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Cheryl Strayed lived on the edge, wrote it all down— and then Oprah came calling

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ANNOUNCING THE 2012 NORTH BAY MUSIC AWARDS AND 24-HOUR BAND CONTEST! 24-HOUR BAND CONTEST Live music will be provided by bands assembled totally at random just 24 hours before in the…24-HOUR BAND CONTEST. Musicians! Here's your chance to take part in a totally creative experiment that people will be talking about for years!

SATURDAY JULY 14 AT THE ARLENE FRANCIS CENTER IN SANTA ROSA! FREE! FINALIST VOTING NOW LIVE!

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BLUES / R&B: Danny Click, Linda Ferro Band, Levi Lloyd, Volker Strifler, Wilson-Hukill Blues Revue COUNTRY / AMERICANA: The Crux, McKenna Faith, Arann Harris and the Farm Band, B.C. Fitzpatrick, David Luning DJ: DJ Beset, DJ Chango B, DJ Zack Darling, DJ Jacques, DJ TonyTone

Here’s how it works: you sign up for the 24-Hour Band Contest at bohemain.com. You tell us your name and what instrument you play. On Friday, we’ll meet and pick names at random, assembling bands made up of complete strangers—a drummer, a bassist, a guitarist, a singer, a keyboard player, a horn player, an accordionist, a rapper, a kazoo player… anything goes! The bands will then have 24 hours to get to work in the practice space, write two original songs and learn one cover song, and return to perform the next night at the NorBays!

FOLK / ACOUSTIC: Church Marching Band, Courtney Janes, Misner & Smith, Jen Tucker Band, Teresa Tudury

Are you in? Of course you’re in. Sign up at www.bohemian.com!

WORLD / REGGAE: Ancient Future, Arcane Dimension, Beso Negro, Counter Culture, Djiin

HIP-HOP / ELECTRONIC: Brilliant & Timbalias, Broiler, MC Yogi, Radioactive, Teenage Sweater INDIE: Chelsea Set, Girls and Boys, Odd Bird, Starskate, Trebuchet JAZZ: Chris Amberger, Lorca Hart, Hot Club Beezelbub, George Marsh, Peter Welker PUNK / METAL: Aftertayst, No Sir, Resilience, Slandyr, Us As a Nation ROCK: Baby Seal Club, Frobeck, Huge Large, Jug Dealers, Steve Pile Band

2012 NORBAYS Saturday, July 14, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm. All Ages! • Winners announced! • Gold Records awarded! • Food by Casino chef Mark Malicki! • Beer and wine available! • Art by Bohemian cover artists! • Get your photo taken in a limo! • Photography by David Korman! • Video by Burning Token! • Funk and Soul 45s by DJ Noah D! • A singing dog walking backwards on stilts! • John Coltrane resurrected! • It’s all happening at the 2012 NorBays!

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Caring at Last For Bohemian Grove, a positive protest BY MARY MOORE

I

t’s true that we need to highlight the police abuse in our community when it comes to our children, especially black, Latino and poor white youth. But we also have to look at the bigger question of inequality in the larger society, as this abuse is not unique to this community; in fact, there are many communities around us that are much worse off and consider Sonoma County to be quite privileged compared to theirs. So why is this problem so universal in our culture? Why do the police, who are supposedly part of the 99%, not act in our best interests? We’ve spent over a decade confronting the issue of police abuse after several spates of unnecessary killings of local youth and the mentally ill, including that of Jeremiah Chass. But the police are not the source of what ails us; they are merely the face of it. We live in a sick culture that stems from the pursuit of money and power, a culture where caring is looked upon as being counterproductive; a culture that is still overcoming racism after all these decades; a culture that disrespects women to the point that we still don’t have control over our own bodies; a culture with rigid class divisions and income inequality that is steadily getting worse. And who would go so far as to see caring in a negative light? Are you aware of the annual ritual called the “cremation of care” held as the opening ceremony at Bohemian Grove every July? This will be the 133rd year that the 1% has held this bizarre ritual as they begin their two-week encampment in our backyard. But this year they will be met with a new concept that I hope will become as ingrained as the 1% concept has become. This year we are calling for the first ever creation of care on July 14 at the Monte Rio Amphitheater with Cindy Sheehan, the Fukushima Mothers delegation, Code Pink and the endorsement of over 20 local and regional groups. What better place to create care than at Bohemian Grove where the elite of the military, government, corporate and financial circles congregate every year? Mary Moore is an activist from Camp Meeker. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

The True Cost of Facebook

With all the many reasons to distrust Facebook, all you can come up with is privacy? Your writer never even makes a case why “privacy” is important as a stand-alone issue (“Closing the Book,” June 20). Facebook collects data on its users so other companies can send ads to possible buyers. Is this likely to land us in Afghani prisons, increase our health insurance premiums or curtail our voting rights? No. Facebook may be “making money off you,” but that’s no loss; the money wasn’t yours in the first place, and advertisers were never going to hand it “back” to you. (It’s also worth noting that one even finds ads in, ahem, newspapers.) The fact that Facebook doesn’t sell “a product” makes it not much different from YouTube or, for that matter, Leave It to Beaver, which was a way to get people to buy soap and shampoo. The egregious privacy violation cited in this article was, by the way, committed not by Mark Zuckerberg, but against him. The perpetrator (Silicon Valley Insider) reportedly “obtained instant message conversations from when Zuckerberg was still at Harvard.” Your author doesn’t seem to mind if journalists release a citizen’s opinionated or obnoxious private messages, because . . . why? Zuckerberg isn’t entitled to privacy in his personal communications, but we’re supposed to be protected from ads for jewelry that we actually like? I was disappointed in the article because I had hoped to find better reasons to reduce or eliminate social media time, so here’s my own list: We have a generation growing up largely without the tempering influence of family, unable to focus long enough to read a book-length work and desperately afraid of boredom. They assiduously remove themselves (via electronic gadgets) from situations where they feel challenged or uncomfortable, thus losing the social skills that come from in-person

practice. Who cares about abstract notions of privacy? I’m much more worried about young girls posting their photos and asking “pretty or ugly?”; predators; the loneliness of finding out that Friends are not friends; socialization that relies on peer influence; the Peter Pan wish to escape adult responsibilities; the addictive nature of periodic reinforcement; and the health costs of inactivity. The argument that “I am more than my statistics and shall not be reduced to a demographic!” sounds narcissistic when compared with these growing social consequences.

ELLEN LAWRENCE SKAGERBERG Santa Rosa

A New New Deal Recently I heard an interview with Ralph Nader. He mentioned that 80 years ago there was an economic depression worse than the one we have now. The president, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, developed a massive work program. If there were the will of the current president and the current Congress to do that again, it would create a great boost to our economy. There can be no doubt that repair is needed on our highways, bridges, school buildings, etc. This should have started at least three years ago. It’s not too late. We should also get behind the Jesse Jackson Jr. bill to raise the minimum wage to $10 per hour. That also would boost our economy.

STANLEY MCCRACKEN Santa Rosa

Dept. of ‘I Beg to Differ’ Dear Jen (Rhapsodies & Rants, “Methane Myopia,” June 20), while it’s true that industrial-scale cattle operations and the conversions of forests to pasture have profound negative impacts on the environment, you’re missing the point of my article (“Fixing the Footprint,” June 13), if you think the Marin Carbon Project is more of the same. The research they are conducting is on


THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

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existing grasslands, land that benefits from careful, well-managed grazing, and has evolved with undulates for millennia. As for your comment about methane gas, it’s true that methane is a powerful climate-changing gas and that cattle are a significant source of the gas. But as stated in my article, the project’s research demonstrates that diverting green waste from landfills and turning it into compost yields a net reduction in methane gas emissions. Further, the application of compost to the soil has been shown to pull carbon out of the atmosphere and sequester it in the soil. Taken together, the group’s research has shown the diversion of green waste from landfills and the storage of carbon in the soil has the potential to more than offset the methane produced by cattle.

STETT HOLBROOK Out standing in his field

Top Five 1 Painted Car of the Week:

“Keisha’s Lesbomobile: SF Pride or Bust!” on Highway 101

2 Chris Herman, from

Sebastopol, builds My Little Pony hair for adult “bronys”

3 Supreme Court is totally

insane, opts 5-4 not to revisit Citizens United decision

4 Sonic.net CEO Dane

Jasper’s “Don’t Tell My Wife” interview in Forbes

5 Santa Clara to spend

$30m on teachers instead of building new 49ers stadium

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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CRACKDOWN Stephen Barlow and Shea Baird say they were operating exactly like 20 other colonic studios in the area.

Down the Chute California Medical Board shuts down Santa Rosa colonic studio BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

T

o say Shea Baird and her husband, Stephen Barlow, were shocked at the investigator’s announcement would be an understatement.

Rather, the couple was in abject disbelief as the man sent by the Medical Board of California to investigate their Santa Rosa–based colonic hydrotherapy practice

said they were in violation of practicing medicine without a license and would have to shut down immediately. On March 22, Baird was given a choice: either sign an affidavit agreeing to cease and desist the practice of colon hydrotherapy immediately or face a potential $10,000 fine or jail time. This was the first time in her 12 years in practice Baird had been visited by an investigator, and she signed

the affidavit. “Every attorney we’ve talked to says, ‘They’re trying to set you up as first in a line of dominoes,’” Baird says. As of now, she and Barlow’s Santa Rosa practice, Every Body Cleansing Studio, can take appointments only for massage or infrared sauna treatments. Baird says colonics made up about 95 percent of the business, and now they’re struggling to get by. The episode began in January,

when Baird got a certified letter from the Medical Board, which had received a complaint from a client claiming to have suffered a ruptured bowel. Baird says this is impossible with her type of treatment. She also discovered the complaint was from the same man who had filed a lawsuit two years prior—a lawsuit that had been settled out of court after an 18-month trial. Under the terms of that agreement, Every Body was found “harmless.” An insurance company handled the settlement and, says Baird, “we all walked away” after the lawsuit was finished in October last year. The affidavit Baird signed in March states that she is “not licensed in California as a physician of a naturopathic doctor,” and that “only a physician’s and surgeon’s certificate authorizes the holder to use drugs or devices in or upon human beings and to sever or penetrate the tissues of human beings.” That means inserting no speculum or tubes, as Baird puts it, “in the booty.” Key to the dispute is SB 577, which lays out what can and cannot be considered medical treatment under the law. A clause in the bill deals specifically with insertion; it allows a colonics patient to be treated if the patient himself inserts the speculum and tube. If the practitioner inserts those objects, that practitioner needs to be licensed. But in 2002, that clause was struck down in a ruling by the California attorney general. In addition, a consent form, which is typically required from new colonics clients, does not sufficiently protect against the risks of practicing medicine without a license, the ruling stated. Baird and Barlow were notified two days prior that an inspector would be coming. He was friendly at first, but his demeanor changed when he produced the affidavit. “It was apparent that this was the plan even before he walked through the door,” says Barlow. The couple was left wondering why their business was targeted. “I could name 20 people from here to San Francisco who are still


‘They’re trying to set us up as first in a line of dominoes.’ Via email, Simoes restated the attorney general’s 2002 ruling about colonic hydrotherapy: “The opinion says that colonic hydrotherapy constitutes ‘treatment’ for the purposes of the medical practice act and must be performed by a licensed physician or under the direction of a licensed physician. If an individual is performing colonic hydrotherapy and is not a licensed physician or under the direction of a licensed physician, this would constitute practicing medicine without a license, and may result in criminal action.â€? If it were still online, Every Body’s website would show about two dozen testimonials from medical professionals across the spectrum praising Baird and Barlow’s practice. Justin Hoffman, a certiďŹ ed naturopathic medical doctor at Truhealth medical clinic in Santa Rosa, said he isn’t surprised to see an investigation take place. “I know it happens all the time,â€? he says. “The Medical Board in California generally operates under the assumption that if somebody is practicing medicine without a license they investigate it.â€?

