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GERIATRIC GOLD RUSH How Marin’s seniors are targeted in the unregulated landscape of home care RACHEL DOVEY REPORTS P18


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Holi Holistic Eye E ye Care s Stress St r e s s Free F Eye Exams s Na t u r a Vision Improvement Natural s IIn-Office n- Of f i Tested Prescriptions

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The closed Quinn Brothers Boardshop in Sebastopol stands empty and Irie-less, with only a mural and stickers remaining.

This photo was submitted by Ryan Beringer of Occidental. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

s Light Li g ht T Therapy improves: Learning Lea r n i ng s Memory y s ADHD Brain B r a i n IInjuries nju r ie s s Fa Fatigue t ig ue Depression SAD Headaches D epr e s sion s SA DsH eadac a he s In Insomnia somn ia s P PTSD T SD s B Brain rain F Fog og Vision Color V i sion s C olor Blindness Bl i n d n e s s

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Dr. D r. Downing Dow n i n g iiss iinternationally n t e r n a t i on a l l y k now n for known for his h i s innovative i n nov at iv ve work wor k and a nd h a s been be e n practicing pr ac t ic i ng in i n tthe he Bay Bay A r ea has Area ffor or o ve r 4 0y ea r s . over 40 years.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Praise the Cobbler Sebastopol bootmaker stepping toeto-toe with U.S. Bank is a local hero BY REI BLASER

I

want to acknowledge Michael Carnacchi, Sebastopol’s warrior for healing soles, who has a predilection for truth and integrity, and who adventitiously has become a torchbearer for financial reform. On Thursday, May 24, 2012, in the U.S. District Court in San Francisco, the counsel for U.S. Bank will attempt to prove Michael Carnacchi’s long enduring complaint against the credit-card company erroneous. The RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations) Act charges U.S. Bank with collecting interest at a rate usurious under federal law, where the interest was more than twice the enforceable rate. Michael Carnacchi strives to exemplify living in integrity and is compelled to shed light on an overlooked shadow within financial lending—one that has been deep-seated in financial laws, like a dormant volcano immersed in the ocean. Carnacchi, with no prior study of law, cultivated himself to competently self-represent. With deep appreciation, he has had in his corner a 90-year-old mentor with 62 years of active law practice whom Michael refers to as “his trainer,” preparing Michael for the ring/courtroom to stand beside opposing counsel like a seasoned lawyer. The initial personal contest to U.S. Bank’s exorbitant credit card interest rate has turned Michael’s soles onto another path. It can be considered a path of selfless service, for the case now has a potential of becoming a class-action suit; conceivably affecting how financial-lending institutions presently operate, thus joining other ripples with the same intent, all to one day grow into the pulse of a tsunami, crashing with a force unbeknownst by many with a seemingly effortless charge. Michael Carnacchi had a choice when the events of his case with U.S. Bank unfolded: to have chosen a path that served his immediate needs and turned a blind eye to the fraud revealed to him. Whereas the path of indifference grows barren, the welltrodden path for raising consciousness leads to the horizon of a growing global majority. Rei Blaser is a resident of Graton and beyond. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Hot Summer Guide Omission

The Hot Summer Guide (May 16) was really pretty hot! However, there is something missing from the paper and that is the lineups for Sonoma County’s music in the parks. I would love to have the schedules for Santa Rosa (Juilliard Park?), Windsor, Healdsburg, Cloverdale and anywhere else in the county where cities are planning community events. Several years ago I created a spreadsheet with days and artists to plan my summer—it would be awesome if the Bohemian did the work for me! Thanks for being you!

SHARON Forestville Thanks Sharon—we, too, have noticed that those summer concert listings are usually buried and hard to find on various city sites. Visit our online music blog, City Sound Inertia, for a full list. Unfortunately, there were even more listings from last week that got eaten by the PDF monster and regurgitated as restaurant listings for San Jose, of all things. We regret the error, and readers can find the missing Hot Summer Guide listings in this issue on p38. —The Ed.

The Pacific Sun Endorses This Guy Michael Allen’s bill, AB 1962, would allow SMART to build a 20-story hotel/casino with a roller coaster on the roof in downtown Petaluma, and the residents could not do a damn thing about it, neon lights and all. This could be repeated in Novato and San Rafael, up and down the line. Why do you think so many politically connected people have bought land along the right-of-way? It’s a developers’ paradise. A Los

Angelization of the 101 corridor from Larkspur to Healdsburg and beyond. SMART is not a transportation plan; it’s a development plan. A taxpayer-funded Ponzi scheme that will wind up as a shabby Myrtle Beach/Atlantic City–style urban disaster.

ALEX EASTON-BROWN Candidate for Assembly, Lagunitas

Error Alert The Library Commission meeting on Monday, May 7, was remarkable for the commission’s inability—or adamant refusal—to listen to points of view other than their own, especially with regard to their pet project, selfcheck machines. The documents that were meant to inform an incisive conversation about the self-check equipment were over 58 pages long and did not include any information from the employees who have been the “testers” for the equipment. The documents were posted on the website less than two days before the commission meeting, and were still being revised hours before the meeting itself. A large number of employees and community people came to the meeting, and several commented on the self-check machines. According to the users, the machines frequently exhibit confusing error messages. They do not process CDs or DVDs as well as they do books. While Sonoma County materials can be piled on the scanner to be read, items from other counties (with whom the library has reciprocal exchanges) need to be separated and treated differently. Some employees prefer not to use the self-check machines at all, because they take longer than simply checking out materials as before. Many patrons have also encountered problems with the machines, but the library management is insisting on “100 percent usage of self-check,” prompting appeals to be reasonable from both employees and patrons. Worst of all for Rohnert Park employees and patrons, the self-check machines are constantly triggering the security alarms. According to testimony at the meeting, this occurs several times a day


THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

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at Rohnert Park library, but out of the thousands of alarms sounding since the gates were turned on, only four have been actual cases of theft. The union has pleaded with management to turn off the security alarms, but management refuses to do so. The Library Commission made a presentation to the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors on March 27. It is worth noting that this is the second time the commission has met since appearing before the board, and none of the suggestions made by the supervisors at that meeting have appeared on an agenda or been discussed in any way. One wonders if the library commissioners are even capable of listening to divergent viewpoints or to admitting any errors on their own part.

VIRGINIA R. HARRIS

SOCOSOL Steering Committee

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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Paper MORTAR Children at the Tuleeni orphanage play with a brickmaking machine bought by Jackie Weiss’ group.

Beyond Borders

Amid a culture of false celebrity charity, two Sonoma County efforts to help African countries have direct effect BY LEILANI CLARK

W

hen Jackie Weiss returned from a sixweek volunteer stint at the Tuleeni orphanage in Moshi, Tanzania, she did so with a slew of memorable stories. But her favorite involves a 12-year-old orphan named Denis.

“Most Tuleeni teens receive a piglet (if they’re male) or a chicken (if they’re female) in order to learn responsibility, and to raise and earn their own money,” says Weiss, a Santa Rosa resident and SSU graduate who grew up in Southern California. “Most of the orphans end up selling their pigs once they are big, but Denis raised his to have piglets.” Denis then sold the

piglets, Weiss says, “and then bought himself a bike.” While the purchase of a bicycle might not seem like a big deal, in one of the poorest economies in the world, a bike can make all the difference. Over coffee, Weiss describes her experience at the Tuleeni orphanage where she worked in the afternoons, tutoring and hanging out with the children.

According to Weiss, Mama Faraji, the head of the orphanage, spends $36,000 a year on school fees for kids who live in the crowded facility and for others who live with extended family members in the community. Realities like that stuck with Weiss, and when she returned to the States, she began looking for ways to continue working with the orphanage. “Anybody who goes there and meets them, even for just one day,” she says, “it’s gonna change your life.” Eric Nelson, a student from Montreal, contacted her soon after, suggesting that they plan a fundraiser to raise money for Tuleeni. He wanted to buy land and help build a new facility to replace the crowded, infertile acre plot of land where the children now live. “He had the idea, and we just went full-force into it,” says Weiss. “We had no idea of the scope of what we were getting ourselves into.” Since 2008, the group called Help Build Tuleeni a Home has gained fiscal sponsorship through Global Exchange of San Francisco, and they’ve raised enough money—about $20,000—to purchase an acre of land in Uru, Tanzania. The official groundbreaking happened in March; Weiss says they need at least $150,000 more to complete construction on a sustainably oriented orphanage with capacities for rainwater catchment, fish ponds and the raising of livestock, in addition to housing for about a hundred children. Weiss is helping to organize two fundraisers, one at Stout Brothers in Santa Rosa on Friday, May 25, and another at the Last Day Saloon on Saturday, May 26. The effort remains small, basically the work of four people, including one who is a member of Christian charity organization Hugs for TU.G.S. Unlike Invisible Children, the group behind last year’s controversial Kony 2012 social media campaign who were called to task for their high staffing fees, 100 percent of the money Weiss’ group raises goes to the orphanage effort. “That’s our thing—every dollar


‘That’s our thing—every dollar really does make a huge difference.’ Having raised $11,500 in online donations, Pile says walls for the school have been constructed. Next, they’ll put on a roof before the rainy season begins. “We’ve definitely got the whole thing kick-started,” he says, though the next step is to find more funding to be able to finish the project. Pile says that to some, Africa might seem like a faraway place to invest so much energy. But “it’s not as distant as it seems,” he explains. “I love the music, and I feel like I want to help preserve it and make it known. It’s not a huge leap to put my energy towards that, as opposed to trying to preserve my Anglo-Saxon folk tradition. My culture has already been well-documented.”

Beach Grouse This summer, a day at the beach could get expensive if a recent State Parks proposal goes into effect. In a move reeking of a thwarted 1992 effort to install pay kiosks on the Sonoma Coast, a plan to place self-pay “Iron Rangers” along the Sonoma, Marin and Mendocino Coast is raising ire among coastal residents and beach lovers. The proposed fee is $8 According to the free-access advocacy group Free Our Beaches, the fee-collection devices would be installed along “almost all state access points that are currently free.” On the Sonoma Coast, the list of affected beaches includes such familiar locations as Salmon Creek, Goat Rock, Russian Gulch, Schoolhouse Beach, Bodega Head, Stump Beach and Shell Beach, among others. “People on the coast go to these spots to enjoy the sunset,” says Bev Burton, a founding member of Free Our Beaches. “They want to charge us for something that always has been and always should be free. How are poorer people going to access the coast?” In a twist that seems more of a cruel joke than truth, department spokesman Roy Stearns told the Press Democrat that State Parks wouldn’t be convening any public meetings on the proposed fees because they can’t afford it. But citizen’s groups are taking matters into their own hands, starting with a public meeting hosted by Free Our Beaches with former supervisor and current Fifth District candidate Ernie Carpenter. The meeting will be held on Thursday, May 25, at the Bodega Bay Fire Station. 510 S. Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 6:30pm. 707.875.2328. In addition, Stewards of the Coast and Redwoods are hosting two public meetings at the Bodega Bay Grange (June 6, 6pm) and the Monte Rio Community Center (June 11, 6pm).—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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really truly does make such a huge difference,” she explains. “And education for an orphan makes every difference. We’re hoping that as the years go on, they’ll become leaders and they’ll help make a difference, and it will grow past that small area, it will branch out.” Hundreds of miles northwest of Tanzania lies the Republic of the Gambia. In 1999, Santa Rosa musician Steve Pile traveled there to study the kora, a 21-string mandinka harp with respected teacher and master player Jali Bakary Konteh. Ten years later, Pile returned to West Africa to record Konteh, with two solar panels and a laptop. The two men hatched plans for the Konteh Kunda School of Music, a place where Mandinka culture and history would be preserved through musical mentorship and an audio library of stories, songs and oral history.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 23-29, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Habits Die Hard

L.A. vote could make one in four Californians bag-free BY JULIANE POIRIER

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felt happily stunned yesterday when I stopped for something at the corner store (which locals call the â&#x20AC;&#x153;ghetto Safewayâ&#x20AC;? and where workers on breaks stand smoking glumly in the parking lot), and the nice checker asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your bag today?â&#x20AC;? To put this moment of triumph in context, I should explain that my neighborhood grocery is not only drab and depressing but rather perversely out of step with the times. So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taken years of saying â&#x20AC;&#x153;No bag, pleaseâ&#x20AC;? to wipe the disgusted surprise off the faces of other checkers whose thought bubble shouts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sure, you freakazoid. Use your stupid ecobag. Guess our plastic isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t good enough for you.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve even had smug checkers argue that I should take the plastic bag because there is a bin outside where I can put it when I am

ďŹ nished with itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as if changing my habits should be avoided at all costs. My cloth bag preference is clearly an affront there. But small habits, just like small groups of dedicated people, eventually make big changes. One small group pushing a big change is the Environment California crew, which worked to get 10,000 petition signatures by this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Los Angeles city council meeting on May 23. The group, hoping to ban single-use bag plastic bags in a city of almost 4 million people, reports that â&#x20AC;&#x153;there is 100 times more plastic pollution in the ocean today than there was 40 years ago.â&#x20AC;? The nonproďŹ t is waiting on pins and needles to see what Los Angeles decides, because a ban there would mean that one in four Californians would be living plastic-bag-free, which is big progress toward a state-wide bag ban. Bag habits die hard. The American bag habit, exported to Europe via retailers, has bled into a world where people just automatically took cloth bags to the store. According to a March report by the Daily Mail, however, large retail stores gave out 6.4 billion plastic bags with merchandise in 2011, increasing the United Kingdomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual use by 333 million in one year. The same report announced that Brussels is considering a singleuse plastic bag ban, across all of Europe, within the next two years. Some suspect the current bag giveaways could reach 10 billion next year, the equivalent of 300 plastic bags per household, per year. The United States consumes an estimated 300 billion plastic bags per year, with 20 billion issued here in California. Fewer than 5 percent of those are recycled. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to explain that to the Los Angeles City Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and to my neighborhood grocery checkers. For more, see www.environmentcalifornia.org.

