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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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‘This is bullying! This is bullying even before we begin our story!’ COVE R STORY P20

Fighting Over Marin’s Sewage T H E PAP E R P 9

Hard Cider Rules in Tomales DI N ING P 15

Ziggy Marley; Yo La Tengo A RTS & IDEAS P25; MUSI C P30 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p9 Green Zone p12 Dining p15 Wineries p18

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Earth Day Every Day

Token greenwashing actions won’t save us BY SIERRA SALIN

I

find myself feeling a growing sense of unease as we pass the 43rd Earth Day—unease at how we tend to greenwash our daily lives and pat ourselves on the back for all that we are doing to “save” the earth, which sustains all our lives, through consuming. Some drive a Prius and buy organic, perhaps, but underneath it all, we are still primarily consumers. We leave in our wake auto and airplane exhaust, and we leave landfills filled with the remains of our ever-hungry consuming lifestyles. I feel unease at fresh, highly radioactive fuel rods, hanging precariously a hundred feet in the air at Fukushima like a nuclear sword of Damocles, ready to tumble at a 6.0-plus earthquake, unleashing 40 Chernobyls on the world. All other issues on the globe at this moment should be taking the back seat. Why are we not mobilizing globally? Are we that far gone in denial, comfort or in being overwhelmed? Are celebrated events more newsworthy and important, such as “How’s their hair look?” I feel unease at how we allow endless wars and homeland insecurity to be our normal everyday “values,” while we continue on in apathy, ignorance and a way of life that reduces every living thing to a dollar value to be exploited for profit. I feel unease at how little heart or action most of us put into ensuring a healthy future for all life, including our own. The commons of nature do not belong to us, unless you consider “ownership” to be the destruction of natural systems. What we appear to value, support and propagate is war and profiteering at the expense of nature. So, happy Earth Day 2012! How did you come to be where you are, today, right now? After you pat yourself on the back, perhaps give an honest look at how you lived yesterday, last week, last year. How are you going to live tomorrow? The future is being created now, through our actions and our inactions. We all know what the stakes are. Are we willing to make sacrifices to our consuming comfort, and actually change our world? Sierra Salin lives in Fairfax. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the Bohemian. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Sexy Sex-Crazed Sharon Stone

Your “Sites of the Silver Screen” (Resident Tourist Guide, April 18) is a keeper. I foresee film fans referring to your list and visiting locations where some major (and minor) movies were shot. But your Magnificent Seven of writers allowed one—a real biggie—to get away. It didn’t even appear online with other films that didn’t make the print edition. You may have heard of it: Basic Instinct—you know, the controversial blockbuster of 1992. Let me pull focus for a minute and fill you in. Popcorn ready? OK, here goes. We’ll start on Western Avenue, the rural area across from Petaluma Junior High. Sexy Sharon Stone is driving like a sex-crazed lunatic in her sexy little black sports car, and detective Michael Douglas is following, trying to keep up, his heart in his throat and his sphincter muscle very likely there as well. The stagey scene shows a cluster of vehicles on a winding road, presumably with a huge cliff off-camera, and Stone zipping in and out of the line of traffic. The filmmakers then shot the scene with the cars on the opposite side of the road, British-style, to give the perspective of a steep cliff. It’s only a berm above the school’s athletic field and below the road. In downtown Petaluma—26 Liberty St., to be exact—Stone pulls up to the curb and goes into the nondescript A-frame house where her aunt (Dorothy Malone) lives. Douglas parks across the street where the magnificent St. Vincent de Paul church is located. He gets out of his car and goes to a rural mailbox that was set up specifically for the movie. He opens it up, takes out a couple of envelopes and reads the addressee’s name: “Hazel Dobkins,” Malone’s character. Douglas sits and waits in his car for hours. Day turns to night, and Stone finally leaves the house. She zips off to Western Avenue, makes a fast right and flies down toward

Petaluma Boulevard North (she had a real need for speed, among other things), with Douglas behind her. Stone is in the left-hand lane but makes a sudden, illegal right onto the boulevard. Douglas, caught unaware, tries to follow, but is unable to change lanes as another car is in the turn lane, blocking him. Stone gets away and Douglas throws his hands up in frustration.

There! I feel so much better for having done your work. When can I expect a check in the mail?

BOB CANNING Petaluma

More North Bay Poets With due respect to Jonah Raskin (“Read Poetry!” April 11), when was the last time Dana Gioia read at, or even attended, a poetry reading in our county? Why don’t we urge people to read the fine local poets who make their presence felt locally? Sonoma County laureate Bill Vartnaw. Geri Digiorno, who hosts the annual Petaluma Poetry Walk. Katherine Hastings with her WordTemple reading series and radio programs. Michael Rothenberg and Terri Carrion, founders of 100 Thousand Poets For Change. Ed Coletti. Andrew Mayer. Vilma Ginzberg. David Beckman. Tom Mariani. Margo van Veen. Don Hagelberg. Gor Yaswen. Many others I can name. Poets who not only have a residence in Sonoma County, but poets who make a difference in Sonoma County.

DAVID MADGALENE Windsor

One Candidate to Another I saw Stacey Lawson’s TV ad last night. It’s like, “Hello, I’m blonde and cute. I don’t have any issues or bother to vote, but I have tons of money.” Michael Allen, every bit the ghost of Jimmy Hoffa, “Look you guys, I’m taking over


THIS MODERN WORLD

this territory, see?â&#x20AC;? resurfacing at the Petaluma Dems last night with his legislative aid passing out campaign ďŹ&#x201A;yers (Hatch Act?). Together they look like Meg and Michael Whitman out to buy some seats at IKEA.

ALEX EASTON-BROWN Lagunitas

Dept. of Tickets Last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s item about the ACLU awards on April 27 (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Insider Art,â&#x20AC;? April 18) listed the admission cost as $55. Organizers would like you to know that at the door, and after April 17, tickets will be $70 ($25 for low-income).

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GREEN RIBBON Members of the RVSD open a new trail and sewer pipe along Corte Madera Creek in December 2011.

Down the Drain

Two sanitation agencies battle, expensively, in Marin BY KELLY O’MARA

A

fter multiple grand jury reports on the dysfunction of the Central Marin Sanitation Agency (CMSA) and the Ross Valley Sanitary District (RVSD), the two sewage agencies are at it again. This time they’re heading to legal arbitration over who gets to service San Quentin

Prison and who should pay a budget gap of $800,000. The dispute has turned ugly, as the CMSA board removed RVSD board member Marcia Johnson from its finance committee at the end of March, alleging that Johnson called the other board members and the general manager names. “That never happened,” said Johnson this week, disputing the charge. “I’m a grownup.”

Johnson believes, instead, that she’s being forced out because she’s asking questions about the San Quentin deal, and is pointing out how costs are being forced on to Ross Valley ratepayers. “It is a plot. I’m not just paranoid,” Johnson added. The RVSD serves San Anselmo, Fairfax, Greenbrae, San Quentin and Larkspur, which it annexed in 1993. The district collects and delivers untreated sewage ) 11 to the CMSA, a joint

In August 2007, Chauncey Bailey was walking to his job as editor of the Oakland Post when he was murdered by a masked gunman. Bailey was the first journalist to be killed on American soil in retaliation for a newspaper story in nearly three decades. A lengthy investigation revealed that a 19-year-old bakery worker had been ordered to execute Bailey by Yusuf Bey IV, the leader of a Nation of Islam off-shoot cult that ran Your Black Muslim bakery. Bey is now behind bars, convicted of multiple murders, and Thomas Peele (pictured), a digital investigative reporter for the Bay Area News Group and member of the Chauncey Bailey Project, has written a book called Killing the Messenger: A Story of Radical Faith, Racism’s Backlash and the Assassination of a Journalist. Peele presents a lecture on Thursday, April 26, in Olney Hall at the College of Marin. 835 College Ave., Kentfield. 7pm. Free. 415.485.9528.

Arts Alive Palestinian playwright Abdelfattah Abusrour founded Al-Rowwad Cultural and Theatre Center in 1998, running classes out of his parent’s house in Bethlehem. After moving to the Aida Camp, just outside of the city, the actor and theater director began offering acting and dancing classes for children who had suffered trauma from the violent struggles between Palestine and Israel. Abusrour’s camp also began fitness programs for women and an outdoor film festival. On Sunday, April 29, at the Sonoma Vintage House, Abusrour presents his experience with empowering young Palestinians in “Beautiful Resistance: Defying the Occupation Through Theater and the Arts.” 264 First St., Sonoma. 3-5:30pm. $10–$15; no one turned away for lack of funds. 707.494.4805.—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

9 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Sanitation ( 9

‘It would be like me telling my neighbor he could use your car.’ The RVSD disagrees with that telling of the story, but is adamant that the CMSA can’t take its business. San Quentin pays the Ross Valley district about $2 million per year, says Richards, approximately $900,000 of which is handed over to the CMSA. “They’re stealing San Quentin from us,” says Johnson. In April, the CMSA board voted on a contract to provide all wastewater collection services to San Quentin for a flat fee of $100,000 per month. The contract vote failed in a 3–3 tie. Johnson says one of the issues was that rates must be determined by usage, not flat fees. The other problem, she says, is that the CMSA is in violation of the terms that created the agency in the first place—terms saying it will only serve its member agencies and not perform services outside its boundaries. Additionally, says Richards, the transportation of the sewage from San Quentin to the CMSA would be through pipes that are actually owned by the Ross Valley district. “It would be like me telling my neighbor he could use your car,” says Richards. That argument will be added to the list of issues to be arbitrated by the two agencies in the coming months. As Mary Sylla, a candidate running for the RVSD board, has pointed out, residents are paying for the lawyers on both sides.

11 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

powers agency made up of the RVSD, the San Rafael Sanitation District and the Corte Madera Sanitary District. The CMSA, in turn, treats the sewage delivered from its member agencies. As a member of the CMSA, the Ross Valley district turns over about half of the rates it collects from residents to the treatment agency, says RVSD general manager Brett Richards. And, counting San Quentin and Larkspur, it accounts for about 54 percent of the CMSA’s annual budget. The amount the CMSA charges the Ross Valley district is based on the number of equivalent dwelling units in the district: a house equals one equivalent dwelling unit, a 10unit apartment building equals 10. In the spring of 2011, per standard yearly procedure, the RVSD notified the Central Marin district that it would have fewer equivalent dwelling units for the 2011–’12 fiscal year. Those 5,000 fewer units would have been a loss of about $800,000, says CMSA attorney Jack Govi. “Not having any idea where that was coming from, CMSA was really concerned,” says Govi. The CMSA says it never got any clarity on the budget shortfall. So the agency adopted a new fiscal policy basing the annual budget on the last quarter of the previous year. That meant that the RVSD would pay for the dwelling units it had the previous year, even if it ended up with fewer in the upcoming year. At the end of the year, the member districts would be reimbursed, says Govi. Ross Valley said no. “You can’t charge us whatever you want,” says Richards. The decrease in the RVSD’s expected dwelling units was a result of a decrease in the amount charged to San Quentin. After testing the sewage released from the prison, it was determined to be less polluted than previously thought, and therefore cost less to treat. Richards says he approached San Quentin in the fall of 2010 about decreasing its rates. But, Govi says, the prison came to the CMSA in the spring of 2011

after finding out it was paying $1.7 million for maintenance of a pump station. CMSA general manager Jason Dow told the prison that the agency could provide that same service for $100,000. Govi says that upon seeing that figure the prison asked for a more indepth service proposal.