He declined to comment on Every Body’s pending case, though he referred to Baird and Barlow as “dear friends.â€? When asked if they have a good reputation in the profession, he replied, “I would deďŹ nitely say that yes.â€? Every Body’s office is tidy, the hydrotherapy machine well maintained and the proprietors are courteous and professional, according to several reviews and client testimonials on the nowoffline website. Reputation does not count in legal opinion, however. In the state attorney general’s 2002 ruling overriding SB 577’s clause, colonic hydrotherapy was deďŹ ned as medical practice. It reads: “The condition of the walls of the large intestine are changed by undergoing the procedure. The purpose of colon hydrotherapy is, at a minimum, to change the client’s physical condition so that the client will be healthier than before the procedure is performed.â€? The decision goes on to suggest that even by determining if colonic hydrotherapy would be beneďŹ cial to a given person, practitioners are thereby diagnosing a client, which is considered practicing medicine. Simoes reiterated the board’s position: “The Medical Board rigorously enforces all laws in the Medical Practice Act and other laws pertaining to physicians and surgeons.â€? Baird says that this could cause reverberations not only among other colonic hydrotherapy practitioners, but throughout the alternative medical ďŹ eld to practices like acupuncture or massage. “The fact that [the investigator] included section 3640 of the business and professions code [regarding practices other than just colonic hydrotherapy] in his supporting documentation is what has caused many different attorneys to have the opinion that they are setting us up to set a new precedent not only for colon therapy but for other alternative health practices,â€? says Baird. “They’re not trying to get rid of colonic hydrotherapy as a practice, they’re just trying to own it.â€?

9

We’ll Quote You on That On June 6, as he observed Santa Rosa police place a man under arrest for public drunkenness at Wednesday Night Market, Carl Patrick soon found himself in handcuffs as well. “I was about 15 feet away, just kind of watching,â€? says Patrick, an activist with Occupy Santa Rosa. After an ofďŹ cer asked him to leave, he says, Patrick offered to back up. But that wasn’t enough. He was placed under arrest, and ofďŹ cer T. Collins told Patrick—a full-time farmworker—to “get a job.â€? Later, after friends and other observers followed Patrick to the downtown police station, he reports that the same ofďŹ cer told him, “Your friends out there should have been knocked the fuck out—and you can quote me on that.â€?

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Patrick faces a June 27 arraignment on the charge of obstructing a police ofďŹ cer. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the ďŹ rst time that the SRPD has appeared to speciďŹ cally target Occupy activists. Last month, Josha Stark was detained for jaywalking during the Wednesday Night Market. According to an OSR press release, the ofďŹ cer cuffed Stark and asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are you in a hurry to get back to your Occupy friends?â&#x20AC;? eventually slamming him into a trashcan. Stark has also said the ofďŹ cers made fun of him for having a debit card in his wallet from Chase Bank. These incidents come on the heels of the seizure of the OSR banner last month, suspiciously aligned with the entry and exit of the AMGEN tour. After taking the banner on Wednesday at the start of the downtown AMGEN festivities, the SPRD refused to return it until the following Monday, after the tourismboosting bike race.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark

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practicing,â&#x20AC;? says Baird. None of them, Baird says, adhere to the laws Every Body is accused of violating. Every Bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s questions to the Medical Board have as of yet gone unanswered. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Medical Board would not be able to comment on any investigation, as investigations are conďŹ dential,â&#x20AC;? writes Medical Board chief of legislation Jennifer Simoes in an email, denying a request for a telephone interview.


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No More Peanuts!

Boy sleuth confronts wildlife feeder BY JULIANE POIRIER

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Napa youth who insists on anonymity—let’s call him “Bobby Jones”— recently performed a civic duty that suggests the next generation may not be as ecologically challenged as some suspect.

Eleven-year-old Jones went solo to the Napa County Resource Conservation District office in Napa last week to complain about a large mound of peanuts he found behind their office complex weeks ago when exploring the creek with a friend. The peanuts looked like the ones he’d seen appearing mysteriously in his backyard farther down the creek. “I’d wondered why there were so many squirrels where I lived,” says Jones, who concluded that the squirrels were living off the free peanuts. “It was a huge pile,” he says. “I figured they had overpopulated from eating all the peanuts.”

The feeding station bothered Jones for over a week, and he discussed possible “suspects” with his mother, who told him that the RCD was not likely the culprit, since their job was eco-educating the public. When Jones finally got up the courage to confront the adults in the office building, he turned down his mother’s offer to accompany him. He said he went alone so nobody would think any adult was “using” him. He walked the creek, pressed though a breach in the fence and climbed to the second level in the complex, where he located the RCD office. “I asked them if they know who was putting the peanuts out,” Jones told the Bohemian. The RCD staff claimed innocence and suggested Jones inquire at a professional office a few doors down. There, Jones found a woman who confessed to feeding the squirrels. Jones asked her to stop. “The lady was nice to me,” says Jones. “But I could tell she was kind of frustrated, like she wished I would go away.” Jones explained to the woman that the peanuts made it too easy for the squirrels, and drew other animals like rats. Jones told the woman that if she stopped feeding the squirrels, there would “still be a lot of squirrels, but there wouldn’t be so many.” Jones speculated that the peanuts bought her entertainment. “She probably just thought that squirrels are cute,” muses Jones, “and that her clients would like to see cute little squirrels running around eating stuff outside the [office] window.” The woman agreed to stop feeding the squirrels if she could at least finish off the bag she’d purchased. “I said she could if she really wanted to,” says Jones. “But that she probably shouldn’t.”

Love animals? Read the science-based reasons to avoid feeding wildlife at www.paws.org.


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14

Dining PSSSST . . . I got a buddy up in Truckee, doin’ his thing with those ducks. Making a bundle, I tell ya.

Opportunity Quacks Here comes the foie gras black market

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ou want the creamiest, fatty duck liver money can buy? You got the cash? Then meet me behind Willie Bird’s at midnight. But remember, you get caught, you don’t know me. Otherwise, Frankie and Titto might need to pay a visit to

your Michelin-star-rated restaurant. Capisce? This, folks, is the hard, new reality that is foie gras. When the July 1 ban on selling foie gras in California drives the market underground, those seeking the delicacy will be forced to order the liver through code or under the cover of darkness and deceit—which, to some, may

BY HOLLY ABRAHAMS still be a better option than not having it at all. One of these people is Douglas Keane, owner and chef of Cyrus in Healdsburg. “If the product is illegal,” he proclaims, “there is probably no cap on what I could sell it for.” With an estimated 25 percent increase in sales of foie gras in the last year in his restaurant, Keane believes that California’s impending mini-

prohibition could be quite the cash-bird. “The black market is organized and ready,” according to Ken Frank, chef at La Toque in Napa. “I know people who have ordered foie gras and stockpiled it in their freezers. Foie gras is not going away.” Although section 25982 of the California Health and Safety code states, “A product may not be sold in California if it is the result of force-feeding a bird for the purpose of enlarging the bird’s liver beyond normal size,” finding ways to serve foie gras may not be such a difficult task. In 2006, a similar ban was put into effect in Chicago, where some chefs circumvented the law by not selling foie gras per se, but rather offering it as a complimentary side to another dish or with an overpriced glass of Champagne. In advance of the California ban, Hudson Valley Foie Gras in New York recently sent out an unusual memo to its California customers explaining how to work the system. “You might consider purchasing foie gras in another state, such as Nevada, and bringing it home,” it reads. “We believe it is also acceptable to have a friend buy foie gras for you in another state and ship it to you at no cost.” Of course, this has little effect on Sonoma’s Guillermo and Junny Gonzalez, founders and owners of Sonoma Artisan Foie Gras, the only other foie gras producer in the United States besides Hudson Valley. “The effect of the ban is the closing of a successful family business that for over 25 years has provided the highest quality duck products with a prevailing philosophy of utmost respect to animal husbandry practices,” Guillermo says. Mark Malicki, chef at Casino Bar & Grill in Bodega, is a rare breed who has come out in support of the ban. “It’s not because I want to see a man lose his business or I feel that it is somewhat unethical to force-feed a duck,” he posted


Lo C Coco’s oco c ’s’ Cucina Rustica

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Chocolates C ho co lates & D Dessert e sse r t C Cafe afe 1 110 10 Petaluma Pe t a l u m a Blvd B l vd North N or th Downtown Petaluma D ow ntow n P et aluma

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ummer elebrations Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Roasted Mushroom Gruyere Tartelette Petit Four Platter Full Catering Menu Available

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15 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27– JULY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

recently. “It’s just because like so many things that used to be special now have so little meaning. I remember when foie was a special-occasion food held with a certain amount of reverence. Now any clown with $50 and an overactive imagination can turn it into ice cream or banh mi.” Still, chefs on either side of the ban say the legislation is poorly written, with what appear to be numerous loopholes and enforceability issues. One of the concerns for Frank is that the black market will change how the product is produced and transported. “The incentive to do it right,” he says, “will be replaced with the incentive to not get caught.” It could also lead to a more abusive means of creating the product, he says. Anyone can forcefeed, butcher and sell a duck from his backyard, but chances are that the harm to the animal will go up. If history has taught us anything, it’s that prohibition is not always successful. Frank recalls that European groups against animal cruelty eradicated most of the veal production and consumption in the U.K. in the ’90s, and the “unintended consequence” of this action was far from ideal: hundreds of thousands of male cows were slaughtered upon birth due to the fact that they held little to no value if they were not going to be used for veal. So you wanna get in the foie gras business? Sounds like it could be a real gold mine. No legitimate competition in California. No clear answer on where and how the ban will be enforced. No foreseeable cap on what one could charge for foie gras. No need to observe health and safety codes—if you do this right, you won’t even pop up on a humane society officer’s radar. Oh, and a ton of chefs would still love to get their hands on the prime goods. Buy yourself a plot of land, gather a gaggle of geese, employ some fly-by-night truck drivers and get to work. Cha-ching.

Voted V oted Best Best Italian Italian re staurant of of the the restaurant Nor th B ay. North Bay.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

킬타

SAT JUNE 30 SAT JUNE 30 SUN JULY 1 SUN JULY 1 MON JULY 2 TUES JULY 3 WED JULY 4 WED JULY 4

March Fourth Marching Band DICKEY BETTS & Great Southern STARSHIP featuring Mickey Thomas LOS LOBOS FREE JOAN JETT and the Blackhearts CONCERTS with Gate Admission STEEL PULSE Preservation Hall Jazz Band THE TEMPTATIONS 3 p.m.

7:30 p.m.

3 p.m.

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2 p.m. and 4 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

VISIT:

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Open 11a.m. to 11p.m. Adults $16, Seniors 65 & older $14 Children 12 & under $14, Children under 4 FREE Children 12 & under FREE on Monday, July 2

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JUNE 30-JULY 4 | SAN RAFAEL, CA | MARINFAIR.ORG


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Cafe La Haye CaliforniaFrench. $$-$$$. The very best Sonoma ingredients are married with nouvelle French cooking styles at this comfortable bistro. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.5994.

Chelino’s Mexican Restaurant Mexican. $. Standout generous taqueria fare with fresh ingredients daily. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1079 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.571.7478.

Dempsey’s Alehouse Gourmet pub fare. $-$$. Popular brewpub and bistro, award-winning handcrafted beers, outdoor dining in summer and pork chops to die for. Lunch and dinner daily. 50 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.765.9694.

El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868. Hikuni Sushi Bar & Hibachi Japanese. $$$. Terrific teppanyaki plus a full sushi bar, tonkatsu, udon and bento. Lunch and dinner daily. 4100 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.539.9188.

JoJo Sushi Japanese. $-$$. Hip downtown eatery features fresh sushi, sashimi, teriyaki, and innovative specials. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 645 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8588.

Lily Kai Chinese. $$. An extensive array of bistro-chic dishes like mild curry lamb, spicy basil prawns and roast duck with steamed lotus buns. Hot and sour soup is stellar. Lunch and dinner daily. 3100 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.782.1132.

Mac’s Delicatessen Diner. $. Large selection of Jewish-style sandwiches; excellent cole slaw. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 630 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3785.

Chez Pierre FrenchItalian-American. $$. A former Denny’s turned Parisian bistro, with surprisingly competent cozy French favorites like escargot and chicken Cordon Bleu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7330 Redwood Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4233.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Madrona Manor Eclectic California cuisine. $$$$. Romantic fine dining in grand historic landmark mansion. Seasonal menu and superior wine list. Dinner daily. 1001 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.4321.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$.

Old Chicago Pizza Pizza. $$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600.

Portelli Rossi Italian. $$.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic

17

Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618. Tasty and affordable fare in a cozy setting. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner, Tues-Sun. 868 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.892.6100.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-inthe-wall as they come. Lunch and dinner daily. Two San Rafael locations: 732 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Open for dinner daily. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520. Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883. )

18

Happy Hour Daily Cocktails & Dining with Sweeping Ten Mile Views Traditional Sunday BrunchÊUÊHandcrafted Ramos Fizzes 850 LAMONT AVENUE, NOVATO s 415.893.1892 s hilltop1892.com

Come and Join Us at the

Friendliest Bar in Town!

THE

APPALOOSA ROOM

Open 11am to ? 7 Days a Week Corner of 4th & Mill Street

GUERNEVILLE Between Woods & the RRR Resort

707.869.3608

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27– JULY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.


