE

SEASON

2012/2013

Emeritus Hall, oďŹ&#x20AC; Elliott Ave, Santa Rosa Campus TICKETS ONLINE www.santarosa.edu/theatrearts TICKETS $10-$15 BOX OFFICE 707.527.4343 Permission granted by Flora Roberts, Inc., 275 Seventh Ave., 26th Floor, New York, NY 10001.

SINGULAR A new production takes

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Heavy Load

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Elephant Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; a little too ambitious BY DAVID TEMPLETON

TM

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ohn Merrick, a sensitive soul with a poetic nature, was born into poverty in Victorian London, doomed to exist in a body so wracked and deformed that he spent his ďŹ rst 21 years in workhouses and freak shows. Widely known as the Elephant Man, Merrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tragic true story has been told many ways over the years, including the atmospheric Oscar-nominated David Lynch ďŹ lm in 1980. The Elephant Man, by What a Show productions, running through Oct. 13 at the Spreckels Center in Rohnert Park, is not the elegant 1979 Tony-winning play by Bernard Pomerance. With a script lifted verbatim from the movie version, and with full monster makeup for Merrick, directorproducer Scott van der Horst attempts to transfer the emotional power of the Lynch movie onto the stage. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a compelling idea, but

as orchestrated by van der Horst (who skillfully shepherded recent hits such as Spring Awakening and Les MisĂŠrables), the ambitious but misguided enterprise fails spectacularly. The assaulting, full immersion, pre-show â&#x20AC;&#x153;entertainment,â&#x20AC;? with a 19th-century carnival theme, has a dozen actorsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;barkers, panhandlers, bearded ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; populating the theater as audience members arrive, ďŹ lling the room with noise, characters shrieking, screaming and demanding money. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like the Dickens Faire of the Damned. Then the play begins. In the Lynch ďŹ lm, there are many short scenes, set in many different locations. Mystifyingly, van der Horst attempts the same thing onstage, resulting in scenes that sometimes last a mere 90 seconds followed by scenery changes that can last up to three or four minutes. There are so many noisy, clunky scene changes, in fact, that the play is never allowed to build any real dramatic momentum, despite some spirited performances, and the whole ungainly endeavor balloons to nearly three hours. Additionally, a sense of uncertainty and disorganization permeates the production, with actors frequently exiting in one direction only to stop and head in another. Fortunately, to play Merrick, van der Horst has recruited one of Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best young actors, Peter Warden (last seen in Main Stage Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Spoon), who dons pounds of prosthetic Elephant Man headgear. Warden gives an expressive, committed, heart-rending performance, transforming his body and voice, and projecting a sense of wounded nobility even while working beneath all that artiďŹ cial foam and rubber. Unfortunately, his performance is virtually crushed beneath the overreaching clutter and stunning clumsiness of the production. The result is one of the most memorable performances of the season in one of the most forgettable productions all year. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Elephant Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday through Oct. 13 at the Spreckels Center. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; 5pm matinees on Sundays. $12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 707.588.3400.

LEGACY Dustin Hoffman, Helen Hunt, Ben Affleck, Ang Lee and others visit Marin this week and next.

Big Stars A major, celebrity-studded Mill Valley Film Festival BY DAVID TEMPLETON

R

aymond “Rain Man” Babbitt, Karl “Sling Blade” Childers and Matt “Daredevil” Murdock all walk into a bar. The bartender looks up and says, “What is this, the Mill Valley Film Festival?”

The answer is yes! Though Rain Man, Sling Blade and Daredevil are not in the festival this year, the stars of those memorable films—Dustin Hoffman, Billy Bob Thornton and Ben Affleck—definitely are, live and in person, each accompanying a shiny new print of their latest work. Affleck brings his much anticipated political thriller Argo, Thornton’s got his Southern/ English drama Jayne Mansfield’s Car and Hoffman screens his directorial debut, the classical comedy Quartet. Celebrating its 35th anniversary, the MVFF is pulling in some true star

CATHERINE CA AT THER RINE

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SHAWKAT BRODY power for a massively varied festival to take place all over Marin County. In addition to those already mentioned, attendees will have the opportunity to see singer Stevie Nicks (Stevie Nicks: In Your Dreams), director Ken Burns (The Central Park Five), director Ang Lee (Life of Pi), Bradley Cooper, appearing with his new film Silver Linings Playbook, Helen Hunt and John Hawkes (The Sessions), Sam Rockwell and writerdirector Martin McDonagh (Seven Psychopaths), producer Jeffrey Katzenberg (Rise of the Guardians), actor-director Matthew Lillard (Fat Kid Rules the World), director Mira Nair (The Reluctant Fundamentalist), director Rob Nilsson (Maelstrom) and many others, from long-lasting legends whose names you might have forgotten to first-time filmmakers whose names you haven’t heard of . . . yet. And speaking of star power, in addition to the hundred-plus films scheduled—and along with a dazzling series of parties, lectures, concerts, panels and receptions—this year’s MVFF is also celebrating another notable 35th birthday, that of Star Wars (since renamed with some extra words and Roman numerals—Ed.), which will be screened amid much costumed hoopla and galactic glee at Century Cinema in Corte Madera (Oct. 8 at 6pm). Film festivals, like street-corner artists, draw all kinds of people, and for every patron ponying up the bucks to rub shoulders with stars, there are many more eager to simply watch the movies— especially tiny, unknown gems unlikely to appear in theaters anywhere else. Such films are the result of a year of cinematic detective work on the part of festival programmer Zoe Elton, whose tastes are appropriately varied. Among her more fascinating finds are Nancy Kelly and Kenji Yamamoto’s stunning documentary Rebels with a Cause, about the activists who saved Pt. Reyes National Seashore from development. As Karl Childers himself might say, “Mmmmmmmmmm.” This year’s Mill Valley Film Festival runs Oct. 4–14 with dozens of screenings and celebrity guests; see www.mvff.com for full schedule.

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26

BETTING THE FARM Donnie and Joe Emerson, and, oh, those collars!