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DIY Savings Start with a measuring tape

BY JULIANE POIRIER

S

ustainability is a do-it-yourself job. Although it goes against all the old-school brainwashing that insists we have to buy solutions from specialists, the information we need to take action can be gotten free from friends, family, neighbors and the nearest computer (in that order). Start at home.

Unlike the do-it-yourselfersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; those who boldly ďŹ x their own pipes, walls or fencesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a free weekend, a trip to a corporate big-box store or large biceps to start assessing energy savings. All the beginner needs to lift is his or her gaze to look around the house, raising awareness of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surroundings. We in this country spend 90 percent of our time indoors. The bright side is that we are not in our cars during that time; the dark side is that our homes are also contributing carbon to the atmosphere. But we can begin reducing the carbon footprint of our dwelling just by measuring a few things.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;What can be measured can be managed,â&#x20AC;? is a workplace mantra. But it applies to our homes when we take a few minutes to measure windows and floor area. Then we can begin (even if we bombed in math class) to discover the rates at which our dwelling wastes energy. With that information we can â&#x20AC;&#x153;plug the leaksâ&#x20AC;? that release carbon into the atmosphere and money into the pockets of PG&E. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fret the math. Web-based calculation tools come in all sorts, but I recommend starting with either of twoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one for left-brainers and the other for right-brainers. For left-brainers, there is the original, nerdy auditing tool that goes by the not so sexy name of Home Energy Saver. A free service developed by the Department of Energyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, this ďŹ ll-in-the-blanks calculator leads you, step by step, through a virtual audit of your home, using your zip code, local weather and details about your domicile, whether you live in a McMansion or a garage apartment. When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve typed in the basics, the program pops up with your homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very own chart of carbon-emission reductions and cash savings possible with some changes in household management. For right-brainers, there is the spinoff website. The same energy calculations framework developed on your tax nickel by the DOE were licensed to private industry in 2009. Microsoft, giving the Home Energy Saver calculators a cosmetic makeover, dubbed their presentation Microsoft Hohm. With the government geek element replaced by advertising sexiness, the Hohm website has strong visual appeal and a simpliďŹ edâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;some might say dumbed-downâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;user interface that makes it friendly and accessible. Both sites work equally well to get you on your way to starting your DIY energy makeover.


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Get your Parks Membership: On-line at sonomacountyparks.org,or at Sonoma Outfitters, REI Santa Rosa, Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Markets, Community Market, Pacific Markets in Santa Rosa and Sebastopol, Sonoma Market, Glen Ellen Village Market, Sebastopol Hardware, NorCal Bike Sport & Bike Peddler, Freidmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home Improvement, or staffed park entry stations

sonomacountyparks.org

707/565-2041

WELLNESS

CENTER Health Starts Here! Gluten Intolerance Group of Sonoma Co. toQN We discuss gluten intolerance and Celiac Disease and the challenges we face while transitioning to a gluten free diet.. Share your ideas & recipes! Feldenkrais toQN Desire for future vitality a pre-requisite! Learn how to be proactive in cultivating your own well-being with Feldenkrais. Beginning Insight (Vipassana) Meditation toQN Practice the art of opening and letting go. Facilitated by Sally Pryce, a 30-year Buddha meditator

Visualizations to build your Immune System toQN Fortify your immune system â&#x20AC;&#x201D; practice 15-minute visualizations with Mamta Landerman, Ayurveda teacher/practitioner Wellness Center events are free unless otherwise noted.

$PEEJOHUPXO.BMMt4BOUB3PTB

4UPSFPQFOEBJMZBNQN   calendar: wholefoods.com/coddingtown

Enjoy j y our Bountyy of Bike Events for the Whole Familyy April A p ril 2 28: 8: W We eL Love ove Bikes Bikes Day Day at at S Santa anta Rosa Rosa Certified Cer tified Farmers Farmers Market M a r ke t April 29: Bike Bodega Bay A p ril 2 9: B ike tto oB odega B ay Fishermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fishermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Festival Fe stival May 6:: Women Biker Chicks M ay 6 Women Ride Ride with w ith B iker C hicks & S Supervisor up e r visor Z Zane ane May M ay 110: 0: A AM ME Energizing n e r g izi n g S Stations t a ti o n s & P PM M Bike Bike Home Home Celebrations C e l e b r a ti o n s JJoin oin tthe he T eam B i ke C hallenge ttoday oday aand nd p edal tthrough h ro u gh M ay! Team Bike Challenge pedal May! A nfo aatt w w w.bike sonoma.org or or 707.545.0153 707.5 4 5.01 5 3 Allll iinfo www.bikesonoma.org

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

BECOME A PARKS MEMBER

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BENNETT VALLEY GOLF COURSE

Reserve your tee time online at www.srcity.org/golf Some of the lowest everyday rates you’ll find in Northern California - no coupon needed! Enjoy a meal on the gorgeous patio overlooking the course at Legends Sports Grill.

Voted Bohemian’s 2012 Best of the North Bay Public Golf Course

3330 Yulupa Avenue, Santa Rosa

Call 707-528-3673 for details.


TO THE CORE Gravenstein apples are too sweet for hard cider, so the Lees of AppleGarden Farm have planted 20 different

varieties in Tomales.

Good Apples Jan and Louis Lee’s AppleGarden Farm hard cider BY STETT HOLBROOK

W

hen I visit Jan and Louis Lee, their apple trees have just burst forth in showy white blossoms. The west Marin couple planted 230 trees four years ago and harvested their first crop this past fall, but except for a few trees’ worth, none of the apples was fit to eat; they were either too tart or too bitter.

Which is just what the Lees want. The recently retired couple built a home on 3.5 acres of bare land just outside of Tomales, but before they drove the first framing nail, they planted the apples. Given Tomales’ cool environment, and their own commitment to keeping local land in agriculture, they knew they wanted to produce something. They weren’t interested in grapes, sheep or vegetables, so they settled on growing apples for hard cider.

“We wanted to do something different,” says Jan, who along with her husband is a retired construction manager. Estate-produced hard cider is definitely different. It’s ironic that there isn’t more of it, given the abundance of apple orchards in the cool, foggy hills west of Highway 101. Of course, there used to be a lot more apples before the ascendancy of wine grapes and the preference for hearty, truck-tolerant apples. Nearby Sebastopol’s famed

Gravenstein apples aren’t made for cross-country shipping, and they’re too sweet for hard cider. The Lee’s AppleGarden Farm cider is a true farmstead product. The 20 varieties of organically grown apples (crabapples, golden russets, Winesaps, Kingston blacks) that go into their cider are all grown in the orchard. They plan to plant an additional 70 trees, but that’s it—they have no intention of sourcing apples elsewhere. “We want to stay small,” says Jan. “We’re committed to the organic lifestyle.” With just the two manning an old, hand-cranked wooden press and a handful of stainless-steel tanks, the operation is definitely small; they plan to make just 500 cases of cider a year. The first batch of cider will hit stores in May, available at Oliver’s markets, Petaluma Market and Palace Market in Point Reyes Station. (If you stay in the Lee’s bed and breakfast, a bottle comes with your room.) Today, the cider is still in the cellar—a 40-degree walk-in cooler next to the Lee’s garage—and according to Jan, it needs a bit more time to round out it’s angular, pucker-inducing flavor. But it’s meant to be lean and dry. “We do not want sweet and fizzy,” she says. I try a little right out of the barrel, and it’s dry and crisp, with just a trace of sugar and a light effervescence. Especially at the height of spring, it’s delicious and refreshing, and it would go great with a plate of charcuterie and cheese, or spicy Thai or Indian food—or all by itself on a hot day. Given west Marin and Sonoma counties’ ideal apple climate and the demand for all things local and artisinal, it’s surprising to me there aren’t more small-batch hard cider makers out there. Jan Lee is hoping more of them get into the game to help create a new cottage industry. “We’d like to have more,” she says. For more information, see www.applegardenfarm.com.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Stett Holbrook

Dining

15


Dining

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

Makeovers, Entertainment, Food Sampling, Sampling, Makeovers, Entertainment,Fashion FashionTips, Tips, Food * Prizes and More! * Cocktails, Goodie Bags , Cocktails, Goody Bags,Prizes and More!

MALL NAME HERE 707.575.0115

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On the Town Square Nicasio

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219 Take D St. to Point Reyes-Petaluma Rd. Left on Nicasio Valley Rd.

www.ranchonicasio.com

it pleasing. Buffet-style quality and greasiness can be a letdown. Lunch and dinner daily. 2130 Armory Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7873.

Buck’s American. $$. Small

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty

plates complement classic fare at Guerneville staple. Prime rib weekend nights! Dinner, Wed– Sat; brunch and dinner, Sun. 16440 Fourth St, Guerneville. 707.869.3608.

family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Cafe Cape Fear Cafe. $$.

Real Döner Turkish. $-$$.

Comforting atmosphere and Southern-kissed California flavors. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 25191 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.9246.

Casual, cafe-style ordering from a friendly staff. Get the coffee and buibal yuvasi dessert. Lunch and dinner daily. 307 F St, Petaluma. 707.765.9555.

Cafe La Haye California-

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly,

French. $$-$$$. The very best Sonoma ingredients are married with nouvelle French cooking styles at this comfortable bistro. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.5994.

Sunflower Caffe Cafe.

Gourmet pub fare. $-$$. Popular brewpub and bistro, award-winning handcrafted beers, outdoor dining in summer and pork chops to die for. Lunch and dinner daily. 50 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.765.9694.

$-$$. Excellent, satisfying food served cafeteria-style. Breakfast and lunch daily. 421 First St, Sonoma. 707.996.6645.