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Dining ( 17

SMALL BITES

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 27– JULY 3, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

N A PA CO U N T Y

Bangin’ Baristas

Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

After almost 20 years of roasting coffee, Taylor Maid is opening its first retail cafe in Sebastopol. The opening coincides with a move back to its original location, in the Barlow building in Sebastopol. “We wanted to go back to our roots,” says Taylor Maid president Rob Daly. “The timing just felt right.” The company has been toying with the retail idea for a while, and started with a mobile cart outside its Keating Avenue roastery a couple months ago. The cafe will open at the latter end of July, says Daly. To celebrate this new venture, the sustainable roastery has invited the area’s top espresso experts to a “Barista Jam” this weekend, and in fact, United States Barista Championship finalist Chris Baca of Verve Roasters in Santa Cruz will pull shots and talk shop. Also, there might be a special new Ethiopian ready to brew for curious coffee consumers to quaff at the jam while local band the Chelsea Set entertains the masses. The Barista Jam and party is Saturday, June 30, at Taylor Maid. 7190 Keating Ave., Sebastopol. Free cold-brewed iced coffee for everyone. 11am–2pm. 707.824.9110. —Nicolas Grizzle

Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Brassica Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the

pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.


Wineries

19

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Atascadero Creek Winery Boutique wine from non-boutiquey, woodworkerturned-winemaker Bob Appleby, in Santa Rosa’s industrial Wineyard. The Sauvignon Blanc is a hit with local restaurants. Thursday through Monday, 11am to 5pm. $5. Heritage Public House, focusing on craft beer, opens at 4pm. 1305-A Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.595.1488.

De Loach Vineyards In the 1970s, Cecil De Loach established this pioneering producer of Russian River Zinfandel and Pinot Noir par excellence.1791 Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.526.9111.

Hawley Winery Barrelfermented Viognier, kiwistyle Sauvignon Blanc, plus toothsome reds. Winemaker John Hawley helped to grow some of the big-name brands; now his sons have joined him in this small, Dry Creek Valley family business. 36 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 6pm; $5 fee. 707.473.9500.

Nalle Winery Rising above the vineyards like some kind of New Age bunker, the rosemary-shrouded winery houses a down-toearth father-and-son team dedicated to low-alcohol Dry Creek Zinfandel. Greeters Lila and Pella present soggy tennis balls. 2385 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Saturdays, noon– 5pm. No fee. 707.433.1040.

Skewis Wines Since 1979, veteran winemaker Hank Skewis labored out of the limelight. Now, he’s got his own shack to showcase his etherial, bright style of Pinot Noir. 57 Front St., Healdsburg. Saturday–Sunday, 11am– 4:30pm. $5. 707.431.2160.

Stonestreet Late wine magnate Jess Jackson took to the hills in a big way. Eight hundred acres, 400 blocks, at elevations up to 2,000

feet. Tasting room is a fewfrills affair, while “mountain excursions” offer views plus Cab and Chardonnay, plus lunch. 7111 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily, 11am to 4:30pm. $12, $15 and $25; Mountain excursion, $75. 707.433.9463.

Tin Barn Vineyards Yes, it is located in a tin barn, of sorts–in the midst of a remote industrial park, home to “Eighth Street wineries.” It’s all flavor and no frills in this friendly warehouse winery. 21692 Eighth St. E., Ste. 340, Sonoma. Saturday–Sunday, 11am–4pm. Tasting fee, $6. 707.938.5430.

that nearly crunches in the mouth, and Chardonnay with a “mouth of butter.” Patio service in fair weather, cozy hearthside tasting in cooler days; good-humored hospitality throughout. 1075 Buchli Station Road, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–4pm; tasting fee $5. 707.252.9065.

Hagafen Cellars There shall be no wine before it’s certified kosher. Wide variety of varietal wines, the go-to choice for many a White House state dinner. 4160 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am to 5pm (yes, they’re open Christmas). $5–$15. 707.252.0781.

St. Supéry Expect to find

N A PA CO U N TY Acacia Vineyard Acclaimed Pinot and Chardonnay; their biggest client is Costco, but the tasting room is a hole-in-the-wall in a drab beige facility. 2750 Las Amigas Road, Napa. Monday through Saturday, 10am–4pm; Sunday, noon–4pm. $15. 707.226.9991.

Artesa Winery Yet another treeless hilltop in the windswept Carneros turns out to be a striking, temple-like visitor center, with fantastic views. Spanish varietals Tempranillo and Albariño; Pinot, too. 1345 Henry Road, Napa. 10am to 5pm daily, $10– $15 fee. Chocolate, cheese and food pairings by appointment. 707.224.1668.

Black Stallion Winery Owned by a pair of Midwest liquor-distribution barons who hired a capable winemaker and envision it to be a retaildestination winery. The wines are quite good. 4089 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.253.1400.

Bouchaine Vineyards Venerable producer of estategrown Burgundian style wine in the rustic wind-scraped hills of Carneros. Pinot Noir and Pinot Meuier with a coolclimate, cherry-skin crispness

the tasting room crowded with a harrassed staff, but St. Supéry features an interesting art gallery with changing exhibitions. 8440 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 800.942.0809.

Saintsbury A contrarian enterprise in the 1970s, now a hallowed hall of Carneros Pinot Noir. Visitors may linger under shade trees in fair weather or sit down for a serious tasting adjacent the office. 1500 Los Carneros Ave., Napa. Monday– Saturday, by appointment. 707.252.0592. Stony Hill Vineyard In the 1940s, advisers from UC Davis told them, “Under no circumstances plant Chardonnay.” So they planted Chardonnay. Intimate tastings in the flagstone-studded, Eisenhower-era McCrea living room; Chardonnay and White Riesling are legends. 3331 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. By appointment, Monday through Friday, weekends when available. $25. 707.963.2636.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

Rued Winery

A family farm with deep roots BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

f you can guess why five Dry Creek Valley wineries are hosting an event called “All American Zin Day” on the weekend before the Fourth of July, give yourself five points. Zinfandel, a grape of obscure origins that made the passage as early as the 1830s and has flourished here for over one and a half centuries, indeed makes an all-American wine. If your eye arrests on one of the participants, Rued Winery, and you ask, “Hey, aren’t they better known for Rued clone of Chardonnay?” give yourself 10 points. For the fact that they’re not quite the same Rueds, take a pass. Just listen and learn.

Listen first, closely, to soft-spoken Dee Rued, whose husband’s family has been farming grapes here since the 1880s, when Henry Rued immigrated from Switzerland. While a family cousin is responsible for the Chardonnay, Richard Rued’s father bought a plot on Dry Creek Road in 1957, and Richard took on the two acres of old grapes there as an FFA project. Eventually he planted more, replacing prune orchards, and the vineyards are now managed by son, Tom, who’s also on hand in the tasting room, his tractor parked out back. In 2006 they founded their own winery, run by son-anddaughter-in-law team Steve and Sonia. On a short drive across Dry Creek Road, Tom and Dee show off their benchland Zinfandel and Cabernet Sauvignon, which on this late spring day are reaching for the sun, their crop of hard, green berries flowered and set. Richard Rued shows up to temper the optimistic scene; as his father used to say, “You can’t tell how good the year has been until the check clears the bank.” Spoken like a true farmer. And here, for once, where the vineyards and the production facility are plainly visible through the tasting-room windows, the best product skimmed from the family’s 160 acres of grapes is offered at comparatively farm-stand prices. With the freshness of a spritz of sea spray, the 2010 Dry Creek Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($16) has crisp flavors of lemongrass and lychee fruit—clearly an asset to its former home, part of the renowned Kenwood Vineyards Sauvignon Blanc program. The 2008 DVC Zinfandel ($25) has a glossy, lush palate of chewy cherry fruit, vanilla and graham cracker; the 2009 DCV Zinfandel ($25), a more intense and more tart, plum-cherry character, which will likely continue to unfold. If I were keeping score, I’d say that’s a 95-pointer. Rued Winery, 3850 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily 11am to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.3261. All-American Zin Day, Saturday, June 30, 11am–4pm; wine and barbecue. Advance tickets $25 at www.allamericanzinday.com, $30 at the door.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27– JULY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.


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Brian Bria an Lindstrom Lindstrom

22

Writer Cheryl Strayed bounces back to be picked for Oprah’s Book Club with ‘Wild’ BY LEILANI CLARK

S

ometimes writers ometimes ccome ome along along who who sseem eem to sspeak, peak, breathe, b br eathe, think think and and even even spit spit magic. magic. They They write books books that thatt inspire inspire readers readers to accost accost whoever’s whoever’s within a 10-foot 10-foot radius, radi d us, to grab grab them them by thee collar You by th colllar and and say, say, Y ou must read read d this now! now! One One modern who modern writer w who certainly certainly falls falls under underr this this category category is is Cheryl Cheryl Strayed—and Strrayed—and soon soon the world the whole whole w orld will know know it. Strayed sspeaks Strayed p aks tto pe om mee fr from om her Portland, h er home home in nP ortland, Ore., Ore., in thee midst th midst off a relentless relentless travel travel that began thee sschedule chedule th a beg at an with th publication March her p ublication in M arch of h er

acclaimed m acclaimed memoir emoir Wild: Wiild: F From rom L ost to F ound on the Pacific Pacific Crest Crest e Lost Found Trail. T raill. W With i h th ith the he upc upcoming omin i g rrelease ele l ase o second book on July July 10, Tiny Tin iny off a second B Beautiful Things —a collection collection Things—a o her “De ar S ugar” ccolumns olumns off her “Dear Sugar” w writt en for for online online magazine magazine written T Rumpus The Rumpus—that —that schedule schedule ccontinues ontinues in in high high gear. gear. O On n June June 30, 30, S trayed aappears ppears at T oby’s Feed Feed d Strayed Toby’s B Barn in P oint R eyes Station ffor orr Point Reyes a conversation con nversation with P oint R eyes e Point Reyes B Book co-owner Kate Kate Levinson. Levinson n. Bookss co-owner Str ayed ssays ays th at ““shellshellStrayed that sshocked” hocked” best describes describes her her state state during d uring these these past past whirlwind whirlwind m onths. After After years years of ttoiling oiling aass months. a midli midlist st author, authorr, g gaining aining min minor or rrecognition e ognition for ec for her her first first n ovel, novel, T orch, and o and writing writing well-received well-received e Torch, es ssays ffor or n ational p ublication ns essays national publications

such such as as The Sun Sun and and New York Yor ok T imes Mag azine, th uccess of Times Magazine, thee ssuccess W Wild il ild ttook ook kh her er tto on new ew h heights. eights. i h E ven Reese Reese W itherspoon got in Even Witherspoon on th ction, p urch hasing th thee aaction, purchasing thee film rights ffor or th tthrough ough h er thee book thr her n ew m ovie pr oductiion ccompany. ompany. new movie production B But ut that that was was only only th thee beginnin beginning. g. In April, April, while while on a book-tour book-tour st op in Mil waukee, Strayed S ayed ttook Str ook stop Milwaukee, a ccall all fr om an unknown unknown num ber from number on h er cell cell phone. phone. It was was Oprah Oprah her W infrey. Winfrey. “I lo ved W iild sso o much, m infrey loved Wild much,”” W Winfrey ttold old h her, err, ““and and I w want antt to to rrestart estart the the book cl club ub ffor or y your our book. b book.”” “It w as stunnin g,” Strayed Strayed was stunning,” rrecalls, ecalls, w who ho h had ad tto ok keep eep th thee n news ews a ssecret, ecret, fr om eeveryone veryon o eb ut h er from but her hus band an dp ublishin h g people e, husband and publishing people, ffor or o ver a m onth. over month.

