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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies A Stained Degree Why the hell should Sandy Weill be honored by SSU? BY SHEPHERD BLISS

S

hame on you, Sonoma State, where I’ve taught humanities for the last four years. Your administration plans to award the notorious Wall Street bankster Sandy Weill an honorary doctorate at its May 12 graduation. This disgraces SSU.

Weill was the CEO of Citigroup, the largest of the “too big to fail” banks bailed out by taxpayers. A major purveyor of toxic mortgages, Citigroup required $45 billion in government investment and a $300 billion guarantee of its bad assets to avoid bankruptcy. Citigroup once paid a $3 billion fine for involvement in the Enron scandal. When Gov. Jerry Brown was California attorney general, he wrote that Citigroup “knowingly stole from its customers, mostly poor people and the recently deceased.” And yet Sandy Weill is getting an honorary degree for donating $12 million to SSU last year to finish its Green Music Center. An article by editor Robert Scheer in the April 19 issue of The Nation describes Weill as a “hustler who led the successful lobbying to reverse the Glass-Steagall law” in 1999. Enacted after the Great Depression to protect us from the kind of economic collapse we are now experiencing, Glass-Steagall was a barrier between investment and commercial banks. Weill shattered it. Up went Weill’s fortunes and the 1% he represents; down went the 99%. Shortly before the 2008 crash, Weill retired. The New York Times headline said it all: “Laughing All the Way from the Bank.” Protests against Weill’s purchased degree have already begun. On April 27, activists passed out research on Weill at the GMC, holding a sign describing him as “King of the Subprime Mortgage— Architect of the Great Recession.” Though officially known as the Green Music Center, some are already calling it the Weill Music Center. He seems to be pulling the strings on the project and making his own laws, just as he and his corporations did with the federal government. Weill and Citigroup justify the popular Occupy chant “Banks Got Bailed Out, We Got Sold Out.” Shepherd Bliss teaches college, farms in Sebastopol, and can be reached at 3sb@comcast.net. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the Bohemian. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Haunted by the Diaper, Too?

Stop or My Mom Will Shoot—yikes! I’m still embarrassed (“Where Was It Filmed?” April 18). This was the only genuine Hollywood movie I was ever in, after all these years in showbiz. I was an extra, spending all day in the hot sun dressed in a police uniform (shortsleeved shirt—what a sunburn!) with a pistol in a holster on my belt, watching Sylvester Stallone and the crowd go through many incomprehensible antics at the Santa Rosa Air Center. I think I was there for almost 10 hours and got paid a hundred bucks and change. I avoided seeing the movie for years and finally rented the video. It was about as bad as movies get, but the worst part was, I wasn’t even in it! I wound up on the cutting-room floor! The indignity! A really excellent feature, by the way. Congratulations to all the writers.

ROLAND JACOPETTI Santa Rosa

Attack of the B-Movie Well, you also missed a cheesy but fun B-movie filmed in the city of Sonoma in 1976. Mr. Billion was directed by Jonathan Kaplan, before he migrated to TV (Law & Order, ER). For a week, we residents watched the bodacious Valerie Perrine and the ornery ex-rodeo clown Slim Pickens ham it up with Italian spaghetti-Western star Terence Hill (born Mario Girotti). The Creamery on First Street East morphed into the Hog Leg Saloon, ornamented with a neon sign that crashed to the ground during a gunfight. We were treated to a car chase around the plaza (which accidently took out

a streetlight pole that I had been lounging against just the day before) and an exploding helicopter on the pitcher’s mound on Arnold Field (no CGI—just a very big bang!). The hero rushed into the Sebastiani Theatre, a scene which received thunderous applause from those of us in the same venue a year later at the film’s spirited premiere. I believe it was the most excitement Sonoma had seen since the Bear Flag Revolt of 1846.

TOM TOLLEFSEN Glen Ellen

Don’t Hang the DJ I don’t think it’s fair or logical to even suggest that rape and sexual assault have any connection with the word “bitch” in a rap song (“Quad City DJs,” April 18). What’s next? A ban on Katy Perry’s “Last Friday Night” because the drinking theme will cause drinking-anddriving deaths? If people rape, or drink and drive, they’re not doing it because a song told them it’s OK. A college campus shouldn’t be a place that buries its head in the sand and tries to be void of pop culture. If a couple of songs have references to drugs, liquor, weed or even drop the word “bitch” a few times, it isn’t time to go running to the president of the college and asking him to intervene; it’s time for you to get more involved with whatever group is responsible, or at least walk up to the DJ and let him or her know how you feel.

ALEX CAMPBELL Santa Rosa

Poetry Heals The feminist and radical poet Adrienne Rich, who died in March, wrote eloquently about the intersection of poetry and politics, of poetry as passionate witness. While much of media’s job is to normalize pain and difference and make it acceptable and


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inevitable, poetry takes us to the frontier of what it is to be humanâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that which society expects us to deny. In many countries, poetry is part of peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives. Here, we often feel blessedly released from it when we leave school. But do others know something we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t? Happily, Sonoma County has a rich culture of poetry (ďŹ nd out more at socolitupdate.com). On May 4 at 7:30 at Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden in Santa Rosa, poets will read in a dozen languages. This will be an opportunity to experience the rich music of poetry, as well as immerse ourselves in the exploration of the human condition. For an evening, we will turn away from the constant message of our differences and celebrate that which unites us. Join us. You may never want to go back.

SUSAN LAMONT Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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2 Barney Frank comes to Iron Horse Vineyards for Jared Huffman on May 6

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5 Right to Know collects

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ANONYMOUS The ‘Who Is Stacey Lawson?’ site criticizes Lawson���s donors, business history and ‘spiritual teacher.’

Campaign Veil Who is ‘Who Is Stacey Lawson?’

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deally, transparency and accountability would be the cornerstones of any election campaign, but for a heated political arena in the internet age, they can also be the first to crumble. On April 15, pre-election machinations whirred with the debut of a website and Twitter account calling itself “Who Is Stacey Lawson?” The staunchly anonymous author has been

BY LEILANI CLARK

dedicated to digging up damaging information about Lawson, one of the frontrunners in the campaign to fill Lynn Woolsey’s seat in the newly redrawn Second Congressional District. The site has triggered a small but fascinating local skirmish fueled by accusations of nefarious election strategies and the importance of transparency. “It’s patently hypocritical, because the same person that’s hiding behind this anonymous screen name and attacking Stacey

on the grounds that she allegedly had things to hide, that she’s a stealth candidate, is taking that whole stealth thing 20 steps further by completely hiding their own identity,” says Cynthia Boaz, a political science professor at Sonoma State University. “To accuse someone of something that you yourself are engaging in—it takes a lot of credibility out of the accusations themselves. It’s really disappointing that people in our local political scene would sink to that level.”

Boaz’s partner, Jason Liles, former Healdsburg mayor and member of the Sonoma County Planning Commission, is a volunteer coordinator on Lawson’s campaign. Boaz says she herself is not involved with the campaign, except as a voter and a supporter. She says that “Who Is Stacey Lawson?” is a “desperate, dirtytricks campaign strategy,” and has implied in Twitter postings that one of the other candidates could be behind the corrosive pop-up. Boaz refuses to speculate on who specifically might be behind the site. Jake Bayless, editor of the online site Empire Report, says that, like Boaz, he’s not fan of any sources’ choice to remain anonymous. Bayless himself has been busy digging up information on Lawson, after coming across an article in the North Coast Journal that mentioned the multimillionaire entrepreneur’s past gig as a spirituality columnist for the Huffington Post. Further digging revealed that all of Lawson’s posts had been deleted in 2011, before she entered the congressional race. Using the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine, which archives content back to 1996, Bayless was able to retrieve 48 soulsearching pieces with titles such as “Knowledge Is Bondage,” “We Are the Terrorists” and “Igniting the Modern Mystic.” A sample passage finds Lawson “hurtling towards oblivion,” writing decrees such as “All my well worn beliefs? Piles of crap. Delete. Everything I thought I knew? Bullshit.” After Bayless reposted the articles on Empire Report, “Who Is Stacey Lawson” reached out to him privately on Twitter, suggesting, “Let’s work together on Stacey Lawson.” Bayless declined. “Really for me, it’s just about the facts. Shine the flashlight on them,” says Bayless, in reference to his decision to republish the Huffington Post materials. “This was one of those things where clearly the candidate would have preferred that they stayed in the dark, and to me that’s problematic.”


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Fish Story

Jim Norton’s film a triumph of eloquence and advocacy BY JULIANE POIRIER

I Enjoy our Bounty of Bike Events for the Whole Family May 6:: Women Chicks M ay 6 Women Ride Ride with with Biker Biker C hicks & S Supervisor up e r visor Z Zane ane May 110: 0: A ME n e r g izi n g S t a ti o n s & P May AM Energizing Stations PM M Bike Bike Home Home C Celebrations e l e b r a ti o n s May 110: 0: ATOC ATOC Team Team Radio Ra d i o S hack-Nissan-TREK M eet & G reet R eception May Shack-Nissan-TREK Meet Greet Reception TREK Store, St o r e , S anta R osa, 5–7pm, 5 –7pm, $15 $1 5 members, members, $20 $20 general ge n e r a l TREK Santa Rosa, Join tthe he T eam B i ke C hallenge ttoday oday aand nd p edal tthrough h ro u gh M ay! Join Team Bike Challenge pedal May! All iinfo nfo aatt w w w.bike sonoma.org or or 707.545.0153 707.5 4 5.01 5 3 All www.bikesonoma.org

f you notice in passing this Saturday, May 5, a few people walking the creeks and tributaries of the Russian River basin carrying whole, stiff salmon in their arms, do not be alarmed. Hold your nose and watch. If some of these carriers are children who seem hardly able to bear the weight, don’t offer to carry it for them—since the next generation bears the burden of an ecosystem in crises, they can certainly hoist a heavy, lifeless fish.

Yes, the fish they carry are dead, but the odd ritual is not a funeral. Rather, the volunteer scattering of fish carcasses in carefully chosen waterways is an act of hope (and

ecosystem replenishment) best understood by viewing the film Salmon: Running the Gauntlet. Jim Norton, the heart and brains behind the film, is an eloquent advocate for these animals, whose life cycle begins in a stream, moves to the ocean for years, then returns to the home stream for spawning and subsequent death. Survival is nothing short of miraculous, in large part because of what we have done to block their cycle. The most obvious is river-damming, which steals and stills the waters, then hatchery-building, which steals and stills natural acts of reproduction. You’d think after such an arduous journey that returning salmon would at least get the chance to have a little treat before death—say, a natural mating experience. One hatchery film I’ve seen claimed that hatcheries are necessary as a “sign of the times.” Not so, says Norton, who claims that 150 years of evidence proves dams and hatcheries have not been good for the fish, nor for the ecosystem in which humans blunder about, failing to improve on nature’s systems. In breathtaking scenes above and below water, Norton’s film lures us into this mysterious fish’s world. Poetic terms such as “fire in cold stone” replace clinical terms, which distance us from nature, as we are submerged in the beauty and pathos of the salmonid life cycle on the Columbia River basin where the movie was filmed. It is not just about that particular system; it is the story of every waterway and how things can still change, how part of the human soul, stilled and stolen by dams and hatcheries, can be restored along with the salmon. Watch this PBS film online. You will be glad, and you’ll know why those volunteers will be placing salmon carcasses this weekend. Help salmon locally at redwoodempiretu.org. To see Norton’s film, visit www.pbs.org and search for “Running the Gauntlet.”


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HOT PLATE Sebastopol’s El Coronel Restaurant stuffs pasilla peppers with jack cheese.