LightsOn When musical rediscovery goes right BY GABE MELINE = F F ;ÝD L J @ :Ý8 I KÝ: F D D L E @ K P

Gaia’s Garden International Vegetarian Buffet Wed, Oct 3, 8pmsSmooth Jazz

Shade &RI /CT PMsJazz with a Twist!

Brulee Sat, Oct 6, 8pm Rockin' Band, Great Vocals

The Harvest Band Now Wed, Oct 10, 7:30pm Raucous Music, Rare Instruments

8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE YOUTH AND FAMILY 7–10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Wed, Oct 3

Thur, Oct 4 7:15–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club

Fri, Oct 5 7–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise WEST COAST SWING PARTY with Steve Luther

Sat, Oct 6 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise Circle N’ Squares HOEDOWN

French Session &RI /CT PMs'$5 cover Monkey Fight Comedy Cartel

Slip Goose Monkey Improv Group Sat, Oct 13, 7:30pm Rock, Reggae, Van, Dead

Robin Rogers' Festival of Friends Wed, Oct 17, 9pm

Comedy Open Mic Helen Pachynski, emcee &INE"EERS7INESs$ 4 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price Open 7 days a week, 11:30am-9:30pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa 707.54 4.2491 www.gaiasgardenonline.com

Sun, Oct 7 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5pm–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING

7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 4:30-5:30pm; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING

Tues, Oct 9 7:30–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Mon, Oct 8

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

T

he Light in the Attic guys were in town last week, and no, that’s not a Shel Silverstein fan club; rather, it’s a Seattlebased record label responsible for reissuing lost classics, both well-known (the Louvin Brothers’ Satan Is Real) and obscure (the Lialeh soundtrack, anyone?).

Currently, Light in the Attic is enjoying tremendous success with the albums of Rodriguez, a Detroit musician many have rediscovered through the documentary film Searching for Sugar Man, in theaters now. Much of the film takes place in South Africa, where, amid 1970s apartheid, Rodriguez was as famous as the Rolling Stones—and where, in the days before the internet made factchecking such rumors simpler, he was said to have committed suicide onstage. Here in America, Rodriguez was a flop. (His record company

executive estimates his total U.S. sales at “six.”) I won’t ruin the documentary, other than to say that, although Rodriguez’s rediscovery is a familiar story, and the minutiae of the hunt threatens its momentum, the film’s payoff is one of the most joyous things to be seen in a movie theater this year. Rodriguez himself must be joyous, too. Forty years after his albums Cold Fact and Coming from Reality tanked, Light in the Attic has been able to write Rodriguez his first-ever royalty checks. “He’s easily our biggest seller right now,” said Light in the Attic’s Josh Wright, sipping a beer at the Last Record Store in Santa Rosa while the clerks bought even more copies from the back of his van. Matt Sullivan, label founder, was poring through the vinyl bins. “This is my favorite album of the year,” he said, holding a copy of Dreamin’ Wild by Donnie and Joe Emerson. And then the story came: two isolated teenagers growing up on the family farm in rural Washington showed enough musical promise that their dad— “the greatest dad in the world,” said Sullivan—took out a loan to buy his sons new equipment and to build a top-notch recording studio on the property. The year was 1979. The resulting record sold very, very poorly. To pay off the loan, the Emersons’ dad literally lost the farm, selling 1,500 acres of land. Here’s the big question—and it’s applicable to any feel-good story of musical rediscovery—is the music any good? I bought a cassette of Dreamin’ Wild off Sullivan, and it’s the best five bucks I’ve spent all month. The brothers’ only exposure to music was a tinny AM radio in the family tractor, and their own songs reflect this rural innocence. “Baby,” in particular, is filled with wide-eyed mystique, a twochord masterpiece that, thanks to Light in the Attic, has been covered by Ariel Pink and used for a key scene in Celeste and Jesse Forever. While Rodriguez’s music channels Bob Dylan, Cat Stevens and other familiar stars of the era, Dreamin’ Wild seems to exist in its own universe—a slice of purity in a pre-fab world.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Jason Robert Brown Composer and lyricist joins forces with the Roustabout Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apprentice Program. Oct 5, 8pm. $30-$35. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Imagination Movers Emmy award-winning quintet from the Disney Channel TV series of the same name present high-octane family fun. Oct 6, 6:30pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Kronos Quartet Famed quartet performs world premiere composition by Edmund Campion in SR Symphonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Classical Series Opener. Oct 6, 8pm, Oct 7, 3pm and Oct 8, 8pm. $20-$75. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

North Bay Alt-Pop Party Collection of local bands includes Midori Longo and Ezra Boy, Stomacher, These Paper Satellites, Ian Johnson, Fear the Few and Moura. Oct 5, 7:30pm. $8-$10. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Debussy, Chopin and others. Oct 7, 4pm. $18-$20. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

NAPA COUNTY Endrah Brazilian metal band, composed of SSU grad Ryan â&#x20AC;&#x153;Relentlessâ&#x20AC;? Raes and three black belt-level MMA fighters. Oct 8. Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant, 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Jason Bonhamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Led Zeppelin Experience

Unforgettable Hits from Nat King Cole NVC professors joined by Michael Parsons Jazz Trio to perform iconic singerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hits. Oct 7, 7:30pm. Napa Valley College, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY

Son of legendary drummer John Bonham plays tribute to his father to coincide with the 30th anniversary of Led Zeppelin memberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death. Oct 5, 8pm. $55. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Aqus Cafe

The Outlaws

Oct 5, North Bay Alt-Pop Party with Midori Longo and Ezra Boy, Stomacher, These Paper Satellites, Ian Johnson, Fear the Few and Moura. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Southern rock legends play favorites from their platinumand-gold collection with Lansdale Station. Oct 3, 8pm. $35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Steve Vai with Beverly McClellan Guitarist and composer plays

First Wednesday of every month, Chamber Music. Second Wednesday of every month, Jazz Jam. First Thursday of every month, Celtic Night. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Theater

Aubergine Oct 5, Peck the Town Crier with Fox and Woman. Oct 6, Mecuryville and ) Dodgy Mountain