Within Strayed flew out W ithin n a week, week,, Str ayed fle wo ut visit Oprah’s Santa tto o vi sit O prah’s S anta Barbara Barbara estate, thee d day onee estat e, sspending p ding th pen ay with on thee m most thee of th o famous ost famous women women in th w orld. Th he tw o at unch ttogether, ogetherr, world. The two atee llunch ch atted ffor o hours or hours an d walked walked chatted and am ong the th he redwoods redwoods of th among thee multimill lion doll ar pr operty ffor or a multimillion dollar property tw o-pagee ph oto sspread pread in the the July July two-page photo iissue ssue of O Mag azine. “I love love this this Magazine. book. I want want a to to sshout hout it fr om th from thee m ountain ntop,” W infrey decl ares mountaintop,” Winfrey declares in th agazine. thee m magazine. It’ lm most eevery very aauthor’s uthor’s It’ss aalmost dr eam, b u ““even ut even with out th at, dream, but without that, w hat h appened with W iild w as what happened Wild was rreally eally int e se an en d am azing,” says says intense and amazing,” Str ayed. “I “ m ean, it had had its own own Strayed. mean, ssort ort of ssuccess uccess before before Oprah Oprah came came aalong, long, and and I was was plenty plenty grateful grateful to to th ng god s, th s. thee writin writing gods, thee book god gods. S ow hen th tthee Opr ah stuff ccame ame So when Oprah aalong, long, I was was just sort sort of stunn ed ed. stunned. I’m still st tunned.” stunned.” Sin ce, Strayed S ay Str yed h as been Since, has tr aveling th ountry y, m eeting traveling thee ccountry, meeting fan th he book, who who are are more more fanss of the th an willi ing to to sshare hare h ow much than willing how h er writin ng has has affected aff ffeected th em her writing them per sonallly. Th ah w ebsite personally. Thee Opr Oprah website iiss overflowing overflowing with praise praise fr om from people who who h ave been moved moved to to have ttears ears b y Str S ayed’s st ory aabout bout by Strayed’s story h er life-altering life-a e alt l ering ssolo olo tri p an d her trip and h er cconfrontation onfrontation with her her own own her fa llibility, aass sshe he tr ekked n orth on fallibility, trekked north th acifi fic C rest T rail. thee P Pacific Crest Trail. Y et, e the the book would would be the the same same Yet, w hether tw ttwo o people or 2 million whether people read read it, Strayed Strayed says. says. It w asn’t written wrritten with a ccall all fr om wasn’t from Opr ah in min d. Oprah mind. “I’ ve n ever written written an ything “I’ve never anything bec ause I th ought th arket because thought thee m market w ould ld lo llove ve it, iit,”” sshe he ssays. ays. “I writ ie would write bec ause it’ iit’ss what’s what’s in my my heart heart because or what’s what’s int eresting to to m e, and and interesting me, Iw ork v ery h ard on m y writin g. work very hard my writing. I definitely definitelly w ant rreaders eaders tto o want cconnect onnect with w m y writin g, don’ my writing, don’tt get m rong, b ut I aalso lso ffeel eel v ery mee wr wrong, but very gr ounded d in th ct th at I h ave grounded thee fa fact that have n o ccontrol ontrol o o ver th at, an d th at p art no over that, and that part of it iiss n ot aabout bout m e.” not me.”

F

or anyone anyone under under th thee im mpression that that Oprah’s Oprah’s impression Bo ook Club Club is is the the territory territory Book Wo omen n’s Novels Novels about about Women Wo omen of Women’s Doing Womanly Wo o anly Things om Things in Doing Very Unmanly Unm manly Ways, Ways, note note that that Very previous picks picks include include brutal brutal previous books like like The Road by by C ormac books Cormac


‘Be really mindful of not consenting to be small.’ Strayed makes no secret of her dislike for the continued and, as she puts it, “discrete” ways that women and men’s stories are vetted and marketed differently by publishers. She’s a founding member of VIDA: Women in Literary Arts, an organization that dedicates itself to making conscious the oftentimes unconscious framing that occurs based on gender. Last year, VIDA released a study titled “The Count” which revealed stark differences in the number of male bylines in national magazines such as The New Yorker, The Boston Review, The Atlantic and even The Nation versus female bylines. “We kept thinking, ‘Well, is it just us, or does it seem like The New Yorker publishes way more men than women?’” says Strayed. “Or, ‘Is it just us, or does it seem like books by women are talked about differently in reviews’— somehow made smaller or cuter or whatnot—whereas works by men were taken much more seriously?” From the start, Strayed was adamant that Wild not be framed in a way that made the story seem smaller or softer than it was. She requested a gender-neutral cover and wanted assurance that the memoir would be marketed to everyone, not just women. Still, among other things, she’s had to deal with male radio hosts who’ve said they read the book and loved it

before going on the air, but as soon as the show goes live, do the old fallback and describe it as a book for women. Strayed corrects them, saying, “No, that’s not true, I was really trying to tell a universal story. It’s not for women; it’s for people.” So what can writers do, specifically women writers, to avoid being categorized as less universal, less serious and, ultimately, somehow less important than male writers? “Be really mindful,” Strayed answers, “of not consenting to be small.” “Small” is the absolute last word that could be used to describe Wild, which tells, in gripping detail, the story of Strayed’s hike at the age of 26 along the 2,663 mile Pacific Coast Trail that spans from Mexico to Canada. Though she officially set off from the Mojave Desert in 1996, the true journey started four years earlier when Strayed’s mother, a nonsmoker and seemingly healthy 45-year-old, died a few weeks after being diagnosed with lung cancer. “Everything about myself had disappeared into the crack of her last breath,” Strayed writes in the book. Strayed, now in her early 40s, had a soul connection with her mother, and the death of the woman who had borne poverty, abuse and divorce as best she could, raising her children in an atmosphere of love, hit the 22-year-old Strayed with the impact of a sudden, natural disaster. Strayed details her slip into the wilds of her own fractured consciousness and her compulsion to escape her body, fissured by loss and despair, through meaningless sex with strangers. Eventually, she landed in Portland, where she began using heroin with an aimless gadabout punk-rock boyfriend. Her estranged husband drove seventeen hundred miles out from Minneapolis, brought her home, helped her get cleaned up, and soon after, sent her packing with divorce papers.

B

y the end of her fourmonth journey down the Pacific Coast Trail, when Strayed crosses the Bridge of the Gods over the Columbia River, she’s traveled 1,100 miles by foot, lost multiple toenails,

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27– JULY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

McCarthy, The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver, The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison and, yes, even Freedom by former Oprah denier Jonathan Franzen. He’s the author who famously expressed reservations when his novel The Corrections was chosen for the book club, saying on NPR’s Fresh Air that he worried it would be labeled as a book for women, therefore turning off male readers.

ON THE TRAIL Cheryl Strayed, along the Pacific Coast Trail, at Crater Lake.

survived countless injuries and one encounter with a bear. She’s learned how to ford a river, navigate with a compass, read a topographical map and stay alive in the wilds of California and Oregon. And she’s managed to come to relative peace with her mother’s passing. It might not be redemption—life is still messy and her mother is still dead—but it is a form of acceptance. All of these moments, from the breakdown of Strayed’s marriage under the strain of bone-drenching grief and subsequent cheating to having to shoot her mother’s beloved horse, Lady, in a frozen field, are told with unflinching, eloquent honesty. It’s a trademark of her writing, one that has earned her fierce fans, both under her own name and as Sugar, the Rumpus’

astoundingly wise advice columnist who addresses letter writers as “Sweet Pea.” When asked how she’s managed to cultivate what writer Steve Almond has called such “radical disclosure, radical honesty and radical empathy,” Strayed says that while the question is a hard one to answer, in the end it all comes down to the act of writing. “The writer’s job is to be honest. You’re really seeking that deeper level of truth and meaning,” she explains. “When you do that, it’s really hard to be judgmental of other people.” It’s this ability to embrace the beautiful mess that it is to be a human that makes Strayed’s writing so affecting. “I’m really just embracing complexity, what it means to be human, and ) 24


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INTO THE WOODS Strayed’s 1,100-mile journey took four long months.

inevitably that leads you, when you do that, to a very sincere and radical place,” she says, pointing out that the word “radical” actually means “root.” “It’s that root place where we’re all human, and we’re all forgiven, and we’re also all implicated,” she says. “We’re also responsible for the good and the bad things in our lives, collectively and individually.” At the same time that Strayed is able to look into the dark recesses without flinching, she’s also warm and generous with an easy laugh. We share a moment of fun when I jokingly say that now that she’s a darling of the Oprah scene, it might be time to let it all go, get out the hammock, drink margaritas and buy an island. “It was so funny, when Wild was ramping up for publication, whenever a good thing would happen I would text my friend and say, ‘I’m not stopping until I have a pool boy,’” she says, laughing. “But lately I’ve been thinking, ‘Wait a minute? What is a pool boy?’ I guess I’d need to get a pool first. But I live in Portland, Oregon, which is sort of problematic because there’s only about six weeks in the year when you could actually use the pool, so maybe I need to rethink the goal.” When I suggest that she’ll need to move to L.A. for a pool, she says with another laugh, “Yeah, then I

become a cliché, don’t I? Move to Hollywood and have a pool boy.” That’s probably not going to happen anytime soon, especially since Strayed lives a happily settled life in the Pacific Northwest with her husband, filmmaker Brian Lindstrom, and their two young children (when she’s not touring or teaching workshops at places like the Esalen Institute in Big Sur). If anything, the last thing Strayed will ever be is a cliché. When I read back to her a quote from Wild I’d written in my own journal, one about being mindful always and developing herself as a writer, and ask if she’s fulfilled this promise to herself, Strayed says that amazingly she has. Though, she adds the caveat that there’s never one place that you arrive at only to stay there. “That vision is still my vision,” she says. “I still want to develop myself as a writer, I still want to develop myself as a human being. I always feel like reaching for the next thing is a big, important part of having a fulfilled life, a good life, and so I do think that I’ve done that, and that I’ll keep doing that.”

Cheryl Strayed appears in conversation about ‘Wild’ on Saturday, June 30, at Toby’s Feed Barn. 11250 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes Station. 7:30pm. The cost is the purchase of a $10 bookstore gift certificate. 415.663.1542.


25

The week’s events: a selective guide

Crush S A N TA R O S A

The Burgers Are Ronald’s

Though I discovered his name wasn’t Michael McDonald somewhere around kindergarten, Michael McDonnell was my childhood next-door neighbor and close friend, and became the star of my sister’s baptism party when he streaked through it as a pre-schooler. Mad TV’s Michael McDonald made middle school enjoyable as “Stuart,” and Michael McDonald of Modesto became World Extreme Cagefighting’s youngest fighter when he signed on at age 19. Of course, the most famous Michael McDonald is the goateed former Doobie Brother, who plays alongside Donald Fagen and Boz Scaggs as the Dukes of September on Wednesday, June 27, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. $90.50–$140.50. 8pm. 707.546.3600.

FA I R FA X

Fabolous Spelling

Fabolous’ big braek came on a radiow show his senyur year of high school, where a live rap cession led to a contrakt with Desert Storm Records. Sinse then, Fabolous has lived in luxshury, once dropping $45,000 on champain and later spending $28,000 on a rainstorm in an Atlanta stripp club. Tho known for his secrisy, this Brooklyn nativ stays loyal to fans, producing qualitee music on his free mixtapes and tweeting prowlifically. Put yor hands in the aeer when Fabolous takes the mic on Friday, June 29, at 19 Broadway. 17 Broadway Blvd., Fairfax. $45. 10pm. 415.459.1091.

SA N R A FA E L

All’s Fair “Walking aimlessly. Seas of fairgoing flesh, plodding, elbowing, looking, still eating. They stand placidly in long lines. . . . Don’t the fairgoers mind the crowds, lines, noise? But the state fair is deliberately about the crowds and jostle, the noise and overload of sight and event. . . . The real spectacle that draws us here is us,” wrote David Foster Wallace in his darkly comical “Ticket to the Fair.” Wallace was brilliant, but he got it all wrong: what draws us are the churros. Decide for yourself from June 30 to July 4 at the Marin County Fair, with concerts by Joan Jett, the Temptations, Steel Pulse and others, at the Marin Center Fairgrounds. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. $14–$16. 415.473.7048.

N A PA

Keep On Truckin’

SON OF A GUN Justin Townes Earle plays the Kate Wolf Festival, running June 29–July 1. See Concerts, p30.

Why do those fat-ass pickup trucks gunning around town need to be as loud as helicopters? In the cases of those who compete in the Truck and Tractor Pull, it’s because they actually are helicopters— under the hood, anyway. Though easy to resent on suburban streets, these blaring engines and plumes of black smoke hark back to Napa’s agricultural roots. Bring your earplugs on Saturday, June 30, to the Napa Valley Expo Fairgrounds. 575 Third St., Napa. $16–$20. 5pm. 707.224.5403.

—Jay Scherf

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el Brooks’ Producers has had quite a ride, evolving from cult classic 1968 film to 2001 Broadway monster to its current status as a popular community theater staple. Not bad, given that the show’s primary selling point is tastelessness. This is a show that combines showstopping musical numbers with fraud, lechery, geriatric sex, dancing Nazis, spinning swastikas and a superswishy gay Hitler.