Roast Beef au Jus • Chicken Fricassee Wild Poached Coho Salmon with Champagne sauce Fresh Eggplant Parmesan • Baked Petaluma Ham Hickory Smoked Bacon & Applewood Sausage Potato Latkes with applesauce and sour cream Smoked Norwegian Salmon with bagels and cream cheese Seven Cheese Tortellini • Vegetable Tart Spring Vegetables grilled and roasted Herb Roasted Fingerling Potatoes Nicasio’s Cow Track Ranch Red Merlot Lettuce Salad Farm Fresh Scrambled Eggs • Buttermilk Pancakes Fresh Seasonal Fruit & Strawberries with créme friache Muffins, Croissants, Pastries & Breads, Cheesecake, Chocolate Decadence, and Brownies Coffee, Tea and Hot Chocolate

Graffiti Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Jazzed-up waterfront destination really is all that jazz. Big menu focuses on creative seafood dishes, also steak and lamb. Variety of indoor and outdoor seating; wide selection of appetizers– half vegetarian–can make the meal. Lunch and dinner daily. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

2695 ADULTS / $2295 SENIORS (65+) $1495 CHILDREN (UNDER 10)

Chinese-dim sum. $. Low prices and good variety make

$

plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Dempsey’s Alehouse

Flavor California cuisine. $-$$. Fresh and organic white-tablecloth food at paper-napkin prices. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9695.

Mother’s Day Brunch Buffet May 13th, 2012 10am–3pm Also serving Mother’s Day Dinner 5pm-8pm

S O N O MA CO U N T Y

Hang Ah Dim Sum

Thai Issan Thai. $$. Popular full-spectrum Thai restaurant. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 208 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.762.5966. Toyo Japanese Grill Japanese. $$$. Well-crafted traditional Japanese with some modern extras like deep-fried mashed potato croquettes with mayo. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8871.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$. The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this

popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Chez Pierre FrenchItalian-American. $$. A former Denny’s turned Parisian bistro, with surprisingly competent cozy French favorites like escargot and chicken Cordon Bleu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7330 Redwood Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4233.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Sun; dinner, Fri-Sat. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Easy Street Cafe American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677. Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, highquality food that lacks pretension. Open for dinner daily. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.


Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

C.C. Blue Japanese. $$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

SMALL BITES

Drink a Bottle, Plant a Tree The Arbor Day Foundation enjoins us to plant a tree on April 27, possibly in the manner of the multigenerational tableau presented on its website: Grandpa holds the shovel while grandkids tamp down the soil around a seedling, aided by encouraging parents. But suppose grandpa is off on the green, holding a golf club? And the brats are busy tending virtual gardens on their iPads? What if planting a tree could be as easy as uncorking a bottle of Chardonnay? Napa-based Trinchero Family Estates promises that they will plant one tree for each bottle of their tree-themed Trinity Oaks brand of varietal wines sold. According to the website www.onebottleonetree.com, wine drinkers had planted 6,657,816 trees when this article was first drafted; by the following morning, the tally was 6,896,949. How do they keep such an accurate count? By “plant a tree,” Trinchero means that they donate to Maryland-based Trees for the Future, which offers instruction in modern agroforestry techniques to farmers in underdeveloped countries—mostly in the tropics. Seeds are supplied, along with help and funding in starting nurseries. The “plant a tree” pledge, in other words, is less a one-toone direct planting and more of a metaphor. But it still feels good, and with the kettle corn aromas and crisp apple cider flavor of Trinity Oaks’ 2010 California Chardonnay ($9), tastes good, too.—James Knight

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The

elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

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The Bay View Restaurant

May 13, 2012 Served from 10:30am–7:00pm Children under 12 half price Complimentary Mimosa FIRST COURSES Dungeness Crab Cake… $16 Gravad Lox… $10 00 Pear & Cheese Agnolotti… $9 Caesar Salad… $9 Clam Chowder… $7 MAIN COURSES (Egg dishes served until 3:00 pm) Eggs Benedict… $16

Eggs Florentine… $13 Crab Cake Benedict… $18 Steak & Eggs… $22 Seafood Fettuccine… $20 Poached Salmon… $22 Pork Filet… $20 Veal & Lobster… $24 New York Steak… $26 DESSERTS Limoncello Flute… $8 Strawberry Pie… $7 Chocolate Decadence… $8

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

reservations: 707.875.2751 or email: reservations@innatthetides.com

800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

17 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

N A PA CO U N TY


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

18

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Audelssa Audelssa’s wines are indeed as dramatic, dry and rugged as the location suggests. 13750 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Tasting room open Friday–Sunday, 11am–5pm; Monday–Thursday and vineyard estate visits, by appointment. 707.933.8514. Cellar No. 8 Historic Italian Swiss Colony at Asti revived as a rechristened timecapsule. Original woodwork, motifs, mementos and the marble wino carving are not to be missed; tasting-room only Sonoma County Zin and Petite Sirah have gobs of oldfashioned flavor. 26150 Asti Post Office Road, Cloverdale. Open daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee, $5. 866.557.4970. Freeman Vineyard & Winery Rundown, trashed—this little winery had seen better times when the Freemans found it. With a spotless crush pad and new horseshoe-shaped cave, it’s giving back the love. Pinot Noir from top West County vineyards. 1300 Montgomery Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only. 707.823.6937.

Iron Horse Despite the rustic tasting room, Iron Horse produces sparkling wine and Pinots for the elite. A brilliant view for winetasting. 209786 Ross Station Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 10am–3:30pm. 707.887.1507. Larson Family Winery Barbecue wine alert! 23355 Millerick Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.938.3031.

Sausal Winery Simple, rural, without corporate crosspromotions and pretense. Good Zinfandel and nice cats. 7370 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.433.5136. Topel Winery Hailing from Hopland, Topel offers estate-

grown Meritage and other wines in this well-appointed tasting room with casement windows open to the street, across from Oakville Grocery. Cedar, chicory, chocolate and brown spice–makes one hungry for a portobellomushroom-on-focaccia sandwich. 125 Matheson St., Hopland. Open daily, 11am– 7pm. Tasting fees, $5–$12. 707.433.4116.

Twomey Cellars Framed by the spacious environs, through a massive glass wall, a panoramic $10 million view of the Russian River Valley awaits tasters. 3000 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 9am–5pm. 800.505.4850. Wine Tasting of Sonoma County A nice stop for a nibble and a sip on the way to the coast. Featured wines chosen from an eclectic local selection; prized allocations of Williams Selyem Pinot also for sale. Cheese plates, deck seating, and a pellet stove for chilly afternoons. 25179 Hwy. 116, Duncans Mills. Open Wednesday–Monday noon to 6pm. Closing varies; call ahead. 707.865.0565.

N A PA CO U N TY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Constant (WC) Boutique winery specializing in the kind of Cabernet that makes the Wine Spectator drool. 2121 Diamond Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.942.0707.

Corison Winery Winemaker Cathy Corison proudly describes herself as a “Cabernet chauvinist.” 987 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.0826.

Flora Springs Winery & Vineyards Napa Valley’s latest geotectonic eruption on Highway 29 is a stylish place to explore famous Chardonnay, Meritage blend and winery-exclusive Italian varietals. Hip but not too cool, the 30-year-old family winery surely has a sense of humor as well as sense of place. 677 S. St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fees, $15–$25. 707.967.8032.

Hess Collection Winery An intellectual outpost of art and wine housed in the century-old Christian Brother’s winery. Cab is the signature varietal. 4411 Redwood Road, Napa. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.255.1144.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

Bergamot Alley Vinyl meets vino in Healdsburg BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

n wine, location is everything. And I’m not talking about terroir. At the fashionable addresses of major metropolitan areas, wines of Spain—or Portugal, or Slovenia, or biodynamic Sicilian brews made by nature herself—are all the rage. I wouldn’t perceive it as any particular snub, were it not for the concurrent rise in trash-talking among aspiring wine commentators, who sniff at “Cali fruit bombs,” wresting the conversation away from what winemakers have labored decades to achieve, taking it back to the Eurocentric bias of the 1950s vis-à-vis naive, domestic wines of no breeding. I think you’ll be amused by their presumption. At Bergamot Alley, the story is somewhat different. Serving only wines from the Mediterranean—South of France, Spain, Italy, Algeria— the wine bar and shop provides a welcome respite amid a densely packed ghetto of tasting rooms. We’ve got our local wines, be they jampacked or cucumber-cool, and we love ’em. If we want a break, by gosh, we have earned it. This wine bar has no bar. From altitudinally enhanced school-desk chairs at long wooden tabletops, customers may order, for instance, a Claudio Morelli “Vigna delle Terrazze” Bianchello ($8 glass), a salty, refreshing white with aromas of rosewater and perspiration. At the back, a barn door pulls up to reveal the so-called porn room, a collection of older and rare bottles, like ’95 Côte du Rhône or ’01 Chianti, with plenty of Brunello and Châteauneuf-du-Pape in between. Retail shelves are made from parts of cubbyholes from the defunct Healdsburg Machine Shop. Other than that, Bergamot Alley has a spartan, casual style, peppered with repurposed relics, but not too preciously hip or uncomfortably modish. The soundtrack is provided on the mood of the moment from an LP record player and shelves packed with mustily fragrant, dog-eared old albums, from Aretha’s Greatest Hits to Talking Heads’ Remain in Light. An inspiration for the bar’s moniker, the Luciano Landi “Gavigliano” Lacrima di Morro d’Alba ($9 glass) is a deep, purple wine perfumed with Earl Grey aromatics, bottomlessly rich yet not oppressively tannic—a good feature in a place that does not yet serve food, but will soon have a catering cart stocked with goodies. But suppose—quelle horreur—that we have tired of wine altogether? Here’s a roster of beers longer than the wine list, with a bias toward Belgians—a 750 of North Coast Brewing’s Brother Thelonious ($14), Moonlight Brewing’s Twist of Fate on tap ($5). Anyone who’s spent the long week making the world’s greatest wines can appreciate that. We’ve earned it. Bergamot Alley, 328-A Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, noon to 1am. Live music Sundays. 707.433.8720.


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20

ALL TOGETHER

Musical director Brett Fenex leads the cast in a number from ‘The Advenutres of Pin Pin.’

Reaching for The Stars For the actors and artists of Alchemia, theater is life

O

K everyone, let’s do this thing!”