Buenos Rellenos Celebrate Cinco de Mayo by making chiles rellenos BY SUZANNE DALY

A

uthentic, delicious and extremely affordable Mexican food was always plentiful where I grew up in West Los Angeles, and when my friends and I ate out at local Mexican restaurants, I often ordered chiles rellenos, deep-fried pillows of mildly spicy chiles stuffed with melted

cheese and encased in a fluffy egg batter. An interesting alternative to tacos, burritos or enchiladas, this tasty vegetarian dish was most satisfying, like eating breakfast at night. But when I left for college in Humboldt County—dios mio! Mexican restaurants were very few and far between; even worse, they had been hippie-fied, heavy on healthy brown rice and beans, and light on flavor. Rellenos on

my plate became a rarity. After subsisting on glorified quesadillas during my first year in college, my luck changed. While camping on the Trinity River, my friend Keith pulled out a can of Ortega chiles, and announced he was making us rellenos for dinner. With his trusty Swiss army knife, he opened the can, unfolded the chiles, and then cut up long cigars of cheddar cheese. While he carefully stuffed the cheese into the pre-seeded and peeled chiles, I was given the tedious task of

separating two eggs and beating the whites stiff with a fork. After both the eggs and my arm were stiffened, I beat the bejeezus out of the yolks, added a pinch of salt and gently folded them into the whites. Gently, so as not to tear the chiles, he dipped each in the batter and slipped them into an oiled skillet. When puffy and golden brown, he flipped the chiles gently, letting the other side brown. Food always tastes better after a long day in the fresh air, and with salsa and stream-cooled brewskis on the side, this meal was heaven on a plate. Better still, my rellenoless days were over, and with the comforts of a real kitchen, the recipe only improved. Rellenos (Spanish for “stuffed”) fuse the foods of the indigenous people of Mexico (chiles) with those of their Spanish conquerors (eggs and cheese). The city of Puebla, home of the poblano chiles often used to make rellenos, is most frequently credited with the inception of this dish, somewhere around the late 1500s. And since Puebla is the site of the battle against the French, celebrated on May 5, it seems appropriate to make chiles rellenos for the Margaritadrenched holiday Cinco de Mayo. Though a variety of larger-sized, milder chiles, such as pasillas, Anaheims or anchos are sometimes stuffed with diced pork, raisins, chopped nuts or even crab or sardines, I prefer the purist version of this dish—just the chile, cheese and eggs. A well-cooked relleno doesn’t need to be smothered in sauce, as it so often is. Served with rice and beans, and sour cream and salsa on the side, this meal translates to spicy comfort food. I learned from an experienced cook how to use fresh chiles, roasting them on a pan in the broiler until they blister and start to blacken. Roast more than needed, because the skin is delicate and rips easily. Turn gently with tongs for more even roasting. Place them into a bag (I’ve used both paper and plastic—plastic holds the steam better but can melt if the chiles are really hot), and let them ) 14 steam so peeling will be

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Suzanne Daly

Dining

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Rellenos ( 13

NORTH BAY BOHEM I AN | MAY 2– 8 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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MOTHER’S M OTHER’S D DAY A AY Y SSunday unday May May 13, 13, 2012 2012

This year year,r, tr treat eat your mom lik like ke a Maharaani Mahar raaani – Indian Queen! SSpecial pecial H Holiday oliday H Hours ours N Noon–9 oon–9 Special Prix Fixe Lunch & Dinner menu m A Welcome Welcome R Rose ose and and Champagne Champagne Motherss Gulabi for Mother NORTH BAY’S ’ BEST INDIAN FOOD 22 YEARS

40 Mendocino Ave, Downtown Santa Rosa 409 os a 7707.579.5999 07.579.5999 ccross ross sstreet treet 5th 5th Ave, Healdsburg 11280 280 Healdsburg Healdsburg Av e, H e al d sb u r g 707.433.2954 Dry Creek 70 7.433. 2954 ccross ross sstreet t re e t D ry C reek RRoad oad www.SizzlingTandoor.com w w w.Siz zlingTandoor.com

o y a M e d o c Cin

! n o i t a r b e l Ce Cocktails, Agave dining room and mole dish

Chef Octovio Diaz showcases his true culinary talent for this festive, cultural celebration. Experience homemade family recipes with fresh moles, sauces, and salsas.

Mother’s M h ’ D Day ayy amily tyle inner er e Sunday, May 13

Oaxaca Cuisine featuring rich, fresh flavors Exotic Maragarita recipes Single Village Mescals 1063 Vine Street, Healdsburg

707.433.2411

www.Agave-Mex.com

thaipotrestaurant.com 707-575-9296 2478 W. Third St SSanta anta Rosa R

707-829-8889 In Downtown Sebastopol

easier. Don’t worry about getting every bit of skin off; the charred bits add flavor and are unnoticeable texturally after being battered. Closely cut around the stem from the top, and pull the stem and seed sac out. The seeds in milder peppers pack little heat, so it’s not important if a few are left inside. I use smaller chiles, about four inches long, for easier handling. Two per person makes a substantial meal. Cut cheese with a low melting point, like sharp cheddar or Monterey jack, into one long piece that fits the chile’s size. Taper the ends to look like little daggers, so the square corners don’t tear the fragile skin as the chile is filled. If they do tear, use toothpicks to patch them together.

After subsisting on glorified quesadillas, my luck changed. For four chiles, a batter from two eggs is usually adequate. Separate the eggs, and beat the whites until stiff. Beat the yolks with a heaping teaspoon of flour and salt and pepper to taste until thickened, and then fold the whites and yolks together. Pour a few tablespoons of flour in a shallow bowl. Carefully dredge the stuffed chile first in the flour, shake off the excess and then coat with egg batter. Heat about half an inch of vegetable oil in a heavy skillet on high until a drop of batter sizzles and browns. Slide the chiles in and cook until puffy and golden. If the oil is too shallow for all parts to brown, use tablespoons of the hot oil to baste the uncooked portions. Flip carefully with a slotted spoon and cook until golden brown. Drain on a paper towel, and eat while hot, accompanied by a favorite salsa. The flavor, and accomplishment, will make a real celebration of Cinco de Mayo.


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Bruno’s on Fourth American. $$-$$$. There’s real sophistication lurking in these upscale American comfort staples like flat-iron steak and fries, macaroni-ham casserole and stellar braised lamb shank. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner only, Sat; brunch, Sun. 1226 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8222.

Buck’s American. $$. Small plates complement classic fare at Guerneville staple. Prime rib weekend nights! Dinner, Wed– Sat; brunch and dinner, Sun. 16440 Fourth St, Guerneville. 707.869.3608.

Charcuterie French Mediterranean. $$. Intimate bistro has casual European wine-bar feel. Lunch and dinner daily. 335 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.7231. De Schmire Hearty continental. $$-$$$. Informal, with emphasis on seafood. Generous portions, open kitchen, outside dining. Dinner daily. 304 Bodega Ave, Petaluma. 70.762.1901.

East West Cafe California cuisine. $$. All vegetarianfriendly. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 128 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2822.

East West Restaurant California cuisine. $$. Comfortable and casual, Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 557 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.6142.

31195 N Redwood Hwy, Cloverdale. 707.894.5616.

JhanThong BanBua Thai. $-$$. Sophisticated and delicate Thai cuisine. Fresh ingredients, packed with flavor. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8048.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. All kinds of burgers imaginable; fries Friday only, no shakes, da Jets. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Royal China. Chinese. $$. Smart décor, professional service, very solid wonton soup. Lunch, Mon-Fri and Sun; dinner daily. 3080 Marlowe Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2911.

Sizzling Tandoor Indian. $-$$. A Sonoma County legend for almost 20 years, and for good reason. Of the more than 100 menu choices, all are worthwhile. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.5999. Toyo Japanese Grill Japanese. $$$. Well-crafted traditional Japanese with some modern extras like deep-fried mashed potato croquettes with mayo. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8871.

Volpi’s Restaurant Italian. $$-$$$. Festive atmosphere teams with great traditional Italian dishes at one of county’s oldest eateries. Accordion in the speakeasy if you’re lucky. Dinner daily. 124 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.2371.

The Girl & the Fig Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner daily. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Hamburger Ranch & Pasta Farm American. $.

Chez Pierre French-

Old-fashioned, informal mom’n’-pop roadhouse. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

Italian-American. $$. A former Denny’s turned Parisian bistro, with surprisingly competent cozy French favorites like

15 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 2– 8 , 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

escargot and chicken Cordon Bleu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7330 Redwood Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4233.

Easy Street Cafe American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195. Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900. Portelli Rossi Italian. $$. Tasty and affordable fare in a cozy setting. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner, Tues-Sun. 868 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.892.6100.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona Ave, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Open for dinner daily. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520. )

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Mother’s Day Brunch Buffet May 13th, 2012 10am–3pm Also serving Mother’s Day Dinner 5pm-8pm



On the Town Square Nicasio

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219 Take D St. to Point Reyes-Petaluma Rd. Left on Nicasio Valley Rd.

www.ranchonicasio.com

Roast Beef au Jus • Chicken Fricassee Wild Poached Coho Salmon with Champagne sauce Fresh Eggplant Parmesan • Baked Petaluma Ham Hickory Smoked Bacon & Applewood Sausage Potato Latkes with applesauce and sour cream Smoked Norwegian Salmon with bagels and cream cheese Seven Cheese Tortellini • Vegetable Tart Spring Vegetables grilled and roasted Herb Roasted Fingerling Potatoes Nicasio’s Cow Track Ranch Red Merlot Lettuce Salad Farm Fresh Scrambled Eggs • Buttermilk Pancakes Fresh Seasonal Fruit & Strawberries with créme friache Muffins, Croissants, Pastries & Breads, Cheesecake, Chocolate Decadence, and Brownies Coffee, Tea and Hot Chocolate

2695 ADULTS / $2295 SENIORS (65+) $1495 CHILDREN (UNDER 10)

$


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NORTH BAY BOHEM I AN | MAY 2– 8 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818. The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

N A PA CO U N T Y Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Brassica Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Sweet Surprises

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

for Mother

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly

New for Spring Fruit Basket Cakes Fresh Fruit Tarts  Iced Mother’s Day Cookies  Chocolate Framboise Princess Cakes, Lemon Cakes

Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $.

NEW MENU 7225 H E A L D S B U R G A V E . S E B A S TO P O L 707.829.8101 1445 T OW N & C O U N T RY D R . S A N TA R O S A 707.527.7654 1353 L I N C O L N A V E CALISTOGA 707.942.1443

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4100 Montgomery Drive Ste C Corner of Montgomery & Summerfield *Dine-in only. Offer cannot be combined with any other promotion. Exp. 5-31-12. Not valid on major holidays.

Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by

SMALL BITES

National Homebrew Day Sonoma County’s homebrewing club, the Sonoma Beerocrats, celebrate National Homebrew Day on Saturday, May 5, with a variety of homebrewing demonstrations and seminars open to the public. Festivities are at Carol Shelton Wines, where the event officially kicks off at 10am with a worldwide toast. National Homebrew Day started in 1988 as an opportunity for homebrewing enthusiasts to share their hobby with family and friends. Held annually on the first Saturday of May, it’s a rallying point for the nation’s estimated 750,000 homebrewers. More than 300 “Big Brew” events are expected this year, which marks the proceedings’ 25th anniversary. Up until early 1979, homebrewing was illegal in the United States. California senator Alan Cranston’s proposed amendment number 3534 authorized the production of beer for personal use, and was signed into law by President Jimmy Carter as part of a federal transportation bill in 1978. This ability for artisanal brewers to hone their craft at home has played an immense part in the larger craft-beer movement. National Homebrew Day offers experienced homebrewers and novices alike the opportunity to celebrate the art of good beer. The Beerocrats’ event includes beer-style talks, brewing teams crafting American and English brown ales and tasting opportunities. Be there on Saturday, May 5, at Carol Shelton Wines. 3354-B Coffey Lane, Santa Rosa. Starts at 10am. Free (21-plus for samples). www.sonomabeerocrats.com. —Ken Weaver

subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna

puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.

Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656.


Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Deerfield Ranch Winery (WC) The finest wine caves this side of the highway. Twenty-thousand-square-foot underground lair is perfect for keeping wine and wine tasters cool on a summer’s day. Watch for giraffes. 10200 Sonoma Highway, Kenwood. Daily 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $10-$15. 707.833.2270.

Inspiration Vineyards The colorful pastoral depicted on the label does exist, but this small, family-owned labor of love is sensibly located in the Pinecreek Business Park. Stylish tasting room; Chard, Cab and Blanc. 3360 Coffey Lane, Ste. E, Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–4:30pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.237.4980.

Medlock Ames Tasting Room Low-key urban aesthetic meets selfconscious sustainable land stewardship, with home-grown food pairings–plus a dark and stylish, full bar in the back. Make this your last stop of the day. 6487 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily 10am–5pm. $12.50 fee. Alexander Valley Bar opens at 5pm. 707.431.8845.

Passalacqua Winery Family-run, boasting good reds and Chardonnay as well as a fun wine-aroma kit to train your senses to identify common wine smells. Large deck, garden and vineyard. 3805 Lambert Bridge Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.433.5575.

Ravenswood Winery The winery motto is “No wimpy wines,” and they make strong, much-praised Zinfandels. A great place to learn that wine is supposed to be fun. 18701 Gehricke Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.933.2332.

St. Francis Winery Simple but cozy, inspired by the monk St. Francis and styled as a California mission. Beautiful

views and food pairings. 100 Pythian Road, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.543.7713, ext. 242.

Tin Barn Vineyards From allspice to Jolly Rancher, coriander, fresh raspberry, jelly Danish and horsetail to a simply enjoyable claret style quaff, it’s all flavor and no frills in this friendly warehouse winery. 21692 Eighth St. E., Ste. 340, Sonoma. Saturday– Sunday, 11am–4pm. Tasting fee, $6. 707.938.5430.