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Dining ILLADELPH STYLE Sonjia and Matt Spector offer a menu rife with small and medium plates perfect for sharing with friends.

Calistoga Caliber JoLe an excellent upvalley detsination

T

he restaurants of St. Helena, Yountville and Napa get all the attention. At the apex of Napa Valley, Calistoga is best known for mud tubs and bubbly water, not food. JoLe is changing that.

The setup for JoLe is perfect. It’s on Lincoln Avenue, Calistoga’s main street, and it’s just off the

lobby of the Mount View Hotel and Spa, a boutiquey, 32-room property with a hideaway pool in the back. The four-yearold restaurant has an urbane, masculine aesthetic, with dark wood paneling, a slim bar featuring top-shelf renditions of classic cocktails and big windows that look out onto the sidewalk. When owners Matt and Sonjia Spector decided to sell their popular Philadelphia restaurant

BY STETT HOLBROOK Matyson and move west with kids in tow to open a new restaurant, they looked all over the North Bay. The couple settled on Calistoga because of the small-town vibe and turnkey restaurant space they found, but what they didn’t know was that many wine country visitors didn’t stray north of St. Helena. The first year of business was hard, says Matt, JoLe’s chef. “If I had a nickel for every time

someone said ‘I never get up to Calistoga,’ I’d be able to open a restaurant in Yountville,” says Matt. But the Spectors don’t need to go to Yountville. They’ve got a great thing going on at JoLe, which turns four years old next month. Before moving to the North Bay, the couple made frequent trips to the area, where Matt says he and his wife (and JoLe’s pastry chef) always ordered from the “left side of the menu” when they went out to eat. Focusing on starters and small plates meant being able to try a greater variety of food from the region. Why commit to 20 bites of the same thing when you can have five bites of several different dishes? As a result, JoLe’s menu of internationally influenced American food comprises a dozen or more small- and medium-sized plates that allow visitors to range all over the menu, especially with the help of a dining companion or two. Over 50 wines by the glass invite further exploration. No matter where you go on the menu—left side, right side—you’re going to find something good. I knew JoLe was going to be special when I spied the lambtongue Reuben ($12) on the menu outside. That offers a window into Matt’s creativity and separates the restaurant from the pizza-andpasta masses. Matt’s talent is to lay out just a few elemental flavors made from impeccably sourced, bracingly fresh ingredients to achieve great results, and just about everything I put my fork into was flat-out delicious. Let’s start with the grilled local asparagus ($12). Simple enough, right? But add a few buttery slices of lardo, a wee fried quail egg and a squeeze of lemon, and you’ve got something special. The grassy vegetal flavor of the asparagus is layered with the melt-in-yourmouth cured pig fat and delicate richness of the egg, all balanced with lemon, and it’s simply delicious. Then there’s the Dungeness crab cocktail ($15). Again, it’s a dish you’ve no doubt had before, but the singularly sweet and briny freshness of the crab meat and


13

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addition of a little bergamot-oilperfumed orange, avocado slices and cucumber create the ultimate crab cocktail. JoLe’s hamburger ($12) is overthe-top but still recognizable as a great burger. It combines truffleflavored cheese, a fried egg and tomato confit on a great bun—a classic dish made better. My favorite of all is the smoked pork shoulder ($14) with queso fresco and zucchini tamales. The pork gets smoked and then braised, so it’s crackly and caramelized, wonderfully moist and dripping with porky, juicy goodness inside. The tamales, made with fresh masa and folded over into a half-moon shape and pan-fried, come with a woodoven-roasted tomatillo sauce and a cinnamon-dusted corn fungus sauce. Outstanding. I could go on but I’ll stop with Sonjia Spector’s coconut cream pie ($8). She developed the recipe years ago, and it was a hit at Matyson in Philadelphia. When they opened JoLe, she thought she’d give it a rest. But when fans of their old restaurant came all the way to Calistoga, they demanded she reinstate the pie immediately. She relented, and we’re better for it. It’s ridiculously good with a supremely creamy filling surrounded by a chocolateganache-layered macadamia-nut crust. Sonjia guards the recipe well; when Bon Appetit asked to publish the recipe in its popular “RSVP” recipe feature, she declined. All told, JoLe is an insurgent jewel in the rarely-traversed-bytourists upvalley, which, thanks to the Spectors, may one day lose its mud-bath reputation to a dining destination. Matt says he and Sonjia have settled into Calistoga and are committed to making a name for themselves in the quiet part of the Napa Valley. “If it’s good, people will come,” he says. It is good—and then some.


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 23 – 29, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

707.536.1193

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Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

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house specialties. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 305 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.4458.

Bruno’s on Fourth

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty

American. $$-$$$. There’s real sophistication lurking in these upscale American comfort staples like flat-iron steak and fries, macaroni-ham casserole and stellar braised lamb shank. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner only, Sat; brunch, Sun. 1226 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8222.

Needed Nee

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10 100% 10 100% 10 100% 10 100% 0% 0%

$$. Casual chic, family-run combination trattoria/ rosticceria/pasticceria featuring traditional Tuscan fare and emphasizing spitroasted meats and housemade pastries. Lunch and dinner, daily. 133 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.0576.

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Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian. $. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491. K&L Bistro French. $-$$$. This comfortable restaurant serves fine food with a friendly Sebastopol flair. Zagat-rated, consistently excellent and surprisingly innovative. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 119 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.6614.

La Fondita Mexican. $. Hearty, filling, very tasty. No glop or goop here. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 816 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.0881.

La Gare French. $$$. Dine in an elegant atmosphere of Old World charm. Dinner, Wed-Sun 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4355. Martha’s Old Mexico Mexican. $. Freshly prepared favorites, along with regional

family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Phyllis’ Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an oldfashioned patty. Lunch and dinner daily. Three locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.989.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

Sizzling Tandoor Indian. $-$$. A Sonoma County legend for almost 20 years, and for good reason. Of the more than 100 menu choices, all are worthwhile. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.5999.

Tres Hombres Mexican. $-$$. Excellent food in Petaluma’s Theater District, and a fun place to hang before or after a flick.Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.773.4500.

MARIN CO U N T Y Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Insalata’s Mediterranean. $$$. Simple, high-impact dishes of exotic flavors. Lunch and dinner daily. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700. Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Sat-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900. Portelli Rossi Italian. $$. Tasty and affordable fare in a cozy setting. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner, Tues-Sun. 868 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.892.6100.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-inthe-wall as they come. Lunch and dinner daily. Two San Rafael locations: 732 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.


French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American.

Two Markets This past Saturday saw the debut of Santa Rosa’s new farmers market scene: the Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market at its new home at the Wells Fargo Center, and the newly formed Redwood Empire Farmers Market at the Veterans Memorial Building, near the site where the other market used to be. Confusing, I know. For those who haven’t followed the drama, the short version goes like this: some vendors wanted to break away from what they saw as overzealous management. A lawsuit was filed. The county raised the market’s rent. Chaos ensued. So is Santa Rosa big enough for two farmers markets? On Saturday, the Wells Fargo Center market was packed with curious shoppers. On my late morning visit, it seemed to be doing about four times the business as the Redwood Empire market— but that one, too, was also doing well. If there’s an upside to the nasty “vendor vs. organizer vs. county” fight it’s this: farmers market shoppers now have a two choices, which is evidence of Sonoma County’s dynamic food scene. The Redwood Empire Farmers Market (Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave., Santa Rosa) runs Wednesdays and Saturdays from 8:30am to 1pm. The Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market (Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa) runs Wednesdays from 8:30am to noon, and Saturdays from 8:30am to 1pm. —Stett Holbrook

$-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Redd California cuisine. $$-$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with

electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

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Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Benziger Winery A nontraditional, organic, biodynamically farmed winery. Don’t miss the daily 45-minute tram ride replete with a tour of the vineyard, wildlife sanctuaries and caves. 1883 London Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 888.490.2739.

Imagery Estate Winery

crab ho house ouse & prime rib 1200 brid bridgeway dgeway ~ 415.331.3226 sali itoscrabhouse.com salitoscrabhouse.com

Results from a 20-year collaboration between winemaker Joe Benziger and artist Bob Nugent. The concept: Commission unique artwork from contemporary artists for each release of often uncommon varietal wines. The wine gets drunk. The art goes on the gallery wall. Not so complicated. Count on the reds and plan to take a stroll down the informative “varietal walk” on the grounds. 14335 Hwy. 12, Glen Ellen. Summer hours, Sunday–Thursday, 10am– 4:30pm; Friday–Saturday, 10am–5pm. 707.935.4515.

Paradise Ridge Winery

Enjoy j y our Bountyy of Bike Events for the Whole Familyy Sonoma S onoma County Count y Bicycle Bicycle C Coalition oalition tthanks hanks iits ts ssponsors ponsors aand nd p partners a r tn e r s ffor or another another successful su c c e s s ful B ike To To Work Work Day, Day, aand nd rreminds eminds you you to to Bike keep pedaling pedaling all all month, month, and and year year round! r o u n d! keep Join Join the the Team Team Bike Bike Challenge Challenge today today and and pedal pedal through through May! M a y! All iinfo nfo aatt w w w.bikesonoma.org o 7.5 4 5.015 3 All www.bikesonoma.org orr 70 707.545.0153

A gorgeous, provocative sculpture garden with annually changing exhibits set amid a pygmy forest. Stay for sunset Wednesday evenings April–October. 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Drive, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.528.9463. Paradise also offers its food-friendly wines at an accessible little shack in the heart of Sonoma Valley. Try structured clarets from the estate’s high-elevation Rockpile vineyards; do some time with “the Convict” Zinfandel. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 8860 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. 707.282.9020.

Terroirs Artisan Wines Four wineries, one very busy winemaker, in a rennovated downtown Geyserville space that’s as dramatic and spacious as it is cozy by the fireplace. Sample limited-release wines that just might express that ineffable concept of earth, terrain and climate that we

call “terroir,” all crafted by veteran winemaker-consultant Kerry Damskey, who ought to know. 21001 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open daily 11am– 5:30pm. 707.857.4101.

MA R I N CO U N TY Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001. Pey-Marin Vineyards A Marin wine adventure where cow country meets conifer forest, at the historic, hospitable Olema Inn. Discover razor-lean “Shell Mound” Marin County Riesling, opaquely purple, yet eminently food-friendly “Punchdown” Syrah, and more. 10000 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Olema. Open daily from noon to 4pm. $12 fee. 415.663.9559.

Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Ross Valley Winery In existence since 1987, the Ross Valley Winery produces Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc and Zin port wines. 343 San Anselmo Ave., San Anselmo. Open Tuesday– Sunday, 1–7pm. 415.457.5157.

N A PA CO U N TY Castello di Amorosa Not only an “authentic Medieval Italian castle,” but authentically far more defensible than any other winery in Napa from legions of footmen in chain mail. In wine, there’s something for every taste, but don’t skip the tour of great halls, courtyards, cellars, and–naturally–an authentic dungeon. . 4045 N. St. Helena

Hwy., Calistoga. 9:30am–5pm. Tasting fees, $10–$15; tours, $25–$30. Napa Neighbor discounts. 707.967.6272.

Fantesca Estate & Winery (WC) Set on land that was the dowry gift when Charles Krug married in 1860, this estate winery specializing in Cab features a wine-aging cave built right into the side of Spring Mountain. 2920 Spring Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.968.9229.

Peju Province Vineyards Talented staff, terrific food pairings and fantastic Cab. 8466 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–6pm. 707.963.3600.

Rubicon Estate Despite the celebrity hype, the wine is award-winning. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.782.4226.

St. Supéry Expect to find the tasting room crowded with a harrassed staff, but St. Supéry features an interesting art gallery with changing exhibitions. 8440 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 800.942.0809.

Schramsberg (WC) Sparkling wine at its best. The “tasting room” is a branch of the cave illuminated with standing candelabras. 1400 Schramsberg Road, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4558.

Truchard Vineyards (WC) No matter how attentive you are to the directions, no matter how much you study the quaint, hand-drawn map found online, no matter how vigilantly you watch the street addresses numerically climb along Old Sonoma Road, you will inevitably miss Truchard Vineyards. What follows is a three-point turn on a blind, two-lane road, with a single thought in your head: “This wine had better be worth the insurance deductible.” But with Cabernet this good, it is. 3234 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.253.7153.


17

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A taste of Carneros BY JAMES KNIGHT

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hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something desolate about the Carneros on the southern sweep of Napa and Sonoma. The rolling hills, dotted with run-down ranches, peter out at the edge of a vast, dun marsh. A Christinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World, with grapes.