28

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NORTH N ORTH BAY BAY POETRY POETRY SLAM SLAM +DAVID + DAVID P PEREZ EREZ

$$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 7:45PM/ALL 7: 45PM /ALL AGES AGES MON MON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; OCT OCT 8 W WEEKLY EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S REGGAE R EGGAE / DANCEHALL DANCEHALL / HIP HIP H HOP OP

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Mr Music presents retrospective as part of First Friday Live. Oct 5, 7pm. $5, $10. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

FEATURING F EATURING B BERNIE E R NIE W WORRELL, ORRELL,

W WALLY ALLY INGRAM, INGRAM, & ANDY ANDY HESS HESS $$25 25 /DOORS / DOORS 88PM/21+ PM /21+ WEEKLY W EE EK KLY E EVENT VENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

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Steve Kimock & Bernie Worrell

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Innovative guitarist plays in special band with Parliament founder and master keyboardist. Oct 10, 8pm. $25. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

$4 $ 4 JAMESON JAMESON & ORGANIC O R G AN I C YERBA YERBA MATE MATE COCKTAILS COCK TAILS $$10 10 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

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CHARLIE C HARLIE MUSSELWHITE MUSSELWHITE H E

Tower Thunder Original composition by Tony Zilincik features improvisation by Petaluma students to benefit Music in the Schools. Oct 7, 4pm. $100. Ann Hamiltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tower, Oliver Ranch, Geyserville.

+T THE HE BLUE BLUE D DEVILS E VIL S

((WITH WITH S SONNY ONNY LLOWE OW E & D DANNY AN N Y H HUKILL) UKILL) $30/DOORS $3 0 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SAT SAT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; OCT OCT 13 13

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SOL S OL HO HORIZON RIZON $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

MARIN COUNTY Lauded composer and pianist performs selections from

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Songs of John Lennon

Sarah Cahill

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FIYAH FIYAH Capleton plays 19 Broadway on Oct. 5.

See Clubs, p29.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

27

selections from latest album â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Story of Lightâ&#x20AC;? while â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Voiceâ&#x20AC;? finalist accompanies him. Oct 7, 8pm. $50. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Music ( 27

28 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE Kristen Loken

Men. Oct 7, Diane Patterson and Sasha Rose. Oct 9, Bruce Klein. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Flamingo Lounge Tues, Swing Dancing with Lessons. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Green Music Center 1029 Oct 3, SSU Faculty Jazz Ensemble. SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

Hopmonk Tavern Oct 4, Will Magid Trio. Oct 5, North Bay Hootenanny with Pat Jordan, Matt Zeltzer and Girls and Boys. Oct 8, Brother Culture and DJ Sep. Oct 10, Steve Kimock featuring Bernie Worrell, Wally Ingram and Andy Hess. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Lagunitas Tap Room Oct 3, Blue Ribbon Healers. Oct 4, Amy McCarley. Oct 5, Brothers of Siren. Oct 6, Remedies. Oct 7, Ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Misbehavinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Oct 10, Welcome Matt. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon

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Oct 5, Mofo Party Band. Oct 6, Sam Andrew Band. Oct 7, Don Neelyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rhythm Aces with T. R.A.D. J.A.S.S. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pick-MeUp Revue. Thurs, Open Mic. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

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3!4s0-$//23s!$6$/3s PINK FLOYD TRIBUTE BAND

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HOWLIN RAIN

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Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

SUNBURST SOUND

&2)s0-$//23s!$6$/3s TOM PETTY TRIBUTE BAND

PETTY THEFT

3!4s7PM DOORSs!$6$/3s BLUES/ROCK MUSICALLY MODIFIED PRESENTS

LESTER CHAMBERS & THE MUDSTOMPER & ZION LION

BENEFIT FOR PROP 37: LABEL GMOS SILENT AUCTION

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Oct 4, Susan Sutton. Oct 5, Vernelle Anders. Oct 6, Yancie Taylor. Oct 7, Gwen â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sugar Mamaâ&#x20AC;? Avery. Oct 9, Maple Profant. Oct 10, Phat Chance. Mon, Greg Hester. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

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Oct 5, Liz Brown and True Grit. Second Tuesday of every month, open mic. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

+++++++++++++

My Friend Joe

5,9(5 7+($75(

Thurs, 7:30pm, Rubber Chicken Open Mic. 1810 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.829.3403.

+++++++++++++ 16135 Main Street, Guerneville

707.869.8022

Tickets always available at the door

Hall of Fame Green Music Center opens among the stars When we remember the grand opening of the Green Music Center years from now, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll talk about the hall. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll talk about the pianist onstage, Lang Lang. But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also talk about the see-and-beseen atmosphere, and the fact that for one night, dignitaries like Jerry Brown and Nancy Pelosi visited the otherwise quiet suburb of Rohnert Park. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a marvel,â&#x20AC;? said Gov. Brown of the hall, sipping a glass of wine near a stageside box seat and chatting amiably with the public during intermission. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m glad to be here.â&#x20AC;? Glad, too, were the other 3,400 estimated people in attendance witnessing this rare, strange piece of history. Strange because of the long, obstacle-laden ride toward opening the hall at a public university, and rare because, really, how often does the governor pop in on Sonoma State University? But the whole point of the night was the venueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s debutante ball, with Lang Lang as its chaperone. The pianistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delicate touch suited the opening perfectly: notes seemed to emerge out of thin air and then dissipate just as smoothly. During Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sonata No. 5, the hall responded to even the tiniest nuance, amplifying each dynamic choice, like droplets hitting a glassy-surfaced lake at dawn and producing pure, clean ripples in the water. Find full coverage of the Green Music Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening weekend, at the Bohemianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music blog, City Sound Inertia.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gabe Meline

Northwood Restaurant Thurs, 7pm,Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

Papaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Taverna Fri, 7pm, live music. Sat, 7pm and Sun, 4pm, Kefi. Sun, 1:30 and 3:30pm, Greek dance lessons, live

music and bellydance show. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

Phoenix Theater Oct 6, No Limit Creation, Mikey, Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Get Enuff Ent, Starkiller

and the Inferno. Mon, 7pm, young peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe

River Reader Oct 6, Jim and Kathy Ocean. 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Society: Culture House Thurs, Casa Rasta. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann and guests. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Spancky’s Oct 6, ADDC. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sprenger’s Tap Room Oct 6, Punching Billy and Loosely Covered. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Tradewinds Oct 5, Bern Man. Oct 6, Rock Hounds. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Wells Fargo Center

Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Osteria Divino Tues, Wed, Thurs, Fri, Sat and Sun, Live music. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Oct 2, Tara Tinsley. Oct 3, Elvis Johnson Soul Revue. Oct 4, Blackout Cowboys. Oct 5, Miracle Mule. Oct 6, Elliott’s Evil Plan. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Oct 6, Revolver and Bonnie Hayes. Oct 7, Ali Marcus and Foxes in the Henhouse. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sleeping Lady Oct 3, Tommy Odetto. Oct 4, Darren Nelson and Magnolia Keys. Oct 6, Makuru. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Mon, reggae. Wed, Larry’s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Studio 55 Marin Oct 5, Brown Chicken Brown Cow Stringband. 1455 East Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Oct 3, Tracorum. Oct 4, DJ Harry Duncan. Oct 5, Village Music All Stars Band. Oct 6, Vinyl. Oct 7, 11am, Summer of Love Revue. Oct 7, 7:30pm, Mitch Woods with the Rocket 88s. Oct 9, Ruckatan Latin Tribe. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Nickel Rose Mon, Wed-Sun, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

19 Broadway Club Oct 5, Capleton. Oct 6, Buckethead. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpe’s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Old Western Saloon Oct 6, Royal Deuces. Main

UPCOMING U PCOMING EVENTS EVENTS Fri O Fri Oct ct 5 221+, 1+, 9–11:30pm 9 –11:30pm $5 $5 Taste T aste of of the the Harvest Ha r v e s t Wine W ine TTasting as t ing & D Dancing a n cing w with it h

H A R V ES T B HARVEST BAND A ND & COPPERMILL C O P P ER M I L L

Oct 4, 4pm, Trevor Lyon with Pint 2 Zion. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Sat S at O Oct ct 6

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant

Dance D anc e L Lesson e s son 8 8:30 :30

Sun S un Oct Oct 7 AAllll Ages, Ages, 7–10pm, 7–10pm, FREE F RE E Country C ount r y R Rock, ock, A Americana meric ana & JJazz azz

NEW N EW S SKYE K YE

Silo’s Oct 4, Gene Keesy. Oct 5, Amanda King with the Mike Greensill Trio. Oct 6, Rudy Colombini and the Unauthorized Rolling Stones. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3!

Uptown Theatre Oct 3, the Outlaws. Oct 5, Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience. Oct 7, Steve Vai with Beverly McClellan. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

New Order The band is currently missing bassist Peter Hook, but bring along a catalogue of hits. Oct 5 at the Fox Theater.

Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Fest First year without billionaire founder Warren Hellman, but with huge lineup of greats. Oct 5-7 at Golden Gate Park.

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW Sat

Beatles and Beyond

Oct 6 REVOLVER AND BONNIE HAYES Early Set Tribute to CAROLE KING 8:30pm Sun

Oct 7

Branford Marsalis Jazz saxophonist exercises acoustics of landmark church in “sacred space” solo concert. Oct 5 at Grace Cathedral.

Singer/Songwriter

ALI MARCUS HENHOUSE

4:00pm / No Cover FOXES IN THE

Foxy Four-Part Harmonies 7:00pm / No Cover

KYLE ALDEN AND FRIENDS Oct 12 Rockin’ Irish-Inspired Originals Fri

8:00pm

LONE STAR RETROBATES Oct 13 Roadhouse/Western Swing 8:30pm Sat

Justin Bieber

TINY T ELEVISION Oct 14 Jeremy D’ Antonio’s Americana

The poor kid’s been working so hard he actually threw up onstage the other night. Oct 6 at Oracle Arena.

Sat

Sun

5:00pm / No Cover

Oct 20

Grizzly Bear Brooklyn indie valedictorians, class of ’09, return with a new, quieter album, “Shields.” Oct 9 at the Fox Theater.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Mon M on Oct Oc t 8

7 7–10pm, –10 p m, 1 18+ 8+

ULTIMATE U LTIMAT TE K KARAOKE ARAOKE LLive ive B Band and K Karaoke araoke 7 7-10 -10 ppm m aand nd

MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT t he b bar ar FOOTBALL FO O TBA LL aatt the Tues T ue s Oct Oc t 9

1 18+ 8+

LGBT L GBT N Night i gh t

Coming C o m ing S Soon oon

Wed W e d Oct O c t 10 10 118+ 8+ $ $10, 10, 21+ 21+ $5 $5

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC WEDNESDAYS W EDNESDAYS One O ne L Love ove P Prod r od p presents r esen t s

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

San Francisco’s City Guide

18+ 1 8+ $ $10, 10, 21+ 21+ $5 $5

Country Co untry & T Top op 4 40s 0s

Oct 8, Endrah. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

George’s Nightclub Oct 5, Reggae with SF Music Club, Lumination and Thrive. Oct 6, Hot for Teacher. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Billco’s Billiards

MARIN COUNTY

Oct 4, Jacques Stotzem. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary

NAPA COUNTY

Oct 5, 8pm, Jason Robert Brown. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

142 Throckmorton Theatre

29

CD/DVD Release Party

MITCH WOODS AND HIS

ROCKET 88S

“Blues Beyond Borders/Live in Istanbul” 8:30pm Fri

Oct 26

MARK HUMMEL , LITTLE CHARLIE, & ANSON FUNDERBURGH

The Real Deal Blues 8:30pm

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

DJ R DJ Relly e ll y R Rel el & Wine W ine Country C o un t r y P Pong ong $200 $ 20 0 G Guaranteed u a r a n t e e d Pot Po t