Vinoteca Vinify Wine Services is like a Russian doll of wineries within wineries making brands for still more clients. It’s in a generic industrial-park location, but with unique, single-vineyard wines from Frostwatch, Baker Lane, Bjornstad, Super Sonoman and others. 3358 Coffey Lane, Ste. C, Santa Rosa. Friday– Sunday 11am–5pm. $10 fee. 707.542.3292.

Nichelini Winery Take a joyride in the Napa backcountry and discover this rustic little winery that’s been in the family for generations. See the only Roman wine press in the Western Hemisphere. 2950 Sage Canyon Road, St. Helena. Saturday and Sunday, 10am–5pm. No fee. 707.963.0717.

and Sigrid Seps and a few likeminded winemakers founded Zinfandel Advocates and Producers (ZAP), through which they continue to proselytize on behalf of “America’s heritage grape.” 3835 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.5310.

Charles Krug Winery

Velo Vino Napa Valley

Valley’s latest geotectonic eruption on Highway 29 is a stylish place to explore famous Chardonnay, Meritage blend and winery-exclusive Italian varietals. Hip but not too cool, the 30-year-old family winery surely has a sense of humor as well as sense of place. 677 S. St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fees, $15–$25. 707.967.8032.

Complimentary Mimosa FIRST COURSES Dungeness Crab Cake… $16 Gravad Lox… $10 00 Pear & Cheese Agnolotti… $9 Caesar Salad… $9 Clam Chowder… $7

Uncorked at Oxbow

N A PA CO U N T Y

Flora Springs Winery & Vineyards Napa

May 13, 2012 Served from 10:30am–7:00pm Children under 12 half price

Storybook Mountain Vineyards (WC) Jerry

Across from the Public Market, this remodeled house in Napa’s historic “Little Italy” is a casual and unaffected joint. Ahnfeldt and Carducci wines include estate Merlot, Syrah, Cab, vinted by Paul Hobbs. Don’t ask about the horse. 605 First St., Napa. Open daily, noon–8pm; winter hours vary. Tasting fee, $10–$20. 707.927.5864.

Founded 1861, and owned by the Peter Mondavi family since only 1943, Krug is among Napa’s most historic wineries. Taste awardwinning Sauvignon Blanc and reserve Cab in unassuming low building across from the original stone winery. Ask about the Johannesburger Riesling. 2800 Main St., St. Helena. Tasting daily, 10:30am to 5pm. Fees vary; complimentary for “Napa neighbors.” 707.967.2229.

The Bay View Restaurant

MAIN COURSES (Egg dishes served until 3:00 pm) Eggs Benedict… $16

Eggs Florentine… $13 Crab Cake Benedict… $18 Steak & Eggs… $22 Seafood Fettuccine… $20 Poached Salmon… $22 Pork Filet… $20 Veal & Lobster… $24 New York Steak… $26

Cycling-themed bungalow is filled with enough gear to outfit a peloton, plus wine and espresso, too. Tastings include spiced nuts and dried cherries, but sample-sized Clif and Luna Bars are readily available for your impromptu energy bar and wine pairings. 709 Main St., St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 6pm. $10–$25. 707.968.0625.

DESSERTS Limoncello Flute… $8 Strawberry Pie… $7 Chocolate Decadence… $8 reservations: 707.875.2751 or email: reservations@innatthetides.com

Vincent Arroyo Winery Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines. 2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.6995.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8–5pm Now Open for Lunch on Saturdays 11am–3pm

ummer elebrations Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Roasted Mushroom Gruyere Tartelette Petit Four Platter Full Catering Menu Available

800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

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Wineries

MOTHER’S DAY


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 2– 8 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Atascadero Creek No-bull boutique finds a home BY JAMES KNIGHT

F

itting that Atascadero Creek should show up in Santa Rosa’s new, industrial-zone, urban tasting room. Over in Graton, amid the prestigious vine rows of Green Valley, where did winemaker Bob Appleby find himself when he sought to build a house? Zoned industrial, an artifact of Graton’s railroad days. So he built a winery—or a three-car garage—with a “caretaker’s residence” above. Appleby enjoyed wine, but hadn’t any particular designs on winemaking when a friend persuaded him to share a corner of his woodworking business with a barrel of Pinot Noir in 1989.

Encouraged by the accolades for his amateur efforts, Appleby eventually closed down the shop and went pro with the wine. A wry-humored sort who plays guitar around the area in a band called Bottle Shock and hauls out his Harley on the odd weekend, Appleby is clearly at home in the vinting life, but tells a story that’s more schlepping and hard knocks than boutiquey-pastoral: vineyards are ripped up under your feet, and if other wineries don’t pick your grapes when you’re not looking, they bid up the price. And the weather takes the rest. He’s glad to be at the Wineyard, spacious digs with a big sit-around bar. Designed by brothers Ray and Dino D’Argenzio of the sonamed winery next door, it’s a comfortable space and still a bit inthe-works. Here, the fine product of students at Santa Rosa Junior College’s Shone Farm winery may be sampled, along with that of two other small producers. The 2011 release of Atascadero Creek’s Ritchie Vineyard, Russian River Sauvignon Blanc ($21) has just a blade of grass in its fruit-bowl aroma of pear and white grapefruit, honeydew melon and pineapple with garnish of jasmine flower. Long finish, rich, but dry. Reminiscent of blackberry wine, the 2008 Haun Ranch Zinfandel ($28) is deep and rich, but the lip-smacking finish is efficient, Chianti-like. The 2008 Rail Road Vineyard, Green Valley Pinot Noir ($30), so named for an eccentric strip of old railway bed gravel, the trellis held up by repurposed railroad track, is perfumed with orange rind, citrus blossom and raspberry compote. It’s easy to see how this obscure winery has a good showing at local restaurants—all self-distributed within 20 miles of his house by the guy who made the wine. “And put the cork in it, and slapped the label on it,” Appleby adds. The Wineyard, 1305-A Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Open Thursday through Monday, 11am to 5pm. Tasting flights $5. Heritage Public House, focusing on craft beer, opens at 4pm. 707.595.1488.


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By the end of the day, Mitch’s brother and one other person had been arrested, and the remaining trimmers had been cited for possession of marijuana with intent to sell. The case is one of many to hit North Bay courtrooms this year involving collectives that believe they’re operating under state and local medical-marijuana ordinances but still find themselves on the wrong side of the law. “Vincent,” who identifies himself as a collective board member, was also there that October morning, and says he’s not sure why the raid occurred, though he admits some of the hired trimmers were carrying expired doctor’s recommendations. Vincent notes that each garden had about 75 to 90 plants, with posted recommendations for two to four members at each site. All of the plants were destroyed. According to Sonoma County’s medical-marijuana guidelines, established in 2006, patients, caregivers and collectives are allowed to cultivate up to three pounds per year, per patient. Gardeners may cultivate up to a 100-square-foot plant canopy and up to 30 plants per patient. A look through the official police report from that October morning shows descriptions of a rural property populated with houses, trailers and gardens, a Winchester rifle in an upstairs bedroom and $16,200 in a drawer. In all, a total of $36,000 in cash was taken as evidence from the site, all growing equipment was confiscated and the plants destroyed. In addition, according to the report, three binders with copies of the collective’s physician recommendations sat on a table used for trimming, next to paperwork for the collective. After individually questioning people, the officers searched the house and the rest of the property, collecting any cash on hand or in pocket. (They returned $20 here and there for gas money to those that grumbled, says Vincent, who had $2,000 taken as evidence.) Officers then left, saying that citations would be arriving in the mail. Later that month, Vincent received a letter informing him of the charges and of his first court appearance. “We were doing the best that we could,” claims Vincent. But the line between legitimate medical cannabis and cultivation for profit can be unclear, to say the least. Combined with law enforcement officials who may not take the time at the ground level to decipher whether a site is following medicalmarijuana guidelines before enacting a raid, and with increasing federal crackdowns on dispensaries in medical-marijuana-friendly states, sometimes the subjective “best” just isn’t good enough.

Smoked Out The federal government makes good on its threat to shut down medical-marijuana dispensaries—and the worst may be yet to come BY LEILANI CLARK

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t was harvest time, and the group of about 25 people had settled in for the day’s work of trimming at a grow site in the hills above downtown Windsor. Suddenly, the Sonoma County Sheriff’s narcotics unit was at the door, rifles up and search warrant out. “It was just guns-pulled, cowboy-style,” says “Mitch,” owner of the 36acre property and one of the leaders of the California Patient Provider Association, a 22-member medical-marijuana collective.


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Residents R esidents only only.. No businesses businesses. s.

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While the exact legalities of medical marijuana have been confusing since the voterapproved Compassionate Care Act of 1996, tension began rising last fall as the federal government ramped up pressure on the exploding medical-marijuana industry. On the morning of Oct. 13, DEA agents raided Northstone Organics collective, a nonprofit known for scrupulously following rules and regulations ascribed by the state and county (down to an innovative collaboration with the Mendocino County Sheriff’s office that’s since been discontinued). Next, the IRS hit the state’s largest dispensary, Harborside Health Center in Oakland, with a $2.5 million bill for back taxes—it’s being disputed by executive director Steve DeAngelo—and told the center that it could not deduct business expenses because of its position as a “criminal drug-trafficking organization.” And the intensity of the highprofile hits has only increased in 2012, namely with the April 2 raid on Oaksterdam University, which was founded in Oakland by Richard Lee, who is probably the state’s most vocal advocate for the legalization of marijuana. Marin saw its share of the crackdown when the state’s oldest dispensary, the Marin Alliance for Medical Marijuana, closed its doors on Dec. 17 after receiving a threatening letter from Melinda Haag, United States attorney for the northern district of California. Three hundred or more of these letters have been sent to dispensaries across California. Most claim to be operating in accordance with the law, but Haag has brought it all down to base geography. “I have a hard time making that distinction [between good and bad dispensaries],” Haag told KQED in March. “When a dispensary comes to my attention that is close to a school, a park, a playground or children, that’s a line I’ve decided to draw.” On April 23, federal prosecutors threatened to seize the property that houses two Novato dispensaries,

DUSTED Medical-marijuana crackdowns in Oakland, Fairfax, Novato, Windsor and Santa Rosa have advocates worried—and courtrooms full.

Green Door Wellness Education Center and its neighbor, Green Tiger Collective. Federal prosecutors, including Haag, filed complaints regarding violations of federal law and municipal zoning codes, though the dispensaries are located in an industrial area that doesn’t appear to be in close proximity to a school or park. At press time, no Sonoma County dispensaries have been targeted by the DEA or federal prosecutors, but the county isn’t immune to struggles between what’s allowed and what’s illegal when it comes to cannabis collectives. Proposition 215 may have eased access to cannabis for those who use the plant as medicine, but it’s also opened up a situation where ordinances and laws become as slippery as wet fish in the hands of law enforcement officials who have the power to make on-thespot decisions concerning whether the marijuana being grown is for medical use or not. Kumari Sivadas of the Sonoma

Alliance for Medical Marijuana (SAMM) says that since 2010, there’s been an increase in prosecutions against groups that appear to fall within medicalmarijuana guidelines. “We’ve observed that there have been more seizures, more arrests, more prosecutions of collectives,” says Sivadas. “These are collectives that have, for the most part, tried to be as legal as possible.”

Clogged Courts Of course, trying is not always the equivalent of succeeding, and Richard Ingram, a Sonoma County attorney with 25 years experience working actively on cannabis cases, says that one of the issues is the “moving target” nature of the laws themselves. “What’s good today might change tomorrow,” he says. “I see people who are trying to do the right thing legitimately in medical-marijuana use, but they’re not always on top of the current state of the law, so police arrest


One public defender said bitterly that the hearing was like a ‘circus.’ And more potential medicalmarijuana cases are funneling into the Sonoma County court system in 2012, including one involving members of the Emerald Empire Gardens, a collective out of Santa Rosa, who are being called into court this month on charges of cultivation and intent to sell. “We have 27 lawyers, and every one of them has got a marijuana case, and I’m confident that they have perhaps dozens each,” says Kathleen Pozzi, chief public defender of Sonoma County. Pozzi will not comment specifically on the California Patient Provider Association since it’s pending, but she says that there are a large number of multiple marijuana cases in the system right now. She adds that critics shouldn’t quickly assume that all

defendants are people who have been operating within the law. “Now, the prosecution’s theory is, generally speaking, that this is an organization that is growing medical marijuana not for medicinal purposes, but for profit,” says Pozzi. “If it wasn’t their theory, they wouldn’t file charges.” Mary Pat Jacobs, a spokesperson for the Sonoma Alliance for Medical Marijuana, says that more work needs to be done to prevent the cases from entering an overloaded and budget-strapped justice system. Last year, the public defender’s office saw its budget slashed by 8 percent, even as 2009–2010 caseloads rose to 115,000, up from 71,000 10 years ago. Jacobs says the problem is further compounded when defendants are dragged across court systems for years. Most of those cases never make it to jury trial. “The reason we’re not seeing any cases actually litigated in the people’s court or going to jury trial is that it’s dragged out for so long, the money is unavailable anymore,” she explains. “Their lives are on hold, so ultimately they plead guilty to a misdemeanor.”