One day at the turn of the century, I drove down with a sampling crew to check grape sugars for an unnamed winery that contracted with a vineyard whose name I have long forgotten. Winding through green slopes of sameness, looking for our blocks, I marveled that the vineyard had set aside an area of tall grass and reeds. But the road around it was littered with shotgun shells. Seems that when the grape-eating birds congregated in the reeds, the vineyard crew, at their leisure, went boom, boom, boom. I take it that things are different at nearby Acacia Vineyard, which has partnered with the Napa-Sonoma Marshes Wildlife Area, the California Department of Fish and Game and Ducks Unlimited to promote marsh restoration and wildlife habitat through sales of its 2009 Marsh Chardonnay ($25). Founded in 1979, and now owned by wine and booze giant Diageo, Acacia pumps out Carneros Pinot and Chardonnay on the props of 90plus scores. Its biggest client is Costco, but the tasting room is a hole-in-the-wall in a drab beige facility swarming with more orange safety vests than a Caltrans pothole-filling partyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;except for the tasting room hostess, who must not be expecting a rowdy crowd. I was lured here, firstly, by a varietal that wine-industry doyens have declared decidedly unsafe: Syrah. Acaciaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2008 Kick Ranch Syrah ($45), from a Santa Rosa vineyard that Syrah faithfuls hold in high regard, has warm aromas of purple pigment, toast, and alluring blueberry fruit. Delicious, but get it while you can: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a one-off. Secondly, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m on a kick of my own with Carneros Pinot. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s say that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking at a shelf of Pinotâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Russian River, Sonoma Coast, etc. What can I expect, generally, from Carneros? Recent tastings have turned up a mixed bag, some bright with cherry fruit, others showing a remarkable similarity in dried berries, potpourri and sandalwood. What ties those together? The 2010 Lone Tree Pinot Noir ($55) is more akin to a Russian River Valley, with chocolate, black cherry and spice, while the â&#x20AC;&#x153;ahaâ&#x20AC;? 2008 Beckstoffer Pinot Noir ($75) has a little of that Carneros incense, soapy, dried fruit and high-toned tannins. This vineyard, planted by Louis Martini in the 1960s, who lent his name to the Martini clone once widely planted in the Carneros, has since been ripped up. If this is the signature Carneros character, get it while you can before itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strictly for the birds. Acacia Vineyard, 2750 Las Amigas Road, Napa. Monday through Saturday, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm; Sunday, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.226.9991.

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Bedside Bankroll With no licensing or certification, anyone can practice in-home elder care in Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and in wealthy Marin, opportunity for fraud abounds BY RACHEL DOVEY Note: This is the third part in a series on senior care in Marin County.


19

Dated June 2008, the notepad shows $22,000 borrowed and $600 returned. When Cora Alingog left the couple, her IOUs became just that. “He was really embarrassed, because everything seemed to be in order,” Richard’s Petaluma-based son, Scott, says about his father, asking that the family’s last name be omitted from this story. Bank statements, notarized loans and a 2009 civil court judgment of $64,567.13 awarded in Richard’s favor corroborate their account, but according to Scott, the family hasn’t seen any of the courtappointed money. Multiple phone messages to the number Alingog gave her employers were not returned for this piece. Richard’s story illustrates how quickly a good caregiving relationship can sour. With no state regulations and a for-profit industry that places providers directly in the homes of elderly, disabled and dependent clients, the phrase “buyer beware” has never been more appropriate. According to many professionals, Marin and its aging community of great wealth, or at least perceived wealth, is ground zero for this booming business. Still reeling from the aftermath of his misplaced trust, Richard reflects on just how easy it was to be taken advantage of while his wife Norma’s severe Alzheimer’s weighed on the family. The couple had employed 10 caregivers in roughly two years, so when they found Alingog, who seemed attentive and loving, their guard was down. “You become really stressed when you have all these health problems, and you welcome help,” Richard recalls. “You don’t scrutinize.” According to his son, the financial loss paled in comparison to losing a trusted provider. “My mom had the fragile carpet ripped from under her feet,” he recalls. “She entered a horrific death spin.” As her condition worsened, the family placed

her in a convalescent home. She died soon afterward.

L

ook in the yellow pages under “Home Health Services” and you’ll get a very different picture of the industry. Business names like “Gentle Care,” “Precious Home Companion” and “Visiting Angels” deliver a pointed message of safety and security. But though agency websites tout selfreferencing descriptors like “compassionate” and “trustworthy,” it’s little more than positive branding in some cases. The problem in California is that often that’s all there is. Many states—Nevada, Tennessee and Louisiana among them—require homecare providers to be either licensed or certified by a public agency, like a department of health. Not the Gold Rush state. To open a for-profit home-care company employing nonmedical workers—in other words, an agency for caregiving duties like feeding, bathing and transportation—all you need is a business license. Anyone with the ability to fill out an application and hand over a small processing fee can do it. Anyone. Sometimes these caregivers are certified nursing assistants, but they don’t have to be. Sometimes they have years of experience, fantastic references and the skill set to provide for clients with bewildering degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, but they don’t have to. Sometimes they’re paid a living wage commensurate with their experience, but—you guessed it—they don’t have to be. Mary Lou Blount, the owner of In Your Home Care for Life and a member of the Marin County Commission on Aging, likens this employer-dictated market to the Wild West. “California runs its own rodeo,” she says, explaining that in Oregon, where she lived before moving to Novato, caregivers were required to be licensed with the Department of Health Services. State workers would drop in to her agency randomly to check financial records or investigate workers’ compensation policies, she recalls. Charges of elder abuse, if there were any, would be reported to them. Many counties, including Marin, have elder-abuse hotlines and task forces, and a handful of national and statewide professional organizations certify what they consider highquality caregiving agencies or geriatric-care managers. But with business licenses as the

only required paper trail, fictitious business names that may or may not contain the term “home care” and various municipalities overseeing licensing, getting a complete overview of the local industry, let alone monitoring it, is a challenge. Richard’s story is the perfect example of just how difficult researching an agency can be. According to his court testimony from May of 2009, he received Alingog through Quality Home Care Service. Listed as Quality Nursing Service in the phone book, Quality Home Care doesn’t have a website, but its contact is listed on Google Maps. Reached by phone, a spokesperson for the San Rafael agency confirmed that Alingog had worked there in the past, but insisted she did not work for them at the time of the loan. The spokesperson repeatedly claimed that she couldn’t remember which years Alingog had been employed by Quality Home Care, adding, “I don’t want to talk about her. I can’t help you.”

T

he home-care agency industry is mushrooming in Marin,” says Michele Boudinot, owner of North Bay Elder Care Options. She cites the county’s relative age—21 percent over 62, compared to 14 percent statewide—and high median income—$89,000 in 2010—as potential incentives for the growth. Boudinot is a certified geriatric-care manager through the National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Mangers, and she’s also a member of the Marin County Elder Abuse Task Force. She cautions that this explosion in services should make Marinbased elders wary. “People are buying franchises who, quite frankly, should probably be buying restaurant franchises,” she says. “They don’t realize what they’re getting into, that now they’re responsible for someone’s healthcare. Sometimes the clients are very frail individuals; they’re vulnerable with complex, chronic health conditions. These novice owners may not know anything about hiring good caregivers, and there are very few good caregivers around, so they put in caregivers without a lot of experience.” As Novato agency-owner Blount put it, in Marin “seniors are sometimes looked at as an easy way to make a buck.” With no centralized data source on the ) 20

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R

ichard was a Judge Judy fan, so whenever his wife’s caregiver asked for a loan, he made her sign an IOU. The 83-year-old San Rafael resident stacked the caregiver’s debts—$3,000 on April 24, $6,000 on May 12—on white notepaper and outlined a payback contract on his own letterhead. A Marin County notary witnessed their signatures.


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 23 – 29, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20 Bedside Bankroll ( 19 home-care industry, it’s difficult to measure its growth. Census data on county business patterns from 2009 lists 24 home healthcare businesses, including medical centers. Boudinot says she’s heard of more than 70. A survey of the Marin County website, several networking rosters and the yellow pages reveals over 50 nonmedical agencies, with at least four operating under multiple names. To quote Richard on his experience with Alingog’s agency, this is an industry where it’s easy to operate “under the radar.” Boudinot acts as a consultant to her elderly clients, charging an hourly fee ranging from $125 to $150. She gathers data on their needs, preferences and finances, and then refers them to either medical outpatient centers, self-employed care providers or agencies that fit their situation. She does not collect a referral fee from those she recommends, so in an industry where agencies and independent caregivers are often at odds, she has a unique view. Still, she’s cautious of businesses that take a large cut of a caregiver’s pay, speculating that the worker’s skill and experience might drop with his or her hourly rate. Some independently contracted caregivers that she uses have decades of experience and charge upwards of $20 an hour. And while that’s comparable to most agencies’ rates—a survey of businesses collected from the various sources described above revealed that the majority charge between $21 and $29 an hour for nonmedical caregiving— caregivers themselves only take a portion of that hourly fee. Exactly what that portion looks like is debatable. According to the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average “home health aide” who is not self-employed in the metropolitan area encompassing Marin, San Francisco and San Mateo counties makes $11.50 an hour, or $24,450 a year. Marin agencies that would disclose their caregivers’ earnings gave me quotes that generally ranged from $11.50 to $16 an hour.

BALANCING THE BOOKS After agency fees, many caregivers in Marin make roughly $11.50–$16 per hour, causing some to commute from more affordable locales.

But agency owners, particularly those that employ their caregivers (“full-service agencies”) as opposed to simply referring them to clients for a fee (“referral agencies”), say that payment gap is built-in insurance. Hourly care for Hired Hands, an agency operating out of Santa Rosa and Novato, is $24 an hour, with “live-in” round-the-clock care starting at $310 per 24-hour period. President Mark Winter declined to state how much the agency pays its caregivers, but he points out that companies like Hired Hands take on the responsibility of being their caregivers’ employers— supervising them, providing them with insurance and workers’ compensation and paying state and federal taxes, all of which figure in to the client’s hourly or daily fee. Hired Hands is a member of the statewide business association California Association for Health Services at Homes, which certifies members based on the evidence that they provide these regulations and a fee. “As a full-service industry, we provide many consumer protections,” he says. Sharon Smith of the San Rafael branch of national franchise Home Helpers reports that the agency charges between $26 and $30 an hour, and pays caregivers $14 per

hour. Between workers’ comp, insurance and franchise fees, the agency’s profit margin is not the bloated 50 percent cut it looks like, but between 12 and 17 percent, she says. As the head of Marin’s public Division of Aging and Adult Services, Nick Trunzo oversees Adult Protective Services. He says there is no available data for reported incidents of abuse that can determine whether agencies or independent contractors are more adequate. “I personally would not say that one model is better than another; there are areas of concern in both,” he says. Trunzo’s main concern with eldercare, however, is that it isn’t really applicable to Marin seniors across the board. As this series has previously explored—and the Division of Aging has documented—Marin elders are generally not as wealthy as the county’s high median income might lead one to expect. With the steep cost of living and the fact that many older adults live on fixed incomes and struggle with age-based disabilities, slightly more than half of Marin residents over 65 could be considered “lowincome” based on the latest HUD and American Community Survey reports. Even if they live in homes bought and paid off years ago,

paying $26 an hour for in-home care may not be an option for many of the county’s seniors. “Affordability is an issue,” says Trunzo, explaining that although Napa’s Agency on Aging requires home-care providers to be certified through the county—a creative fix to the lack of state-wide licensing, but one that charges caregivers a fee—Marin is reluctant to raise the bill on homecare any higher. And this economic imbalance slices both ways. For caregivers, making it on an hourly wage of $11.50–$16 in a county where the median rent is over $1,500 isn’t easy, either. For some, this means working for a higher, cash-only fee as an independent contractor and sidestepping agency benefits and workers’ compensation. Others commute long distances; Boudinot says she’s seen caregivers drive into the county from as far away as Sacramento. And with its decided lack of workforce housing, some simply pay rents far beyond their means and try to survive.

M

aria Alarid pays $600 a month to split her canal-neighborhood one-bedroom with two roommates. A caregiver for the public agency In Home Supportive Services (IHSS), she says she’s been working up to seven days a week lately to make ends meet at an hourly rate of $11.55. Alarid doesn’t have a long history in the industry. Since emigrating from Mexico in 1974, the 64-year-old San Rafael resident has worked as a housecleaner and been employed by a Spanish-language newspaper. But she’s highly recommended by her government-sponsored place of employment, which serves lowerincome elderly who qualify for Medi-Cal. And she loves her job, adding, “I respect anyone who does it, because it’s not always easy.” Along with physical hurdles— like lifting elderly clients into their wheelchairs with an already strained back—Alarid says the fear of being taken advantage of in this intimate industry has led to false accusations. Once, an elderly woman reported that she’d stolen $1,000. The woman later found it tucked away in her own home, Alarid says. “When they accuse you of


21

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something you didn’t do, you feel really bad,” she says. But while many caregivers, like Alarid, may seem to disprove the notion that quality of care and pay scale rise together, Aneice Taylor of Woodacre says she’s sometimes struggled to find good caregivers at a rate she can pay. Paralyzed from the neck-down in a 1982 mudslide that destroyed her house, Taylor qualifies for MediCal. She’s used IHSS, which she describes as “generally a very good system,” but the amount of care she needs—everything from help with meal preparation to help getting out of bed—has led her to seek out caregivers independently as well. “I’m sad to say that I’ve had to hire really unpleasant, dangerous people out of desperation,” she says. “If you have no one who’s going to get you out of bed or get you dressed or feed you or take care of your bodily needs—believe me, I have had people living here who were not people I wanted to be living with.” Taylor says she’s fortunate to have a home with extra rooms, so she can offer caregivers a place to live to supplement their pay. But this has forced her to let people into her home—not just on an hourly basis, but constantly—whose company she later regretted. She’s employed homeless caregivers

before, she says. Caregivers with substance-abuse problems. Caregivers who stole. She’s known and employed many wonderful people at a relatively low wage, she adds, who have come to feel more like friends than employees, but when asked if it was financial desperation that led to the hiring of poor-quality employees, she replies, without pausing, “That was it.” Taylor is the founder of In Spirit, which helps quadriplegics like herself stay independently in their homes. Through her nonprofit, she’s able to secure grants and donations for others who might need them, to supplement their caregiving, and she’s currently using some inheritance funds her mother left to supplement her own care. However, like Marin’s vast aging and disabled population who may not be able to afford a highquality agency, private caregiver or geriatric care manager, she’s unsure of what the future holds. Speaking of her mother’s money, she says, “I don’t know what I’ll do when that runs out.” This article was produced as a project for the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, a program of USC’s Annenberg School for Communcation & Journalism.