Liz Jahren, program director of the Alchemia Theater for Life in Santa Rosa, gently guides an actor to her correct mark, then heads back to her seat, stopping to shove a black wooden box a few feet nearer to the center of the rehearsal room. All around her, 22 slightly nervous performers are finding their places. “Erica has to leave in halfan-hour,” Jahren reminds the cast, “so we have to stay really focused, right? We’re starting from where

we left off at break-time, the first bully scene, right after Possibility.” Erika Smallen, choreographer and dance instructor, sits among the actors as Jahren takes a seat near the piano. Musical director Brett Fenex plays a snippet of the song Possibility, one of several he has written for The Adventures of Pin Pin, the original show being rehearsed today. As Fenex plays the melody, several performers begin to sing along: For me to see you, and you to see me, we gotta be who we are! Nobody knows how good it can be, until we reach for the stars!

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

Life’s an opportunity, rife with possibility! “OK, here we go!” Jahren gives a huge thumbs-up. “Ahleli, hit it!” “Can I have lunch with you?” “A little louder, Ahleli!” encourages Jahren. “Can I have lunch with you?” Ahleli, 30, is playing the title part of Pin Pin, alternating performances with actor Danny, 22. She perches on the black wooden box, tentatively addressing the actors, all clustered here and there. As scripted, they pointedly turn their backs on poor Pin Pin, acting out a typical day on a typical schoolyard.

“Freeze!” shouts Michael, 30, one of two narrators, stepping in from the taped-off wings. When none of the actors stop what they are doing, Michael repeats the command. “Freeze!” “Come on, people!” calls out Jahren, with comically wide eyes. “You heard the man! Freeze!” This time, everyone stops cold and hold their position. “This is bullying!” Michael says, his memorized line now tumbling out in a rapid rat-a-tat-tat of words. “This is bullying before we even begin our story!” “This is ‘social exclusion,’ a form of bullying,” adds Laura, 30, the


other narrator, moving in beside Michael. “Unfreeze!” Fenex slides into a bouncy and menacing piano riff, as another performer, Julie, 24, leads a quartet of rough and scary characters out onto the stage, punching the palm of her hand with one balled-up fist. These, clearly, are the primary bullies of the show.

“Look who’s sittin’ over there!” Julie snarls, pointing menacingly at Ahleli. “Let me to introduce you to my crew—Fear, Terror, Shame and Pain!” “Good, Julie, good!” Jahren says, clapping her hands. “But I think you forgot to say ‘Oh ho ho!’ when you make your entrance.” Julie grins, her make-believe tough-girl attitude melting from her face. “I didn’t forget it,” she explains, matter-of-factly. “I just didn’t want to say it.” Something in the way Julie says this strikes the entire room, including Julie, as hilarious. The resulting explosion of laughter is as much a release of nervous energy as anything else. Everyone knows that the show they are rehearsing—an original touring musical based loosely on the story of Pinocchio—will open in just three and a half weeks. There is still much to be done. Many of the actors don’t yet know their lines, their grasp of the choreography is still tentative, and everyone’s emotions—on and off the stage— are running high. “It’s a little bit overwhelming,” Julie admits, during afternoon break. “But we’re real close to being ready. We all work real hard. And audiences like us. They really take us in, because they know this

IN THE WINGS The cast of ‘Pin Pin’ in rehearsal; the show includes lessons on bullying.

is how we show our talent. We’re artists, and audiences know that. We make art when we walk into a room. We make art when we make our own entrance. To me, that’s what Alchemia is all about.”

A

lchemia, founded in 1998 by Lorin Kaufmann and Julia Macdougall, is a steadily expanding, communitybased day program with weekday activities in Novato, Petaluma and Santa Rosa. Created to serve adults with developmental disabilities, Alchemia provides a wide array of arts instruction, including painting and ceramics classes, dance and choreography workshops, creative writing classes, musical theater and singing instruction, and—using space at Santa Rosa’s Sixth Street Playhouse—its own designated theater company. Funded by a generous grant from the California State Council on Developmental Disabilities, Theater for Life—along with Alchemia’s other programs, like the art gallery Artists Without Limits—was designed to meet the needs of adults with learning disabilities, Down syndrome, Asperger’s and other conditions, specifically targeting those who identify as artists. Currently, the

cast of Pin Pin, which launches several months of touring on May 4, range in age from 22 to 35 years old. “What distinguishes the Theater for Life program from other vocational work-oriented programs,” explains Jahren, who began as a theater instructor seven years ago, “is that our program encourages them to think of themselves as artists—because they are artists. For real. Some of our actors are huge divas. If it weren’t for their disability, they’d be rockin’ it in L.A. They are that good. So we provide a space for them to rock it right here.” For Jahren, recognizing the performers as artists includes giving them a stipend for their work in shows like Pin Pin. The majority of donations collected at performances go to the actors. In her office at Sixth Street, Jahren sits at her computer, calling up photos from past productions. Since joining Alchemia, her troupe of actors has presented Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream, Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, and several original musicals, including Little Red, a play about stranger awareness that was toured to thousands of students in the North Bay. The current show opens its tour

with a four-performance run at Santa Rosa’s Glaser Center and then to the Studio at Sixth Street for several more performances. Jahren is still scheduling the rest of the show’s itinerary, which is expected to continue through spring and summer. The Adventures of Pin Pin, which contains musical lessons about how to handle bullying, was inspired, in part, by one of Alchemia’s actors. “Vince didn’t speak until he was five years old,” explains Jahren, “and when he did finally speak, he was speaking in complete sentences. One of the very first things he said to his mother was, ‘Mama, I am just like Pinocchio. I’m not a real boy!’ That’s how a lot of these artists feel, like the world doesn’t see them as one of them—so that was the genesis of this play.” In the show, Vince, 22, plays a number of characters, including a playfully menacing cheetah with hip-hop moves. “When I first came here, I came to see Little Red,” Vince says, “and I was surprised by it. I was inspired by the idea of being an actor. I was thinking, ‘Wow! I wish I could be up there, too.’ Now I’m in this show, and I really like who I am. When I’m acting, I’m happy. So it’s a dream come true.” ) 23

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

‘If it weren’t for their disability, they’d be rockin’ it in L.A. They are that good.’

21


Ĺ´Ĺ´ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Alchemia ( 21

23

Live Entertainment

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Saturday, April 28th 9pm California Cowboys BE THE ME ‘Pin Pin’ has a month-long run in Santa Rosa.

T

hree days later (and an even three weeks before opening), the Alchemia actors have hit their stride. The nerves and worries so evident a few days before have given way to a joyful exuberance that’s thoroughly infectious. “OK, from the top of the show!” Jahren grins, clapping her hands for emphasis. “You guys totally rock! You ready? Let’s do this! And don’t forget to smile!” Fenex plays the opening music, as the cast line up in a row around the stage. Michael and Laura step forward. “This is the story of living with different abilities.” Laura says, confidently. “And how it affects our lives,” adds Michael. “To tell the story, I’d like to introduce the amazing members of the Alchemia Theater for Life company. Nonie! Matthew! Shane! Ahleli! Melissa! Alicia! Melanie! Carolyn! Connie! Danny! Jamal! Michael! Kyle! Laura! Tim! Dante! Joy! Diana! Julie! Kylie! Vincent!” “Whoo-hoo!” everyone cheers.

“We want to talk about disability,” states Matthew, not forgetting to smile. One by one, the cast steps forward. “I have Down syndrome!” “I have VCFS!” “I have a learning disability!” “I have Asperger’s syndrome!” “I have Tourette’s!” “I’m a chrysanthemum!” shouts Julie. “We,” adds Kyle, “are not our labels!” Raising their arms, as Jahren gives them all a huge thumbs-up, the cast begins to sing. “Life’s an opportunity! Rife with possibility! When ‘you’ and ‘I’ turn into ‘we,’ we’ll see the world we want to see! And I will be the me . . . I’ve always wanted to be!” ‘The Adventures of Pin Pin’ plays at the Glaser Center (547 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa) Friday, May 4, at 10:30am and 7pm, and Saturday, May 5, at 2pm and 7pm. It continues May 8–24 at the Sixth Street Playhouse Studio (52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa), Tuesday– Thursday mornings at 10:30am. Suggested donations $7–$15. 707.547.7644.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

The week’s events: a selective guide

CULTURE

Crush S A N TA R O S A

Penne for Parks People do crazy things when they’re in love—leave voicemails at 3am, show up at the other person’s house unannounced, and maybe participate in things they wouldn’t admit being proud of later on. But if you’re in love with county and state parks, there’s no way you’re going to let them be taken away without a fight—or, in this case, a feast. Head to the Pastapalooza event with “Pasta King” Art Ibleto for pasta, live music, a silent auction and much more to benefit local parks. Luckily, Jack London State Park is being spared from the chopping block, but Annadel and others are still in danger. Eat in the name of love on Saturday, April 28, at the Veterans Memorial Building. 1351 Maple Ave., Santa Rosa. 6pm. $30. 707.565.2041.

M I L L VA L L E Y

So Bizarre When is stepping back from a job appropriate? After a week? A year? Twenty-five years? Cartoonist Dan Piraro, creator of Bizarro has finally completed his 10,000th cartoon and is deciding to take a much-deserved break. Well it’s sort of a break—he’s going to be touring on his “other” claim to fame, his oneman comedy show. Is pursuing a new profession really the best way to take a break from 25 years of work? I guess the joke’s on him this time. Consistently funny in newsprint and garnering rave reviews for his variety show, Piraro is a national treasure, with a smart hat to boot. Catch the celebration with guest comedian Michael Capozzola on Friday, April 27, at 142 Throckmorton Theatre. 142 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $20–$23. 415.383.9600.

MUIR BEACH

Spring Has Sprung “Family fun” isn’t generally a very persuasive term to the average person, but this weekend there’s an exception to the rule. Slide Ranch boasts amazing scenery, and their annual Spring Fling open house is full of creative activities you won’t find at the usual family picnic. The day includes workshops on milking cows and making butter, food tasting from local farms and seeing a sweater made out of raw wool. There are also guided hikes through the headlands, and even one from the Golden Gate Bridge to the beach. Don’t think that the words “family” and “fun” can’t exist together in harmony; they can and will on Saturday, April 28, at Slide Ranch. 2025 Shoreline Hwy., Muir Beach. 10am. $25–$30, with family discounts. 415.381.6155.

N A PA

Pedal Pushers What’s a city to do when there’s a large, empty building that’s been closed for almost four years? Hold a bike fest in it! This weekend, the former COPIA center site plays host to the first annual Napa Bike Fest, a celebration for all types of cycling enthusiasts. With three different bike rides for different ability levels, everyone will have a chance to ride. After a cruise around town, there’ll also be a BMX bike show, bike movies, live music, food and even a swap meet to sell or exchange bikes or bike parts. It may seem like a small silver lining to COPIA’s bankruptcy—or more like silver spokes—on Saturday, April 28, at the former COPIA Center. 500 First St., Napa. 9am. Free.