Green War Nearly all medical-marijuana advocates agree that the tumult surrounding collectives’ rights to cultivate, transport and distribute cannabis has been exacerbated under the Obama administration. Despite recent Gallup Polls revealing a record-high 50 percent support for medical marijuana in the United States, and President Obama’s own 2008 campaign promise to support state’s rights for medical marijuana, this administration has been declared the worst ever when it comes to actual support, according to groups like the Marijuana Policy Project. Obama recently told Rolling Stone magazine, “I never made a commitment that somehow we were going to give carte blanche to large-scale producers and operators of marijuana—and the reason is, because it’s against federal law.” He then cited ) 22 the “murky” area where

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them because they haven’t dotted i’s and crossed t’s.” Cases are then referred to the court system, where they might go on for months or even years, depending on whether the defendants accept deals offered to them by the district attorney’s office. In February, charges were dropped for about half of the defendants in the California Patient Provider Association case—mainly trimmers who were hired hands—but for those known as the “Windsor 16,” the case has entered its seventh month. Only about four or five have private attorneys; most requested courtappointed legal representation. An April 5 arraignment saw almost all of the defendants, their respective lawyers, bailiffs and other court employees packed into a Sonoma County superior court room. One public defender, who declined to be identified, said bitterly that the hearing was like a “circus.”


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Marijuana ( 21 large-scale commercial operations supply not only medical marijuana users but â&#x20AC;&#x153;may also be supplying recreational marijuana users.â&#x20AC;? The question of legality, not to mention backtracking on campaign promises, has also come to play in Sonoma County. Sarah Shrader, of the Sonoma County chapter of Americans for Safe Access (ASA), says that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s difficult to track whether marijuana cases are medical or not, since charges will note simply â&#x20AC;&#x153;cultivationâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;possessionâ&#x20AC;? without mention of doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommendations. But she does say that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen an uptick in cases under Jill Ravitchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s term as district attorney. Critics charge this is in contradiction to statements Ravitch made at a 2010 candidate forum at the Sonoma County Library, where she told the audience of over a hundred that what was most important regarding medical marijuana is that there is safe access for qualiďŹ ed patients. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I understand that there is a place for it,â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and I understand that the law requires that there be safe access in our community.â&#x20AC;? Later in the debate, she went on to say that enforcement would be on a â&#x20AC;&#x153;caseby-case basis,â&#x20AC;? adding that Sonoma County was enlightened when it came to medical-marijuana laws. Pozzi says that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spoken to public defenders in counties like Kern, Tulare and San Bernardino, and from what sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heard, Ravitch is lenient in comparison. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know marijuana cases are not her priority,â&#x20AC;? says Pozzi. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Her priority in prosecuting cases are crimes of violence and elder abuse.â&#x20AC;? But Shrader says sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting calls about new cases every week and that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s currently tracking at least a dozen medical cannabis cases, the majority of which have multiple defendants. She does say that Ravitch has been willing to sit down and review cases and changes in case law with advocates from SAMM and ASA, but that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been over a year since theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve met with her. The district attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office did not respond to repeated requests for an interview.

Untangling the Mess In December 2011, California Attorney General Kamala Harris sent out a memo detailing her concerns about the lack of regulation for medical dispensaries and collectives in the state, while at the same time affirming her commitment to maintain access for qualiďŹ ed patients to physicianrecommended marijuana. But to do so, lawmakers must ďŹ rst â&#x20AC;&#x153;deďŹ ne the contours of the right to collective and cooperative cultivation,â&#x20AC;? wrote Harris, citing Section 11362.775 of the Health and Safety Code. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By articulating the scope of the collective and cooperative cultivation right, the Legislature will help law enforcement and others ensure lawful, consistent and safe access to medical marijuana,â&#x20AC;? she continued. Spokesperson for SAMM Mary Pat Jacobs says that a state-wide regulatory agency for dispensing collectives might be the solution, at least to solve confusion about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legal and what isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t at a local and state level. Of course, such an agency wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remedy anything at the federal level, where marijuana is still considered to be dangerous, illegal and without any medicinal use. Jacobs points to a bill proposed by Assemblymember Tom Ammiano that would establish a regulatory framework for medical marijuana in California, which passed out of the Public Safety Committee on April 17. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It might be the solution to the problems going on right now,â&#x20AC;? she says. It remains to be seen if the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Windsor 16â&#x20AC;? will end up with jail time, probation or ďŹ nes, or, for that matter, whether they were operating within proper legal guidelines. Mitch says that, for now, his wife has put in a vegetable garden, and that the most potent thing theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re growing is tomatoes. He still seems baffled by the sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s raid and the eradication of the gardens on his property. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work with your attorney there watching you to make sure everythingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good,â&#x20AC;? says Mitch, with a sigh, â&#x20AC;&#x153;then I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see how people have a chance.â&#x20AC;?


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24

The week’s events: a selective guide

CULTURE

Crush S A N TA R O S A

Mayo Caliente

Cinco de Mayo: the weather is usually nice, everyone’s generally happy, and there’s always a lot going on to celebrate Mexico’s independence—except that’s not what it’s about at all! On the anniversary of el Dia de la Batalla de Puebla, take time to enjoy the seventh annual Roseland Cinco de Mayo Celebration, filled with food, dancing, music, performances from local bands, a breakdance contest and even a lowrider car show. The alcohol-free, family event is always the biggest Cinco de Mayo party around; be there Saturday, May 5, in Roseland. 665 Sebastopol Road, Santa Rosa. 3–10pm. Free.

SEBASTOPOL

Underwear Action It’s said that to make public speaking less nerve-wracking, it helps to imagine that everyone watching you is sitting in their underwear. However, what if there’s an event designed for watching people in their underwear? This weekend, catch Aubergine’s Vintage Lingerie Fashion Show followed by live music from the band Q. The motto for this show is “sexy yet classy,” but feel free to see for yourself firsthand—or at least ask the band if they feel more or less comfortable playing to a bunch of people in their underwear. It’s all happening on Thursday, May 3, at Aubergine After Dark. 755 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8pm. $10–$15. 707.827.3460.

MONTE RIO

You’re Welcome According to legend, vampires aren’t allowed to enter a home unless welcomed inside. Whether vampire or no, encroaching on someone else’s property unwelcomed never has a happy ending. Luckily, this weekend LandPaths opens its new 554-acre Bohemia Ecological Preserve to the public, where anyone can go on a guided hike, explore and learn more about the land. Music, dancing, food and more round out the open invitation. Just be careful of traipsing on the land next door—it’s the Bohemian Grove, and we hear they’re not so friendly to uninvited visitors. Check it out on Sunday, May 6, at the Bohemia Preserve. Shuttles run from Westminster Woods, 6510 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. Free. 11:30am–7pm. 707.544.7284.

SEBASTOPOL

Doin’ Dylan If there was ever a holiday called Bob Dylan Day, it might go like this. People dress up like characters from Bob Dylan songs. People sing Bob Dylan songs. Maybe people dress up like Bob Dylan himself. People quote Bob Dylan songs all day. For diehard fans, the closest thing to a Dylan holiday just might be Bob Dylan Night in Sebastopol. Dressing up as a character from one of his songs is requested, but not mandatory. A diplomat, who carries on his shoulder a Siamese cat, perhaps? The band plays Dylan songs galore on Friday, May 4, at the Sebastopol Community Center. 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. 7pm. $5–$10. 707.823.1511.

—Jennifer Cuddy

I’VE GOT A KRSH ON YOU Brian Griffith’s girlfriend Carrie Rodriguez plays May 3 with the Steep Canyon Rangers in Petaluma. See Concerts, p31.


GLOBAL GAL Jazz singer Meklit Hadero plans to travel through Africa on a boat of recycled plastic.

Style on the Nile

From Ethiopia to Brooklyn to the Bay, Meklit Hadero shines BY JENNIFER CUDDY

I

always knew that if I had courage to really do what I wanted to do,â&#x20AC;? says Meklit Hadero, â&#x20AC;&#x153;it would be music.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

Courage may have been the only thing in question, because Meklit Hadero clearly has talent and passion in spades. A 32-yearold singer, musician, songwriter, guitarist and international activist, Hadero has embraced

her Ethiopian ties and integrated them into a hybrid of folk, jazz, hip-hop and soul. On the cusp of a worldwide tour, she makes a local stop May 3 at the Osher Marin Jewish Community Center. Born in Ethiopia and raised in the United States shortly before her second birthday, Meklit was immersed in the folk music of her birthplace from childhood. During her childhood and adolescence, she and her family moved around the States; she

spent parts of her life in Brooklyn, Virginia, Florida and Iowa. After studying political science at Yale, Hadero decided to explore the West Coast, spending time in Seattle. After a few visits to the Bay Area, Hadero developed a connection with San Francisco and became immersed in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ&#x201A;ourishing arts scene. She settled in the Mission district and started performing at a small cultural center called the Red Poppy Art House. After ďŹ rst singing

a cappella, she learned how to play guitar, then acquired a trumpet player and has also recently added a drummer to her group, all the while willing to take the challenge of exploring the unknown. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to play the same way every night,â&#x20AC;? she jokes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like surprise and spontaneity, and I like jazz musicians because they are great improvisers. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ&#x201A;exible and ďŹ&#x201A;uid enough that that kind of evolution can develop onstage in front of everyone.â&#x20AC;? Hadero sees her music as more than mere entertainment, and herself as more than just an entertainer. Hadero has recently raised funding to begin the Nile Project, created to connect, through music and arts, all 11 countries in Africa that touch the Nile River. Cofounded by Mina Girgis, the project will come to fruition as Hadero and Girgis ďŹ&#x201A;oat down the Nile in a recycled-plastic boat, recording and picking up musicians along the way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are two ways I like to think about it,â&#x20AC;? she says, planning the trip for May. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Music] is the act of learning, and then thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the absorption.â&#x20AC;? At the same time, Hadero is also a senior fellow with TED, the conference for innovators and their ideas. She finds the TED program â&#x20AC;&#x153;mind-blowingâ&#x20AC;? and a â&#x20AC;&#x153;wonderful opportunity to change your perspective about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible in this world in a broad way.â&#x20AC;? With her global inďŹ&#x201A;uences and positive spirit, Hadero is able to share her musical gift worldwide. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything that touches you,â&#x20AC;? she says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;somehow ends up in what you make.â&#x20AC;? Meklit Hadero performs Thursday, May 3, at the Osher Marin Jewish Community Center. 200 N. San Pedro Road, San Rafael. 7:30pm. $25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$30. 415.444.8000.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 , 20 1 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

ArtsIdeas

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STAGE PARDNER After 30 years

running the range, James Dunn steps down.

Mountain Man James Dunn directs his final show on Mt. Tam BY DAVID TEMPLETON

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the most spectacular theatrical environments anywhere,â&#x20AC;? says director James Dunn of the 3,000-seat Cushing Memorial Amphitheater on Mt. Tamalpais. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re surrounded by nature,â&#x20AC;? he describes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on top of this beautiful mountain, with views of the Bay and San Francisco. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the largest stages youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ever see, big enough to do things they could only dream of doing on Broadway. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just amazing!â&#x20AC;?

For three decades, Dunn has worked his annual magic up on

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Music Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; plays Sundays, May 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 17, with one Saturday show on June 16, at the Cushing Memorial Amphitheater. Highway 1 on Mt. Tamalpais; parking extremely limited, so hiking, carpooling or taking shuttle recommended. All shows 2pm. $1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;-$40. 415.383.1100.

27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 , 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

Mt. Tam, directing the yearly Mountain Play extravaganza through 29 productions. The grand scale of the outdoor stage has inspired some jaw-dropping moments: horses, a stagecoach and an actual surrey with a fringe on top in Oklahoma; a real minibus ďŹ lled with hippies careening into the action in Hair; authentic army jeeps and trucks in a production of South PaciďŹ c, still remembered fondly for the well-timed ďŹ&#x201A;yover of WWII planes that Dunn orchestrated for every performance. The Mountain Play, which ďŹ rst launched in 1913, will celebrate its 100th anniversary next year. Sadly, it will mark that milestone without Dunn. After 30 years, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decided to make this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of Meredith Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Music Man his last show on the mountain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This will be my 30th consecutive Mountain Play,â&#x20AC;? Dunn acknowledges. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve loved directing these shows. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a wonderful adventure. But everything comes to an end, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just happy to be ending my run with a show as big and fun as The Music Man.â&#x20AC;? Featuring musical direction by Debra Chambliss and some energetic choreography by Rick Wallace, Dunnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mountain Play swan song will be a bit of a reunion. In addition to one or two brand new faces, Dunn has assembled a large cast of actors, many whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve performed for him several times over the last 30 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a lot of old friends with me on this one,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Music Man is a perfect show for us. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the power of music and the magic of imagination. It shows what a community can do when it comes together to create something wonderful. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Music Manâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Mountain Play.â&#x20AC;?