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TUCK &

BETRAYED TRUST One San Rafael senior living with Alzheimer’s entered

This is Tuck & Patti — all it takes is the guitar and the voice. The fundamental things still apply.


CULTURE

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The week’s events: a selective guide S T. H E L E N A

HEALDSBURG

Custer’s Last Stand

Guitar Gods In an epic case of trolling the entire internet, Spin magazine recently published a “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” list that ignored such musty givens as Jimi Hendrix, Eddie Van Halen and Joe Satriani. Instead, it picked fresh(er) faces like Johnny Greenwood, Carrie Brownstein and Doug Martsch. Boy, were people pissed! We might include on our own list Tuck Andress, who is an antidote to the cock-rock wankiness so rampant in the world of guitar gods. With Patti Cathcart, he’s created a guitar-vocal partnership that’s technically mesmerizing while still emotionally resonant. And wouldn’t you know it? His talented niece, St. Vincent, also made Spin’s list. See Tuck and Patti on Saturday, May 26, at the Raven Theater. 115 North St., Healdsburg. 8pm. $30–$35. 707.433.6335.

In 2009, the Beth Custer Ensemble shared a bill at the Go Left Fest at Yoshi’s with such free-jazz pioneers as Roswell Rudd, Michael Allen, Sunny Murray and others. Doing as the Romans do, Custer pushed the borders of jazz in an experimental performance that wiggled, twisted and quaked. Three years later, Custer has premiered her latest song “For the Grace of Any Man,” possibly the world’s only gospel-tinged danceable pop sing with a bass clarinet solo. In other words, Custer is always searching. This week, her ensemble accompanies the 1929 Russian surrealist film My Grandmother, which was suppressed by the Russian government for its depiction of public officials as comically inept. Custer’s music suits the movie perfectly; see it on Saturday, May 26, at Tres Sabores Winery. 1620 S. Whitehall Lane, St. Helena. 7:30pm. $15–$35. 707.967.8027.

S A N TA R O S A

Jumpin’ Jackson Built on donated land 12 years ago, the Sonoma Country Day School took the saved money and built a topnotch performance space, the Jackson Theater. The theater’s performances haven’t been limited to recitals for schoolchildren paying up to $19,000 a year in tuition, though; it’s also hosted Rialto Cinemas screenings, the Healdsburg Jazz Festival and musical guests from Little Feat to Dave Brubeck. This week, the well-outfitted stage sees bands that ordinarily play house parties and DIY spaces, namely Not to Reason Why, Kinship (formerly Goodriddler), and touring acts Echorev and Annie Kahane and Alex Hersler. It’s called the North Bay Experiment, and it’s happening on Friday, May 25, at Jackson Theater. 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 7:30pm. $15. 707.935.3035.

P E TA L U M A

Tons o’ Tab You know what I like to do after dropping a tab of acid? I like to go down to the corner store and get a six-pack of Tab, bring it home and open nine tabs in Firefox, and just hit the “TAB” button on my keyboard over and over and over and over again. This causes a hallucinatory file cabinet to emerge from my skull and appear floating before me; I open it and scan each file’s tab until I find the holy grail: a music book of Frank Zappa guitar tabs. After shredding on “Chunga’s Revenge” for four hours, I head to the local bar and drink Old Grand-Dad until I come down, leave without paying my tab, and head to Petaluma to see Tab Benoit on Thursday, May 24, at the Mystic Theatre. 21 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 8pm. $21–$23. 707.765.2121.

BERTIE! Hugh Laurie sings New Orleans blues at the Uptown Theatre on May 29. See Concerts, p29.

—Gabe Meline


THE BRAINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NO PLAYTHING When you see headlines like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Four-Year-Old May Be As Smart As Einstein,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; read cautiously.

Small Wonder Can â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;geniusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; be detected in infancy? BY SCOTT BARRY KAUFMAN

F

our-year-old Heidi Hankins was all over the news recently. According to the Daily Mail, she â&#x20AC;&#x153;has an IQ of 159â&#x20AC;&#x201D;only one point below Albert Einsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and has become one of the youngest members of Mensa.â&#x20AC;? As her father has pointed out, she has always shown an intense need for intellectual stimulation,

bursting at the mouth to speak at birth, acquiring vocabulary by the age of one and voraciously reading through all 30 books in the Oxford Reading Tree set in an hour by the age of two. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know just how much of this is true, but assuming it is, Heidiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s case raises an intriguing question: can high intelligence accurately be detected this young? In the late â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s and early â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s,

Joseph Fagan and his colleagues tested 61 infants between seven and 12 months of age on their ability to selectively attend to novel pictures. First they showed the infants unseen pictures (e.g., the face of a baby) for only a few seconds. Then they kept pairing old pictures with new pictures, and recorded how long the babies looked at the old pictures. The idea is that smarter infants get bored faster by looking at pictures they have already seen. The researchers then followed up

with subjects in this group when they reached the age of 21, testing their IQ scores and looking at their academic achievement. How well did this simple test in infancy predict later performance? Strikingly well. The infantattention test given during the ďŹ rst six to 12 months of life was signiďŹ cantly correlated with both adult IQ (.34) and academic achievement (.32). Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more, these correlations were independent of the education levels of their parents. This is rather impressive considering that this was a very brief test lasting only a few minutes, given to them when they were just infants. To put these numbers in perspective, these correlations are identical to the correlation found between SAT scores and college GPA. They also found great consistency; IQ scores at age three were strongly correlated with IQ scores at age 21 (.70). Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more, both IQ assessed at age three and IQ assessed at age 21 were correlated with academic achievement at age 21 about just as strongly (.60 and .70, respectively). This is consistent with research by Susan Rose at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and her colleagues that found striking consistency in information processingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;including memory, processing speed, attention and representational competenceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from infancy through the ďŹ rst three years of life. So if you strictly deďŹ ne intelligence by IQ scores, then, yes, you can ďŹ nd reliable information processing indicators in infancy that predict later IQ scores and academic achievement. Of course, this is group-level data, and the correlations are far from perfect. So there is plenty of room for error, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s extremely ) 24 dangerous to try to

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predict an infant’s future level of academic success based on a single, brief test of attention administered before the first year of life. But from a scientific perspective, these numbers are impressive, and they suggest that these effects are real. But let’s put all this in perspective for a moment. The title of the Daily Mail article is “Four-yearold ‘genius’ accepted into Mensa with an IQ almost as high as physicist Stephen Hawking.” I can’t tell you how angry I get when I read headlines like this. Should we really be propagating the idea that a high IQ at any age, let alone from a four-year-old, is equivalent to genius? Intelligence quotient is a relative ranking based on percentages within a particular age group—that’s all an IQ score means. Heidi’s high IQ score indicates that she is a few grades ahead of her classmates in cognitive reasoning and vocabulary knowledge. Based on her father’s observations, she can read at a seven-year-old level. That’s surely impressive, but do we really want to put such pressure on young Heidi to become a genius? That’s a heck of a lot of pressure for a four-year-old, high IQ or not. As her father points out, “She is not precocious, she is just a little girl who likes her Barbies and Legos, but then you will find

her sitting down and reading a book.” This is really important. Heidi displays precociousness in one particular area—speed of learning— and appears to have been born wired to learn. Many cases like Heidi exist all around the world, and what she’s going through is a very real phenomenon, linked to her unique brain wiring. But what we must understand is that Heidi can be extremely high in this one dimension but be a normal, average young girl on many other dimensions, including social and emotional development. To become a genius takes so much more than just being high on one trait. It takes many, many factors coming together, such as drive, imagination, opportunity, perseverance and just plain luck. I know the folks at the Daily Mail love their attention-grabbing headlines, but let’s please keep this real: Heidi is ready to advance academically, and she, like all the other kids in her school, deserves to get the resources that are best suited to her current level of functioning. But in terms of being a “genius,” only time will tell. Right now, leave her alone, and let her just be an adorable, inquisitive young girl. Scott Barry Kaufman is adjunct assistant professor of psychology at New York University.


returns to a North Bay stage this month to play one of her favorite roles.

Not So Innocent Heather Gordon returns as Billie Dawn BY DAVID TEMPLETON

B

From where Gordon sits backstage at Cinnabar, before tonightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rehearsal, the raucous sounds of electric saws and pounding hammers can be heard seeping in from the stage area, where the elaborate multilevel set is being built. All that noise forms a bustling soundtrack to our conversation, as Gordon talks about why sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s returned to Sonoma County, taking a break from a busy career as a ďŹ lm and

television actress to play a part at a small theater in Petaluma. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just something about Billie that I identify with,â&#x20AC;? says Gordon, who ďŹ rst played the part six years ago at College of Marin and immediately fell in love with the charming but undereducated Billie, longtime mistress of thuggish businessman Brock (played by Gary Grossman). Eager to make an impression in Washington, D.C., Brock calls upon the well-spoken newspaper reporter Paul (Paul Huberty) to give Billie a few lessons in how to behave in educated society, lessons that result in Billieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unexpected rise in consciousness, which eventually challenges everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assumptions about who she is, including her own. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A woman who looks a certain way gets treated a certain way,â&#x20AC;? Gordon observes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People put labels on her. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something so innocent and pure about Billie, and yet sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got this ďŹ ght and this hunger. Her journey is so fun to play.â&#x20AC;? Gordon, who may identify with Billie yet is anything but undereducated, earned her masters

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Born Yesterdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, May 25 through June 10, at Cinnabar Theater. 3333 N. Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma. Friday and Saturday at 8pm, Sunday at 2pm. $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 707.763.8920.

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illie is probably my favorite character Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever played,â&#x20AC;? says Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;born actress Heather Gordon, describing Billie Dawn, the iconic showgirl-sex-object she portrays in Cinnabar Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of Born Yesterday, the classic 1946 stage comedy by Garson Kanin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t write a lot of great female characters like this anymore,â&#x20AC;? adds Gordon.

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Stage

degree at Harvard, where she studied at the American Repertory Theater, afterward journeying to Russia for a stint at the Moscow Art Theater. Gordon next landed an agent, and has been busy working her way upward in Hollywood ever since. Last year, Gordon was featured in the award-winning independent ďŹ lm Seducing Charlie Barker. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ lmed commercial and television pilots and has made several ďŹ lms, including the upcoming comedy December Dilemma with Sean Astin and Richard Benjamin, and the animated ďŹ lm Skyforce. While in town for Born Yesterday, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shooting the independent comedy Tony Trans Am. The last time Gordon appeared onstage in the North Bay was four years ago in Sixth Street Playhouseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of Robert Reichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s political satire Public Exposure. Her co-star in that show was Sheri Lee Miller, who now directs her in Born Yesterday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When Sheri reached out to me,â&#x20AC;? Gordon says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;asking me to consider playing this role in this production, it just tugged at my heart, because I love this show so much, and I love her. As much as I enjoy doing on-camera work, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing like theater.â&#x20AC;? Gordon feels that the experiences sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had over the last several years are giving her plenty of material to draw upon as she returns to the role of Billie Dawn. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At times, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve felt very much like Billie feels, a ďŹ sh out of water,â&#x20AC;? she admits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living on the East Coast, going to Harvard then to Russiaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it was very overwhelming. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never lived out of the Bay Area, and suddenly I was thrown into this whole other world. L.A.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a cakewalk compared to all of that! â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned some of what Billie learns,â&#x20AC;? she adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life is full of surprises and challenges, but you grow, you adapt, and you learn. You get savvy pretty quick, or youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re done. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Billie does. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s savvy. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a survivor. I think we both are.â&#x20AC;?


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 23 – 29, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

SUMMER

Film

Copperfield’s Books

JUNE AUTHOR EVENTS Friday, June 1, 7pm

Wednesday, June 6, 6pm, Village STEPHANIE MAROHN Montgomery What the Animals Taught Me Friday, June 8, 7 pm, Petaluma SEBASTOPOL

DAVID TALBOT Season of the Witch

Friday, June 15, 7pm

LITTLE CHILDREN The child actors in Philipe Falardeau’s drama are top-notch.