Of course, modern American musical theater is all about pushing the boundaries while simultaneously serving audiences who want good singable songs and great big laughs. In the new season-closing production at Sixth Street Playhouse, director Craig Miller walks that line, maintaining just enough Brooksian

tastelessness to please fans of big, broad comedy, while using the somewhat overstuffed enterprise as a showcase for a spectrum of local talent, young and old. The story is essentially the same as in the movie. Unscrupulous Broadway producer Max Bialystock (a strong-voiced Matlock Zumsteg, best known for his local improv troupe the World’s Biggest Comedy Duo) teams up with neurotic bookkeeper Bloom (Jeff Coté, who struggles a bit with the songs but delivers plenty of farce). Convinced that they can make more money from a flop than a hit, they set out to produce the worst play they can find, settling on a script titled Springtime for Hitler, a loony labor of love by a closeted Nazi pigeon-keeper named Franz Liebkind (a hilariously committed Mark Bradbury). Then there’s the flamboyantly untalented director Roger De Bris (Larry Williams, charmingly offensive as the gayest of gay stereotypes), and the sexy wannabe actress Ulla, played to the bombshell max by April Krautner. Crammed with theatrical insidejokes (“I’m the man who invented theater-in-the-square! Nobody gets a good seat!”), the show is a bit overlong, with the actors milking the spaces between lines a bit too often, and the orchestra (under the spirited direction of Janis Dunson Wilson) hitting more than its share of key-challenged notes. But it’s the joyously naughty energy of the large cast that makes the whole thing work. A bit of tightening would serve the show well, but as The Producers moves into the last three weekends of its five-week run, there’s no denying that it proves, once and for all, that sometimes bad taste can be a good thing. ‘The Producers’ runs Thursday– Sunday through July 15 at Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm Thursday–Saturday, 2pm Sundays, with additional Saturday matinees on June 30, July 7 and July 14. $15–$35. 707.523.4185.


PILLOW TALK Emily Blunt and Rosemarie DeWitt cope in Lynn Shelton’s drama.

Sibling Fling One-night stands and acts of rage in ‘Your Sister’s Sister’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

L

ynn Shelton’s Your Sister’s Sister is the best argument for Mark Duplass we’ve had so far. Duplass has been working hard in the indie vineyard, and here he plays Jack, a bitter, unemployed Seattleite. The brother’s ex, Iris (Emily Blunt, swallowing and kind of choking on her British accent), offers Jack her family’s vacation home in Puget Sound as a refuge. Unbeknownst to Jack, Iris’ big sister, Hannah (Rosemarie DeWitt), is there already, recovering from the break-up of her own long-term relationship with a woman. Jack and Hannah get into the tequila, and then into the sack. Matters are complicated by Iris’ hurt feelings and Hannah’s hidden agenda. Director Lynn Shelton goes for the realistically unkempt look in dress as well as bed: the wardrobe of hoods, flannels and thermals complements the wild night (spoiler: Jack comes too soon). The wit is in the slyness of the come-on: “I would be super-open to this,” is Jack’s passive way of trying to lure this lesbian into a man’s bed. Seeing Hannah, it’s as if the call went out for a young Catherine Keener. They certainly found her. Rosemarie DeWitt had the title role in Rachel Getting Married, and was also Midge in Mad Men, the woman who catalyzed that Ozu-like passage where Don Draper was, without any warning, transfixed by a folk song about Babylon. Here, she’s a lowdown moqueuse: when Jack pays her body a heavy compliment, she picks her tooth with her fingernail to show how touched she is. Your Sister’s Sister is capped with a token, petty act of rage that’s meant to look existential but looks more like street vandalism. Shelton gives her actors room to play—Duplass looks sly and clever for once—but the shaggy, unfocused quality of Shelton’s dramas leaves the story to go in only one direction: the realm of too-easy reconciliation and affirmation. ‘Your Sister’s Sister’ opens Friday, June 29, at Summerfield Cinemas.

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NEW MOVIES Magic Mike (R; 110 min.) Steven Soderberghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest stars Channing Tatum as a veteran male stripper teaching the ropes to newcomer Alex Pettyfer. With Matthew McConaughey. (GB)

People Like Us (PG-13; 95 min.) Drama stars Chris Pine and Elizabeth Banks as siblings who discover each other after the death of their wealthy father in the directorial debut from the co-creator of Fringe. (GB)

Pink Ribbons, Inc. (NR; 97 min.) Documentary based on Samantha Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book of the same name looks at the misuse of an important cause by corporations looking to improve their image. At the Smith Rafael Film Center. (GB) Take This Waltz (R; 116 min.) Actress Sarah Polleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second film as director stars Michelle Williams as a happily married woman who must come to terms with her growing feelings for the neighbor. With Seth Rogen, Luke Kirby and Sarah Silverman. (GB) Ted (R; 106 min.) John Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) finds the teddy bear he wished for in childhood cramping his attempt to embrace adulthood in comedy from the creator of Family Guy. (GB) Your Sisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sister (R; 90 min. ) A man recovering from the death of his brother falls for his friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gay sister. See review, p27.

ALSO PLAYING Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (R; 105 min.) Latest example of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ailing state of literature makes it to the big screen. Co-produced by Tim Burton. (GB)

The Avengers (PG-13; 142 min.) Marvel Studios rounds up characters from recent hits for an ensemble superhero thriller directed by Joss Whedon. Stars Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man), Chris Evans (Captain America), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), Samuel L . Jackson and Scarlett Johansson. (GB) Bernie (R; 104 min.) Richard (Slacker, School of Rock) Linklaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest stars Jack Black as

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Texas mortician, choir leader and murderer Bernie Tiede. Based on a true story. Co-stars Shirley MacLaine and Matthew McConaughey. (GB)

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG-13; 124 min.) John Madden (Shakespeare in Love) directs an all-star cast playing British retirees in India in adaptation of Deborah Moggachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel These Foolish Things. (GB)

Brave (PG; 93 min.) In Pixarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest, a

young princess in ancient Scotland must use her skills as an archer to reverse a curse put on her family. With the voices of Kelly Macdonald (Gosford Park), Emma Thompson and Billy Connolly. (GB)

Hysteria (R; 100 min.) Maggie Gyllenhaal and Hugh Darcy star in romantic comedy set in Victorian England about the invention of the vibrator. (GB) Madagascar 3: Europeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted (PG; 85 min.) Still trying to get back to New York, the gang find themselves in a traveling circus show in Europe. With the voices of Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, Martin Short and Frances McDormand. (GB)

Men in Black 3 (PG-13; 106 min.) Agent J (Will Smith) travels back in time to 1969 to save a young Agent K (Josh Brolin)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the planetâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in third installment of hit sci-fi comedy. Also stars Tommy Lee Jones. (GB) Monsieur Lazhar (PG-13; 94 min.) An Algerian immigrant recovering from a personal tragedy fills in for a classroom whose former teacher committed suicide. (GB) Moonrise Kingdom (PG-13; 94 min.) In September 1965, gifted 12-year-olds Suzy and Sam head off to the wilderness of a fictional New England island, not knowing Hurrican Maybelline is heading for them. Directed by Wes Anderson (Rushmore, Fantastic Mr. Fox) with dollhouse aesthetics and New Yorker cartoon punch lines. (RvB)

Prometheus (R; 124 min.) Ridley Scott directs this (sort of) sequel to the Alien franchise about the link between the aliens and humanityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s origins. Co-stars Charlize Theron, Guy Pearce and Noomi Rapace (Girl with the Dragon Tattoo). (GB)

Rock of Ages (PG-13; 123 min.) Teens dream of rock stardom on L.A.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sunset Strip in adaptation of Broadway musical set in 1987. With Russel Brand, Tom Cruise, Mary J. Blige, Catherine Zeta-Jones, and featuring â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70sâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s radio staples by Journey, Foreigner, Bon Jovi, REO Speedwagonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;stuff like that. (GB) Seeking a Friend for the End of the World (R; 101 min.) Romcom set against the destruction of the planet co-stars Steve Carrell and Keira Knightley. (RvB)

Snow White and the Huntsman (PG-13; 127 min.) Fantasy-action adaptation of the fairy tale stars Kristen Stewart and Chris Hemsworth, with Charlize Theron as the evil queen. (GB)

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s My Boy (R; 114 min.) Adam Sandler plays a down-and-out schmuck trying to reconnect with the now-rich son he had 20 years ago. Co-stars Andy Samberg. Directed by the writer of Hot Tub Time Machine! (GB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com


JUNKYARDERS What instrument

will Fishtank Ensemble play next?

To the Gills

Fishtank Ensemble time-travel for hybrid sound BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

A

s long as the inhabitants can tolerate the same water, it’s a good bet there’ll be a wide variety of colors, shapes and sizes in any given fish tank. The same holds true for Gypsy jazz group Fishtank Ensemble, which blends Gypsy, jazz, flamenco, folk, rockabilly, tango, rock, pop and more to create a truly unique sound. The group, based in Los Angeles, has been playing in the United States for seven years. But the European influence is undeniable—Serbian upright slap bassist Djordje Stijepovic has led many Serbian bands, not to mention rockabilly and bluegrass groups in America; French violinist Fabrice Martinez spent about seven years hitchhiking

Fishtank Ensemble plays Thursday, June 28, at 142 Throckmorton (142 Throckmorton, Mill Valley; 8pm; $18–$28) and Friday, June 29, at the Cloverdale Plaza (100 Broad St., Cloverdale; 7pm; Free).

29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27– JULY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

through Europe with various musical instruments; and guitarist Douglas Smolens is an accomplished flamenco and Gypsy jazz player. Classically trained singer Ursula Knudson hails from Sacramento and plays theremin, ukulele, and, after joining Fishtank Ensemble, was inspired to learn the musical saw. “I guess I seek out nontraditional instruments,” she says. Knudson mimics her own voice on the saw so well that at times it’s difficult to distinguish between the two. Then again, her own voice is so versatile, maybe she’s mimicking the saw. “I guess I thought it was nerdy,” she says. “I didn’t want to be that girl who could only sing opera.” Her singing is highlighted on the band’s third album, Woman in Sin, in a stripped-down version of “Fever.” The tension lets loose in the next track with “Djordje’s Rachenitza,” an accordion, violin and bass tune in 5/8 time that would be a sin not to dance to. Stijepovic’s virtuoso slap bass finds its way into Gypsy and flamenco just as well as rockabilly and bluegrass; the refreshing sound brings a punk energy. There’s also a hefty Django Reinhardt influence from Smolens. This hybrid sound is aided by instrument selection. The violintrombo is a peculiar instrument made of the body and strings of a violin with a long trumpet bell attached to the bridge giving it a loud, honky, Victrola sound. And though it’s no longer part of the band, the group once featured the shamisen, a Japanese lute instrument. The banjolele will also feature in the upcoming concerts. The ukulele with the body and timbre of a banjo is one of those unexpected but wonderful combinations of sound. “It’s not my main instrument, but it gives a unique kick to the show,” Knudson says. As if Fishtank Ensemble needed more quirks.


Music

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 27â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JULY 3, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Catfish Jack Harmonica, guitar and vocals come together to make the blues. Featuring Maria Villaboy on bass. Jun 30, 2pm. free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

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Donald Fagen, Michael McDonald and Boz Scaggs perform together as the Dukes of September Rhythm Revue. Jun 27, 8pm. $90.50 to $140.50. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Friday Night Live Cloverdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer-long series features Fishtank Ensemble on Jun 29. Through Aug 31, 7pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

J Boog & Katchafire The Samoan singer brings his California flavor to the all-Maori reggae band. Jun 27, 8:30pm. $30-$35. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

KRSH Backyard Concerts Hang out in stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s backyard and listen to tunes from Blind Pilot on Jul 5. 6pm. Free. KRSH, 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.9999.

Summer Nights on the Green Outdoor summer shows in Windsor include Tom Rigney and Flambeau on Jun 28, Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings on Jul 5. 6pm. Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

TRADJASS First Sun every month, catch these Dixieland strutters. First Sunday of every month. $10. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Tuesdays on the Plaza Summer concert series in Healdsburg plaza features Solid Air on Jul 3. 6pm. Free. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg.

MARIN COUNTY Fabolous You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deny it, the fabulous Fabolous is still doinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; his thing in the hip-hop world. Jun 29, 9pm. $45. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Marin Fair Concerts Free concerts with fair admission include MarchFourth Marching Band (Jun 30), Dickey Betts (Jun 30), Starship (Jul 1), Los Lobos (Jul 1), Joan Jett (Jul 2), Steel Pulse (Jul 3), Preservation Hall Jazz Band (Jul 4) and the Temptations (Jul 4). For more info, see marinfair.org. Marin Fairgrounds, 10 Ave. of the Flags, San Rafael.

Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band Barbecue on the lawn at Peter Rowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday bash. Jul 1, 3pm. $20. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Zydeco Flames Barbecue on the lawn and get down to some Nawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;lins boogie. Jul 4, 3pm. $10 to $15. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

BEYOND Kate Wolf Festival Annual fest honoring the great Kate Wolf features Lucinda Williams, Justin Townes Earle, Richard Thompson, KD Lang, Jimmy LaFave, Loudon Wainwright and many more. Jun 29-Jul 1. Black Oak Ranch, Laytonville. For ful info, see www.katewolfmusicfestival.com.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aubergine Jun 28, Ancestree, Midnight Sun Massive, Counter Culture. Jun 28, Danjula. Jun 29, Baba Fats. Jun 30, Daniel Crook, These Paper Satellites, Couteaux and Grader. Tues, 7pm, ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; limelight open mic with Tawnie. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. ) 707.874.9037.