Thur T hur Oct O c t 11 11 118+ 8+ $ $10, 10, 21+ 21+ $5 $5

Country Co untry & T Top op 4 40s 0s Dance D anc e L Lesson e s son 8 8:30 :30

Fri F ri O Oct ct 1 12 2

21+ 21+ $20 $ 20

DAZZLE D A Z ZLE & DISCO DIS C O Lingerie L ingerie Fashion Fashion Show Sh o w Sat S at O Oct c t 13 13 18+ 18 + $ $10, 10, 21+ 21+ $5 $5

Country Co untry & T Top op 4 40s 0s Dance D anc e L Lesson e s son 8 8:30 :30

Sun S un Oct O c t 14 14 Rock R ock / Funk Funk

REX R EX P PER ER D DIEM IEM Our O ur a awesome we s o me s sound ound s system, ystem, sprung sprung and and s spacious pacious dance dance ffloor, loor, unique unique iinternationally nternationally iinspired ns pi red p pizzas, izzas, 30 beers on 30 b ee rs o n ttap, ap, and and VIP VIP bottle bo t tle service service are are sure sure to to give give you you and and your y ou r party party a great great night night out! out!

Come C o me a and nd jjoin oin u us! s!

707.544.1562 7 0 7.5 4 4.15 62 397 3 97 A Aviation v ia t i on B Blvd. lvd. Suite Sui t e E Santa S an t a R Rosa osa ((Next Next to to Airport Airport C Cinema) inema)

www.maverickssantarosa.com w w w.maverickssant ar osa.com ffacebook.com/maverickssantarosa acebook.com/maverickssan t ar os o a Ma v e r i c k s N i gh t s L i ve: Mavericks Nights Live: facebook.com/MavericksNightsLive facebook.com/Maver icksNigh t sL i ve

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Oct 5, Djiin. Oct 10, Prairie Sun. First Sunday of every month, Organix Guitar. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30

Galleries OPENINGS Oct 5 At 6pm. Napa Valley Museum, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tidalâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Above, So Below,â&#x20AC;? a two-person exhibit featuring paintings of Gail Chase-Bien and photographs of Roger Jordan. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Oct 6 At 4pm. Marin MOCA, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Legends of the Bay Areaâ&#x20AC;? features work of San Francisco artist David Maxim. Novato Arts Center, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

ArtQuest Shadowing Program Begins Oct. 10 By Appointment Only 707.535.4842

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Oct 3-Nov 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Transitions,â&#x20AC;? featuring Jim Butcherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oil and pastel paintings, Wanda McManusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s watercolors and wood sculpture by Adam Bradley. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

At 6pm. di Rosa, Auction preview sneak peek at artworks featured in Dada di Rosa benefit.. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Red Dot 2012â&#x20AC;? features four artists from around the country, with works similar in their diverse media. Reception, Oct 6 at 5pm. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

At 5pm. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Red Dot 2012â&#x20AC;? features four artists from around the country. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

From 3 to 5pm. Gallery Route One, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artists of the West Marin Review,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dualityâ&#x20AC;? and the work of Will Thoms. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

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Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Healdsburg Museum

Oct 7

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Oct 5-Nov 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artists of the West Marin Reviewâ&#x20AC;? features the work of artists who have appeared in the awardwinning literary journal. Reception, Oct 7 at 3pm. Oct 5-Nov 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dualityâ&#x20AC;? featuring the collaborative and individual work of Zea Morvitz and Tim Graveson. Reception, Oct 7 from 3 to 5pm. Oct 5-Nov 11, GRO presents the work of Will Thoms in the Annex. Reception, Oct 7 at 3pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

At 4pm. Quercia Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fleeting Spaces,â&#x20AC;? pastel paintings by Jan Thomas and oil paintings by Cynthia Jackson-Hein. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

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Gallery Route One

SONOMA COUNTY Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Oct 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Culture Shock!â&#x20AC;? with works by Becoming Independent and community artists. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Through Nov 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ancestors of Mexico,â&#x20AC;? artifacts, photos and more. Free. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Local Color Gallery

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Oct 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Body of Art,â&#x20AC;? figurative art from local artists. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Quercia Gallery Through Oct 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fleeting Spaces,â&#x20AC;? pastel paintings by Jan Thomas and oil paintings by Cynthia Jackson-Hein. Reception, Oct 6, 4pm. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Nov 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lyrical Complexities,â&#x20AC;? sculpture by Charles Fahlen, who died in 2010. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Sonoma County Museum Through Nov 4, Offerings

and shrines for DĂ­a de los Muertos on display. Through Nov 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Death and Taxes in Fantasylandia,â&#x20AC;? 2D work by Enrique Chagoya. Through Nov 4, Exhibit by Bay Area artist offers satirical slant on recession. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

University Art Gallery Through Oct 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sound Image Object,â&#x20AC;? 20 artists who make reference to music and sound in their work. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY The Hannah Gallery Through Nov 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Architects, Activists and Avengers: The Black Panther Party 1968,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Pirkle Jones and Ruth-Marion Baruch. 170 Donahue St, Marin. ThursSat, 1-5pm. 415.419.1605.

Marin MOCA Oct 6-Nov 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Legends of the Bay Areaâ&#x20AC;? features the work of San Francisco artist David Maxim. Reception, Oct 6 at 4pm. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

North Bay Artworks Oct 6, 1-5pm, Meet bronze artist Tim Cotterill for the unveiling of an exclusive wine patina bronze frog sculpture named Cabby. Free. 7049 Redwood Blvd, Ste 208, Novato. 415.892.8188.

Novato Arts Center Oct 7, 11am, View over 40 working artists in their studios. Free. 500 Palm Drive, Novato.

Osher Marin JCC Through Nov 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You Did What to My Comics!?!â&#x20AC;? papercuts by Isaac Brynjegard-Bialik. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Oct 6, 6pm, Auction Preview Party features sneak peek at outstanding art works featured at Dada di Rosa 11th Annual Benefit with music by the Hot Frittatas. $5-$10.

5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

31 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

ECHO Gallery Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Creatures,â&#x20AC;? sculptures, paintings, photos and drawings by six artists. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Napa Valley Museum â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tidalâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Above, So Below,â&#x20AC;? two-person exhibit featuring paintings of Gail Chase-Bien and photographs of Roger Jordan. Reception, Oct 5 at 6pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Events All Aboard! Fundraiser, silent auction and bar benefits Cass Gidley Marina. Oct 5, 6:30pm. $25$40. Studio 333, 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.8272.