Dreaming the Soul Back Home

Class Act

ROBERT MOSS SEBASTOPOL

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE AND PETALUMA

‘Monsieur Lazhar’ shows teachers at their best—and worst BY RICHARD VON BUSACK Thursday, June 21, 7pm

Monday, June 4, 7pm

LEWIS RICHMOND

Aging as a Spiritual Practice SEBASTOPOL

ANITA Wednesday, June 13, 6pm ELIZABETH PERCER AMIRREZVANNI Equal of the Sun An Uncommon Education

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

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VISIT COPPERFIELD’S BOOKS THIS SUMMER FOR FEATURED BOOKS: GREAT FICTION and NONFICTION choices for R&R on the beach or couch

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great biographies, travel, cooking, Summer Olympics

ALWAYS GREAT GIFTS: Graduation, Father's Day

EVENTS FOR KIDS AND TEENS! Pizza Parties, Star Authors, Summer Reading Olympics (5th Grade and under)

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ou can recognize the shape of the Canadian Oscar nominee Monsieur Lazhar at 500 yards. It follows the pattern of legions of films, from Goodbye, Mr. Chips to Ciao, Professore!, complete with the emphasis on the seasonal change: a wintry classroom giving way to leafy summer as the school year ends. Director-writer Philipe Falardeau reflects a cosmopolitan Montreal in the story of Bachir Lazhar (Mohamed Fellag), a widowed Algerian immigrant who steps up to take the place of a beloved teacher who hanged herself right in the classroom, and whose 11–12-year-old students are played by seriously adroit child actors. Sophie Nélisse is the winsome Alice, the teacher’s pet; Émilien Néron is shrewd as the boy who likes Alice, but who has been acting out badly ever since he found his teacher dead. Vincent Millard is the fatter aggro boy who loves to play King of the Hill in the snow; he has political tragedy in his own family background. This special kind of tragedy is essential to Lazhar’s own story, too. It’s part of Monsieur Lazhar’s restraint that the teacher guards his personal history from others. We only really learn Lazhar’s backstory during his sessions with the jesting-Pilate types who work on the Canadian refugee board. (One of them is vastly amused and affronted that the greenhorn Lazhar dared to apply for help from “the Republic of Quebec.”) Fellag’s dry performance makes Lazhar an enigmatic character: a born teacher, reserved, old-worldly, funny, but ready to shut out his colleagues if they get too close. Fellag’s covert acting goes beyond simple tragedy. It becomes a study of a grave, walled-in and perhaps even limited man. Two groups would seem to be particularly taken by this film. Parents are one. Despite the suicide, the Quebec school here is so startlingly well-run and trouble-free that it provides fantasy material for Californians. And Monsieur Lazhar discusses a constant matter of anxiety for teachers: how to handle children seeking reassurance and affection. ‘Monsieur Lazhar’ opens Friday, May 25, at Summerfield Cinemas.


Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Chernobyl Diaries (R; 93 min.) Irradiated mutants return in this horror film about American teens who take an “extreme” adventure tour into the Chernobyl ruins. (GB)

First Position (NR; 90 min.) New documentary from Bess Kargman follows a group of young dancers in preparation for the Youth America Grand Prix ballet competition. (GB)

Men in Black 3 (PG-13; 106 min.) Agent J (Will Smith) travels back in time to 1969 to save a young Agent K (Josh Brolin)—and the planet—in third installment of hit sci-fi comedy. Also stars Tommy Lee Jones. (GB)

Monsieur Lazhar (PG-13; 94 min.) An Algerian immigrant recovering from a personal tragedy fills in for a classroom whose former teacher committed suicide. See review, adjacent page.

ALSO PLAYING The Avengers (PG-13; 142 min.) Marvel Studios rounds up characters from recent hits for an ensemble superhero thriller directed by Joss Whedon. Stars Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man), Chris Evans (Captain America), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), Samuel L . Jackson and Scarlett Johansson. (GB)

Battleship (PG-13; 131 min.) The Navy takes on aliens in the Pacific after a beacon to a newly discovered planet brings a fleet of petulant extraterrestrials to Hawaii. (GB) Bernie (R; 104 min.) Richard (Slacker, School of Rock) Linklater’s latest stars Jack Black as Texas mortician, choir leader and murderer Bernie Tiede. Based on a true story. Co-stars Shirley MacLaine and Matthew McConaughey. (GB)

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG-13; 124 min.) John Madden (Shakespeare in Love) directs an all-star cast playing British retirees in India in adaptation of Deborah Moggach’s novel These Foolish Things. (GB)

Chimpanzee (G; 78 min.) Disneynature’s fourth original documentary follows an abandoned chimp and his adoption by a new mother in Africa’s Ivory Coast jungle. Coproduced by the Jane Goodall Institute and narrated by Tim Allen. (GB)

Coriolanus (R; 122 min.) Ralph Fiennes directs and stars in adaptation of Shakespeare’s final political tragedy about a banished Roman hero who joins forces with the city’s enemy. With Vanessa Redgrave, Gerard Butler and Brian Cox. (GB)

Dark Shadows (PG; 113 min.) Tim Burton’s

comic take on the ’60s–’70s cult soap opera stars Johnny Depp as the vampire Barnabas Collins who, unearthed, returns to his manor to find it overrun with troubled relatives. (GB)

Darling Companion (PG-13; 103 min.) Lawrence Kasdan (The Big Chill) directs Kevin Kline and Diane Keaton in a comedy about a couple who engage the services of a psychic to find their lost pooch. (GB)

K.D. LANG & THE SISS BOOM BANG LUCINDA WILLIAMS LEFTOVER SALMON RICHARD THOMPSON RUTHIE FOSTER TEXAS TORNADOS

The Dictator (R; 83 min.) A deposed dictator (Sacha Baron Cohen) adjusts to his new life in New York City while awaiting the chance to return to power in the fictional nation of Wadiya. Ben Kingsley and Anna Faris co-star. (GB)

The Five-Year Engagement (R; 124 min.) Jason Segel and Emily Blunt co-star in romcom about a couple whose relationship suffers after their wedding is endlessly postponed. Directed by Nicholas Stoller (Forgetting Sarah Marshall) and produced by Judd Apatow (Bridesmaids). (GB)

The Hunger Games (PG-13; 142 min.) Droolingly anticipated adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ bestselling young adult novel about a dystopian future where teens kill teens in annual rated-PG-13 bloodsports. (GB) The Lucky One (PG-13; 101 min.) After

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returning from Iraq, a soldier searches for the unknown woman whose photograph gave him hope and courage. Based on the Nicholas Sparks’ novel. (GB)

Marley (PG-13; 144 min.) Bio-doc from Kevin MacDonald (Last King of Scotland) on the life of reggae legend Bob Marley features interviews with Marley’s family and top reggae artists. (GB)

The Pirates! Band of Misfits (PG; 88 min.) Aardman Animations (Chicken Run, Wallace & Gromit) returns with feature based on books by British author Gideon Defoe. With the voices of Hugh Grant, Salma Hayek and Jeremy Piven. (GB) Sound of My Voice (R; 85 min.) A cult leader who believes he’s from the future has unexpected sway over a journalist and his girlfriend in this psychological thriller and indiefilm-fest favorite. (GB)

Think Like a Man (PG-13; 120 min.) After learning their wives are soaking up the advice in Steve Harvey’s real-life self-help book Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man, four men try to turn the tables on their mates. From director Tim Story (Barbershop). (GB)

What to Expect When You’re Expecting (PG-13; 110 min.) Ensemble romcom about five expecting couples stars Jennifer Lopez, Cameron Diaz, Elizabeth Banks, Dennis Quaid and Chris Rock. (GB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

5/25 5 / 25 – 5/31 5 / 31

First Fi rst P Position osition

NR (10 :15, 112:30, (10:15, 2: 30, 2:30, 2: 30, 44:30) : 30 ) 7:30, 7: 30, 9:45 9 : 45 WWednesday ednesday 55/30 / 30 oonly: nl y : (1 (12:30, 2: 30, 22:30, : 30, 44:30) : 30 ) 77:30, : 30, 99:45 : 45

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Film

27


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 23 – 29, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

FEATURING NEA JAZZ MASTERS

ROY HAYNES SHEILA JORDAN KENNY BURRELL

PLUS: Vijay Iyer | Freddy Cole | Michele Rosewoman Calvin Keys | Julian Priester | Shotgun Wedding Mal Sharpe | Lorca Hart | Billy Hart | Andy McKee & MORE!

CHALK HILL ESTATE RODNEY STRONG VINEYARDS THE HEALDSBURG TRIBUNE RANCH7 CREATIVE

LOOTING NO MORE Rare texts form Mat Callahan’s latest project.

Work World Mat Callahan resurrects songs of an Irish labor leader BY LEILANI CLARK

O

n a bright, spring morning in Dublin nearly a hundred years ago, the Irish socialist leader James Connolly was executed by firing squad. His bloody death was the British army’s punishment for his involvement in the Easter Rising, and it set off outrage among the thousands of people who loved the charismatic, working-class organizer. Unfortunately, historical amnesia has all but eliminated knowledge of Connolly from public consciousness, although a few of his followers are determined to revive the story of the man credited with establishing the modern Irish labor movement. Mat Callahan, musician and author of The Trouble with Music,

Anja Tanner

Music

28

is going about his Connolly revival in a musical way. Originally from San Francisco and now a full-time resident of Switzerland, Callahan and his band recently recorded a collection of Connolly tunes for a new project titled Songs of Freedom. On May 25, he performs at the Arlene Francis Center. “He was definitely a voice for the working people,” says Callahan by phone from the Bay Area. “As a musician, I felt that the way to reintroduce Connolly was through the lesser-known fact that he actually wrote some beautiful songs.” Inspiration for the project started with Callahan’s 60th birthday party—coincidentally, the same day as the birth of the French Revolution. Revolutionary songs, many by Connolly, became the order of the festivities, and Callahan assembled a band of friends to play them. “The Irish musicians said, ‘We really need to get this out in Ireland,’” he says, mentioning the economic crisis there and beyond. “The situation demands it.” Thus began a search for an original songbook, published in 1907 in New York, where Connolly lived while organizing with the International Workers of the World. After enlisting the help of a rare and collectible bookstore in Ireland, Callahan tracked down a copy, edited by Connolly, in the Dublin National Library. The bookseller also found a second book, published in 1917, containing original lyrics by Connolly. Fans of the Looters, the San Francisco–based band fronted by Callahan in the 1980s, should expect a wholly different sound. “The Connolly stuff is more traditional and acoustic, whereas the Looters were a full-on worldbeat band,” he says. Nonetheless, in a world where the 99% and an ongoing economic crisis dominate national and global discussion, the time is right to recognize a Marxist leader of the Irish working class, says Callahan. “Connolly is as timely today,” he adds, “as he was a hundred years ago.” Mat Callahan performs at Honk Voyage, a benefit for the Hubbub Club Marching Band, on Friday, May 25, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 6pm. $10. 707.823.5865.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Beth Custer Ensemble Superstar mix of instrumentalists (Beth Custer, Dina Maccabee of Vienna Teng, Chris Grady of Tom Waits’ band) present award-winning live soundtrack to 1929 silent film “My Grandmother.” May 26, 8pm. $30-$60. Tres Sabores Winery, 1620 S Whitehall Lane, St. Helena. 707.967.8027.

McKenna Faith Local teenage country songstress takes Sebastopol stage. May 26. $10. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Gonzalo Bergara Quartet Internationally acclaimed quartet plays mix of jazz from Buenos Aires. May 26, 8pm. $22-$25. Sebastopol Community Center Annex, 350 Morris St, Sebastopol.

I See Hawks in LA Southern California Americana band plays songs from new acoustic album. May 27, 7:30pm. $22. Studio E, address with tickets, Sebastopol. www.northbaylive.com.

Phelan and Chuck Ervin in sneak preview of upcoming PBS music series. May 25, 8pm. $15. Occidental Center for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Clubs & Venues

Tuck & Patti

Aubergine

Vocalist Patti Cathcart and guitarist Tuck Andress play rare Sonoma County show. May 26, 8pm. $30-$35. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

May 24, Cast of Clowns. May 25, Ancient Mystic and the Real Far Band. May 26, McKenna Faith. May 27, Alma Desnuda, Calamity Walker. May 29, Jazz Duality. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

NAPA COUNTY James Farm Acoustic jazz quartet features Joshua Redman, Aaron Parks, Matt Penman and Eric Harland. May 23, 8pm. $30-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Hugh Laurie

THURSDAY, JUNE 21

NIGHT RANGER FRIDAY, JUNE 22

SATURDAY, S ATURDAY, JUNE JUNE N 23

May 25-26, Crossfire. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden May 25, Un Deux Trois. May 26, Maria Bija and Sebastian Link. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden

Mother Hips & Tea Leaf Green

May 25, Steve Pile. 439 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.8023.

May 24, Wine Country Swing. May 26, Harvest Band. May 26, Quarter to Four. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Garagiste Healdsburg

) 30

LONESTAR S UNDAY, JU NE 2 4 SUNDAY, JUNE 24

FIESTA LATINA: BANDA REALENGO, BANDA SANGRE AZTECA, AND LOS SHAKAS DE LABANDA

38 SPECIAL Enjoy historical exhibits and films as you take a journey starting with the construction of the Golden Gate Bridge to stories from today’s caretakers.

ONE PRICE FITS ALL! ADMISSION INCLUDES: concerts, carnival rides, exhibits, chef demos, World’s Ugliest Dog® Contest, kids area, and hands-on fun!

ADULTS $15 | KIDS & SENIORS $10

Acclaimed writer behind Trace Adkins’ “Honky Tonk Badonkadonk” and George Strait’s “Give It Away” sings some of his own tunes. May 30, 8pm. $37.50-$47.50. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Information and Discount Tickets online:

WWW.SONOMA-MARINFAIR.ORG

A Little Street Music Local Americana group Bottleshock performs with Blue and Lonesome, Smilin’ Iguanas and the Rhythm Rangers. May 27, 3-6pm. Free. Taft Street Winery, 2030 Barlow Lane, Sebastopol. 707.823.2849.