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Film

I GOTTA BE ME ‘Baldguy’ is full of song and dance.

Kickin’ It with Shorty Film Fest Petaluma features 28 quick ones BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

F

ilm festivals abound in our bailiwick, so going for short is a sensible solution. It worked for the 30-minutes-or-less Poppy Jasper Film Festival in faraway Morgan Hill, for instance. You can’t argue with the essence of the short-and-to-the-point film; it’s hard to go wrong in 10 minutes. Short-attention-span cinema is highlighted in the Petaluma Film Alliance’s 2012 Film Fest Petaluma. Heavy on animation and drama, light on documentary, there are 28 films in three separate programs. Where to begin? Bobby Young’s handsome and locally made “The Squash” is a story of a poor farmer who begins mysteriously receiving cash inside his vegetables, serving as a parable for our times about the perils of taking the fast money in farming. Well known is the Oscar-winning “Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore,” a painstakingly animated, Louisiana-made tale that combines The Wizard of Oz with Buster Keaton’s Steamboat Bill, Jr. Superior film shorts are on show from Canada, Australia and France. “The Maker” follows a chimerical hare made of cloth and flared human teeth who toils away on a mysterious something. In “Nullarbor,” an old geezer challenges a young hotshot to a drag race in the tractless desert. And “Dik,” by the Australian TV actor Christopher Stollery, concerns a child caught making an ageinappropriate drawing. The French films highlight creeping angst, with titles like “Moi” and “Personne” (“no one”); one called “Angel Dust” could be billed “Just when you thought it was safe to hide in your bed . . .” “Planet Z” by Momoko Seto is for those who enjoy observing the progress in their compost heaps (mine’s far more compelling than many a Hollywood release). Seto uses microphotography to catch the sci-fi quality of the slow speed and up-close angles of vegetable decomposition. Those who dislike cauliflower, for example, can watch as that cruciferous vegetable finally gets what’s coming to it. Film Fest Petaluma runs Saturday, May 5, at the Mystic Theatre. 21 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. Three programs at 2:30pm, 7:30pm and midnight. $10–$15; all-day pass $25. For full schedule, see www.petalumafilmalliance.org.


Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES The Avengers (PG-13; 142 min.) Marvel Studios rounds up characters from recent hits for an ensemble superhero thriller directed by Joss Whedon. Stars Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man), Chris Evans (Captain America), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), Samuel L . Jackson and Scarlett Johansson. (GB)

Delicacy (PG-13; 108 min.) A young widow

The Island President (NR; 101 min.) When climate change threatens a three-foot rise in sea level that would render the Maldives uninhabitable, President Mohamed Nasheen develops a plan in his first year in office to make the islands completely carbon-neutral. From Bay Area documentary filmmaker Jon Shenk. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB) Jiro Dreams of Sushi (NR; 81 min.) An inside look at top Michelin-rated sushi restaurant Sukiyabashi Jiro, in Tokyo, and the chef who founded it. (GB)

(Audrey Tautou) still mourning her husband’s death after three years is courted by a Swedish co-worker. In French with English subtitles. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB)

The Kid with a Bike (NR; 87 min.)

The Raven (R; 111 min.) John Cusack plays Edgar Allen Poe as a detective hunting a serial killer whose crimes closely resemble murders appearing in the author’s stories. Directed by James McTeigue (V for Vendetta). (GB)

Lockout (PG-13; 110 min.) A government

ALSO PLAYING Bully (PG-13; 98 min.) Filmmaker Lee Hirsch looks at the extent of bullying in American schools in his new documentary. (GB)

The Cabin in the Woods (R; 105 min.) Director Drew Goddard and Joss Whedon aim to return quality chills to the horror genre in film about a group of friends vacationing in a remote cabin. Nifty movie poster. (GB)

325 Corte Madera T Town o own Centerr 250 participating artists, guides & maps available at marinopenstudios.co marinopenstudios.com om

marinopenstudios.com marinopenstudio os.com

Marley (PG-13; 144 min.) Bio-doc from Kevin MacDonald (Last King of Scotland) on the life of reggae legend Bob Marley features interviews with Marley’s family and top reggae artists. (GB)

The Pirates! Band of Misfits (PG;

The Five-Year Engagement (R; 124

Gallery Exhibition April 28 28–May – May 13

returning from Iraq, a soldier searches for the unknown woman whose photograph gave him hope and courage. Based on the Nicholas Sparks’ novel. (GB)

Damsels in Distress (PG-13; 99 min.)

Wiesz stars as the wife of a prominent judge who leaves her marriage for an ex-RAF pilot in drama set in 1950s postwar Britain. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB)

Two T wo W w Weekends: eekends: May 5 – 6 and May 12 –13, e –13 3, 2012

The Lucky One (PG-13; 101 min.) After

Mirror Mirror (PG; 106 min.) Tarsem Singh (The Cell, The Fall) directs live-action adaptation of Snow White tale starring Julia Roberts as the evil queen. With Sean Bean, and Lily Collins as Snow White. (GB)

The Deep Blue Sea (R; 98 min.) Rachel

A TREAS TREASURE SURE

agent (Guy Pearce) falsely accused of espionage is offered amnesty if he can rescue the president’s daughter from a space prison that’s fallen to the inmates. Screenplay by Luc Besson (Nikita, The Fifth Element). (GB)

Chimpanzee (G; 78 min.) Disneynature’s fourth original documentary follows an abandoned chimp and his adoption by a new mother in Africa’s Ivory Coast jungle. Coproduced by the Jane Goodall Institute and narrated by Tim Allen. (GB) Three friends at a college dominated by men set out to change the school’s environment. Directed by Whit Stillman (The Last Days of Disco). At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB)

Unearth

Belgian drama about an abandoned boy who latches on to a woman he meets at a doctor’s office. (GB)

88 min.) Aardman Animations (Chicken Run, Wallace & Gromit) returns with feature based on books by British author Gideon Defoe. With the voices of Hugh Grant, Salma Hayek and Jeremy Piven. (GB)

Safe (R; 94 min.) Jason Statham does that thing he does in thriller about an ex–cage fighter (!) who comes to the aid of a girl sought by the Russian mob for a code locked in her memory. (GB)

5/4 5 /4 – 5/10 5 /10 Wed, May 2 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club

Delicacy D elicacy PPG13 G13

Thur, May 3 6–7am; 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Dance Club

PPG13 G13 (10:15, (10 :15, 12:30, 12: 30, 2:45, 2: 45, 5:00) 5 : 00 ) 7:15, 7:15, 9:45 9 : 45

Fri, May 4 7:15–11pm

8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise WEST COAST SWING PARTY with DJ Steve Luther $10

Sat, May 5 7–11pm

8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise Adobe Squares/Singles & Pairs HOEDOWN

Sun, May 6 5–9:30pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10

min.) Jason Segel and Emily Blunt co-star in romcom about a couple whose relationship suffers after their wedding is endlessly postponed. Directed by Nicholas Stoller (Forgetting Sarah Marshall) and produced by Judd Apatow (Bridesmaids). (GB)

Think Like a Man (PG-13; 120 min.) After

The Hunger Games (PG-13; 142 min.)

The Three Stooges (PG-13; 85 min.) The

Mon, May 7 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm Scottish Country Dancing

Droolingly anticipated adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ bestselling young adult novel about a dystopian future where teens kill teens in annual rated-PG-13 bloodsports. (GB)

Farrelly brothers bring the classic trio to the big screen in an original story starring Chris Diamantopoulos as Moe, Will & Grace’s Sean Hayes as Larry and Mad TV’s Will Sasso as Curly. (GB)

Tues, May 8 6–7am; 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30–10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE Brazilian Drumming and Dance/Samba

learning their wives are soaking up the advice in Steve Harvey’s real-life self-help book Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man, four men try to turn the tables on their mates. From director Tim Story (Barbershop). (GB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES

SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

(11:00, (1 1: 00, 11:30, : 30, 44:30) : 30 ) 7:00, 7: 00, 9:30 9 : 30

Damsels D amsels iin nD Distress istress Deep D eep Blue Blue S Sea ea NR (10:45, (10 : 45, 11:00, : 00, 44:00) : 00 ) 6:45, 6 : 45, 9:15 9 :15

Kid K id with with a B Bike ike PPG13 G133 (10 : 30, 12:45, (10:30, 12: 45, 3:15, 3 :15, 5:30) 5 : 30 ) 7:30, 7: 30, 9:30 9 : 30 SSunday unday 5/6 5 / 6 only: onl y : (1 (10:30, 0 : 30, 55:30) : 30 ) 77:30, : 30, 99:30 : 30

Marley PPG13 Marley G13 (1 (1:15) :15 ) 99:00 : 00 Salmon S almon F Fishing ishing iin n tthe he Ye Yemen men PPG13 G13 (1 (10:15, 0 :15, 4:15) 4 :15 ) 66:45 : 45 Join us Join us for for encore encor e performances per for mances of of TThe he BBright r igh t SStream tream from fr om tthe he Bolshoi Bolshoi TTheater heater in in M oscow oonn Moscow SSunday unday 5/6 5 / 6 at at 1pm 1pm and and Tuesday Tuesday 5/15 5 /15 at at 6:30pm. 6 : 3 0 pm.

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922

Mal JJoin oin uuss for for a LIVE L I V E presentation pr esent ation of o f LLaa FFille ille M al GGardee ar dee from f r om tthe he RRoyal oyal Ballet B allet in in London L ondon on on Wednesday W ednesday 5/16 5 / 16 at at 11:30am! 11: 3 0 am ! Encore Encor e performances per f or m ance s oonn Sunday Sunday 5/20 5 / 20 at at 1pm 1pm and and Tuesday Tuesday 5/29 5 / 29 at at 6:30pm. 6 : 3 0 pm. TTickets icket s are ar e on on sale s ale now now at at our our box box office of fice or or online online at at w w w.mov ieticket s.com ! www.movietickets.com!

1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

5 51 Summerfield 551 Summer field Road Road S an t a R osa 707-522-0719 707- 52 2- 0719 Santa Rosa

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 2– 8 , 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Film

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Music

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

DELIVERTHE WORD The original members of War play this weekend.

Still at War

Lawsuits steal glory from Lowrider Band BY GABE MELINE

= F F ;Ă?D L J @ :Ă?8 I KĂ?: F D D L E @ K P

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden International Vegetarian Buffet DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO! Wed May 2, PMsJazz

Shade Fri May 4, 7:30pm Poetry in Many Languages Music by De Corazon a Son 100,000 Poets for Change Sat May 5, 8:30pm Queen of the Boogie Woogie

Wendy DeWitt Wed May 9, 7:30pm Music from Central France

French Session Thur May 10, 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm Bottleneck Blues & Slide Guitar

Tony Gagarin Fri May 11, 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm, $5 cover Stand-Up

Monkey Fight Comedy Night Mon May 14, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8pm Literary Salon

Dine with Local Authors &INE"EERS7INESs$ 5 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