—Jennifer Cuddy

BATS IN THE BARN Fruit Bats play Gundlach Bundschu winery April 28. See Concerts, p31.


SETTING SON Ziggy Marley on his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legacy: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Not everything beneďŹ cial is material, physical, money. You understand?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Lively Up Himself Ziggy Marley discusses new â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Marleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; documentary Ë&#x153; BY JACQUELYNNE OCANA

W

hen Ziggy Marley walks into the room, his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence takes over. Waist-length dreadlocks are wrapped up in a handcrocheted beanie. He wears the same kind of ďŹ tted jean shirt his father made sexy in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s, and the laces of his scuffed leather boots are untied.

Settling in, he opens a copy of last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bohemian, noticing his son Daniel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bambaataaâ&#x20AC;? Marleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show that evening in Petaluma. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aaah, I wish him a good gig, that Bam Bam,â&#x20AC;? he says. Ziggy has the same soft demeanor youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see in interviews with Bob Marley, amusement shifting his gaze away in thought as he waits patiently for questions he hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t already answered before. As executive producer for Marley, the full-length documentary on his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life, Ziggy is the acting ambassador for the

family during the release of the ďŹ lm. When Shangri-La Entertainment owner Steve Bing bought the rights to use Bob Marleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music for a ďŹ lm in 2006, he ďŹ rst talked to Martin Scorsese as director, then Jonathan Demme. Three years later, ďŹ lmmaker Kevin Macdonald (The Last King of Scotland) came on board, but the window of opportunity was short: Bing had only bought the rights for ďŹ ve years, at a reported $1.5 million for 50 songs. (The ďŹ lm uses only one song twiceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Selassie Is the Chapelâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

when Rastafarian emperor Haile Selassie arrives in Jamaica and again as thousands of people line Marleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funeral procession.) Macdonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision for the ďŹ lm was a straightforward account of Marleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life from birth to death. Before ďŹ nally cutting the ďŹ lm down to two and a half hours, he had interviewed 90 people. Along with reggae star Jimmy Cliff, associate producer and Marley band mate Neville â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bunny Wailerâ&#x20AC;? Livingston is the resident storyteller. Between accounts of the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early days, Bunny makes clear that none of the Wailers was happy with the inďŹ&#x201A;uence Island Records founder Chris Blackwell exercised over the band. Referring to his â&#x20AC;&#x153;exploitiveâ&#x20AC;? touring practices, Bunny says Blackwell took Bob away from Jamaica. Audio clips reveal Peter Tosh occasionally referring to Blackwell as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whitewellâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whiteworst.â&#x20AC;? The ďŹ lm is not, however, about hashing out opinions as to why Bob Marley guided the band and, ultimately, his own life down the path he chose. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t about representing all sides. It was about representing Bob,â&#x20AC;? says Ziggy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hopefully, it will give people a better understanding of him. Maybe an individual might listen to a song and because they saw the ďŹ lm they understand it deeper, what heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talking about and what it means.â&#x20AC;? (Listening to the backstory of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cornerstone,â&#x20AC;? for example, will sink the heart of any Marley fan.) Although the ďŹ lm is about one man, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impossible to separate Marleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unifying music from his home county. On the April 20 premiere of Marley, the mayor of Kingston, Jamaica, offered a free public screening in Emancipation Park. Celebrating Jamaicaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50th anniversary, it was meant to unite Jamaicans and Rastafarians under the spirit of a national ) 26 icon. Someone thought it

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Marley ( 25

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clever to switch out the red carpet for a thoroughfare laid in red, gold and green, but Rastas protested the disrespectful treading on a symbol of faith. Condemnations of â&#x20AC;&#x153;How can you walk on the Rasta ďŹ&#x201A;ag? Fire ďŹ dat!â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;A idiot ting dis!â&#x20AC;? caused such a scene that staff had to present the Marley family to the press via the backstage entrance. Director Kevin Macdonald refers to Bob Marley as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the only Third World superstar,â&#x20AC;? bringing the island nation to the forefront of world music. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Africa, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been thinking about,â&#x20AC;? says Ziggy, on presenting the ďŹ lm around the globe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are going to be looking into Africa. After the excitement, then we can head to Africa.â&#x20AC;? ReďŹ&#x201A;ecting on his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legacy in Jamaica, Ziggy continues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the most important things we can do, in terms of the Third World, to affect them is education. Know your history, know your roots, have pride in what is the past and understand what has been before you. This ďŹ lm plays that role. Making sure the next generation of youths in school will have an understanding of this great hero of the world who comes from Jamaica, who comes from a Third World country. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll show that it is possible, with hard work, what Bob has done. We all can do that because not everything beneďŹ cial is material, physical, money. You understand? Some things are mental and spiritual.â&#x20AC;? Ziggy once told PBS, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The last thing my father told me was, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;On your way up, take me up. On your way down, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let me down.â&#x20AC;? At this point in the interview, Ziggy ďŹ nally steps away from saying â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When my father said that, it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t strike me, but as I grew up I actually grew into that without even having it on my mind. It just happened naturally for me, trying to keep all the things we do in perspective with my father. All the opportunities to monetize him, trying to make sure we are not selling out. On the same level, children reďŹ&#x201A;ect their parents, so if me as a son of my father is a good person, then it reďŹ&#x201A;ects good on my father.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Marleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is in theaters now.


The brainchild of Roger Bean, the popular off-Broadway jukebox musical just opened a fourweekend run at Santa Rosa’s Sixth Street Playhouse. As blasts from the past go, this wistful romp

‘The Marvelous Wonderettes’ runs Thursday–Sunday through May 13 at Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Show times vary. $15–$28. 707.523.4185.

Eric Chazankin

ome animals are instinctually wired for certain behaviors—to be aggressive, to be stealthy, to hunt in packs and hang upside down in the dark. We human animals, in a similar way, are wired for nostalgia, a weird sentimental longing to think about our past, to recall some place we once knew or some style of music with which we once had pleasant personal associations. It is to address such nostalgic urges that shows like The Marvelous Wonderettes are created.

BUBBLEGUM Julianne Lorenzen is Suzy in the fun-loving ‘Wonderettes.’

PopRocks ‘Wonderettes’ a tuneful trip to the ’50s and ’60s BY DAVID TEMPLETON

S

27 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Stage

through the radio hits of the ’50s and ’60s couldn’t be much blastier. Wisely putting its emphasis on the music rather than the plot (there really isn’t one), director Craig Miller, working with musical director Janis Dunston Wilson, honors the spirit of the music by casting four leading ladies who really know how to sing these tunes. Betty Jean (Shari Hopkinson), Suzy (Julianne Lorenzen), Cindy Lou (Ashley Rose McKenna) and Missy (Katie Veale) are high school seniors, best friends whose bond begins to break as they form a one-night-only girl group to entertain at their 1958 senior prom. Inside Springfield High’s decked-out gymnasium (with a detailed set by Michael Carnahan), playfully outfitted in color-coded dresses (great costumes by Tracy Hinman Sigrist), the Wonderettes gradually reveal romantic rivalries and secret crushes, all of them coming to a boil as the girlish foursome mix pop-rock hits like “Mr. Sandman” and “Goodnight, Sweetheart, Goodnight” with such semi-forgotten tunes as “Born Too Late” and “Lucky Lips.” Between the songs, there are audienceparticipation bits and some groaninducing gags, many straying toward the giddily juvenile (guess what the acronym for “Springfield High Is Terrific” ends up spelling?). After the intermission, the action jumps 10 years ahead to 1968, resuming at the class of ’58’s 10-year reunion, where the stillsplintered Wonderettes—one of them extremely pregnant—have reluctantly reformed the group, now taking on hits like “Respect,” “Leader of the Pack” and “Son of a Preacher Man.” In an oddly surreal turn, the songs now mirror each member’s life over the last decade. The Marvelous Wonderettes, as a play, is as slight and fluffy as they come. Its chief strength is the nostalgic hit one gets from those songs, sung with spirit and charm by a cast that truly understands what makes them so much fun.

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28

Film

THE RIGHT TROUSERS The ‘Wallace & Gromit’ team finds treasure on the high seas.

How Arrr You?

‘The Pirates’ transcends matey overload BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

H

asn’t the world suffered enough pirates? In one of the best jokes in The Pirates! Band of Misfits, a crewmember observes, “You can’t just say ‘arrr’ and make everything better.” Yet the new film from Aardman Animations (Wallace & Gromit) is sweet, winning and delightfully funny. It relates the saga of an indifferently able pirate and his crew, including all due adventures (sword fights, chases, last-minute rescues from the chopping block) and voice work by Hugh Grant and Salma Hayek. On the phone with producer and co-director Peter Lord, we talk about pirate-movie overload. “We were concerned about those other pirates spoiling the marketplace for us,” he said, “but our approach was completely different. We started from a whole different place. If we refer to anything, it is to the classic pirate movies, such as Treasure Island or the Burt Lancaster film The Crimson Pirate.” Pirates did not come easy. “People ask how long a film takes,” Lord says. “Whenever I answer, there are gasps of horror and astonishment. All animated films take about five years.” All worth it, perhaps, to instruct growing children in the story of Queen Victoria’s secret life as a ninja. “It’s likely the most historically inaccurate film ever made,” Lord jokes. “It’s magnificently wrong—in one scene we have Jane Austen and the Elephant Man together. She died 50 years before Mr. Merrick was born. Napoleon is sitting side by side with Queen Victoria.” Among the dunce-capped history here is the presence of Polly, the dodo—and the last of these birds had died more than 150 years before the film is set. How does one animate them? “It’s surprisingly easy,” Lord says. “She’s about the size of a squash ball. Big wide hips, very short legs, a very amusing sort of swingingbutt walk, big wide eyes, a little sensitive smile on the beak.” Such subtle glimpses, such increments, are Aardman’s specialty, and once again they’ve come up with treasure. ‘The Pirates! Band of Misfits’ opens in wide release on Friday, April 27.


Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Bully (PG-13; 98 min.) Filmmaker Lee Hirsch looks at the extent of bullying in American schools in his new documentary. (GB)

The Five-Year Engagement (R; 124 min.) Jason Segel and Emily Blunt co-star in romcom about a couple whose relationship suffers after their wedding is endlessly postponed. Directed by Nicholas Stoller (Forgetting Sarah Marshall) and produced by Judd Apatow (Bridesmaids). (GB)

Marley (PG-13; 144 min.) Bio-doc from Kevin MacDonald (Last King of Scotland) on the life of reggae legend Bob Marley features interviews with Marley’s family and top reggae artists. See Arts, p25.