Roaring Twenties Fundraiser Santa Rosa Symphony celebrates 85th Anniversary with fundraiser to honor Donald Green and Corrick Brown. Oct 5, 7pm. $250. Green Music Center 1028, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Wicked West Elaborate haunted house with free kids nights on Oct 6 and 11. 6:30-8pm. Wicked West Ghost Town, Jose Ramon Ave., Santa Rosa.

Film Community Cinema Oct 9 at 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Goes Janesvilleâ&#x20AC;? by Brad Lichtenstein. Second Tues of every month. Free. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Jewish Film Festival Series runs through December with a theme of â&#x20AC;&#x153;music.â&#x20AC;? Films include â&#x20AC;&#x153;Davidâ&#x20AC;? on Oct 4. 1 and 7:30pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Le Ciel Est a Vous Rare film made during the occupation of France tells story of female pilot and her working-class family. Oct 5, 7pm. $4-$6, free for SSU students. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

IN THE CARDS Former Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manager Tony La Russa is at CopperďŹ eldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Petaluma Oct. 4, Book Passage Oct. 5.

Mill Valley Film Festival Participate in a Mill Valley tradition and see films including â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life of Pi,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;On the Roadâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silver Linings Playbook,â&#x20AC;? with festival appearances by Stevie Nicks, Billy Bob Thornton, Ben Affleck, Ang Lee, Ken Burns, Dustin Hoffman and many more. Oct 414. Various locations around Marin County; see www.mvff. org for full schedule.

Opera in the Park The Royal English Opera Company performs highlights from favorite operas. Sun, Oct 7, 3pm. Free. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

Sing-Along Grease Sing along with Rydell High with musical host Andrew Moore. Oct 6, 7pm. $15. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Welcome to the South Film about post office manager from small, northern Italian town plays as part of Italian Film Festival. Oct 6, 5:30 and 7:45pm. $14. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Wise Women Speak Watch documentary featuring actresses, nobel laureates and Buddhist nuns, be inspired by guest speaker Ronita

Johnson, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coming to Forgiveness,â&#x20AC;? and Ruth Richards, the Drum Queen, and bring potluck dish. Oct 6, 10am. $25-$30. Veterans Memorial Hall, 8505 Park Ave, Cotati.

Food & Drink 12th Annual Blessing of the Animals Event to honor Saint Francis of Assisi includes animal blessing followed by naming of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winery Dog of the Yearâ&#x20AC;? and petfriendly activities, vendors, exhibitors and pet adoptions. Oct 7, 2pm. Free. St. Francis Winery & Vineyards, 100 Pythian Rd at Highway 12, Santa Rosa. 888.675.WINE.

Fall Festival Experience the autumn harvest season with U-pick pumpkins and veggies, wine and heirloom tomato tastings, apple pressing and scarecrow building. Oct 6, 10am-3pm. Free. Shone Farm, 6225 Eastside Rd, Forestville.

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Lectures Ballot Props with League of Women Voters Hour-long presentation on the 11 ballot props. Oct 5, 2pm. Free. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

Innovation & Leadership in East Africa Dr Wanijiru Kamau-Rutenberg, an assistant professor at USF, talks about empowering African female leaders. Oct 9, 7:30pm. $5. Spring Lake Village Auditorium, 5555 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa.

Peg Conley presents workshop on coping with words, watercolors and other media. Oct 7, 2pm. $20. River Reader, 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

September 30 through November 18 April 29October to June27,245–7 pm Reception: 150 N. Main St. Sebastopol 707-823-4256 707-829-7200

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Oct 4, “Equine Science and Art” with Amanda Fisher. 6:30pm. $4. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

A Short History of Social Movements David Walls, professor of sociology at SSU, offers teach in on successes and failures of women’s suffrage, civil rights and other movements. Oct 4, 7pm. Free. Share Exchange, 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.393.1431.

Ann Wright Former US Army colonel speaks about her work as a peace activist and efforts to build a unique ship in Gaza. Oct 5, 7-9pm. $10 suggested donation. Christ Church United Methodist, 1717 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa.

Readings

The Epidemic ‘The Normal Heart’ revisits early days of the AIDS crisis When Larry Kramer’s passionately angry play The Normal Heart first appeared in New York City, the AIDS epidemic was relatively young. Long before “AIDS cocktails” and safe sex, gay men feared for their lives, while religious pundits used the tragedy to push their vision of God’s judgment. The Normal Heart, born of Kramer’s frustrated attempts to warn the gay community to stop having sex, was painfully autobiographical. Within his own community, Kramer was known as a reactionary crackpot—and then he watched as his friends died and the plague went global. Now, 37 years after the first diagnoses of “the gay cancer,” San Francisco’s American Conservatory Theater brings The Normal Heart back to the Bay Area. Directed by George C. Wolfe, the production is an astounding achievement, alternately chilling and deeply affectionate, blending humor and heartbreak in the tale of a group of gay friends—based closely on Kramer’s own friends and associates—who battle indifference, fear and each other to gain attention for a disease that society tried desperately to ignore. The Normal Heart runs Tuesday–Sunday through Oct. 6 at the American Conservatory Theater. 415 Geary St., San Francisco. Tuesday–Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. $20–$95. 415.749.2228.—David Templeton

Marin Poetry Festival

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Oct 3, 7pm, Celebration features Robert Hass, Gillian Conoley and Giovanni Singleton, among others. $10 suggested donation. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

Book Passage Oct 3, 7pm, “Reinventing Bach,” with Paul Elie. Oct 4, 7pm, “Vex, Hex, Smash,

Smooch: Let Verbs Power Your Writing” with Constance Hale. Oct 5, 1pm, “One Last Strike: Fifty )