Jura Margulis Piano master plays Schubert and Rachmaninoff, with preconcert lecture by maestro Gabriel Sakakeeny. May 26, 8pm. $15-$20. Petaluma Historical Museum and Library, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398. Bluegrass all-stars Nell Robinson, Jim Nunally, Mike

WEDNE WEDNESDAY, SDAY, JU JUNE NE 20 2

Flamingo Lounge

Jamey Johnson

Soldier Stories

|

SONOMA COUNTY

Renowned British wit and famed actor from “House” plays songs from New Orleans blues album “Let Them Talk.” May 29, 7pm. $50. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

California’s unsung psychpop heroes play rootsy mix

SONOMA-MARIN FAIR CONCERT SERIES JUNE 20-24

NASHVILLE OUTLAW The woefully underrated country artist Jamey Johnson plays Santa Rosa May 30. See Concerts, above.

29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 23 – 29, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

of ‘70s rock and power pop. May 26, 7:30pm. $20. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.


30 NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 29, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

DIN N E R & A SHOW

THE JAMES MOSELEY BAND May 25 Hot Soul Music 8:30pm Fri

JOHNNY ALLAIRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S May 26 Rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Roll Dance & Birthday Party for Bob! Sat

8:30pm

###MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND ### BBQs On The Lawn! Gates Open at 3, Music at 4

ARIA MULDAUR AND HER May 27 BMLUESIANA BAND PLUS HOUSTON JONES Sun

Mon

May 28

ELVIN BISHOP AND RON THOMPSON AND THE RESISTORS

#################### Sun 3 THE MAD MAGGIES Rancho

Music ( 29 Heritage Public House May 25, Comedy Night with Kevin Camia and MC Ricky Del Rosario. May 26, Midori and Ezra Boy. 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sonoma May 25, Foxes in the Henhouse. May 25, Ira Marlowe. May 26, The Adversary with Tony Gibson. May 26, Jimbo Trout. May 27, Wendy DeWitt. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hopmonk Tavern

JOHNNY VEGAS ANDTHE HIGH ROLLERS Jun 9 High Energy Rock and Soul Review

May 24, Juke Joint with Kytami of Delhi to Dublin. May 25, Hot Buttered Rum. May 26, Punching Billy. May 30, Billy Martin and Wil Blades Duo. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Fri

Hotel Healdsburg

Jun

Rowdy Folk Fusion 5:00pm / no cover

Debut!

THE MUDDY ROSES Jun 8 Powerful Harmonies, Country/ Blues Fri

8:30pm / no cover

Sat

8:30pm

Jun 15 Sat

Jun 16

TOMMY CASTRO AND THE

PAINKILLERS

8:30pm CD RELEASE PARTY!

LE JAZZ HOT

The Quartet of The Hot Club Of San Francisco 8:30pm

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

May 25, Dick Conte and Steve Webber Duo. May 26, Susan Sutton Trio with Bill Fouty and Dave DeMarche. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Last Saturday of every month, Good Hip-Hop. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Last Day Saloon

ALL DOOR TIMES 9PM

Best Music Venue / Best Place for Singles to Meet THUR )MAY 24 )9PM )$10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12

CASUAL OF HEIROYGLYPHICS

SOL DOC

FRI )MAY 25 )9PM )$10

SAGE SAT )MAY 26 )10PM )$10

STEPPIN UP SATURDAYS THUR MAY 31 )9PM

TRAINWRECK FRI )JUNE 9 )9PM )$45

CAMBO & THE LIFE CATHEY COTTONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ALLSTAR JAM FRI )JUNE 15 )9PM )$15

EpiCenter Sound, Jay Jonis & 19 Broadway presents:

J STALIN

SAT )JUNE 16 )9PM )$12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16

MICHAEL LANDAU SOUL PIE

HOT UPCOMING ACTS +45"-*/t'"#6-064 7/14 MODERN ENGLISH 19BROADWAY.COM MUSIC HOTLINE 415.459.1091

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McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

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ROBERT EARL KEEN PLUS DAVID JACOBS-STRAIN 3!4s7PM DOORSs$26 s BLUES/FOLK/JAM BAND

MELVIN SEALS & JGB PLUS ON THE SPOT TRIO

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CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE Misha Miller

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week Reservations Advised

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

May 25, Earl Thomas & the Blues Ambassadors with Hand Me Down and Jenny Savage. May 26, Battle of the Skillest. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pick-Me-Up Revue. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station May 23, Phat Chance. May 24, Susan Sutton. May 25, Vernelle Anders. May 26, Wendy DeWitt. May 27, Frankye Kelly. May 29, Maple Profant. May 30, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub May 24, Elaine Dempsey. May 25, Midnight Sun. May 26, Hellhounds. May 27, David Aguilar and Peter McCauley. May 29, Tudo Bem. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Joint Battle of the Skillest brings popping, locking and spinning When Mike â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ground Levelâ&#x20AC;? Cisneros spoke with the Bohemian in March about his days breaking with fellow Windsor native and B-Boy World Champion Omar â&#x20AC;&#x153;Roxriteâ&#x20AC;? Delgado, he was just coming off a personal hiatus. But passion doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quell easily in the arts. Cisneros has recently teamed with Shen-na â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sha-Oneâ&#x20AC;? Smith under the moniker Stolen Laces. Adding some veteran credibility to the North Bay hip-hop scene, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gathered a crew of renowned Bay Area colleagues for an all-out b-boy battle this week in Santa Rosa. With the recent passing of Beastie Boy Adam â&#x20AC;&#x153;MCAâ&#x20AC;? Yauch, the world has been thrown into nostalgia for up-rock dancing and vinyl scratching. Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all-ages exhibition features all four elements of hip-hop culture under one roof: gallery showings by graffiti artists, MC-ing by Kool Daddy Moe and an exclusive scratch performance by DJ Fooders backing the main breaking event, where a $1,000 prize pack awaits for streetwise crews and a $250 prize pack for kids. Judges include â&#x20AC;&#x153;hip-hop archeologistâ&#x20AC;? Mikey Ice and West Coast Rock Steady Crew member Zulu Gremlin. Know the steez on Saturday, May 26, at the Last Day Saloon. 120 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. 2pm. $5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$7. 707.545.5876.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jacquelynne OcaĂąa

Mystic Theatre May 24, Tab Benoit with Jimmy Leslie. May 25, B-Side Players with Bayonics. May 29, Robert Earl Keen with David JacobsStrain. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Outer Planes Comics & Games May 26, Bitzarz Chiptune with IntramuralTechmoBowl,

Scissorfeind and Cr33p0ch. 526 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2000.

Redwood Cafe May 25, Gold Coast Jazz Band. May 26, Tim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Riverside Bistro Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted


by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Fourth Friday of every month, Kaleidoscope. Live art and DJs. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Spancky’s Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. May 25, Who Too. May 26, the 85s. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sprenger’s Tap Room Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Studio E May 27, I See Hawks in LA. Address with tickets. Sebastopol. www.northbaylive.com.

Tradewinds May 25, Pure Cane. May 26, Brothers of Siren. Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Wells Fargo Center May 30, Jamey Johnson. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Presidio Yacht Club May 24, Jeff Jolly Band. Fort Baker, Sausalito. 415.332.2319.

May 24, Soul Pie with Whiskey Thieves. May 25, Stu Allen and Mars Hotel. May 26, Cast of Clowns. May 28, Mill Valley Memorial Day Concert On the Green. May 30, James Nash & the Nomads featuring Scott Amendola, Dewayne Pate and John R Burr. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Rancho Nicasio May 25, James Moseley Band. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse May 25, Pa’l Bailador. May 26, Marble Party. May 27, Trenz. May 29, Noel Jewkes and Denise Perrier. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Sat, 2pm, juke jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Mon, reggae. May 24, Groove Society. May 25, Valerie Troutt. May 26, Dirty Hand Family Band. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall May 23, Dedicated Maniacs.

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Opera House May 23, James Farm. May 25, Tommy Castro. May 27, Joan Osborne. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Silo’s May 23, Clay Hawkins. May 24. 707 Band. May 25, West Coast Song Writers Competition. May 26, 7th Sons. May 27, Idol Finals. May 28, Idol Finale. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre May 23, West End Wednesdays with Kelly and Jekel Duo. May 26, Mother Hips and Tea Leaf Green. May 29, Hugh Laurie (yep, that Hugh Laurie). 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

31 Wed, May 23 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, May 24 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise Fri, May 25 7–11pm

8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther hosts a MOTOWN, DISCO, ROCK’N’ROLL DANCE

Sat, May 26 8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise 11:30am–1:30pm Scottish Challenge Dance 7–11pm Latin Dancing with Cuban Band CARLITIOS MEDRANO and SABOR DE MI CUBA fundraiser for Elsie Allen High School Sun, May 27 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 1:30–3:30pm VINTAGE DANCE 5–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, May 28 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, May 29 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30–10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

May 23, Brazilian Carnival with Samuka & the Wild Tribe Band. May 24, Casual of Hieroyglyphics with Sol Doc. May 25, Sage. May 30, Diamond Jazz. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osteria Divino

San Francisco’s City Guide

Marco Benevento Brooklyn jazz pianist with an ear for cheeky covers and a penchant for effects pedals. May 24 at Yoshi’s Oakland.

Ceremony Modern punk band whose album “Rohnert Park” made the world’s dullest city famous. May 27 at the New Parish.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Be a part of Questlove’s incessant live-tweeting as legendary crew hit the stage. May 28 at Regency Ballroom.

May 23, Swoop Unit. May 24,

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

KYTAMI K YTAMI

((LIVE) LIVE ) O OF FD DEHLI EHLI TO TO DUBLIN DUBLIN

$$44 JA JAMESON MESON & O ORGANIC RGANIC YYERBE ERBE M MATE ATE CO COCKTAILS CKTAILS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

FRI FRI – MAY MAY 25 25

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS

FFOLK/BLUEGRASS/COUNTRY OLK / BLUEGRASS/ COUNTRY

HOT HO TB BUTTERED UTTERED RUM RUM +T TBA BA

$$20/DOORS 20 / DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

SAT SAT – MAY MAY 26 26

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS PARTY/COVER/POP PA RT Y/ COVER / POP

PUNCHING P UNCHING BILLY BILLY + LLOOSY OOSY COVERED COVERED

$$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+ WEEKLY W EEK EKLY E EVENT VENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

MON MON – MAY MAY 28

REGGAE/DANCEHALL R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL

MONDAY M ONDAY N NIGHT IGHT E EDUTAINMENT DUT TAINMENT

RAS R AS G

((SHASHAMANI SHASHAMANI SOUND) SOUND)

The Roots

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS AMERICAN A MERIC AN JAZZ/SOUL JA ZZ / SO S UL

EVENING E VE NING W WITH ITH

BILLY B ILLY MA MARTIN RTIN & WIL WIL B BLADES LADES DUO DUO +M MARK ARK S SEXTON EXTON BAND BAND

$$12 12 ADV/$15 ADV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 7PM/21+ 7PM /21+ THUR T HUR – MAY MAY 3 31 1 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

GHETTO G HET TO FFUNK/BOOGIE U N K / B O O GI E B BREAKS/GYPSY R E A K S / GYP SY D DOODLE O O D LE

$5 $ 5 JJAMESON AMESON A ALL LL N NIGHT IGHT & O ORGANIC RGANIC G GUAYAKI UAYAKI C COCKTAILS OCKTAILS $$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM/21+

The Cult Openers Against Me! play first shows since Tom Gabel’s transgender announcement. May 27 at the Fillmore.

WED W ED – MAY MAY 30 30

SPACE S PACE COWBOYS COWBOYS MANCUB MANCUB & SMOOVE SMOOVE +M MALARKEY ALARKEY

Danzig Evening with the evil kitty-litter-buying one promises a special set of Misfits songs. May 27 at the Warfield.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

WORLD/ELECTRONIC/FUNK W OR O LD / ELEC TRONIC / FUNK

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT

May 23, Lau Paiva. May 24, Passion Habanera. May 25, Noam Lemish Trio. May 26, Joan Getz Quartet. May 27, Priscilla and Nannick. May 29, Carlos Oliveira. May 30, Silvio Correia Duo. 27 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

May 23, Carlos Olivera. May 24, Wendy DewItt with Kirk Harwood. May 29, Lorin Rowan. May 30, John Hoy. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

WEEKLY W EE EK KLY E EVENT VENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES–10PM AGES–10PM

George’s Nightclub

19 Broadway Club

THUR T HUR – MAY MAY 24 24

$3 $ 3 RED RED STRIPES STRIPES & $4 $4 JAMESON JAMESON ALL ALL NIGHT NIGHT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+ TUES T UES – MAY MAY 29 29 W WEEKLY EEK KLY EVENT EVENT BILL B ILL DECARLI DECARLI PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

MARIN COUNTY May 24, Hunks. May 25, Cheeseballs. May 26, Amber Morris Voice Coaching. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR S INGLES TO M E ET SINGLES MEET B EST BAR BAR HHONORABLE BEST ONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HONORABLE HONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC M US I C V VENUE ENUE HONORABLE HONOR ABLE

FRI F RI – JUN JUN 1

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS GYPSY/PIRATE/FOLK G YPSY Y/ PIRATE/ FOLK

Come see us!

DIEGOS D IEGOS U UMBRELLA MBRELLA

Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

$$12 12 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

Brewery Tours Daily at 3!