The Pirates! Band of Misfits (PG; 88 min.) Aardman Animations (Chicken Run, Wallace & Gromit) returns with feature based on books by British author Gideon Defoe. With the voices of Hugh Grant, Salma Hayek and Jeremy Piven. See review, adjacent page. Safe (R; 94 min.) Jason Statham does that thing he does in thriller about an ex–cage fighter (!) who comes to the aid of a girl sought by the Russian mob for a code locked in her memory. (GB)

ALSO PLAYING American Reunion (R; 115 min.) Fourth in the original American Pie series sends the original cast back to Michigan for their 10-year high school reunion. (GB)

The Cabin in the Woods (R; 105 min.) Director Drew Goddard and Joss Whedon aim to return quality chills to the horror genre in film about a group of friends vacationing in a remote cabin. Nifty movie poster. (GB)

Chimpanzee (G; 78 min.) Disneynature’s fourth original documentary follows an abandoned chimp and his adoption by a new mother in Africa’s Ivory Coast jungle. Coproduced by the Jane Goodall Institute and narrated by Tim Allen. (GB) Damsels in Distress (PG-13; 99 min.) Three friends at a college dominated by men set out to change the school’s environment. Directed by Whit Stillman (The Last Days of Disco). (GB)

The Deep Blue Sea (R; 98 min.) Rachel Wiesz stars as the wife of a prominent judge who leaves her marriage for an ex-RAF pilot in drama set in 1950s postwar Britain. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB)

The Hunger Games (PG-13; 142 min.) Droolingly anticipated adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ bestselling young adult novel about

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Film

29 a dystopian future where teens kill teens in annual rated-PG-13 bloodsports. (GB)

In Darkness (NR; 144 min.) In Nazi-occupied Poland, a sewer worker helps hide a group of Jews in the city’s tunnels. In Polish with English subtitles. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB)

The Island President (NR; 101 min.) When climate change threatens a three-foot rise in sea level that would render the Maldives uninhabitable, President Mohamed Nasheen develops a plan in his first year in office to make the islands completely carbon-neutral. From Bay Area documentary filmmaker Jon Shenk. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB) Jiro Dreams of Sushi (NR; 81 min.) An inside look at top Michelin-rated sushi restaurant Sukiyabashi Jiro, in Tokyo, and the chef who founded it. (GB)

The Kid with a Bike (NR; 87 min.) Belgian drama about an abandoned boy who latches on to a woman he meets at a doctor’s office. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB)

Lockout (PG-13; 110 min.) A government agent (Guy Pearce) falsely accused of espionage is offered amnesty if he can rescue the president’s daughter from a space prison that’s fallen to the inmates. Screenplay by Luc Besson (Nikita, The Fifth Element). (GB) The Lucky One (PG-13; 101 min.) After returning from Iraq, a soldier searches for the unknown woman whose photograph gave him hope and courage. Based on the Nicholas Sparks’ novel. (GB) Mirror Mirror (PG; 106 min.) Tarsem Singh (The Cell, The Fall) directs live-action adaptation of Snow White tale starring Julia Roberts as the evil queen. With Sean Bean, and Lily Collins as Snow White. (GB)

4/27 4 / 27 – 5/3 5/3

Deep D eep Blue Blue S Sea ea NR

(10:45, (10 : 45, 1:00, 1: 00, 44:00) : 00 ) 7:00, 7: 00, 9:15 9 :15

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The T he IIsland sland P President resident

111 min.) Ewan McGregor plays a fisheries expert who helps realize a sheik’s dream of creating a river for fly-fishing in the desert. With Emily Blunt and Kristin Scott-Thomas. (GB)

(1 0 : 30, 12:45, 12: 45, 3:15, 3 :15, 5:30) 5 : 30 ) 7:30, 7: 30, 9:30 9 : 30 (10:30,

The Salt of Life (NR; 90 min.) Retired, 60year-old Gianni takes the advice of a friend and searches for a young mistress in Italian comedy from the director of Mid-August Lunch. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB)

Think Like a Man (PG-13; 120 min.) After learning their wives are soaking up the advice in Steve Harvey’s real-life self-help book Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man, four men try to turn the tables on their mates. From director Tim Story (Barbershop). (GB)

The Three Stooges (PG-13; 85 min.) The Farrelly brothers bring the classic trio to the big screen in an original story starring Chris Diamantopoulos as Moe, Will & Grace’s Sean Hayes as Larry and Mad TV’s Will Sasso as Curly. (GB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES

SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

PPGG (11:00, (11: 00, 1:15, 1:15, 3:30) 3 : 30 ) 6:45, 6 : 45, 9:00 9 : 00

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5 51 Summerfield 551 Summer field Road Road Santa Rosa S an t a R osa 707-522-0719 707- 52 2- 0719


Music

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30

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shows turn awkwardness into art.

Ramblinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; On & On Ask Yo La Tengo anythingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;really BY LEILANI CLARK

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onâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bother shouting out â&#x20AC;&#x153;Speeding Motorcycle!â&#x20AC;? when Yo La Tengo play the Mystic Theatre on May 2. Though their appearance is billed as â&#x20AC;&#x153;freewheeling,â&#x20AC;? itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a request show, says multi-instrumentalist James McNew, who joined the endearing indie rock band in 1991 alongside Hoboken, N.J.â&#x20AC;&#x201C;based husband-andwife team Ira Kaplan and Georgia Hubley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of an acoustic show, but mostly itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a question-and-answer show,â&#x20AC;? says McNew by phone from Brooklyn. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The only thing we plan is what song weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll open with.â&#x20AC;? Freedom and spontaneity take over after that, with the band ďŹ elding questions from the audience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll just sit there and stare at you until somebody asks a

question,â&#x20AC;? says McNew. Nothingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s off limits, though the band might not answer everything in a completely forthcoming wayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and then, he says, the songs will start. If asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What kind of car do you drive?â&#x20AC;? they might play an autorelated song (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Today Is the Day,â&#x20AC;? perhaps? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little Hondaâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ed.)); if asked where they stay while on the road, they might play one of their many covers (â&#x20AC;&#x153;A House Is Not a Motelâ&#x20AC;? from Loveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Forever Changes, or their own â&#x20AC;&#x153;From a Motel 6,â&#x20AC;? perhaps?). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the kind of musical stunt thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appreciated in these dark days when a lot of bands can barely squeeze out a â&#x20AC;&#x153;thank youâ&#x20AC;? to the crowd, much less meaningful interaction. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel that it brings everyone closer,â&#x20AC;? says McNew, not a trace of sarcasm in his voice. Yo La Tangoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;freewheelingâ&#x20AC;? set has been done before, most notably overseas, including a Barcelona show translated by famed Spanish music journalist Ignacio Julia. It was one of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;weirdest, most fun shows weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever done,â&#x20AC;? says McNew. What does the band talk about when thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no audience around? After our interview, Yo La Tengoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practice starts in a couple of hours; McNew says that he, Hubley and Kaplan will probably chat about the Knicks and last nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amazing Aislers Set show. Then theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get working on a score for ďŹ lmmaker Sam Greenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller, which the band performs at the premiere on May 1 at SFMOMA. In true freewheeling style, what happens at a YLT practice depends on what they feel like doing, for the most partâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the perk of 20-plus years of adventurous, thoughtful musicology. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes we just get together to mess around,â&#x20AC;? says McNew, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and sometimes we get together because we like it and we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have anything else to do, but really, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always something to work on.â&#x20AC;? Yo La Tengo improv the hell out of it on Wednesday, May 2, at the Mystic Theatre (21 Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma; 8pm; $21; 707.765.2121) and in a free afternoon in-store at the Last Record Store (1899-A Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa; 2:30pm; free; 707.525.1963).


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Blue Note Collective Featuring Pete Estabrook on trumpet, Jordan Wardlaw on sax and others. Apr 29, 4pm. $20. Occidental Center for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Surrender to Love This “evening of musical blessings” features Melissa Phillippe and Z Egloff, the former of whom was apparently once called “Bonnie Raitt meets God.” Apr 27, 7pm. $20-$25. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8280 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

NAPA COUNTY

Dmitri Matheny Group

Chris Isaak

Lauded flugelhornist Dmitri Matheny performs with Dave Ellis on tenor sax, Matt Clark on piano, Seward McCain on bass and Deszon Claiborne on drums. Apr 28, 7:30pm. $25. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

‘Blue Velvet’-featured songwriter appears with Nick Isaak. Apr 27, 7pm. $75-$90. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Fruit Bats Night of music in the old redwood barn also features Gold Leaves and Garrett Pierce. Apr 28, 7pm. $15. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Harvey Mandel Eclectic guitarist plays 21-andover show. Apr 28, 9pm. $20. River Theatre, 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Kenny Rogers Pop-country legend of “Islands in the Stream,” “The Gambler,” “We’ve Got Tonight,” more. Apr 28, 8pm. $45-$85. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Apr 27, the Creak. Apr 28, Edge of Town Band. Apr 29, Gold Coast. Last Thursday of every month, live improv with Slip-Goose Monkey (see Comedy). 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Apr 26, Misner and Smith with Melody Walker and Jacob Groopman. Apr 27, Sycamore Slough String Band and Grandpa Banana’s Band. Apr 28, LoCura. Apr 29, Irish Seisun with Riggy Rackin.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Coffee Catz Mon, 6pm, open mic. Thurs, Science Buzz Cafe (see Lectures). Sat, 2pm, Bluegrass jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Doc Holliday’s Saloon Apr 27, Terry Sanders & the Black Market Blues. Apr 28, Benni Boom Presents. Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 138 Calistoga Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.623.5453.

Flamingo Lounge Apr 27, Opening Night Band. Apr 28, Groove Foundation. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Apr 27, Haute Flash Quartet. Apr 28, Honey B & the Pollinators. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden Apr 27, Julie Chasen and friends. Apr 27, Robin Rogers’ Circle of Friends. Apr 28, One Dollar Tacos. Apr 30, Neil Buckley Octet. Tues, Jim Adams. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Gundlach Bundschu Winery

FEATURING NEA JAZZ MASTERS

ROY HAYNES SHEILA JORDAN KENNY BURRELL

PLUS: Vijay Iyer | Freddy Cole | Michele Rosewoman Calvin Keys | Julian Priester | Shotgun Wedding Mal Sharpe | Lorca Hart | Billy Hart | Andy McKee & MORE!

CHALK HILL ESTATE RODNEY STRONG VINEYARDS THE HEALDSBURG TRIBUNE RANCH7 CREATIVE

$5 Discount at Box Office with Ad or Online CODE #1244175

Apr 28, Fruit Bats with Gold Leaves and Garrett Pierce. 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Hopmonk Tavern Apr 25, Michelle Shocked’s 2012 Roadworks ) Tour: Roccupy.