32

OUT COME THE WOLVES Los Lobos rock the Marin Fair July 1. See Concerts, above.


ŵų NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Buy tickets at livenation.com. To charge by phone (800) 745-3000. Limit 8 tickets per person. All dates, acts and ticket prices are subject to change without notice. All tickets are subject to applicable service charges.


Music ( 30

32 NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 27â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JULY 3, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Doc Hollidayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Saloon C74 0CA4=0?0

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Wed, Jun 27 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Jun 28 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Jun 29 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

Sat, Jun 30 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm North Bay Country Dance Society/ Contra Dance hosts THE NEWTS Sun, Jul 1 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm

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8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther presents A NIGHTCLUB TWO-STEP PARTY

8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10

Mon, Jul 2 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues,Jul 3 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise BRAZILIAN SAMBA MUSIC AND DANCE with Victoria Strowbridge

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Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

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1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

$PSOHSDUNLQJ

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW Sun

July 1

BBQ ON THE LAWN!

THE PETER ROWAN BLUEGRASS BAND AND

SPECIAL GUESTS THE ROWAN BROTHERS Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm

################# 4TH OF JULY BBQ ON THE LAWN ! July 4 ANNUAL CELEBRATION WITH THE Wed

THE ZYDECO FLAMES

### Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm ## LIPBONE REDDING July 6 Returns Solo! 8:00pm / No Cover

Mon, DJ Mixxxa. Tues, Family Karaoke. Wed, Country Music Wednesdays. 138 Calistoga Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.623.5453.

First Edition Sun, Open Mic Night hosted by Carl and Paul Green. 1420 E Washington Ave, Petaluma. 707.775.3200.

Flamingo Lounge Jun 29, Fusion. Jun 30, Groove Foundation. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Frank and Ernieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jul 3, Undercover. 9 Mitchell Lane, Healdsburg. 707.433.2147.

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Jun 27, Shade. Jun 28, Wine Country Swing. Jun 29, Greenhouse (Celtic). 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Galeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Central Club Jun 28, Tito, Gorgeous Birdman & Dig Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. 106 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.0118.

Hopmonk Tavern Jun 28, Fire Fly with Supervision. Jun 30, Walking Spanish & Vandella. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Inn at the Tides

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Fri

Sat, Maple Profant. Bay View Restaurant. 800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 800.541.7788.

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jun 27, Stephan Jacobs. Jun 29, Top Rakin Reggae Showcase. Jun 30, Juke Junkies and Brite Lites. Jul 3, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Last Saturday of every month, Good Hip-Hop. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

STOMPY JONES July 7 The Coolest Swing 8:30pm

Lagunitas Tap Room

Sun

BEATLE Q ON THE LAWN!

Fri

Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm BBQ ON THE LAWN! A Retro Honky Tonk/ Rockabilly Revue

Jun 27, Iowa Blues Joe & Vicki Price. Jun 28, the Deadlies. Jun 29, Ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Misbehavinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Jun 30, Danny Montana & the Bar Association. Jul 1, Deborah Crooks. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Sat

July 8 July 15

Sun

THE SUN KINGS

DEKE DICKERSON, RED MEAT, T B-S

TARS AND HE Gates Open at 2:00pm, Music at 3:00pm BBQ ON THE LAWN! UTCH HACKS AND THE LASS ACKS Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm BBQ ON THE LAWN! 2ND ANNUAL CAJUN FEST WITH EAUSOLEIL UARTET AVEC

July 22 B Sun

July 29

G

W

P

B Q MICHAEL DOUCET & TOM RIGNEY AND FLAMBEAU

Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Come see us! Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

Last Day Saloon Jun 28, Clear Conscience, Herb in Movement, Arden Park Roots. Jun 29, Invasionâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;A Tribute to an Era, Strange Cabbage. Jul 1, The Mission Gold Jazz Band, T.R.A.D. J.A.S.S.. Mon, karaoke. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pick-Me-Up Revue. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

KICK UP THOSE BOOTHEELS

The Zydeco Flames play an outdoor Fourth of July barbecue at Rancho Nicasio. See Concerts, p30. Main Street Station

Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Jun 28, Susan Sutton. Jun 29, Susan Sutton trio. Jun 30, Frankye Kelly. Jul 1, Cazadero Jazz Project. Tues, Maple Profant piano noir. Sun, Kit Mariahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open mic. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Jun 29, Bowpriest. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe

Jun 28, Two on a Match. Jun 29, the David Thom Band. Jun 30, Blue House. Jul 1, Acoustic Celtic Jam. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Jun 29, Brian Francis. Jul 1, Organix Guitarâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Music & Mimosas. Jul 2, Rock Overtime Student Performance. Tues, 6:30pm, SSU night open mic and poetry reading. Thurs, 7:30pm, open mic. First Sunday of every month, Music and Mimosas. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Mystic Theatre

Riverside Bistro

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

Jun 27, J Boog and Katchafire. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Northwood Restaurant Thurs, 7pm, Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

Papaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Taverna Jun 29, Carl and Paul Green. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

Phoenix Theater Jun 29, Boo Radleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House, 26MPH, the Illness. Jun 30, Digital Chaos Dance, Daggerpoint, Blaus, JasonH. Mon, 7pm, young peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Fourth Thursday of every month, writers workshops. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Russian River Brewing Co Jul 1, Jason Bodlovich. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Society: Culture House Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jun 27, Comedy Night.


Lemish Trio. Jun 29, Passion Habanera. Jun 30, Bob Johnson Quartet. 27 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room

Jun 27, Swoop Unit. Jun 28, Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jam Sammich. Jun 29, Vinyl. Jun 30, Sage. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Station House Cafe

Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Toad in the Hole Pub First Sunday of every month, Robert Herrera, Brianna Lee, Josh Barrett. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Sausalito Seahorse

Jun 29, Iowa Blues Joe & Vicki Price. Jun 30, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Jun 27, Marcello & Seth. Jun 28, Peter Welker with Deborah Winters. Jun 29, Alligator. Jun 30, Freddy Clark. Jun 30, Lady D. Jul 1, Orquesta La Moderna Tradicion. Mon, local talent onstage. Tues, jazz jam. Wed, Marcello and Seth. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Wells Fargo Center

Sleeping Lady

Tradewinds

Jun 27, Donald Fagen, Michael McDonald & Boz Scaggs. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Jun 28, Fishtank Ensemble. Jun 29, Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora. Jun 30, Danny Click and the Americana Orchestra. Mon, Open Mic with Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Jun 27, Jack Irvingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Songwriter Showcase. Jun 28, Amber Morrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Classic Rock Workshop. Jun 29, Revolver. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Sat, 2pm, juke jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jun 28, Devineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jug Band. Jun 29, Jazz Jam with Michael Pinkim. Jun 30, Salsa Cumbia.

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden International Vegetarian Buffet

Jun 29, Pete Lind Jazz Trio. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Wed, June 27, 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Contemporary Jazz

Shade

NAPA COUNTY

Thur, June 28, 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Guitar and Pedal Steel!

Billcoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Billiards Jun 28, Later Dayz. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Calistoga Inn Wed, Fri, Tom Duarte. Thurs, Taylor Brown. Sat, Lloyd Gregory. Mon, Tues, Alvon. Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant Jun 30, Captain Crunch. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wednesday, Battle of the Bands. Jun 29, West Coast Songwriters Competition. Jun 30, Cosmos Percussion Orchestra. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Wine Country Swing Fri, June 29, 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11 pm 5 cover, $4 min or $15 for dinner & show Funk, Fusion, Blues and Soul Roger Volz & the Allstars Thur, July 5, 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm Eclectic Mandolin, Guitar, Bass & Vocals

$

Slowpoke &RI *ULY nPMsPoetry & Music

The Activistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lounge Sat, July 7, 8-10pm Queen of the Boogie Woogie!

Wendy Dewitt Mon, July 9, 6-8pm Literary Salon ~ Meeting & Reading

Dine with Local Authors Wed, July 11, 7-9pm Unplugged, Traditional Folk Music

The French Session $

&INE"EERS7INESs 5 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

707.544.2491 www.gaiasgardenonline.com

No Name Bar First Monday of every month, 8:30pm, Kimrea. Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

FIREFLY F IREFLY

((OUTDOOR OUTDOOR P PERFORMING ERFORMING FFIRE IRE A ARTS RTS S SHOW) HOW)

WITH W ITH SU SUPERVISION PERVISION

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San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Andy Rourke Yes, that Andy Rourkeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the bassist from the Smiths lays down a DJ set at Popscene. Jun 28 at the Rickshaw Stop.

El-P Landmark hip-hop producer plays with Killer Mike and Mr. Muthafuckinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; eXquire. Jun 29 at Regency Ballroom.

Keane Brit band from Sussex celebrates new album â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strangelandâ&#x20AC;? with free in-store. Jun 29 at Amoeba SF.

Mickey Hart Grateful Dead drummer experiments by turning wavelengths from outer space into sound. Jun 30 at the Fillmore.

Casualties

Old Western Saloon Jun 29, Tyler Crosby. Jun 30, Chris Zenardi & the High Beamz. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Jun 27, Lau Paiva. Jun 28, Noam

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Jun 27, the Fibrillators. Jun 27, Sonny Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tao of Rock. Jun 28, Trainwreck. Jun 29, Fabolous. MoJul 1, Phil Hardgrave. Jul 4, Pure Cane. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

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Jun 30, Trio Garufa. Jul 1, Sweet Can Circus. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

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Jun 30, Rudy Colombini & the Unauthorized Rolling Stones. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

33

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Jun 29, Feral Moon Band. Jun 30, AquaNet. Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 27– JULY 3, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Arts Events Galleries OPENINGS Jun 28 At 7pm. Occidental Center for the Arts, “Anything Goes” features members bringing ready-tohang art. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Jun 30 At 2pm. RiskPress Gallery, “She Eats Cheetos with Chopsticks,” work of painter Naomi Murakami. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Jul 1 From 3 to 5pm. Gallery Route One, group show of member artists, with Mimi Abers, Candace Loheed and others. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

SONOMA COUNTY Aubergine Through Jun 30, Various artworks by Dan Katra on display, with new permanent installation by Stanley Mouse. Free. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Calabi Gallery Through Aug 19, “Art Inspired by the Natural World” with work from Fran Hardy, Alexander Loemans and others. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

City Hall Council Chambers Jul 3-Aug 22, “The Abstract in Reality,” paintings by Dana Vallarino. Dynamic abstracts are full of rich color and texture. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Cornerstone Sonoma Through Jul 31, Christopher Scott’s original paintings and giclee prints on display, presented by Zipper. Through

Sep 30, “Heads Up,” the human head interpreted by seven sculptors in different mediums. 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. Daily 10-4 707.933.3010.

Finley Center Through Aug 9, “Pointless Sisters’ Art Quilt Show” features work of local contemporary quilters. Reception, Jun 21 at 5pm. 2 060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1. 707.543.3737.

Finley Community Center Through Aug 9, “Fiber Art,” by the Pointless Sisters features fiber art and wall quilts. Through Aug 9, the Redwood Empire Model Shipwrights display mini boats for mini oceans. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gaia’s Garden Through Jun 29, expressive landscape paintings by Felicia McFall with photography from the SRJC intermediate class. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 707.544.2491.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Aug 4, “Alchemy of Seasons” features Becoming Independent and community artists, including Genevieve and Raymond Barnhart and others. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Garagiste Healdsburg Through Jul 31, Caitlin McCaffrey shows abstract photographs taken in San Francisco’s Chinatown at night. 439 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.8023.

Graton Gallery Through Jul 8, “Soo Noga: Abstract Paintings in Oil” features JeriLu Breneman and others. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Jul 28, “Landau, Miller and Vogel” features the work of Frank J Miller, James Vogel and Natasha Landau. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Jul 3-30, “River and Stream” honors the flow of life that rivers and streams generously share with man. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Local Color Gallery Through Jul 15, “Three for the Show” features colorful land and seascape paintings by Jody Shipp, Leslie Zumwalt and Andrea Way. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

Occidental Center for the Arts

EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY ‘Red, White and Boom’ features live music, BBQ and

Jun 28, 7pm, “Anything Goes” features members of the center bringing any kind of ready-to-hang art. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

fireworks on July 4 at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds. See Events, adjacent.