ROOTS/ROCK/REGGAE R OOTS/ ROCK / REGGAE

1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

+S SHOVELMAN HOVELMAN

SAT S AT – JUN JUN 2

UM HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS RAELLBEASE T

SOL S OL HO HORIZON RIZON $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

EVE N

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 23 – 29, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Society: Culture House

Mark’s Jam Sammich. May 25, Honeydust. May 26, Chrome Johnson. May 27, Slowpoke. May 29, Jenny Lloyd. May 30, (W+T)J2. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.


Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 29, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

32

Galleries OPENINGS May 26 At 4pm. Quicksilver Mine Co, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stardust: Reflections on Nature and Existenceâ&#x20AC;? presents the work of Christiane Michaela Vincent. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799.

May 30 From 3 to 5pm. Gallery Route One, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then and Now,â&#x20AC;? featuring Andrew Romanoff, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vanishing California,â&#x20AC;? with Patti Trimble and the works of Dorothy Nissen in the Annex. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

SONOMA COUNTY Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Through May 30, Paintings on silk by Elaine Vickery. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 707.544.2491.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through May 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Birds of a Feather,â&#x20AC;? featuring Becoming Independent and artists at Studios on A. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

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Gallery One Through Jun 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Petalumaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Heritageâ&#x20AC;? features work by Katherine Austin, Robin Burgert and Jonnie Russell. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Gallery 300 Saturdays through May 27, New paintings by Mary Vaughan. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

OFYUUP5IF8JOFZBSE $MFWFMBOE"WF 4BOUB3PTB  (PUPXXX)FSJUBHF1VCMJD)PVTF43DPNGPSPVSNPOUIMZTDIFEVMF

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clay and Glassâ&#x20AC;? features work by Monica Boettcher, Jane Burton and others. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Local Color Gallery Through Jun 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through the Lens,â&#x20AC;? featuring photography of Mike Shoys, John Hershey and Tom Moyer. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Jun 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reflections,â&#x20AC;? featuring the works of various artists, juried by Bob and Susan Cornelis. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Pelican Art Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art at the Sourceâ&#x20AC;? with over 40 artists presents a preview exhibit. 143 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Open Tues-Thurs and Sat, 11 to 6; Fri, 11 to 8; SunMon by appointment only. 707.773.3393.

Petaluma Arts Center Through May 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Culture Within: The Japanese American Experience Through Art,â&#x20AC;? featuring the works of Henry Sugimoto. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Quercia Gallery Through Dec 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;1+1=2,â&#x20AC;? featuring 16 artists exhibiting two framed images. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Quicksilver Mine Company

collection. 1781 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. Wed-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.875.2922.

RiskPress Gallery Through May 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paradise in Gathering Darkness,â&#x20AC;? features work by Jim Sullivan. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Russian River Art Gallery Through May 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flora and Fauna,â&#x20AC;? featuring artistic explorations of natural world. 16200 First St, Guerneville. Daily, 10 to 6. 707.869.9099.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Jun 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Search,â&#x20AC;? features the art of James Reynolds. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Side Street Gallery Through Jun 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wheely Good Art,â&#x20AC;? features bike-related art by Paula Smith, Mylette Welch and many others. 507 David Clayton Rd, Windsor.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Jun 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Color Theory: The Use of Color in Contemporary Art,â&#x20AC;? featuring work of nine artists from across the country. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Towers Gallery Through Jun 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cloverdale: Where the Vineyards Meet the Redwoods,â&#x20AC;? with various artists in various media. $15. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY Alemany Library Gallery May 23-Jun 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;MSA Past Presidentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Showâ&#x20AC;? features the work of more than 30 MSA past presidentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3251.

Art Works Downtown

Through May 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Invernessâ&#x20AC;? featuring the impressionist work of Jill Keller-Peters. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

May 25-Jul 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stardust: Reflections on Nature and Existenceâ&#x20AC;? presents the work of Christiane Michaela Vincent. Reception, May 26 at 4pm. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Through Jun 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Surface Designâ&#x20AC;? welcomes worldrenowned Danish artist Gugger Petter. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Ren Brown Collection

Through May 31,

Through Jun 17, Yoko Hara

Through Jun 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Behind the Alter,â&#x20AC;? featuring the Paul

Graton Gallery

8BUDIGPS8FEOFTEBZTXJUI ¥#SFXFEGPS5IPVHIU¢DPNJOHTPPO

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mediterranean Visions,â&#x20AC;? exhibit features the collaborative work of Robyn Spencer-Crompton, Peter Crompton and Francesco Cafiso. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Bolinas Museum


33 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 29, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

BUT SHEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ONLY A DREAM Otto Premingerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great 1944 ďŹ lm â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Lauraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; screens May 29 at the Napa Valley Opera House. See Film, p34 .

LeBaron Thiebaud Collection of Mexican Retablos. Through Jun 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Circles,â&#x20AC;? with photos by Rick Chapman in photography gallery. Through Jun 24, Work by Tess Felix Greene in Coastal Marin Artists Gallery. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Elsewhere Gallery Through Jun 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Le Triangle,â&#x20AC;? features art by the Fairfax French Club, including works by Geoff Bernstein, JeanMarc Brugeilles and Pierre Flandreau. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through May 26, Annual juried exhibit features variety of artwork in all media. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Route One Through Jun 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then and Now,â&#x20AC;? featuring Andrew Romanoff, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vanishing California,â&#x20AC;? with Patti Trimble and the works of Dorothy Nissen in the Annex. Reception, May 30, at 3pm-5pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through May 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Muslim Eyes,â&#x20AC;? featuring religions and secular art by 35 Muslim artists. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato.

Marin MOCA Through May 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Altered Books,â&#x20AC;? showcases the work of 150 Bay Area artists who re-imagine, reconstruct and rework old, discarded books. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Point Reyes Artist Studios May 26-28, Point Reyes Artist studios gives patrons an opportunity to visit 21 artist studios. Free. Around Tomales Bay, Pt Reyes Station.

Seager Gray Gallery Through May 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art of the Bookâ&#x20AC;? featuring handmade books, altered books and bookrelated materials. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

exhibition through Yo el Rey Roasting, Art House and World Artist Exchange features artists from across the nation. 1217 Washington, Calistoga. 707.942.1180.

Comedy Bay Area Playback Theater Improvisational theater based on true stories from audience members. Sat, May 26, 8pm. $8-$10. Open Secret, 923 C St, San Rafael. 415.457.4191.

George Lopez One of the top five highest grossing comedians in the world comes to Santa Rosa. May 26-27, 8pm. $55-$65. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Jun 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;CYCLE,â&#x20AC;? new works by Hung Liu. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Hess Collection Winery Ongoing, outstanding private collection featuring work by Franz Gertsch, Robert Motherwell and other modern masters. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. Daily, 10 to 5:15. 707.255.1144

Yo el Rey Roasting Through May 31, Salon-style

Dance Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub May 27, 7pm, Memorial Day Singles Dance, single adults invited to dance to favorites with Society of Single Professionals. $10. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.226.0262.

Green String Farm Barn Dance May 25, 5-9pm, easy-to-learn English country and contra dancing with a dinner of chili and cornbread ) to benefit Heifer

34

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NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 23 – 29, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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International. $30. Green String Farm, 3571 Old Adobe Rd, Petaluma. 707.778.7500.

Events Benefit for Ayudame a Pintar Mi Futuro Guatemalan project “Help Me Paint My Future” benefited by show including paintings, clothing, handbags, jewelry and more. May 27, 1-6pm. Donations accepted. Subud Hall, 234 Hutchins Ave, Sebastopol.

Environmental Leadership Awards Business Leaders’ breakfast honors CEO of Conservation Corps. May 23, 7:45am. $25. Four Points Sheraton, 1010 Northgate Dr, San Rafael. 415.479.8800.

Food Not Bombs Help prepare and serve free vegan meals every Sun afternoon; served at 5. Sun. Railroad Square, Fourth and Wilson streets, Santa Rosa. 707.701.3620.

Grand Opening for Great Blue Heron Hall Fun-filled day featuring bird watching, tours, horse-drawn carriage rides and historical anecdotes. May 26, 11am-4pm. Free. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

May Madness JuggleFest Pins! Knives! Horses! Okay, so maybe not horses. But many other items will be juggled when Santa Rosa club presents local juggling festival. May 26, 9am. Free. Juilliard Park, 227 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa.

Native Words, Native Warriors Developed by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, this unique exhibit tells remarkable story of soldiers from more than a dozen tribes who used their Native languages while in service in the U.S. military. Through Jul 1. Petaluma Historical Museum and Library, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Water Smart Expo Drop in to test your drinking water IQ, speak with industry experts, enter a raffle and get

your face painted during the Wednesday Night Market. May 23, 5-8pm. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

Yoga for Your Eyes Body worker Pnina Zoharah teaches techniques for healing your eyesight. May 29, 7pm. $20-$25. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8280 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Film The Merry Widow HD broadcast from Dresden Opera of classic Franz Lehar operetta. May 26,7pm. $20. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

The Met Opera ‘Gotterdammerung,’ May 30, 1pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Royal Ballet of London ‘ La Fille Mal Gardee.’ May 29, 6:30pm. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

Seldom Seen Flicks Classic, rarely seen films and documentaries. May 29, “Laura.” 7pm. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Food & Drink Blues BBQ & Silent Auction Oysters, barbecue and music by Danny Click and the Hell Yeahs. May 27, 11am-5pm. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Healdsburg Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon. Healdsburg Farmers Market, North and

Vine streets, Healdsburg. 707.431.1956.

Larkspur Flower & Food Festival Celebrate the beginning of summer with gourmet samples, a salsa tasting and fresh bouquets. May 27, 11am6pm. Free. Downtown Larkspur, Magnolia Avenue between King and Ward streets, Larkspur.

Novato Farmers’ Market Come together and celebrate fresh and local food. T ues, 4-8pm. through Sep 22. Novato Farmers Market, Grant and Sherman avenues, Novato.

Oysterpalooza Fifth annual celebration of oysters features live music from Redwing Bluegrass Band, Tiny Television and others. May 27, 12-10:30pm. Rocker Oysterfeller’s, 14415 Hwy 1, Valley Ford. 707.876.1983.

Petaluma Farmers’ Market Live music and over 50 local booths. Sat, 2-5:30pm. through Nov 17. Free. Petaluma Farmers Market, Walnut Park, corner of Petaluma Blvd S and D St, Petaluma.

Totally Truckin’ Thursdays Four food trucks park in the O’Reilly parking lot, provide you with local goodness and donate 10 percent of sales to a monthly selected nonprofit. Thurs. O’Reilly & Associates, 1005 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.7190.

Volunteer Firemen’s Barbecue Music from Andre’s All Stars, open air dancing and grilled chicken with the Muir Beach Volunteer Firemen’s Barbecue. May 27, noon-5pm. Free, donations accepted. Muir Beach Picnic Grounds, Muir Woods Rd, Marin.

Wednesday Night Market Over 130 vendors and all the people you went to elementary school with flood downtown Santa Rosa. Wed. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

Wine Country Passport Weekend Enjoy a boutique collection of four unique tasting experiences. May 26, 11am4pm. $50-$60. Beringer Vineyards, 2000 Main St, St Helena.


CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Service Agency, 555 Northgate Dr, San Rafael. 415.492.9444.

Review of internationally known potterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life and work with visit to Pond Farm. May 26, 10am-12:30pm. $5$15. Redwood Forest Theatre, Armstong Redwoods State Reserve, Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville.

Christiane Michaela Vincent May 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 12, 2012 Artist Reception: Saturday, May 26, 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm Gallery Talk: Thursday, June 14, 7pm

Tony Redhouse

Before and After Robin Grossinger examines Napa Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ecology Like his famously quirky sibling Miranda July, Robin Grossinger studies the unseen webs and natural intricacies that underlie our daily lives. But rather than exploring these ideas through talking cats and interpretive dance, the Berkeley-based scientist does so through historical ecology. A senior scientist at the San Francisco Estuary Institute, Grossinger muses on such questions as how history teaches us ways to practice smart design, what California looked like before European contact and how buildings can work in harmony with nature. Grossingerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest historical ecology study has taken place right here in the North Bay, via the publication of Napa Valley Historical Ecology Atlas: Exploring a Hidden Landscape of Transformation and Resilience. With the help of cartographer Ruth Askevold and local researcher Shari Gardner, the atlas weaves together rare maps, photographs, paintings and travelers accounts to reconstruct early Napa Valley and examine how the land area has changed over last 200 years, the idea being that the study of the past, and the resilience of certain natural features, can teach us ways to increase the health of living landscapes in the future. Grossinger appears on Thursday, May 24, at the Theatre (formerly Copia). 500 First St., Napa. 7pm. 707.252.8002.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark

Native American musician and inspirational speaker talks about oneness of being. May 25, 7pm. Petaluma Historical Museum and Library, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Divorce Options Workshop Volunteer group of attorneys,

financial specialists and mental-health professionals offer four-hour workshops on divorce. Last Sat of every month, 9am. $45. Family

11-6 Thursâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Mon (closed Tues & Weds)

6671 Front Street/Hwy 116, Downtown Forestville 707-887-0799 quicksilvermineco.com

Teach-In Series â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brown Bag Economic Justiceâ&#x20AC;? series features introduction to Occupy Santa Rosa and Occupy movement in general. Thurs, May 24. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.701.3620.