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Years in Baseball, Ten and a Half Games Back, and One Final Championship Season” with Tony La Russa. Oct 5, 7pm, “Hendrix on Hendrix: Interviews and Encounters with Jimi Hendrix” with Steven Roby. Oct 6, 10am, “Ivy and Bean make the Rules, Book 9” with Annie Barrows. Oct 6, 1pm, “The Prizefighter and the Playwright: Gene Tunney and Bernard Shaw” with Jay Tunney. Oct 6, 4pm, “Dancing Dogs: Stories” with Jon Katz. Oct 6, 7pm, “Sutton” with JR Moehringer. Oct 7, 1pm, “Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life” with Natalie Dykstra. Oct 7, 4pm, “The Story of My Assassins” with Tarun Tejpal. Oct 7, 7pm, “Las Hijas del Maiz” with Bertha L. Santana. Oct 8, 7pm, “Hildegard of Bingen: A Saint for Our Times” with Matthew Fox. Oct 9, 7pm, “Get What You Want: The Art of Making and Manifesting Your Intentions” with Tony Burroughs. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Oct 4, 3pm, “Hey! Who Stole the Toilet” with Nancy Krulik. Oct 9, 3pm, “Fingerprints” with Kristen Paige-Madonia and “If I Lie” with Cory Jackson. Oct 9, 7pm, “Rock Bottom” with Sarah Andrews. Oct 10, 7pm, “Among the Silent Giants” with Sharon Moxley and Susan Dregey. Oct 10, 7pm, “Among the Silent Giants: A Young Girl’s True Adventures in a Wild Country” with Sharon Porter Moxley and Susan Dregey. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Oct 3, 2pm, “The Great Unexpected” with Sharon Creech. Oct 3, 7pm, “Mindfulness in the Garden” with Zachiah Murray. Oct 4, 7pm, “One Last Strike” with Tony LaRussa. Oct 5, 4pm, “Hey! Who Stole the Toilet?” with Nancy Krulik. Oct 9, 7pm, “A Place Called Armageddon” with CC Humphreys. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Napa Copperfield’s Books Oct 7, 4pm, “Dancing Dogs” with Jon Katz. 3900-A Bel Aire Plaza, Highway 29 and Trancas Street, Napa. 707.252.8002.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Oct 9, 7pm, “Distilled Spirits” with Don Lattin. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.2618.

Word Up! Oct 7, 11am-5pm, Literacyworks once again brings together over 3,000 participants to celebrate the joy of lifelong learning and raise funds for North Bay libraries. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.499.6800.

Occidental Center for the Arts Oct 7, 4pm, “I’ve Got Some Lovin’ to Do” with Julia Park Tracey. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Church Oct 7, 3pm, “An Unknown World: Notes on the Meaning of the Earth” with Jacob Needleman. 11445 Shoreline Highway, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1349.

River Reader Oct 3, 6pm, New Black Bart Poetry Society Inauguration. Oct 8, 7pm, “TomorrowLand” with Grant Bailie. 16355 Main St, Guerneville 707.869.2242.

Theater Bad Penny Site-specific play unfolds as characters interact over the lake. Oct 3-14, 11am, 12, 2 and 5pm. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Clowns on a Stick: To Bury a Cat Full-length clown-mime piece tells story of woman trying to bury her cat. Various times. Oct 5-14. $10-$20. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Einstein & the Polar Bear Curtain Call Theatre presents romantic comedy by Tom Griffin. Various times. Oct 5-27. $12-$15. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

The Elephant Man Alive Stage Productions presents version of the David Lynch classic. Through Oct 14, 2 and 8pm. $25. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Gigolo This “Cole Porter Revue”

features classics like “Anything Goes” and “You’re on Top.” Oct 5-7, 2 and 8pm. $15. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later Epilogue focuses on the longterm effects of the murder of Matthew Shepard on Laramie and on the nation as a whole. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Oct 7. $15-$20. Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500.

Macbeth Shakespeare’s epic drama about murder most foul, betrayal and madness. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Oct 21. $10-$20. College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

Tapas Short Play Festival Plays include “Clowns” by Conrad Bishop and Elizabeth Fuller, “Gail and Peter” by Carol S. Lashof, “Standing Room Only” by Aren Haun and others. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Oct 21. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Topdog, Underdog 2002 Pulitzer winner follows brothers Lincoln and Booth, trapped in a dangerous sparring match fueled by poverty, face, family history and even their names. Various times. Through Oct 21. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

We Won’t Pay! We Won’t Pay! Comedic farce in which a housewife hides a stolen bag of groceries by saying she’s pregnant. Directed by Laura Jorgensen. Dates and times vary. Through Oct 7. $15-$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of October 3

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “In a full heart there is room for everything,” said poet Antonio Porchia, “and in an empty heart there is room for nothing.” That’s an important idea for you to meditate on right now, Aries. The universe is conspiring for you to be visited by a tide of revelations about intimacy. And yet you won’t be available to get the full benefit of that tide unless your heart is as full as possible. Wouldn’t you love to be taught more about love and togetherness and collaboration? TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

As I turn inward and call forth psychic impressions of what’s ahead for you, I’m seeing mythic symbols like Whoopee Cushions, rubber chickens and pools of fake plastic vomit. I’m seeing popcorn shells that are stuck in your teeth and a dog that’s eating your homework and an alarm clock that doesn’t go off when it’s supposed to. But as I push further into the not-too-distant future, exploring the deeper archetypal levels, I’m also tuning into a vision of fireflies in an underground cavern. They’re lighting your way and leading you to a stash of treasure in a dusty corner.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” That’s the opening sentence of Charles Dickens’ bestselling novel A Tale of Two Cities. The author was describing the period of the French Revolution in the late 18th century, but he could just as well have been talking about our time—or any other time, for that matter. Of course many modern cynics reject the idea that our era is the best of times. They obsess on the idea that ours is the worst of all the worst times that have ever been. When your worried mind is in control of you, you may even think that thought yourself, Gemini. But in accordance with the current astrological omens, I challenge you to be a fiery rebel: come up with at least five reasons why this is the best of times for you personally. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

“Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life,” said Pablo Picasso. That’s certainly true for me. I can purify my system either by creating art myself or being in the presence of great art. How about you, Cancerian? What kinds of experiences cleanse you of the congested emotions that just naturally build up in all of us? What influences can you draw on to purge the repetitive thoughts that sometimes torment you? How do you go about making your imagination as fresh and free as a warm breeze on a sunny day? I urge you to make a study of all the things that work for you, and then use them to the max in the coming week.