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I

t starts with a cowbell and then that amazing, ascending bass line, landing off-time on the upbeats. A quick roll of the drums and the rhythm kicks in, full of syncopation and soul. Congas, organ and harmonica propel the action, punctuated by a Spanish-tinged lead guitar lick that every 14-year-old in Los Angeles has learned how to play for the last 40 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Low Rider,â&#x20AC;? the song, has become such an anthem that it almost no longer belongs to its creators but to the world at large. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been endlessly covered, featured in movies, and used as a joke every time a kid with a bananaseat, chain-link-handlebar bike comes rolling down the sidewalk,

from Whittier to White Plains. And in fact, the legacy of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Low Riderâ&#x20AC;? doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t belong to its creators. Well, four-ďŹ fths of them, at least. Howard E. Scott, B. B. Dickerson, Lee Oskar and Harold Brown are four of the ďŹ ve original living members of War, but due to one of those unfair, cutthroat lawsuits you hear about so often in the music industry, they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t perform under the name War. They canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even mention that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re original members of War on their concert posters. The venues they play arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allowed to mention War in any advertisements for their shows. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another band, fraudulently called â&#x20AC;&#x153;War,â&#x20AC;? who by court order gets to do all those thingsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and it contains just one original member. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lowrider Bandâ&#x20AC;? might sound like a name for a War cover band, but the fact is theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re far closer to the real thing. Drummer Harold Brown once went to see War, and watched as keyboard player Lonnie Jordan was introduced as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the man who wrote all the songs.â&#x20AC;? As he told Joel Selvin of the San Francisco Chronicle in 2009, he registered his complaint in direct fashion: he picked up a pie and hurled it at his former band mate. Want to hear hits like â&#x20AC;&#x153;The World Is a Ghetto,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Cisco Kid,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spill the Wineâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t We Be Friendsâ&#x20AC;? played by a bunch of hired hands and one original member? Then go see War, whose guarantees are so high that when a local promoter once called me for advice on whether to book the show, the ticket price would have been set near $50 just to cover expenses. But if you want to hear that timeless, classic soul, played by the very people who absorbed Los Angelesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; melting pot of AfricanAmerican and Latino culture and swirled it into musical history, then you know which band to go see. The Lowrider Band play Sunday, May 6, at the Mystic Theatre. 21 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 8pm. $31. 707.765.2121.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY American Philharmonic Emperor and King concert, featuring works by Beethoven and Saint-Saens. May 6, 3:30pm. $20-$30. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Shelby Lynne Grammy-winning singersongwriter headlines benefit for children’s music education. May 6, 7pm. $55-$65. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

John Santos Five-time Grammy nominee comes to Marin with his sextet. May 4. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Bob Dylan Tribute The poet’s verses, performed by Solid Air, Love Choir and others at First Friday Live. May 4, 7pm. $5-$10. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Lowrider Band Four of the five original members of War, singers and composers of the hits “Lowrider,” “Why Can’t We Be Friends” “Spill the Wine” and more. May 6, 8pm. $31. Mystic Theatre, 21 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Steep Canyon Rangers Bluegrass pros play with opener Carrie Rodriguez. May 3, 7pm. $21. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

NAPA COUNTY F.A.M.E. Napa Valley Auction & Concert Third annual benefit provides funding to Foundation for African Medicine and Education, with music by Nigerian folk band Baba Ken Okulolo & the Nigerian Brothers. May 6, 2-5pm. $50$75. Robert Mondavi Winery, 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 707.968.2203.

Keola Beamer & Ralatea Helm Hawaiian music legend and Grammy-nominated vocalist pair up. May 3, 8pm. $30-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

31

Choir presents “The Writes of Spring.” May 5, 7pm. $20-$25. First United Methodist Church, 625 Randolph St, Napa.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 2– 8 , 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

Oakland East Bay Gay Men’s Chorus

Voena: Voices of Life Bay Area multicultural children’s choir blends a cappella vocal arrangements, dance, and theatrical elements. May 5, 7:30pm. $25-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aubergine May 4, Hadley Hill, Stages of Sleep and Conception Vessel One. May 5, Cinco de Mayo with the Jug Dealers. May 6, Moonbeams. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Christy’s on the Square May 3, Hadley Hill, Icarus the Owl, Flyover States. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. ) 707.528.8565.

32

Yo La Tengo Cult rockers from Hoboken, New Jersey play an almostacoustic set of songs from entire catalog, with stories about their life as a band. May 2, 7pm. $21. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121. Also, free in-store May 2 at 2:30pm at the Last Record Store, 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1963.

MARIN COUNTY Beethoven & the Bridge Marin Symphony performs the world premiere of the Golden Gate Opus Commission and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9. May 6, 3pm and May 8, 7:30pm. $29-$70. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Charlotte A nna Molinari

Meklit Hadero Ethiopian-born songstress appears with Quinn Deveaux. May 3, 7:30pm. $30. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

May 16, 1996—April 20, 2012 DANCE PARTY DJ Paul Timberman celebrates

NEON’s one-year anniversary at Society: Culture House on May 4. See Clubs, p32.

Rest in Peace.


32

Music ( 31

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May 2, Shade. May 4, 100 Thousand Poets for Change. May 5, Wendy DeWitt. Tues, Jim Adams. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

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Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 138 Calistoga Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.623.5453.

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May 4, Powerhouse. May 5, Decadance with El Papachango. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

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Hopmonk Tavern May 3, Juke Joint with Cumbia Zumbia and Minimex. May 4, Zen Road Pilots. May 5, Sambada. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Reservations Advised

STEFANIE KEYS May 4 Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Originals/Americana Fri

8:30pm

THE TICKETS BAND May 5 Cinco de Mayo Party! 8:30pm

5:00pm / No Cover

Debu

THE FABULOUS BUD E LUV May 11 Why Go to Vegas When You Can Come to Nicasio! Fri

8:30pm

GATOR BEAT May 12 The Band with a Beat that Bites Sat

8:30pm

Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Brunch Buffet

 SUNDAY, MAY 13 â&#x20AC;˘ 10AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3PM  ALSO SERVING MOTHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY DINNER â&#x20AC;˘ 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8PM

BIG SANDY & HIS FLY-RITE BOYS May 18 Western Swing, Rockabilly, & Traditional Country Fri

Sun

8:30pm

DEBBIE DAVIES

May 20 Legendary Blues Guitarist/Singer 7:30pm

Rancho Debut!

THE JAMES MOSELEY BAND May 25 Hot Soul Music Fri

8:30pm

JOHNNY ALLAIRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S May 26 Rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Roll Dance & Birthday Party for Bob! Sat

8:30pm

415.662.2219

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Kodiak Jackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

FOXES IN THE HENHOUSE cho May 6 Foxy Four-Part Harmonies Ran t! Sun

May 4, Rob Fisher and Matt Clark Duo. May 5, David Udolf Trio with Chris Amberger and Alan Uâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ren. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800. Wednesdays, Brainstorm (dubstep). Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

DIN N E R & A SHOW

Sat

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

May 4, DJ Amen. 256 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma. 707.765.5760.

Last Day Saloon May 2, Cassidy Crowley, Tony Gibson. May 4, Sweet Leaf with Inner Edge and Bill Decker Band. May 5, Pulsators. May 6, Fourth Street Jazz Band. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station May 2, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. May 3, Susan Sutton. May 4, 7pm, Bruce Halbohm and Blue Jazz. May 5, Yancie Taylor. May 8, Maple Profant. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub May 3, 7:30pm, Tony Gibson. May 5, 8pm, Andrew Freeman. May 6, Acoustic Celtic Jam. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

A Little Lovinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Shelby Lynne headlines Little Kids Rock benefit The positive effects of music in a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life begin with lullabies at home and continue with the presence of music programs in schools. The Little Kids Rock BeneďŹ t, featuring Shelby Lynne, supports the Little Kids Rock mission on May 6 at Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in San Rafael. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I jumped at the chance to help out a much-worthy cause,â&#x20AC;? says Lynne. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was a kid, I played daddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guitar, so I was fortunate to have an instrument lying around I could play on a whim. Musical instruments are interesting for kids. They naturally gravitate toward them out of curiosity, whether they are musically inclined or not.â&#x20AC;? Little Kids Rock partners with disadvantaged public school districts to fund teacher training, instrument donations and free lessons for kids. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Music lessons are a gift, and having the ability to read music is a wonderful asset in life, no matter what your occupation is,â&#x20AC;? says Lynne. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew when I was just a kid, five or six, that music would be my life,â&#x20AC;? says Lynne. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I carry my childhood influences with me everywhere I play.â&#x20AC;? The Little Kids Rock Benefit is on Sunday, May 6, at Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub. 842 Fourth St., San Rafael. 6pm. $45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$65. 877.568.2726. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Suzanne Daly

Mystic Theatre May 2, Yo La Tengo. May 3, Steep Canyon Rangers with Carrie Rodriguez. May 4, PettyTheft. May 6, Lowrider Band. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Phoenix Theater May 5, Floydian Slip.

201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe May 4, Full Steem. First Sunday of every month, Music and Mimosas. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. ) 707.795.7868.

34


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Art PAID ADVERTISING SECTION

Gallery

34

THE ARTISTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SEARCH

Music ( 32 The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Sebastopol Community Center May 4, First Friday Live: Bob Dylan Night. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Society: Culture House Wed, Gallery Wednesday, DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. May 4, Neon one-year anniversary with DJ Paul Timberman and guests. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s May 4, Blue Diamond Phillips. May 5, CounterBalance. Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

James Reynolds April 29 to June 24 Reception May 19 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm

Tradewinds

SEBASTOPOL GALLERY 150 N. Main St. Sebastopol 707.829.7200

Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

100 YEARS OF BAY AREA ART featuring art from 1910â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2010

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma 707.781.7070 calabigallery.com

'ESabS`\/dS >SbOZc[O1O'"'# %%%%&& %% ;]\ÂłAOb( O[Âł#(!^[ Ac\ROg( O[Âł#^[ Âľ4W\Rca]\4OQSP]]YÂś 3abOPZWaVSR'&&

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>3B/:C;/¸A63@7B/53 3fVWPWbQ]\bW\cSac\bWZ8c\S    1:/AA711/@>/7<B7<5APg9ObVS`W\S/cabW\  E67;A71/:167193<>/7<B7<5APg@]PW\0c`US`b  ;7F32A>3173AA1C:>BC@3APg8]\\WS@caaSZZ >3B/:C;/5/::3@G=<31=;

May 2, Chris Lujanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Right Now. May 3, Connie Duceyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s C-JAM. May 8, James Moseley Quartet. May 9, EMK. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar May 3, Friends of Finch. May 4, Other Stones. May 5, Acacia. May 6, Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Jam. May 8, Deep Bench. May 9, Elvis Johnson Group. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio May 4, Stefanie Keys. May 5, Tickets Band. May 6, Foxes in the Henhouse. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

MARIN COUNTY

Caribe. May 6, Mario Guarneri. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s May 3, Walt the Dog, Bone Rady. May 4, Jerry Hannan. May 5, Honey Dust. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

NAPA COUNTY Billcoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Billiards May 5, 4pm-2am, Cinco de Mayo with Audio Farm. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant May 5, Voltones. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Sausalito Cruising Club Mon, Blue Monday Jam Session with the Taters. 300 Napa St, Sausalito.

Sausalito Seahorse May 2, Tangonero. May 3, Dore & CRB. May 4, Seventh Son. May 5, Eddie Neon. May 6, Orquesta la Moderna Tradicion. Mon, local talent onstage. Tues, jazz jam. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady May 3, Danny Uzilevsky. May 4, Todd Boston. May 5, Mambo

Napa Valley Opera House May 3, Keola Beamer and Ralatea Helm. May 4, Napa Valley Educational Jazz Fest. May 5, Voena: Voices of Life. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s May 3, Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Idol Prelim. May 4, Sing a Song. May 5, Rudy Colombini and the Unauthorized Rolling Stones. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Finneganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marin Mon, open mic with KC Turner. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub May 3, Kenny Washington. May 4, John Santos. May 5, Sol and En Vivo. May 6, 6pm, Little Kids Rock Benefit with Shelby Lynne, Prairie Prince and Little Kids Rock Band. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Washed Out

Nickel Rose

Johnny Otis Celebration

Mon, Wed-Sun, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

19 Broadway Club May 2, Honey Cooler. May 3, 21st Century Blues with Rayner Brock and Mike Varney. May 5, Miles Schon Band with Cathey Cotten and Elliottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Evil Plan. May 6, Jaded. May 9, Diamond Jazz. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Tues, 9pm, Uzilevsky Korty Duo with special guests. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Call today to advertise! 707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

Panama Hotel Restaurant

First Monday of every month, 8:30pm, Kimrea. Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

When Ernest Greene was born in 1983, little could he know chillwave was in his future. May 4 at Mezzanine.

Lucky Otis, Nicky Otis, Jackie Payne, Barbara Morrison and moreâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;no Shuggie, though. May 5 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oakland.

The Weeknd Dirty, dramatic R&B from elusive Canadian Abel Tesfaye, who offers his music online for free. May 8 at the Fillmore.

Death Cab for Cutie Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true: their music has gotten better since Ben Gibbard and Zooey Deschanel broke up. May 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 at the Fox Theater.

Silversun Pickups SoCal band with hit album â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carnavasâ&#x20AC;? plays free in-store for new release. May 9 at Amoeba SF.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


35

Galleries OPENINGS May 4 At 5pm. Journey Center Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art from the Heart,â&#x20AC;? featuring variety of forms and mediums by Maria Crane. 1601 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.2121. From 5:30-7:30pm. Napa Valley Museum, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Take a Chance on Miniatures,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; small works by 80 artists, curated by Jennifer Garden. Reception, May 4, 5:307:30pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500. From 6 to 8pm. Arts Guild of Sonoma, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cheap But Grand,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; multimedia works measuring 8â&#x20AC;?x8â&#x20AC;? and selling for $100. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

May 5 From 1 to 4pm. Local Color Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through the Lens,â&#x20AC;? featuring photography of Mike Shoys, John Hershey and Tom Moyer. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2744.