Readings Book Passage May 23, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Outsourced Self: Intimate Life in Market Times,â&#x20AC;? with Arlie Hochschild. May 24, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Making a Difference: Stories of Visions and Courage from Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leaders,â&#x20AC;? with Captain Sully. May 25, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Habit,â&#x20AC;? with Susan Morse. May 30, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fathers Day A Journey Into the Mind and Heart of My Extraordinary Son,â&#x20AC;? with Buzz Bissinger. Through May 31, Susan Hall, Paintings and drawings by Susan Hall. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books May 25, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Taste What Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Missing,â&#x20AC;? with Barb Stuckey. 2316 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Redwoods Presbyterian Church May 24, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maya Roads,â&#x20AC;? with Mary Jo McConahay. $5. 110 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur.

The Theater

Lectures

Amaterasu (detail). Pigment & plaster on panel, 26" X 18", 2012

May 24, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Napa Valley Historical Ecology Atlas: Exploring a Hidden Landscape of Transformation and Resilience,â&#x20AC;? with Robin Grossinger, Shari Gardner and Ruth Askevold. Free. 500 First St, Napa 707.259.1600. )

36

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35 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 23 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 29, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Pond Farm & Legacy of Marguerite Wildenhain

STARDUST: Reflections on Nature & Existence


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Theater Born Yesterday Ex-show girl and mistress Billie Dawn gets a new lesson on life and love when her corrupt and uncouth junk czar boyfriend hires a newspaper reporter to tutor her in current events, grammar and gentility for mixing with political elite in Washington, D.C. Various dates and times. May 25-Jun 10. $15$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

God of Carnage Following an altercation between their 11-year-old sons in Cobble Hill Park, Annette and Alan Raleigh agree to meet Veronica and Michael Novak to discuss the situation civilly, but the veneer of polite society soon falls away. Various dates and times. May 24-Jun 17. $34$55. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The Night of the Iguana Cris Cassell of San Francisco directs Tennessee Williams piece. Various dates and times. Through Jun 17. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Noises Off Play within a play explores what really goes on behind the curtain. Various dates and times. May 25-Jun 17. $20-$22. Novato Theater Company, 484 Ignacio Blvd, Novato.

Norman, Is That You? Comedy by Ron Clark and Sam Brobrick, with John Rowan as director, presented by Pegasus Theater Company. Various dates and times. Through Jun 10. $15. Rio Nido Roadhouse, 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Souvenir Stephen Temperley presents play on eccentric-yettalentless diva Florence Foster Jenkins. Various dates and times. Through May 27, 6pm. $30. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the

CRITIC’S CHOICE Pamela Holmes

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 23 – 29, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

36

Lens Journey Central Valley desolation focus of new photo project For their latest project, Valley of Shadows and Dreams, documentary photographers Ken and Melanie Light have captured the beauty and dismay in the Central Valley. Fascinated by the development boom in the central part of California, they began exploring the issues affecting the valley—land and water use, economic disparity and population growth—through stark, lovely black-and-white photos. From farmers displaced by ill-conceived housing developments to the large numbers of children born with birth defects in Kettleman City, the stories and injustices in the book may surprise even born-andbred Californians who thought they knew everything about the Golden State. In an interview with California Watch, Ken Light said he and his wife wanted to explore the people “who are the spine of the valley, the lifeblood of the valley, who have been hidden in the shadows.” The Lights have done this before, to great success, with Coal Hollow, a collection of photographs and oral histories about the legacy of coal mining in West Virginia. After a five-year photographic journey through California’s heartland, they’ve produced a second book with as much power and grace as the first. The Lights appear on Wednesday, May 30, at the Venture Greenhouse. 30 Castro Ave., San Rafael. 7pm. Free. 415.721.0636.—Leilani Clark

community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St,

Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


ŵŹ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 23-29, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 23-29, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

ŵź

Higher Vision Festival This new event features Burning Spear, Tinariwen, the Motet and many others on June 9 at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds. If the consciousness-altering tunes get your head a-spinning, there will be plenty of organic grub to bring you back down to earth. 415.256.8499 or InTicketing.com.

Techno-Tribal Dance The decade-plus crown jewel of the Harmony Festival goes smaller but doesn’t disappear at the Hopmonk on June 9. Two stages of pulsing electro music feature Love & Light, Russ Liquid, Seraphim and many others. With limited capacity, this is a first-come, first serve event. See www.techno-tribal.com.

Novato Festival of Art, Wine & Music Two-day live music fest features area crafters, good things to eat and drink, including a wine garden, and live music on two stages. Musical highlights include Chuck Prophet (June 9), Lydia Pense (June 9), Jaime Kyle (June 10) and Bonnie Hayes (June 10). Children’s area complete with petting zoo, art tent and a chance to climb aboard a fire engine. Saturday–Sunday, June 9–10. Old Town Novato, on Grant between Redwood Avenue and Seventh Street. Free. 415.472.1553.

Cotati Jazz Festival The “biggest little jazz festival” celebrates its 32nd anniversary with food, beer, music and fun. This free, all-day event encompasses every musical and nonmusical venue in downtown Cotati with the main acts slated for La Plaza Park. Performers in the park include Jason Bodlovich, One World Latin Band, Bautista, and the Burleigh Bunch. Check individual venues for bookings. June 16. Noon–7pm. www.cotatijazz.com.

Marin Art Festival This “lawn party for the arts” features over 250 artists by the Lagoon in the Marin Civic Center in a twoday outdoor party that includes international food, live music,

fine wine and brews, and more. In addition to paintings, jewelry and sculptures, patrons can enjoy a wide variety of Cajun, Greek and French fare. June 16–17, Lagoon Park, at the Marin Center, Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. $10; kids and parking, free. 415.388.0151. www.marinartfestival.com.

Rodney Strong Concert Series The 22nd annual KJZY Summer Concert Series in the sunny grasslands behind the Rodney Strong winery kicks off its season with Tower of Power and Craig Chaquico (June 16), Dave Koz and BeBe Winans (July 28), Al Jarreau and the George Duke Trio (Aug. 11) and Huey Lewis and the News (Sept. 1). Rodney Strong Vineyards, 11455 Old Redwood Hwy., Healdsburg. $50–$115. 707.869.1595.

Sonoma-Marin Fair The world’s ugliest dogs appear and a hundred tons of metal collide in the destruction derby, with carnival rides, fair food and more. The musical lineup includes War (June 20), Night Ranger (June 21), Lonestar (June 22) and 38 Special (June 23). The Fiesta Latina buttons it up on June 26. Sonoma-Marin Fair, Petaluma Fairgrounds, two blocks west of East Washington Exit, Petaluma. June 20–24. Noon to midnight. $15, adults; $10, kids and seniors; under three, free. Tickets include rides. www.sonoma-marinfair.org. Sierra Nevada World Music Fest Slightly outside the North Bay but of avid interest to locals is this three-day roots reggae and world music festival at Booneville’s Mendocino County Fairgrounds, running this year June 22–24. Acts include Jimmy Cliff, LoCura, Luciano, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Third World and many others, plus late-night dancehall. All three days, $160; one day, $60–$70; limited camping available. 916.777.5550. www. snwmf.com.

Petaluma Music Festival Fifth annual event to keep music in the schools features Jackie Greene, Pimps of Joytime, Poor Man’s Whiskey, Nicki Bluhm and many others in all-day fest of music, food, raffle and much more. Aug 4, 11am-9pm. $30. Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds, 175 Fairgrounds Drive, Petaluma. www.petalumamusicfestival.org.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of May 23

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “My soul is a fire that suffers if it doesn’t burn,” said Jean Prevost, a writer and hero of the French resistance during World War II. “I need three or four cubic feet of new ideas every day, as a steamboat needs coal.” Your soul may not be quite as blazing as his, Aries, and you may normally be able to get along fine with just a few cubic inches of new ideas per day. But I expect that in the next three to four weeks, you will both need and yearn to generate Prevost-type levels of heat and light. Please make sure you’re getting a steady supply of the necessary fuel. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Here’s a great question to pose on a regular basis during the next three weeks: “What’s the best use of my time right now?” Whenever you ask, be sure to answer with an open mind. Don’t assume that the correct response is always “working with white-hot intensity on churning out the masterpiece that will fulfill my dreams and cement my legacy.” On some occasions, the best use of your time may be doing the laundry or sitting quietly and doing nothing more than watching the world go by. Here’s a reminder from philosopher Jonathan Zap: “Meaning and purpose are not merely to be found in the glamorous, dramatic moments of life.”

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “Sometimes I think and other times I am,” said French poet Paul Valery. Most of us could say the same thing. From what I can tell, Gemini, you are now entering an intensely “I am” phase of your long-term cycle—a time when it will be more important for you to exclaim “Woohoo!” than to mutter “hmmm . . .”; a time to tune in extra strong to the nonverbal wisdom of your body and to the sudden flashes of your intuition; a time when you’ll generate more good fortune by getting gleefully lost in the curious mystery of the moment than by sitting back and trying to figure out what it all means. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

Don’t pretend you can’t see the darkness. Admit to its presence. Accept its reality. And then, dear Cancerian, walk nonchalantly away from it, refusing to fight it or be afraid of it. In other words, face up to the difficulty without becoming all tangled up in it. Gaze into the abyss so as to educate yourself about its nature, but don’t get stuck there or become entranced by its supposedly hypnotic power. I think you’ll be amazed at how much safety and security you can generate for yourself simply by being an objective, poised observer free of melodramatic reactions.

LEO (July 23–August 22) It’s OK with me if you want to keep the lion as your symbolic animal, Leo. But I’d like to tell you why I’m proposing that you switch over to the tiger, at least for now. People who work with big cats say that lions tend to be obnoxious and grouchy, whereas tigers are more affable and easy to get along with. And I think that in the coming weeks it’ll be important for you to be like the tiger. During this time, you will have an enhanced power to cultivate friendships and influence people. Networking opportunities will be excellent. Your web of connections should expand. By the way, even though lions are called kings of the jungle, tigers are generally bigger, more muscular and better fighters. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

In 1977, the first Apple computers were built in a garage that Steve Jobs’ father provided for his son and Steve Wozniak to work in. (You can see a photo of the holy shrine here: tinyurl.com/AppleGarage.) I suggest you think about setting up your own version of that magic place sometime soon: a basement, kitchen, garage, warehouse or corner of your bedroom that will be the spot where you fine-tune your master plan for the coming years—and maybe even where you begin working in earnest on a labor of love that will change everything for the better.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) I have a heads-up for you, Libra. Do your best to avoid getting enmeshed in any sort of “he said, she said” controversy. (Of course it could be a “he said, he said” or “she said, she said” or “trans said, intersex said” brouhaha, too—you get the idea.) Gossip is not your friend in the week ahead. Trying to serve as a mediator is not your strong suit; becoming embroiled in personal disputes is not your destiny. In my opinion, you should soar free of all the chatter and clatter. It’s time for you to seek out

big pictures and vast perspectives. Where you belong is meditating on a mountaintop, flying in your dreams and charging up your psychic batteries in a sanctuary that’s both soothing and thrilling.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

In some Australian aborigine cultures, a newborn infant gets two names from the tribal elders. The first is the name everybody s. The second is sacred and is kept secret. Even the child isn’t told. Only when he or she comes of age and is initiated into adulthood is it revealed. I wish we had a tradition similar to this. It might be quite meaningful for you, because you’re currently navigating your way through a rite of passage that would make you eligible to receive your sacred, secret name. I suggest we begin a new custom: when you’ve completed your transformation, pick a new name for yourself and use it only when you’re conversing with your ancestors, your teachers or yourself.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Please raise your hand if you have ever sought out a romantic connection with someone mostly because of the way he or she looked. You shouldn’t feel bad if you have; it’s pretty common. But I hope you won’t indulge in this behavior any time soon. In the coming weeks, it’s crucial for you to base your decisions on deeper understandings—not just in regards to potential partners and lovers, but for everything. As you evaluate your options, don’t allow physical appearance and superficial attractiveness to be the dominant factors. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) The 21st flight of the 4.5-billion-pound space shuttle Discovery was supposed to happen on June 8, 1995. But about a week before its scheduled departure, workers discovered an unforeseen problem. Northern flicker woodpeckers had made a mess of the insulation on the outer fuel tank; they’d pecked a couple of hundred holes, some quite deep. To allow for necessary repairs, launch was postponed for over a month. I’m choosing this scenario to serve as a useful metaphor for you, Capricorn. Regard it as your notice not to ignore a seemingly tiny adversary or trivial obstacle. Take that almost-insignificant pest seriously. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) It’s official: dancing increases your intelligence. So says a report in the New England Journal of Medicine. Unfortunately, research found that swimming, bicycling and playing golf are not at all effective in rewiring the brain’s neural pathways. Doing crossword puzzles is somewhat helpful, though, and so is reading books. But one of the single best things you can do to enhance your cognitive functioning is to move your body around in creative and coordinated rhythm with music. Lucky you: this is a phase of your astrological cycle when you’re likely to have more impulses and opportunities to dance. Take advantage! Get smarter. (More info: tinyurl.com/DanceSmart.) PISCES (February 19–March 20) Your animal totem for the next phase of your astrological cycle is a creature called a hero shrew. Of all the mammals in the world, it has the strongest and heaviest spine proportionate to its size. This exceptional attribute makes the tiny animal so robust that a person could stand on it without causing serious harm. You will need to have a backbone like that in the coming weeks, Pisces. Luckily, the universe will be conspiring to help you. I expect to see you stand up to the full weight of the pressures coming to bear on you—and do it with exceptional charisma.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 23-29, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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