32

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim Book by Hugh Wheeler From an Adaptation by Christopher Bond

April 20, 21, 26, 27, 28, May 3, 4, 5 at 8:00 PM April 21, 22, 28, 29, May 5 at 2:00 PM SRJC Burbank Auditorium, 1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa, CA Buy Tickets Online: www.santarosa.edu/theatrearts Box Office: 707.527.4343 RECOMMENDED FOR AGE 18 AND ABOVE. CONTAINS STRONG LANGUAGE, ADULT CONTENT, AND VIOLENCE

KENNY, GEE Former fried-chicken magnate Kenny Rogers sings of love, islands,

holding, folding and more on April 29 at the Wells Fargo Center. See Concerts, above.

SWEENEY TODD is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Phone: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684 www.MTIShows.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

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755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.


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Apr 27, Ser La Muse. Apr 28, Baby Seal Club. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Apr 28, Jimmy Gallagher Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apr 25, Brainstorm with Freddy Todd. Apr 27, Beat Buffet with Donysjs Take Over. Last Saturday of every month, Good Hip-Hop. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Last Day Saloon Apr 25, Jenn Rawling and Basho Parks. Apr 27, KC Mosso Presents DJ WorryKnot, DJ Paul Timberman and Frankie Boots Band. Apr 28, Daniel Castro Band with Dangerous Beauties. Mon, karaoke. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pick-Me-Up Revue. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Apr 25, Gwen Sugarmama Avery. Apr 26, Susan Sutton. Apr 27, Bruce Halbohm and Blue Jazz. Apr 28, Yancie Taylor & the Jazz Doctor Trio. Apr 30, Awesome Opossums. May 1, Maple Profant. Sun, Kit Mariahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open mic. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

MOONLIGHT M OONLIGHT BREWING BREWIN NG

AN EVENING WITH

.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

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CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE Hilary Hulteen

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

32

Apr 26, Jaydub and Dino. Apr 27, Joyride. Apr 28, High Country. Apr 29, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Every other Monday, knitting night. Wed, 7:30pm, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

North Light Books & Cafe Apr 26, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Thurs, 5:30pm, open mic. 550 E Cotati Ave, Cotati. 707.792.4300.

Northwood Restaurant Thurs, 7pm,Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

Phoenix Theater Apr 27, John Beaver with RossFM and Orionz. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Mas Bicicletas Rupa and the April Fishes, touring by bike With all the heavy loading, road travel, staying up late and waking up earlyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;only to do it all again the next dayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;touring with a band is hard enough. Doing it by bicycle? Impossible! Not so, says globally inclined San Francisco band Rupa and the April Fishes. To prove it, the Roma-French-Hindu-Latin fusion band fronted by physician-by-day Rupa embarks on the 10-stop Bay Rising Tour this week, which has them biking around a 200-mile radius. The tour is almost entirely human-powered; a bike-powered sound system will keep the band amplified at shows. (Lucky volunteer pedalers from the audience provide the leg muscle.) Interested cyclists are also welcome to ride alongside the band members as they bike from stop to stop, all part of their desire to â&#x20AC;&#x153;learn about the dynamics of the San Francisco Bay bioregion in an adventurous, sociable and direct way.â&#x20AC;? In addition to playing at a local workerowned cooperative, the band makes a stop at San Quentin, where theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll sing for inmates. With Rupa and the April Fishesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; frenetic, political, party jazz style, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take a lot of pedal and people power to keep up. The Bay Rising Tour rolls up on Thursday, April 26, in the plaza in front of Arizmendi Bakery (1002 Court St., San Rafael; 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm; 415.456.4093) and on Thursday, April 26, at the Sausalito Seahorse (305 Harbor Drive, Sausalito; 9pm; 415.331.2899).â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark

Redwood Cafe Apr 28, Midnight Sun Massive. Tues, 6:30pm, SSU night open mic and poetry reading. Thurs, 7:30pm, open mic. Fourth Friday of every month, Full Steem. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

River Theatre Apr 28, Harvey Mandel. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted

by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Society: Culture House Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta.


Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apr 28, Blue Rock Country Club. Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Tradewinds Apr 25, Counter Culture. Apr 27, Purple Haze. Apr 28, Levi Lloyd and the 501 Band. Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

MARIN COUNTY Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Apr 27, Pop Fiction. Apr 28, Sila, DJ Azrec Parrot and Funk on the Bottom. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Ghiringhelli Pizzeria Apr 27, Synergy with Counter Culture. 1535 South Novato Blvd, Novato. 415.878.4977.

19 Broadway Club Apr 25, Gail â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Mojoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Blues Band. Apr 27, Grateful Dead Tribute with Front Street Band. Apr 29, Trainwreck. May 2, Honey Cooler. Fourth Thursday of every month, Jeremy Knudsen presents Fourth Thursday Hip-Hop Night. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

142 Throckmorton Theatre Apr 28, Crazy in Love tribute to Patsy Cline with Lavay Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Osteria Divino Apr 25, JP Buongiorno. Apr 26, Tango #9. Apr 27, Passion Habanera. Apr 28, Tomoko Funaki Trio. Apr 29, Duo Gadjo. 27 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Nickel Rose Mon, Wed-Sun, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Apr 25, Thrust in the Meters. Apr 27, Swamp Thang. Apr 28, Swoop Unit with the Mission Players.

Apr 28, 9pm, Swoop Unit with the Mission Players. Apr 29, Slowpoke. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910. Apr 25, Marcelo and Seth. Apr 26, Donna Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Acuti. Apr 26, Donna Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Acuti. Apr 27, Rupa and April Fishes. Apr 28, Will Magid. Apr 29, Paâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Bailador. Apr 30, Benefit for Baby Vinnie. May 1, Noel Jewkes. Mon, local talent onstage. Tues, jazz jam. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Progressive Swedish black metal band co-headlines with the epic outfit Mastodon. Apr 27 at the Fox Theater.

Concert for Ronnie Montrose Tribute with Sammy Hagar, Joe Satriani, Neal Schon and others from late guitaristâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. Apr 27 at Regency Ballroom.

Three Six MaďŹ a Academy Award-winning MCs play with Oaklandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enjoyably off-kilter Main Attrakionz. Apr 28 at Mezzanine.

ShaďŹ q Husayn The secret weapon of the Los Angeles hip-hop underground. Apr 29 at the New Parish.

Tennis

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Apr 25, Tom Finch Student Showcase. Apr 26, John Varn and friends. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Sat, 2pm, juke jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

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Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apr 26, Matt Bolton. Apr 27, Endoxi. Apr 28, Savannah Blue. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

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Apr 26, Kristin Van Dyke Band. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

33

Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, oldschool DJ night. Sat, DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Napa Valley Opera House Apr 25, Montreal and California Guitar Trio. May 2, Ronchin Jazz Band. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Rainbow Room Fri, Sat, 10pm, DJ dancing. Sun, salsa Sundays. 806 Fourth St, Napa. 707.252.4471.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apr 25, Giants of Jazz. Apr 28, Katie Cat and Cain. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Breezy 1980s-tinged pop band from Denver recently signed to Fat Possum Records. Apr 30 at the Independent.

Uptown Theatre

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Uva Trattoria

Apr 27, Chris Isaak. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123. Wed, Gentlemen of Jazz. Sun, James and Ted. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Reservations Advised

DIN N E R & A SHOW

THE JESSE BREWSTER BAND Apr 27 Original Rock, Americana, Alt-Country ncho Fri

8:30pm

VOLKER STRIFLER BAND Apr 28 Original Blues and More Sat

Sun

Ra Debut!

8:30pm

2 Apr 29 WTJ FEATURING WENDY FITZ

5:00pm / No Cover

STEFANIE KEYS May 4 Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Originals/Americana Fri

8:30pm

THE TICKETS BAND May 5 Cinco de Mayo Party! Sat

8:30pm

FOXES IN THE HENHOUSE cho May 6 Foxy Four-Part Harmonies Ran t! Sun

5:00pm / No Cover

Debu

THE FABULOUS BUD E LUV May 11 Why Go to Vegas When You Can Come to Nicasio! Fri

8:30pm

GATOR BEAT May 12 The Band with a Beat that Bites Sat

8:30pm

Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Brunch Buffet

 SUNDAY, MAY 13 â&#x20AC;˘ 10AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3PM  ALSO SERVING MOTHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY DINNER â&#x20AC;˘ 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8PM

BIG SANDY & HIS FLY-RITE BOYS May 18 Western Swing, Rockabilly, & Traditional Country Fri

8:30pm

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

GATOR BEAT Saturday, April 28

Wed, Apr 25 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Apr 26 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7am; 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Dance Club Fri, Apr 27 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm DJ Steve Luther hosts MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;N ROLL Sat, Apr 28 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9am; 9:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:15am Jazzercise 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:30pm SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE with Gary Thomas 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm DJ Steve Luther hosts GATOR BEAT Sun, Apr 29 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:30am Zumba Gold with Toning 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Apr 30 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, May 1 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7am; 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Fourth Friday of every month, Kaleidoscope. Live art and DJs. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

34

Arts Events OPENINGS Apr 27 At 5pm. Gallery One, “Petaluma’s Heritage” features work by Katherine Austin, Robin Burgert and Jonnie Russell. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277

Apr 28 11am to 5pm. Issaquah Dock, Sausalito’s floating homes community presents “Artists of Issaquah,” featuring local art in a variety of mediums. Waldo Point Harbor, Harbor Drive, Sausalito.

May 1 At 6pm. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, work by expressionist painters, photographers and sculptors. 616Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

Apr 26 9:30am to 4pm. Outdoor Art Club, “Gardens Art and Architecture,” features Mill Valley properties transformed into art. $35-$45. 1 W Blithedale Ave, Mill Valley.