SONOMA COUNTY Arts Guild of Sonoma May 2-28, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cheap But Grand,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; multimedia works measuring 8â&#x20AC;?x8â&#x20AC;? and selling for $100. Reception, May 4, 6-8pm. 140 East Napa Street, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

Gallery One Through Jun 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Petalumaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Heritageâ&#x20AC;? features work by Katherine Austin, Robin Burgert and Jonnie Russell. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery Through May 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Invernessâ&#x20AC;? featuring the impressionist work of Jill Keller-Peters. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through May 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mediterranean Visions,â&#x20AC;? exhibit features the collaborative work of Robyn Spencer-Crompton, Peter Crompton and Francesco Cafiso. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Museum May 6, 11:30am-4:30pm, Historic Healdsburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest homes showcased on selfguided walking tour. $35-$40. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Journey Center Gallery â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art from the Heart,â&#x20AC;? featuring a variety of forms and mediums by Maria Crane. Reception, May 4 at 5pm. 1601 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 9 to 5; weekend hours by appointment. 707.578.2121.

Local Color Gallery Through Jun 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through the Lens,â&#x20AC;? featuring photography of Mike Shoys, John Hershey and Tom Moyer. Reception, May 5 from 1 to 4pm. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

Gathering Darkness,â&#x20AC;? features work by Jim Sullivan. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

University Art Gallery Through May 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;BFA Exhibition 2012,â&#x20AC;? featuring work of 13 graduating students. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown May 4-Jun 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Surface Designâ&#x20AC;? welcomes worldrenowned Danish artist, Gugger Petter. Reception, May 11 at 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Gallery Route One Through May 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emergences,â&#x20AC;? featuring the art of Mimi Abers. Through May 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Traves de Neustros Ojos,â&#x20AC;? the Latino photography project featuring Gisela Alvarado, Ariana Aparicio and Mario Garcia. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA

Through May 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Culture Within: The Japanese American Experience through Art,â&#x20AC;? featuring the works of Henry Sugimoto. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Through May 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Altered Books,â&#x20AC;? showcases the work of 150 Bay Area artists who re-imagine, reconstruct and rework old, discarded books. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Petaluma Museum

Marin Open Studios

Petaluma Arts Center

Through Jul 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Native Worlds, Native Warriors,â&#x20AC;? unique exhibit tells remarkable story of soldiers from more than a dozen tribes who used their Native languages while in service in the U.S. military. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Through May 15, Gallery exhibition features over 260 participating artists, guides and maps. May 5-6, galleries in Novato, San Rafael, San Anselmo, Fairfax, Woodacre and San Geronimo. 301 Town Center, Corte Madera. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.448.0363.

Quicksilver Mine Company

Seager Gray Gallery

Through May 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond Words: New Portraits and Places,â&#x20AC;? by Kai Samuels-Davis. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Ren Brown Collection May 4-Jun 17, Yoko Hara collection. 1781 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. Wed-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.875.2922.

RiskPress Gallery May 5-27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paradise in

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 , 20 1 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Arts Events

Through May 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art of the Bookâ&#x20AC;? featuring handmade books, altered books and bookrelated materials. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Jun 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;CYCLE,â&#x20AC;? new works by Hung Liu. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, )

36

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re changing the way you smoke, one volt at a time

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NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 2– 8 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

36 Arts Events Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm. 707.226.5991.

Napa Valley Museum May 4-June 2, ‘Take a Chance on Miniatures,’ small works by 80 artists, curated by Jennifer Garden. Reception, May 4, 5:307:30pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Events Bohemia Preserve Celebration May 6, 11:30am-7pm, expansive land newly acquired by LandPaths open to public for hikes, activities, food, drumming and more. Free shuttles from Westminster Woods, 6510 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.524.9318.

California Herdeljezi Roma Festival

( 35 hosted by KGGV radio. May 3, 7-9pm. Guerneville School, 14630 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.2864.

Cuatro de Mayo Get a head start on the celebration with food and beverages. May 4, 3pm. $8. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

Food Trucks at Ragle Trucks in the park from 4pmdusk. May 3. Ragle Ranch Park, 500 Ragle Rd, Sebastopol.

Barney Frank Join congressional candidate and assemblymember Jared Huffman and Representative Barney Frank for a lively afternoon of conversation. May 6, 3pm. Free, contributions encouraged. Iron Horse Vineyards, 9786 Ross Station Rd, Sebastopol. 707.887.1507.

selection of jewelry, gems, beads and more. May 4-6. $7. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa.

Mix Evening of music, cocktails and interactive art surrounded by colorful exhibit. May 5, 7-11pm $25. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Name Your Price Singles Party Meet-and-party sponsored by Society of Single Professionals allows participants to pay-whatthey-can for entrance. May 8, 7pm. Tolay, 745 Baywood Dr, Petaluma. 707.283.2900.

Native American Spring Celebration Lytton Band of Pomo Indians sponsors event to honor Native American culture. May 6, 9:30am. Free with parking fee. SRJC, Doyle Student Center Lounge, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4460.

Roma Festival begins on Friday evening with a presentation by Romanichel activist Mario Williams, and continues Saturday with full day of music and dancing. May 4-5. $12-$15. Sebastopol Veteran’s Auditorium, 282 S High St, Sebastopol.

Gardens with Sculpture Sculptor Sara Schomp and six other homeowners open their gardens to the public. May 6, 10am-5pm. $5-$25. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Locally known psychic and medium promises messages from the other side. May 3, 7pm. $45. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Candidates Night

Gem Faire

Candidates for Fifth District Supervisor participate in forum

Over 80 importers/exporters and manufacturers onsite with

Comedy and craft beer help fund local Boys and Girls Club. Fri, May 4. $10. Bear

Karen Peterson

Stand Up for a Cause

Republic Brewing Co, 345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.2337.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Sunset Gala Dinner May 5, 5pm, Gourmet meal and auction benefits Harmony and Salmon Creek Schools. $40. Fernando’s, 17699 Hwy 1, Bodega. 707.876.1920.

Vintage Lingerie Fashion Show Aubergine and Vixen productions host pre-Cinco de Mayo celebration with vintage lingerie fashion show and concert featuring Q. May 3. $10-$15. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Field Trips Bird Walk Helen Kochenderfer leads aviary exploration. May 5, 8am12pm. $6 parking fee. Spring Lake Park, 391 Violetti Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

Field Trip Sharpen your photo skills or learn the basics with nature photographer Bryant Hichwa. May 6, 9am-3pm. Mayacamas Sanctuary, Pine Flat Road, off Highway 128, Healdsburg.

Spring Workshop Series Two-hour interactive workshops on the importance of native plants to California ecosystem and how to design, care for and maintain your own native backyard. Sat, May 5. $40. Richardson Bay Audubon Center, 376 Greenwood Beach Rd, Tiburon. 415.388.2524.

Film Film Fest Petaluma International filmmakers and Sonoma County students showcase their work. May 5, 2:30pm-12am. $10-$25. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Happy Herdeljezi Roma Fest celebrates new season in Sebastopol It’s that time when birds begin chirping more freely, flowers bloom, sunshine lingers longer and cool nights provide relief from the heat of the day. Yep, it’s Herdeljezi time. The traditional Romani neighborhood celebration marks the change in seasons, from staying warm indoors to moving outdoors. “Herdeljezi is a celebration of what Mother Earth gives us,” says festival organizer and Voice of Roma founder Sani Rifati, a Rom from Kosovo. In addition to local groups Inspector Gadje, Jacks & Aces, and Sani and Benji Rifati, the eight-piece New York–based Balkan Romani “sazet band” will make its West Coast debut Saturday. The festival begins Friday evening with a talk on Romani culture and jam session at the Sebastopol Veterans Memorial Building. On Saturday there are workshops ($20 each) at the Veterans Hall on Romani violin music, Balkan Romani singing, drumming and clarinet, as well as Turkish Romani dancing to get ready for the festival, which begins afterward in Ives Park. The Roma Festival begins on Friday, May 4, at the Veterans Memorial Hall (282 High St., Sebastopol; 7:30pm; $12–$15) and continues Saturday at Ives Park (7400 Willow St., Sebastopol; 11am dance workshop, $20; 12:30–9pm festival, $15–$18). 707.823.7941.—Nicolas Grizzle

First Friday Film Series March 2, “Mutiny on the Bounty.” $5. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Om Shanti Om DANISH CANDY Gugger Petter shows work constructed from newspaper at Art

Works Downtown starting May 4. See Galleries, p35.

Romantic reincarnation epic about an artist who falls for

a superstar. Sun, May 6, 4pm. $5-$6. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Thrive View unconventional

documentary that follows the money upstream, and participate in post-film dialogue with filmmakers. May 4, 7:30pm. $12-$16. Unity in Marin, 600 Palm Dr, Hamilton, Novato. )

38


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ŵź Arts Events

Lectures Archeology & History of Sonoma Coast SRJC Professor Tom Origer presents seminar on diverse regional history. May 5, 9am-2pm. $15. Jenner Visitor Center, 10439 Hwy 1, Jenner. 707.865.9757.

Forgotten Engineer Bay Area author John Van der See discusses Charles Ellis, the designing engineer of the Golden Gate Bridge, and why his name appears nowhere on or near the bridge. May 8, 7pm. $10. Elk’s Lodge, 1312 Mission Ave, San Rafael, 773.755.4700.

Historic Preservation “Restoration of Petaluma’s 1914 NWP Depot and Associated Buildings,” with Glenn David Mathews on May 6 at 4pm. $5. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Jazz Forum Ruzsa Nikolic-Lakatos and her Romani Ensemble performs traditional Lovara songs. May 2, 1pm. Green Music Center 1029, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

Readings Book Passage May 4, 1pm, “The Extraordinary Education of Nicholas Benedict,” with Trenton Lee Stewart. May 4, 7pm, “The Song of Achilles” with Madeline Miller. May 5, 7pm, “To Save a Mountain: The 100-Year Battle for Tamalpais,” with Barry Spitz. May 6, 12pm, “The Hidden Europe: What Eastern Europeans Can Teach Us,” with Francis Tapon. May 6, 1pm, “Prosper in Love,” with Deborah Michel. May 6, 2pm, “Jesus Loves You But the Rest of Us Think You’re an A**hole,” with Agatha Hoff. May 6, 4pm, “David Park: A Painter’s Life,” with Nancy Boas. May 6, 6pm, “Make It Stay,” with Joan Frank. May 6, 7pm, “In the Sierra: Mountain Writing by Kenneth Rexroth,” with Kim Stanley Robinson and Tom Killion. May 7, 7pm, “Private Empire: ExxonMobil

( 36 and American Power” with Steve Coll. May 8, 7pm, “Dust to Dust: A Memoir” with Benjamin Busch. May 9, 7pm, “My Happy Days in Hollywood” with Garry Marshall. Through May 31, Susan Hall, Paintings and drawings by Susan Hall. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Theater Harmony in Hiding

May 6, 2pm, “When Women Were Birds,” with Terry Tempest Williams. 451 Mesa Rd, Bolinas.

Based on the book “Memoirs of a Jewish Boy,” this true story of 12-year-old Horst Ferber, an aspiring pianist forced into hiding from the Nazis in 1942, is presented by Ross Alternative Works. Various dates and times. Through May 6. $15. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Gaia’s Garden

Jesus Phreak

Commonweal

May 4, 7:30pm, 100 Thousand Poets for Change, Reading by local poets celebrates music of spoken word. $4. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa 707.544.2491.

One-man play explores the controversial topic of “gay Christians.” May 5, 4-7pm. $5. Thanksgiving Lutheran Church, 1225 Fulton Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.544.0241.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

The Marvelous Wonderettes

May 3, 6pm, “Make it Stay” with Joan Frank. May 4, 6:30pm, “Pity the Beautiful” with Dana Gioia. 2316 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Travel back to 1958 and meet the Wonderettes, four girls who step up to perform at their senior prom. Various dates and times. Through May 13. $15$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books May 4, 5pm, “Special Ed: Voices from a Hidden Classroom” with Dennis Bernstein. May 5, 7pm, “When Women Were Birds: Fifty-Four Variations on Voice” with Terry Tempest Williams. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

River Reader May 2, 7pm, “Red Slide Magnesite Mines and Railroads,” with John Schubert. May 5, 6pm, “Coming Out from Behind the Badge,” with Greg Miraglia. May 9, 7pm, “Safe Haven,” “Sherlock Holmes and the Princess Jewel,” “Average Joe,” “Once Upon a Crime” and “The Fat Man,” with John DeGaetano. 16355 Main St, Guerneville 707.869.2242.