25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Pelican Art

Quicksilver Mine Company

Through Jun 30, “Art at the Source” with over 40 artists presents a preview exhibit. 143 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Open Tues-Thurs and Sat, 11 to 6; Fri, 11 to 8; SunMon by appointment only. 707.773.3393.

Petaluma Arts Center Jul 3, 7:30pm, Botanical Artist and Quiltmaker Nina Antze demonstrates the magic of colored pencils. Jun 29Sep 9, Local artists present altered (photoshopped) photos combined with mixed media. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Museum and Library Through Jul 1, Developed by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, this unique exhibit tells the remarkable story of soldiers from more than a dozen tribes who used their native languages while in service in the US military. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. WedSat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on MonTues. 707.778.4398.

Quercia Gallery Through Jun 30, “Our River, Our Ocean,” featuring paintings of Sonoma County landscapes by Heather P McConnell and sculpture by Colin Lambert.

Through Jul 1, “Stardust: Reflections on Nature and Existence” presents the work of Christiane Michaela Vincent. Jun 14, artist talk. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

RiskPress Gallery Jun 30-Jul 31, “She Eats Cheetos with Chopsticks,” the work of painter Naomi Murakami. Receptions, Jun 30, 2pm and Jul 26, 5pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jul 8, “New Yosemite Perpective” featuring paintings by Jeffrey Williams. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Russian River Art Gallery Through Jul 2, “River, Redwoods and Recollections” features works focusing on nostalgia, memories and the authenticity of life on the river. 16200 First St, Guerneville. Daily, 10 to 6. 707.869.9099.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Jul 21, “Borders// Boundaries” explores the concept of geographical, psychological and other boundaries. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Aug 12, “Spontaneous Journeys” features Teri Sloat’s landscapes and folk art. Reception, Jul 14, 5pm. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma Community Center Through Jun 29, “Processing” featuring recent clay works by Tyler Nansen. 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. Daily, 7:30am to 11pm. 707.579.ARTS.

Sonoma County Museum Through Aug 12, 11am-5pm, “Santa Rosa’s Chinatown,” exhibition explores how Chinese communities developed in Sonoma County, with special attention to Santa Rosa’s Chinatown. $5-$7. Through Sep 9, “Trees” featuring the large-scale oil paintings of Chester Arnold. Through Sep 9, “Sonoma Oaks: Points of View” featuring Hugh Livingston’s multimedia installations on the patterns and sounds of California oak habitats. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Sep 13, “Cross Pollination,” the art of painter Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Reception Jun 22, 6pm. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center Jun 27-16, “Chance Encounters”

features photography by Don Kelsey with images from the last 40 years. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

MARIN COUNTY Alemany Library Gallery Through Jun 29, “MSA Past Presidents’ Show” features the work of more than 30 MSA past presidents’ work. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3251.

Art Works Downtown Jun 29-Aug 3, “Still Lifes,” curated by Jennifer Farris and Rab Terry, features 42 artists in different media. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Aug 18, “Journeys: Chronicles in Clay,” featuring the work of Terra Linda ceramic artists. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jul 4, Gallery artists Bryn Craig, Ruperto Cadiz and others display new work. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Marin Community Foundation Through Sep 28, “Beyond Landscape” features artwork focused on sustaining nature and taking care of the planet. Reception, Jun 28, 4:30pm. 5


Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Golden Gate Bridge, an Icon That Changed the World,â&#x20AC;? historical exhibit. Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. Tues-Fri, plus second and third Sat monthly, 11 to 4. 415.454.8538.

Marin MOCA Through Jul 15, Summer National Juried Exhibition judged by Lucinda Barnes. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hidden Places, Fleeting Moments,â&#x20AC;? features work by MSA members in all media. Through Jun 30, 2-4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nurturing the Creative Sparkâ&#x20AC;? featuring works in all media by the Golden Gate Artists branch of the National League of American Pen Women. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jun 28, Ninth annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wabi-Sabi Showâ&#x20AC;? features mixed-media group exhibit curated by Marico Chigyo. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Jun 29, Retrospective of the acrylics, drawings and various other media of Jackie Kirk. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elizabeth Gorek: Embodied,â&#x20AC;? featuring the work of painter Elizabeth Gorek. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Smith Anderson North Gallery Through Aug 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Williams, Waitsâ&#x20AC;? features the work of Franklin Williams and Kellesimone Waits, who share a playful obsession for acquiring and incorporating discarded relics. 20 Greenfield Ave, San Anselmo. 415.457.8847.

Tobyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feed Barn Through Jun 30, Student art presented by Gallery Route Oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Artist in the Schools Program. 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes

Slack Collective Art Studios and Gallery, 964 Pearl Street, Ste B, Napa.

Back Roads Productions proudly presents

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Sep 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Entering the Wildâ&#x20AC;? featuring the work of Trish Carney, Adriane Colburn and others. Ongoing, gallery open and tours given daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Ongoing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Momentum: Art that Moves (Us),â&#x20AC;? second annual interactive public art exhibition ARTwalk. Free.. 707.257.2117. First Street and Town Center, Napa.

Gordon Huether Gallery Ongoing, round two of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art on F1RST.â&#x20AC;? Evolving exhibition of Gordon Huetherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine art. Ongoing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Metal Meddle,â&#x20AC;? featuring new work by Gordon Huether. 1465 First Street, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Hess Collection Winery Ongoing, outstanding private collection featuring work by Franz Gertsch, Robert Motherwell and other modern masters. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. Daily, 10 to 5:15. 707.255.1144.

Napa Valley Museum Through Aug 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Modernâ&#x20AC;? features the abstract expressionist paintings of Ira Yeager. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Paula Poundstone Spend an evening laughing with the star of NPRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wait, Wait...Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Tell Me.â&#x20AC;? Jun 28, 8pm. $25-$80. Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts, Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

The Unwatchables Live improv and sketch comedy. Jun 29, 7pm. Free.

Dance Dhyana Center Lofts Last Thursday of every month, Catalyst Community Dance, Monthly community dance party with various DJs and prayer rituals. 186 N Main St, Sebastopol 800.796.6863.

K.D. LANG & THE SISS BOOM BANG LUCINDA WILLIAMS LEFTOVER SALMON RICHARD THOMPSON RUTHIE FOSTER TEXAS TORNADOS

Events Calistoga Art Walk Follow the signs and view art with strolling tour of shops and galleries. First Wed-Thurs of every month, 5-7pm. Free. Downtown Calistoga, Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.225.1003.

Ecstatic Raga Singing Class Come open your heart into the bliss of the sweetness of the sacred ragas with Sukhawat Ali Khan. Wed, 7:30pm. $15. Sae Taw Win II Dhamma Center, 7415 Hayden Ave, Sebastopol.

JUNE 29, 30 & JULY 1, 2012

JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE MARCIA BALL â&#x2014;&#x2020; J I MMY LAFAVE LOUDON WAINWRIGHT I I I RUTH MOODY â&#x2014;&#x2020; BLAME SALLY POOR MANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WHI SKEY CACHE VALLEY DRIFTERS BROTHERS COMATOSE BROKEDOWN IN BAKERSFIELD FERRON â&#x2014;&#x2020; RITA HOSKING TERESA TUDURY â&#x2014;&#x2020; UNDER THE RADAR MAMUSE â&#x2014;&#x2020; MORE...

"5#&"65*'6-#-"$,0",3"/$)t-":50/7*--& Tickets & Info. 415-256-8499 (Inticketing) www.katewolfmusicfestival.com

Food Not Bombs Help prepare and serve free vegan meals every Sun afternoon; served at 5. Sun. Railroad Square, Fourth and Wilson streets, Santa Rosa. 707.701.3620.

Foundry Festval Music by Highway Poets, Choppinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Broccoli, the Hoovers and Gold Coast Jazz Band. Free driftwood! Music begins at 7pm. Jun 30, 11am. $12 to $15. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Marin County Fair

Michael Franti & Spearhead Yonder M ountain String

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This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Always Fresh, Fun and Local.â&#x20AC;? All rides and concerts free with admission. Bands include MarchFourth Marching Band, Dickey Betts and Great Southern, Mickey Thomas and Starship, Los Lobos, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Steel Pulse, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, the Temptations. Food, fireworks, fun and more. Jun 30-Jul 4, 11am-10pm. Marin Fairgrounds, Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael.



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Band Kinky â&#x20AC;˘ Sierra Leoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Refugee All Stars Dumpstaphunk â&#x20AC;˘ Baka Beyond

Hot Buttered Rum â&#x20AC;˘ Bomba Estereo Orgone â&#x20AC;˘ Pimps of J oytime David Lindley â&#x20AC;˘ Rupa & the April Fishes

DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: David Starfire â&#x20AC;˘ Ana Sia â&#x20AC;˘ Dragonfly â&#x20AC;˘ Shamanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dream Samba Da â&#x20AC;˘ Indubious â&#x20AC;˘ Afromassive â&#x20AC;˘ Ma Muse Clan Dyken â&#x20AC;˘ Fanna-Fi-Allah Qawwali Sufi Ensemble Joel Rafael â&#x20AC;˘ Absynth Quintet â&#x20AC;˘ Dirt Floor Band Beso Negro â&#x20AC;˘ The Freys â&#x20AC;˘ Shovelman â&#x20AC;˘ Jeff Baker â&#x20AC;˘ Nicki Scully

Melissa Crabtree â&#x20AC;˘ Steel Toed Slippers

Ginger Ninjas â&#x20AC;˘ Willits Shakespeare Co. â&#x20AC;˘ Sita Devi MC Caroline Casey â&#x20AC;˘ and More

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36

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35 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JULY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Marin History Museum

Station. Mon-Sat, 9 to 5; Sun, 9:30 to 4. 415.663.1223.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 27– JULY 3, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

36 Arts Events Jul 1, noon-4pm. Free. Monte Rio Beach, Monte Rio.

Red White & Boom Santa Rosa’s fireworks show with Pat Jordan Band, Wonderbread 5, family fun and more. Jul 4. 3:30pm-10pm. Free-$7. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Vallet Rd, Santa Rosa.

Resource Clinic Get info on housing, transit, food stamps and Medi-Cal. Wed, 11am-1pm. Free. Petaluma Health Center, 1301 Southpoint Blvd, Petaluma. 707.559.7500.

Sacred Intimacy for Couples This workshop shows how to discover deep intimacy and nurture sacredness in a relationship. Jun 29, 7pm. Free. Center for Inner Health & Stillness, 424 Eighth St Ste A, Santa Rosa.

Truck & Tractor Pull Car show, tractor pull, food, wine, beer, and kids get in free. Yeeeee-haw! Jun 30, 11am8:30pm. $16 to $20. Napa Valley Exposition, 575 Third St, Napa.

Vine Art An evening of art, winetasting, food and music. Jun 29, 6-9pm. $15. Gallery 300, 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.332.1212.

Field Trips Community Garden Meeting & Potluck Learn about the project, including how to rent a plot, volunteer needs and garden sponsorship. Jun 30, noon3pm. Free. Larson Park, 335 De Chene Ave, Sonoma.

Dave & Bill Hikes Evening hike culminates in a wine and cheese soiree and fireworks show. Proceeds benefit Team Sugarloaf. Jul 4, 6:45pm. $50. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

Sunset Hike & Dine Meet at parking area across from inn for monthly two-hour hike on moderate to steep trails with midhike wine and cheese served overlooking

( 35 Pacific Ocean. Optional dinner and socializing at inn follows. Last Sat of every month. $15. Mountain Home Inn, 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley, RSVP. 415.331.0100.

Film The Decoy Bride Will Katie be able to fool the awaiting media and live up to being a stand-in for the world’s most famous movie star? Jun 30, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Don Giovanni That notorious womanizer is back in the New York Met’s version Mozart’s classic comedic opera. Jun 30, 10am. $10-$15. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Girl with a Pearl Earring Girl with a Pearl Earring is the subject of one of Vermeer’s most enduring portraits. Jun 28, 7pm. $5. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Pink Ribbons, Inc. Millions are raised in the name of breast cancer, but where does this money go? Based on the book by Samantha King. Opens Jun 29. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival True-story films include shorts like “Flying Anne” on Jun 29. Through Oct 19. $10-$50. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Take This Waltz Food, wine and dancing with Crossfire and film presented by Sonoma International Film Festival. Jun 30, 6pm. $35 to $50. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Food & Drink All-American Zin Day Dry Creek, Kokomo, Mazzocco-

Sonoma, Rued and Wilson wineries pour meaty reds to go with meaty steaks. Jun 30, 11am-4pm. $15 to $30. Deux Amis, 1960 Dry Creek Rd, Healdsburg. 707.431.7945.

Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Cotati Farmers Market Entertainment schedule changes weekly, see www. cotati.org for details. Thurs, 4:30-7:30pm. through Sep 20. free. La Plaza Park, Old Redwood Highway, Cotati.

Days of Wine & Lavender Festival Walk through fragrant lavender fields while sipping a variety of wines. Jun 30, noon-4pm. $70 to $85. Matanzas Creek Winery, 6097 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.6464.

French Garden Farm Market Enjoy produce from restaurant’s farm, along with freshly baked breads and pastries from their kitchen. Every Sun, 10 to 2. Free. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Harvest Market Selling local and seasonal fruit, flowers, vegetables and eggs. Sat, 9am-1pm. Harvest Market, 19996 Seventh St E, Sonoma. 707.996.0712.

Healdsburg Farmers Market Wed, 4-7pm. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg. Wed-Sat, 9amnoon. Healdsburg Farmers Market, North and Vine streets, Healdsburg. 707.431.1956.

Indian Valley Farmers Market Organic farm and garden produce stand where you bring your own bag. Wed, 10am-3pm. College of Marin, Indian Valley Campus, 1800 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.454.4554.

Napa Valley BBQ & Beer Battle A BBQ throwdown and 10 local breweries highlight this benefit for the Napa Valley Ed. Foundation. Jul 1, 1-4pm. $45 to $55. Napa Valley Marriott Hotel, 3425 Solano Ave, Napa.

Novato Farmers Market Come together and celebrate fresh and local food. Tues, 48pm. through Sep 22. Novato Farmers Market, Grant and Sherman avenues, Novato.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Petaluma Farmers Market Live music and over 50 local booths. Sat, 2-5:30pm and Wed, 4:30-8pm. through Aug 29. Free. Petaluma Farmers Market, Second Street between B and D streets, Petaluma. Sat, 2-5:30pm. through Nov 17. Walnut Park, Petaluma Boulevard South and D Street, Petaluma.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Sonoma Farmers Market Depot Park, First St W, Sonoma. Fri, 9am-noon. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. 707.538.7023.

Totally Truckin’ Thursdays Four food trucks park in the O’Reilly parking lot, provide you with local goodness and donate 10 percent of sales to a monthly selected nonprofit. Thurs. O’Reilly & Associates, 1005 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.7190.

Wednesday Night Market Over 130 vendors and all the people you went to elementary school with flood downtown Santa Rosa. Wed. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

West End Wednesdays West End merchants offer wine, coffee and food tastings. Wed, 5-7pm. Free. Downtown Napa, First Street and Town Center, Napa.

Lectures Clean Energy Series: Why Go Solar? Workshop Kate Collins, CEO of

) 38

Naomism Finding new philosophies with Naomi Murakami Combining a palette of bold, contrasting colors with a limitless array of blotched and arrhythmic curves, Naomi Murakami brings acrylic paints to the canvas in the name of her own philosophy, Naomism. Naomism, you ask? Having arisen from her self-proclaimed “garbage” past, Murakami’s new philosophy is fine art, which she thanks for keeping her heart beating. Being a Tokyo native who’s become disillusioned by the traditional ideas in her culture, yet still an outsider to the culture of the United States where she currently resides, she’s found a true homeland in art. Indeed, her philosophy transcends her art, which encapsulates a world of her own. Her internally based paintings feature non-objective figures that all seem to resist yet simultaneously weave into the other visual elements of her pseudo-realist work. Murakami’s prints, on the other hand, host more defined and recognizable characters— faces and mechanical gears, for example—in detailed etchings. Fine art isn’t the only thing occupying Murakami’s time; she’s the art director at the Wellness and Advocacy Center in Santa Rosa and runs art workshops, encouraging others to explore their identity through art. “She Eats Cheetos with Chopsticks,” featuring work by Naomi Murakami, is on exhibit June 28–July 27 at RiskPress Gallery. Opening reception, Saturday, June 30, at 2pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave., Sebastopol. 707.478.2379.—Catherine Zaw


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38 Arts Events Gaia Energy Systems, speaks about solar energy. E-mail CEA@ solarsonomacounty.org to register Jun 27, 6pm. free. Sonoma Mountain Business Cluster, 1300 Valley House Dr, Ste 100, Rohnert Park. 707.794.1240.

Divorce Options Workshop Volunteer group of attorneys, financial specialists and mental-health professionals offer four-hour workshops on divorce. Last Sat of every month, 9am. $45. Family Service Agency, 555 Northgate Dr, San Rafael. 415.492.9444.

My Life, My Choices Learn about advance health care planning in this seminar. Jun 27, 6pm. Free. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

The Neurobiology of Leadership Examine how your brain perceives reality, and the biological constraints which shape how you experience life and respond to it. Jun 29, 9am. Free. USF Santa Rosa campus, 416 B St, Santa Rosa.

‘Vince Guaraldi at the Piano’ with Derrick Bang Jun 29, 3pm. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

( 36

Readings Book Passage Jun 27, 7pm, “Once Upon a River” with Bonnie Jo Campbell. Jun 28, 7pm, “XO: A Kathryn Dance Novel” with Jeffery Deaver. Jun 29, 7pm, “Shout Her Lovely Name” with Natalie Serber. Jun 30, 1pm, “Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats” with Kristen Iversen. Jun 30, 4pm, “Monarch Beach” with Anita Hughes. Jun 30, 7pm, “A Different Kind of Luxury: Japanese Lessons in Simple Living and Inner Abundance” with Andy Couturier. Jul 1, 4pm, “To the Last Breath: A Memoir of Going to Extremes” with Francis Slakey. Jul 2, 7pm, Left Coast Writers: Mary Jo McConahay. Jul 3, 5:30pm, Bay Area Writing Project (BAWP) - Group Reading. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Christ Church United Methodist Jun 27, 7pm, “Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control” with Medea Benjamin. 1717 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa.

Point Reyes Books Jun 30, 7:30pm, “Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail” with Cheryl Strayed. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1542.

Theater 10-Minute Play Contest Festival Wedwood Writers nine winning 10-minute plays will be produced over the three-day festival. Dates and times vary. Jun 29-Jul 1. $16. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Cabaret Broadway comes to Main Street starring Broadway performer Nikki Snelson. Dates and times vary. Through Jul 1. $35-$40. Napa Valley Opera House, 1 030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Defining Moments Presented by Petaluma Readers Theatre, these stories represent the crossroads that we all face. Thurs-Sat, 8pm. through Jul 7. $12. Murray Rockowitz Photography Studio, 128 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma.

The Producers Craig Miller directs this Mel Brooks classic musical. Various dates, times and prices. Through Jul 15. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of June 27

ARIES (March 21–April 19) If you play solitaire, your luck will be crazy strong in the coming weeks. If you have candid, wide-ranging talks with yourself in the mirror, the revelations are likely to be as interesting as if you had spoken directly with the river god or the angel of the sunrise. Taking long walks alone could lead to useful surprises, and so would crafting a new declaration of independence for yourself. It’ll also be an excellent time to expand your skills at giving yourself pleasure. Please understand that I’m not advising you to be isolated and lonely. I merely want to emphasize the point that you’re due for some breakthroughs in your relationship with yourself. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Are you in possession of a talent or interest or inclination or desire that no one else has? Is there some unique way you express what it means to be human? According to my understanding of the long-term astrological omens, the coming months will be your time to cultivate this specialty with unprecedented intensity; it’ll be a window of opportunity to be more practical than ever before in making your signature mark on the world. Between now and your next birthday, I urge you to be persistent in celebrating the one-of-a-kind truth that is your individuality.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20)

“Message in a bottle” is not just a pirate movie cliché; it’s a form of communication that has been used throughout history for serious purposes. England’s Queen Elizabeth I even appointed an official “Uncorker of Ocean Bottles.” And as recently as 2005, a message in a bottle saved the lives of 88 refugees adrift in the Caribbean Sea on a damaged boat. Glass, it turns out, is an excellent container for carrying sea-born dispatches. It lasts a long time and can even survive hurricanes. In accordance with the astrological omens, I nominate “message in a bottle” to be your metaphor for the rest of 2012. Here’s one way to apply this theme: Create a message you’d like to send to the person you will be in five years, perhaps a declaration of what your highest aspirations will be between now and then. Write it on paper and stash it in a bottle. Store this time capsule in a place you won’t forget, and open it in 2017.

CANCER (June 21–July 22)

Every 10,000 years or so, reports the Weekly World News, hell actually does freeze over. A rare storm brings a massive amount of snow and ice to the infernal regions, and even the Lake of Fire looks like a glacier. “Satan himself was seen wearing earmuffs and making a snowman,” the story says about the last time it happened. I foresee a hellfreezes-over type of event happening for you in the coming months, Cancerian—and I mean that in a good way. The seemingly impossible will become possible; what’s lost will be found, and what’s bent will be made straight; the lion will lie down not only with the lamb, but also with the sasquatch. For best results, be ready to shed your expectations at a moment’s notice.

LEO (July 23–August 22) “In purely spiritual matters, God grants all desires,” said philosopher and activist Simone Weil. “Those who have less have asked for less.” I think this is a worthy hypothesis for you to try out in the next nine months, Leo. To be clear: it doesn’t necessarily mean you will get a dream job and perfect lover and $10 million (although I’m not ruling that out). What it does suggest is this: You can have any relationship with the Divine Wow that you dare to imagine; you can get all the grace you need to understand why your life is the way it is; you can make tremendous progress as you do the life-long work of liberating yourself from your suffering. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

‘RUDIMENTARY SKILLS’ Work by William Smith hangs at Willow Wood Cafe in

Graton through August. See Galleries, p34.

A plain old ordinary leap of faith might not be ambitious enough for you in the coming months, Virgo. I suspect your potential is more robust than that, more primed for audacity. How would you feel about attempting a quantum leap of faith? Here’s what I mean by that: a soaring pirouette that sends you flying over the nagging obstacle and up onto higher ground, where the views are breathtakingly vast instead of gruntingly half-vast.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22)

“The dream

which is not fed with dream disappears,” said writer Antonio Porchia. Ain’t that the truth! Especially for you right now. These last few months, you’ve been pretty good at attending to the details of your big dreams. You’ve taken the practical approach and done the hard work. But beginning any moment, it will be time for you to refresh your big dreams with an infusion of fantasies and brainstorms. You need to return to the source of your excitement and feed it and feed it and feed it.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

A Chinese businessman named Hu Xilin is the champion flykiller of the world. Ever since one of the buzzing pests offended him at the dinner table back in 1997, he has made it his mission to fight back. He says he has exterminated more than 10 million of the enemy with his patented “Fly Slayer” machine. Oh, and by the way, his obsession has made him a millionaire. It’s possible, Scorpio, that your story during the second half of 2012 will have elements in common with Hu Xilin’s. Is there any bad influence you could work to minimize or undo in such a way that it might ultimately earn you perks and prizes—or at least deep satisfaction?

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) From the 14th through the 18th centuries, many towns in England observed a curious custom. If a couple could prove that they had gone a year and a day without ever once being sorry they got married, the two of them would receive an award: a side of cured pork, known as a flitch of bacon. Alas, the prize was rarely claimed. If this practice were still in effect, you Sagittarians would have an elevated chance of bringing home the bacon in the coming months. Your ability to create harmony and mutual respect in an intimate relationship will be much higher than usual.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “If I had my life to live over,” said Nadine Stair at age 85, “I would perhaps have more actual problems, but I’d have fewer imaginary ones.” I suggest you write out that quote, Capricorn, and keep it close to you for the next six months. Your task, as I see it, will be to train yourself so you can expertly distinguish actual problems from imaginary ones. Part of your work, of course, will be to get in the habit of immediately ejecting any of the imaginary kind the moment you notice them creeping up on you. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Astronomer Percival Lowell (1855–1916) was instrumental in laying the groundwork that led to the discovery of Pluto. He was a visionary pioneer who helped change our conception of the solar system. But he also put forth a wacky notion or two. Among the most notable: he declared, against a great deal of contrary evidence, that the planet Mars was laced with canals. You have the potential be a bit like him in the coming months, Aquarius—mostly a wellspring of innovation but sometimes a source of errant theories. What can you do to ensure that the errant theories have minimal effect? Be humble and ask for feedback. PISCES (February 19–March 20) Throughout the 16th century and even beyond, European explorers trekked through the New World hunting for the mythical land of El Dorado, the Lost City of Gold. The precious metal was supposedly so abundant there that it was even used to make children’s toys. The quest was ultimately futile, although it led the explorers to stumble upon lesser treasures of practical value—the potato, for example. After being brought over to Europe from South America, it became a staple food. I’m foreseeing a comparable progression in your own world during the coming months: You may not locate the gold, but you’ll find the equivalent of the potato.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


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