LEO (July 23–August 22) “Our culture peculiarly honors the act of blaming, which it takes as the sign of virtue and intellect.” So said literary critic Lionel Trilling. Now I’m passing his idea on to you, Leo, just in time for the No-Blaming Season. Would you like to conjure up a surge of good karma for yourself? Then for the next 10 days or so, refrain from the urge to find fault. And do your best to politely neutralize that reflex in other people who are sharing your space, even if they love to hate the same political party or idiot fringe that you do. P.S.: For extra credit, engage in speech and activity that are antidotes to the blaming epidemic. (Hint: praise, exaltation, thanks.) VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

One of the reasons platinum is regarded as a precious metal is that it is so infrequently found in the earth’s crust. A second reason is that there are difficulties in extracting it from the other metals it’s embedded in. You typically need 10 tons of ore to obtain one ounce of platinum. That’s a good metaphor for the work you have ahead of you, Virgo. The valuable resource you’re dreaming of is definitely worth your hard work, persistence and attention to detail. But to procure it, you’ll probably need the equivalent of several tons of those fine qualities.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) While doing research in South America four decades ago, anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss found an indigenous tribe whose people claimed they could see the planet Venus in the daytime. This seemed impossible to him. But he later consulted astronomers who told him that in fact Venus does emit enough light

to be visible by day to a highly trained human eye. My prediction for you, Libra, is that in the coming months you will make a metaphorically equivalent leap: you will become aware of and develop a relationship with some major presence that has been virtually undetectable. And I bet the first glimpse will come this week.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Whether or not anyone has ever called you an “old soul” before, that term will suit you well in the coming months. A whole lot of wisdom will be ripening in you all at once. Past events that never quite made sense before will more clearly reveal the role they have played in your life’s master plan. Relatively unimportant desires you’ve harbored for a long time will fade away, while others that have been in the background—and more crucial to your ultimate happiness—will rise to prominence.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) In most of my horoscopes I tell you what you can do to make yourself feel good. I advise you on how you can act with the highest integrity and get in touch with what you need to learn about. Now and then, though, I like to focus on how you can help other people feel good. I direct your attention to how you can inspire them to align with their highest integrity and get in touch with what they need to learn about. This is one of those times, Sagittarius. I’m hoping you have your own ideas about how to perform these services. Here are a few of my suggestions: Listen with compassionate receptivity to the people you care for. Describe to them what they’re like when they are at their best. Give them gifts they can use to activate their dormant potential. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) If you’ve ever watched tennis matches, you know that some players grunt when they smack the ball. Does that help them summon greater power? Maybe. But the more important issue is that it can mask the sound of the ball striking the racket, thereby making it harder for their opponents to guess the force and spin of the ball that will be headed toward them. The coming week would be an excellent time for you to hunt down a competitive advantage that’s comparable to this in your own field of endeavor. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Many people seem to believe that all of America’s Christians are and have always been fundamentalists. But the truth is that at most 35 percent of the total are fundies, and their movement has only gotten cultural traction in the last 30 years. So then why do their bizarre interpretations of the nature of reality get so much play? One reason is that they shout so loud and act so mean. Your upcoming assignment, Aquarius, is to do what you can to shift the focus from smallminded bullies to big-hearted visionaries, whether that applies to the Christians in your sphere or any other influences. It’s time to shrink any tendency you might have to get involved with energy vampires. Instead, give your full attention and lend your vigorous clout to life-affirming intelligence. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

[WARNING: The following horoscope contains more than the usual dose of poetry.] Mirthful agitation! Surprising deliverance! I predict you will expose the effects of the smoke and mirrors, then find your way out of the labyrinth. Lucid irrationality! Deathless visions! I predict you will discover a secret you’d been hiding from yourself, then escape a dilemma you no longer need to struggle with. Mysterious blessings arriving from the frontiers! Refreshed fertility roused by a reborn dream! I predict you will begin to prepare a new power spot for your future use.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Computer Market LAPTOP, Computer, LCD Panel $249, $99, $55- Like New! CRC Computer Repair Center, 3227 Santa Rosa Ave, 95407. FREE checkup, expert laptop repair, tune-up, spyware removal. 9am–5pm, Tues–Sat. 707.528.8340.

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An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30 a.m. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Explore Helen Keller’s awe-inspiring journey, rooted in her spirituality and mystical experiences! Fri, Oct 12, 7–9pm, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org

Prayer and Journey Beads Workshop Create a bead strand for your spiritual practice or as a chronicle of your personal journey. Sat, Oct 13, 2–5pm, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org.

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Meeting the Mystics: Helen Keller, a Shining Soul

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Learn various forms, such as introspective, religious, and humorous/pop culture in this Haiku workshop. Mondays, Oct 15 & 22, 7–9pm, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org

Workshops Rocks and Clouds Zendo — Rohatsu Sesshin Seven Day Meditation Retreat. Sat Dec 1–Sat Dec 8. Email us with any questions: dterra@sonic.net. Find us on the web: www.rocksandclouds.org or call 707.824.5647

New!! How to Haiku: Contemplating the Divine in Creation Learn various forms, such as introspective, religious, and humorous/pop culture in this Haiku workshop. Mondays, Oct 15 & 22, 7–9pm, 707.578.2121 www.journeycenter.org

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | OCTOBER 3-9, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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He was bad news from the start. For this year's Jive writing contest, we're asking for a 400-words-or-less piece of ďŹ ction themed around the wrong sort of man. Something's off with the guy. But something pulls you in. Just make sure that your story at some point includes the phrase "he was bad news from the start." Our favorite entries will be published in our Fall Lit issue, and we'll have a reading with the winners on Oct. 17 at CopperďŹ eld's Books in Montgomery Village at 6pm! Send us your entires to: javajive@bohemian.com. Deadline is Wednesday, Oct. 10, at 5pm.


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