Silver Spoon Romantic musical comedy by Si Kahn and Amy Merrill presents story of Polly, who, like all of us here at the Bohemian, is both a member of the alternative press and a rising star in her family-owned Wall Street brokerage house. When she falls for a working-class grape boycott committee leader, she faces a conflict universal to any self-respecting bank-heiressturned-hard-nosed-altweeklyreporter. In fact, the plot is nearly identical to a typical Monday in our Fifth Street office, with just a little more singing but roughly the same amount of jazz hands. Various dates and times. Through May 5. $20-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Uptown Theatre May 4, 8pm, David Sedaris, The brilliantly hilarious nonfiction guru who doesn’t hold an MFA from Iowa, dropped out of college and was discovered when Ira Glass saw him READING HIS DIARY at a Chicago club. But we’re not jealous, and even if we are, we’ll get over it. $49-$59. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Astrology

FREE WILL

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of May 2

ARIES (March 21–April 19) On the one hand, you’re facing a sticky dilemma that you may never be able to change no matter how hard you try. On the other hand, you are engaged with an interesting challenge that may very well be possible to resolve. Do you know which is which? Now would be an excellent time to make sure you do. It would be foolish to keep working on untying a hopelessly twisted knot when there is another puzzle that will respond to your love and intelligence. Go where you’re wanted. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

From an astrological perspective, it’s the New Year season; you’re beginning a fresh cycle. How would you like to celebrate? You could make a few resolutions—maybe pledge to wean yourself from a wasteful habit or self-sabotaging vice. You could also invite the universe to show you what you don’t even realize you need to know. What might also be interesting would be to compose a list of the good habits you will promise to cultivate and the ingenious breakthroughs you will work toward and the shiny yet gritty dreams you will court and woo.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “My father-in-law was convinced that his sheepdogs picked up his thoughts telepathically,” writes Richard Webster in his article “Psychic Animals. “He needed only to think what he wanted his dogs to do, and they would immediately do it. He had to be careful not to think too far ahead, as his dogs would act on the thought he was thinking at the time.” To this I’d add that there is a wealth of other anecdotal evidence, as well as some scientific research, suggesting that dogs respond to unspoken commands. I happen to believe that the human animal is also capable of picking up thoughts that aren’t said aloud. And I suspect that you’re in a phase when it will be especially important to take that into account. Be discerning about what you imagine, because it could end up in the mind of someone you know! CANCER (June 21–July 22) Your right brain and left brain have rarely been on such close speaking terms as they are right now. Your genitals and your heart seem to be in a good collaborative groove as well. Even your past and your future are mostly in agreement about how you should proceed in the present. To what do we owe the pleasure of this rather dramatic movement toward integration? Here’s one theory: you’re being rewarded for the hard work you have done to take good care of yourself.

LEO (July 23–August 22)

A South African biologist was intrigued to discover an interesting fact about the rodent known as the elephant shrew: it much prefers to slurp the nectar of pagoda lilies than to nibble on peanut butter mixed with apples and rolled oats. The biologist didn’t investigate whether mountain goats would rather eat grasses and rushes than ice cream sundaes or whether lions like fresh-killed antelopes better than caesar salad, but I’m pretty sure they do. In a related subject, Leo, I hope that in the coming weeks you will seek to feed yourself exclusively with the images, sounds, stories and food that truly satisfy your primal hunger rather than the stuff that other people like or think you should like.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22) There are only a very few people whose ancestors were not immigrants. They live in Africa, where Homo sapiens got its start. As for the rest of us, our forbears wandered away from their original home and spread out over the rest of the planet. We all came from somewhere else! This is true on many other levels, as well. In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you Virgos to get in touch with your inner immigrant this week. It’s an excellent time to acknowledge and celebrate the fact that you are nowhere near where you started from, whether you gauge that psychologically, spiritually or literally.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22): “When I’m good, I’m very good,” said Hollywood’s original siren, Mae West, “but when I’m bad I’m better.” I think that assertion might at times make sense coming out of your lips in the next two weeks. But I’d like to offer a variation that could also serve you well. It’s articulated by my reader Sarah Edelman, who says, “When I’m good, I’m very good, but when I’m batty, I’m better.”

Consider trying out both of these attitudes, Libra, as you navigate your way through the mysterious and sometimes unruly fun that’s headed your way.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) The Weekly World News, my favorite source of fake news, reported on a major development in the art world. An archaeologist found the lost arms of the famous Venus de Milo statue. They were languishing in a cellar in southern Croatia. Hallelujah! Since her discovery in 1820, the goddess of love and beauty has been incomplete. Will the Louvre Museum in Paris, where she is displayed, allow her to be joined by her original appendages and made whole again? Let’s not concern ourselves now with that question. Instead, please turn your attention to a more immediate concern: the strong possibility that you will soon experience a comparable development, the rediscovery of and reunification with a missing part of you.

SAGITTARIUS (November22–December 21) Seventeenth-century physicians sometimes advised their patients to consume tobacco as a way to alleviate a number of different maladies, from toothaches to arthritis. A few doctors continued recommending cigarettes as health aids into the 1950s. This bit of history may be useful to keep in mind, Sagittarius. You’re in a phase when you’re likely to have success in hunting down remedies for complaints of both a physical and psychological nature. But you should be cautious about relying on conventional wisdom, just in case some of it resembles the idea that cigarettes are good for you. And always double-check to make sure that the cures aren’t worse than what they are supposed to fix. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Outer space isn’t really that far away. As astronomer Fred Hoyle used to say, you’d get there in an hour if you could drive a car straight up. I think there’s a comparable situation in your own life, Capricorn. You’ve got an inflated notion of how distant a certain goal is, and that’s inhibiting you from getting totally serious about achieving it. I’m not saying that the destination would be a breeze to get to. My point is that it’s closer than it seems. AQUARIUS (January20–February 18) When most Westerners hear the word “milk,” they surmise it has something to do with cows. But the fact is that humans drink milk collected from sheep, goats, camels, yaks, mares, llamas and reindeer. And many grocery stores now stock milk made from soybeans, rice, almonds, coconut, hemp and oats. I’m wondering if maybe it’s a good time for you to initiate a comparable diversification, Aquarius. You shouldn’t necessarily give up the primal sources of nourishment you have been depending on. Just consider the possibility that it might be fun and healthy for you to seek sustenance from some unconventional or unexpected sources. PISCES (February 19–March 20) You wouldn’t want to play a game of darts with an inflatable dartboard, right? If you were a smoker, you’d have little interest in a fireproof cigarette. And while a mesh umbrella might look stylish, you wouldn’t be foolish enough to expect it to keep the rain out. In the spirit of these truisms, Pisces, I suggest you closely examine any strategy you’re considering to see if it has a built-in contradiction. Certain ideas being presented to you—perhaps even arising from your own subconscious mind—may be inherently impractical to use in the real world.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


ŵŻ

For Sale

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Miscellaneous l Services

For Sale

Miscellaneous

LAPTOP, Computer, LCD Panel

$249, $99, $55- Like New! CRC Computer Repair Center, 3227 Santa Rosa Ave, 95407. FREE checkup, expert laptop repair, tune-up, spyware removal. 9am-5pm, Tues–Sat. 707.528.8340

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1.888.420.3808 www.cash4car.com

Business Opportunities

Employment

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Real Estate Services ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: www.Roommates.com

Share Rental Forrestville Small 1 BR, private entrance with sun porch. Partiall furnished. Honest female preferred. 707.889.9044

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A Rare Irish Rose Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please call before 11pm. No blocked calls, No texts. Kara, 415.233.2769

Alternative Health&Well-Being

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Massage & Relaxation

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Healing & Bodywork

STRONG THOROUGH 30+ yrs. Experience. 25/50/75. SPECIAL: Free 15 min. massage to experience my work. Colin Godwin, CMT 707.823.2990 www.colingodwin.blogspot.com

Guerneville M4M Massage

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Workshops Shamanic Apprenticeship Wiccan Priestess, Cerridwen Fallingstar, author, The Heart of the Fire, offers her 20th year-long pprenticeship program beginning Mid-May. Call/email for brochure/interview. 415.488.9641 c.fallingstar@gmail.com www.cerridwenfallingstar.com

Rocks and Clouds Zendo Memorial Day Weekend Meditation Retreat. Fri, May 25 – Mon, May 28. Email us with any questions: daterra@sonic.net. Find us on the web at 222.rocksandclouds.org or call 707.824.5647

Foot Massage $19.99/45 min 2460 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa

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Connections

Finding inspiration and connecting with your community

Advaita Non-Duality Satsang With Bala: Experiencing Acceptance

The Journey Center: A Place for Transformation

www.advaita.org/default.htm?AFBbala.htm Friday May 11th San Rafael 7–8:30pm Saturday Sunday May 12th 13th 1:00-4:00pm Larkspur 415.410.5509 email: busterzdad@gmail.com

Resources for your spiritual journey (contemplative prayer/meditation practices, workshops/retreats, spiritual direction, art gallery, reading room, bodywork). 1601 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa www.journeycenter.org 707.578.2121

Unity of Santa Rosa

Prayer and Journey Beads Workshop

Sunday School & Service 10:30am – Non-traditional. Inter-denominational. A spirituallyminded community. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Create a bead strand for your spiritual practice or as a chronicle of your personal journey. Sat, May 12, 2–5pm, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org.

Schedule Online

QuietMassage.com Santa Rosa 8 am – 8 p m

Full Body Sensual Massage

SPIRITUAL

(707) 536-1136

Mahakaruna Buddhist Meditation Center Offers ongoing classes for all levels of practice and interest. Eveyone is welcome. $10 donation requested per class. Prayers for World Peace: Sun, 10:30–11:45am Noontime Meditations: Tuesday–Saturday, 12:00 General Programs: Tues & Weds, 7:30–8:30 304 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma, 707.776.7720 www.meditateinnorcal.org

The Relaxation Station

4HAIs$EEP4ISSUE Swedish #OUPLES-ASSAGE by appointment, walk-ins welcome

707.528.2540 3401 Cleveland Ave #2 Santa Rosa

Share your organization’s inspiration with over 123,000 Bohemian Readers monthly!

707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 2-8 , 20 1 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGR AM

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxycontin and Vicodin using Methadone.

We’re here to help you help yourself.

• Subutex/Suboxone available • Confidentiality assured

1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B • Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 • www.srtp.net

• MediCal accepted

Wellness Practitioners Wanted Promote Your Business— Create More Visibility in your Community - Contact Lynn Kwitt @ 707.280.5449 or email: healthfairsampler1@gmail.com

Dogs Day Out Dog Park Outings Safe, Fun Outings. We pick up and drop off. www.dogsdayout.co or call 707.544.5113

• Providing Treatment since 1984

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE — BUY, SELL, TRADE

MEET THE TEAM

707.546.4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

Donate Your Auto 800.380.5257 We do all DMV. Free pick up- running or not (restrictions apply). Live operators- 7 days! Help the Polly Klaas Foundation provide safety information and assist families in bringing kids home safely.

AT TREK BICYCLE STORE SANTA ROSA

Hatha Yoga for Spiritual Awareness Donation based classes. Beautiful Studio. Experienced Instructor of 25 years.All levels welcome. 707.529.6965 http://www.santarosayoga.org

PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxycontin, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal! Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

PEACE IN MEDICINE IS NOW OPEN IN SANTA ROSA 1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College Ave. Santa Rosa CA 95401 — Great Prices! Visit our online menu at WWW.PeaceinMedicine.org

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

•Led by Dr. Hanya Barth •Real Care—Real Doctors •24/7 Safe Verification •Totally Confidential

We’ll Match Any Local Price

MAY 10, 5-7 PM MEET CHRIS HORNER & JENS VOIGT AUTOGRAPHS, Q&A SESSION ADMISSION TICKETS

ALL $20 FOR NON-MEMBERS

$15

FOR SONOMA COUNTY BICYCLE COALITION MEMBERS

FREE STORE PINT GLASS

TO FIRST 50 PEOPLE TO ARRIVE

Visit trekstoresantarosa.com to purchase tickets. TICKETS ARE LIMITED. — ADMISSION INCLUDES FOOD AND ONE DRINK —

Quality ID Cards

1.707.568.0420

ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT SONOMA COUNTY BICYCLE COALITION

www.GREEN215.com

Downtown Santa Rosa: 741 5th St @ E St

Move In Specials 5 X 10…

starting as low as $ 30 per month

starting as low as $ 75 per month

We sell boxes, packaging and other moving supplies

3205 Dutton Ave | 1435 Sebastopol Ave Santa Rosa | Locally Owned & Operated

707-546-0000 707-578-3299

A Bohemian approach to the web. The new Bohemian.com

10 X 10…


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