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery Through May 20, “100 Years of Bay Area Art,” featuring local art from 1910-2010. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Gallery One Through Jun 2, “Petaluma’s Heritage” features work by Katherine Austin, Robin Burgert and Jonnie Russell. Reception, Apr 27 at 5pm. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery Through May 27, “Inverness” featuring the impressionist work of Jill Keller-Peters. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through May 31, “Mediterranean Visions,” exhibit features the collaborative work of Robyn Spencer-Crompton, Peter Crompton and Francesco Cafiso. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through May 6, “Laughing Matters,” featuring works centering on theme of laughter. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Local Color Gallery May 1-Jun 4, “Through the Lens,” featuring photography of Mike Shoys, John Hershey and Tom Moyer. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

Petaluma Arts Center Through May 28, “A Culture Within: The Japanese American Experience through Art,” featuring the works of Henry Sugimoto. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Phantom IV Gallery Through Apr 29, “Bohemia Ranch Waterfalls Vernissage,” featuring new paintings and lithographs by Ryan Douglas and William Wheeler. 9077 Windsor Rd, Windsor. 707.527.5447.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through May 20, “Beyond Words: New Portraits and Places,” by Kai SamuelsDavis. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through May 5, “Showin’ on the River,” juried photography exhibit. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Gallery Apr 29-Jun 23, “The Artist’s Search,” features the art of James Reynolds. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Jun 10, “Color Theory: The Use of Color in

Contemporary Art,” featuring work of nine artists from across the country. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

University Art Gallery Through May 12, “BFA Exhibition 2012,” featuring work of 13 graduating students. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY Book Passage Through May 31, Paintings and drawings by Susan Hall. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Claudia Chapline Gallery Through Jun 5, Farmart exhibit, featuring the works of Tamae Agnoli and others. 3445 Shoreline Hwy, Stinson Beach. Hours: Sat-Sun, noon to 5, and by appointment. 415.868.2308.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through May 26, Annual juried exhibit features variety of artwork in all media. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Route One Through May 13, “Emergences,” featuring the art of Mimi Abers. Through May 13, “A Traves de Neustros Ojos,” the Latino photography project featuring Gisela Alvarado, Ariana Aparicio and Mario Garcia. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Issaquah Dock Apr 28, 11am-5pm, Sausalito’s floating homes community presents “Artists of Issaquah,” featuring local art in a variety of mediums. Waldo Point Harbor, Harbor Drive, Sausalito.

Marin Community Foundation Through May 31, “Muslim Eyes,” featuring religions and secular art by 35 Muslim artists. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin History Museum Through Sep 1, “The Golden Gate Bridge, an Icon That Changed the World,” historical exhibit. Boyd Gate House,


CRITIC’S CHOICE

Can you build a working boat in three hours? Not only do entrants in the Bodega Bay Wooden Boat Challenge have to build their own sea-craft in three hours using only nonpower tools, they have to sail it, too. This potentially wet-and-wild coastal tradition is part of the annual Fisherman’s Fest, stretching back 39 years in Bodega Bay. Teams consisting of four members or fewer are given a slim assortment of lumber, screws, caulking and duct tape and, between 10am and 1pm, left to build a boat that hopefully will not sink. But not everyone can whip up a watertight vessel in one morning, as video footage from the event’s website clearly shows. When the dozens of hand-built ships finally enter the bay to be raced, some capsize right away. For the ones that sink slowly, a CHP helicopter is on scene to rescue waterlogged boaters who have managed to paddle themselves farther out to sea. Without motors and with hand-made oars, successful contestants race and return to land unsoaked, knowing they’ve braved the salty expanse in something that, only a few hours before, was nothing but a pile of wood and tape. The Bodega Bay Fisherman’s Festival runs Saturday–Sunday, April 28–29, at Westside Park in Bodega Bay. Wooden Boat Challenge begins on Saturday at 10am; race at 1:30pm. Other events include an art show, boat parade, live music and more. For more information, see www.bbfishfest.org. —Rachel Dovey

1125 B St, San Rafael. Tues-Fri, plus second and third Sat monthly, 11 to 4. 415.454.8538.

Marin MOCA Through May 26, “Altered Books,” showcases the work of 150 Bay Area artists who

re-imagine, reconstruct and rework old, discarded books. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Apr 28, “Open Craft

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Apr 26, “Photo Phantasies,” featuring photos of the strange, unfamiliar and unexpected. May 1-31, Marin Open Studios at O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, featuring work by expressionist painters, photographers and sculptors. Reception, May 1 at 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Outdoor Art Club Apr 26, 9:30am-4pm, “Gardens Art and Architecture,” features Mill Valley properties transformed into decorative art. $35-$45. 1 W Blithedale Ave, Mill Valley.

Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Stand Up Comedy Night Night of laughs features Dave Burleigh and Deb Campo. Apr 26, 8pm. $20. Las Guitarras, 1017 Reichert Avenue, Novato. 415.892.3171.

Dance Sonoma State University Through Apr 28, Four contemporary dance pieces and the talents of 30 dancers featured in dance concert. Various dates and times. $9$16. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park 707.664.2880

Events

NAPA COUNTY Di Rosa Through Jun 10, new work by Hung Liu. $10. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Gordon Huether Gallery Ongoing, round two of “Art on F1RST.” Evolving exhibition of Gordon Huether’s fine art. 1465 First Street, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Hess Collection Winery Ongoing, outstanding private collection featuring work by Franz Gertsch, Robert Motherwell and other modern masters. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. Daily, 10 to 5:15. 707.255.1144.

Napa Valley Museum Through Apr 29, “Mozart’s Muses,” featuring the artistry of costumes from the San Francisco Opera’s productions of Mozart’s operas. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Yo El Rey Roasting Current show, “Myanmar Photography Journey,” images from Burma. 1217 Washington St, Calistoga. 707.942.1180.

Comedy Craig Ferguson Host of “The Late, Late Show” on CBS appears in stand-up form. Apr 25, 8pm. $50-$65.

Spring Fling Ranch’s popular event celebrates spring on the farm with live, kid-friendly music, local organic cuisine, and hands-on farm and craft activities. Apr 28, 10am-4pm. $25-$95. Slide Ranch, 2025 Shoreline Hwy, Muir Beach. 415.381.6155.

Totally Tomatoes Workshop Accompanied by spring plant sale, this workshop focuses on growing the best tasting and most productive tomatoes in Sonoma, including which heirloom varieties to plant in local climate. Apr 28, 10am-12pm. Sonoma Ecology Center, 20 E Spain St, Sonoma. 707.996.0712.

Field Trips

Fisherman’s Festival Celebrate 200 years of history and participate in two-day festival filled with fish and chips, music and a wooden boat building and sailing contest. Apr 28-29, 10am-5pm. Westside Park, Westshore Road, Bodega Bay.

Nestward Migration

Fundraiser for Healdsburg Animal Shelter

Star Party

Three Sonoma County craftswomen stage a one-day show and sale, with a portion of the proceeds going to local animals. Apr 28, 10am-3pm. Free. Dragonfly Farm, 425 Westside Rd, Healdsburg.

Napa Bike Fest Napa Bike offers bike swap meet, bike films, road rides, food and drinks. Apr 28, 9am6pm Free. Downtown Napa, First Street and Town Center, Napa. www.napabike.org.

Native Words, Native Warriors Developed by the Smithsonian, this unique exhibit tells remarkable story of soldiers from more than a dozen tribes who used their Native languages while in service in the U.S. military. Through Jul 1. Petaluma Historical Museum and Library, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Docent-led walks to the nesting colony at Delta Pond take place between 7:45 and 9:15am. Apr 28. $10. Laguna Foundation, 50 Old Courthouse Square, Ste 609, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277. Observatory’s three main telescopes plus many additional telescopes open for viewing. Apr 28, 9pm. $11. Robert Ferguson Observatory, Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.6979.

Film Into the Forbidden Zone Author Sebastian Junger and photographer Reza enter a modern day Armageddon in war-torn Afghanistan. May 1, 6pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Seldom Seen Flicks Classic, rarely seen films and documentaries. Apr 24 at 7pm, “San Francisco.” Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Shop Party

Tiburon International Film Festival

Local craft fair with live music and art. Apr 29, 11am5pm. $2. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Eleventh annual festival shines the spotlight on Spanish cinema. For complete lineup of films and panels, visit TiburonFilmFestival.com.

Through Apr 27. Playhouse Theater, 40 Main Street, Tiburon. 415.381.4123.

Transformation: The Life & Legacy of Werner Erhard Film presentation and discussion with Bob Flax on EST founder. Apr 26, 7:159:15pm $7-$10. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8280 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Youth Film Festival Five youth from Sonoma County participating in festival for youngsters include Amy West, Jaycob Bellochio and others. Apr 29, 11am. $10. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Food & Drink Hall Cabernet Cookoff Professional chef contestants vie for you vote as the best pairing with Hall Cabernet Sauvignon. First- and secondplace teams get cash donation for local charity. Apr 28, 11am. $48-$60. Hall St Helena, 401 St Helena Hwy S, St Helena. 707.967.0700.

Pastapalooza for the Parks Dinner to benefit local parks features Pasta King’s locally famous pasta and polenta, wine from Barefoot Wine & Bubbly, Lagunitas Beer, Costeaux bread and dessert by Worth Our Weight. Apr 28, 610pm. $30. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Lectures Art of Costume Design Sandra Ericson, leading educator in clothing and textiles, presents lecture in conjunction with Mozart’s Muses exhibit. Apr 26, 7pm. $5. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Beautiful Resistance Director of theater program for children living in Aida Refugee Camp near Bethlehem speaks on program called “Beautiful Resistance.” Apr 29, 3-5:30pm. $5-$10. Vintage House, 264 First St E, Sonoma.

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35 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Rich Panter

Paddle Battle

and Sculpture,” a juried exhibit featuring various members. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25–MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

36

Arts Events

Ayurvedic

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Belva Davis Longtime Bay Area journalist speaks about her groundbreaking career. Apr 26, 12:30pm. Free. SRJC Petaluma Campus, 680 Sonoma Mtn Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.778.3974.

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Ex-Warden Speaks Against Death Penalty Jeanne Woodford, executive director of Death Penalty Focus and former warden at San Quentin State Prison, is keynote at Sonoma County chapter of American Civil Liberties Union event. Apr 27, 5:30pm. $25-$70. Friedman Event Center, 4676 Mayette Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.360.3021.

Forum on Sustainable Agriculture Santa Rosa assemblymember Michael Allen hosts lineup of experts from academia, government, public health and farming to speak at community forum on sustainable agriculture and food. Apr 28, 1-4pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Teach-In Series “Brown Bag Economic Justice” series features introduction to Occupy Santa Rosa. Thurs, Apr 26. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.701.3620. Workshop with Andrew Mellen focuses on getting organized with an emphasis on sustainable and green practices. Apr 29, 10am1pm. San Geronimo Valley Community Center, 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

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Michael David Lukas & Michael Krasny

The Marvelous Wonderettes

“The Oracle of Stamboul” with Michael David Lukas and Michael Krasny. Apr 25 at 7pm. Dominican University, Angelico Hall. 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.457.4440.

Travel back to 1958 and meet the Wonderettes, four girls who step up to perform at their senior prom. Various dates and times. Through May 13. $15$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Napa Valley Museum Apr 28, 5:30pm, Poetry Lounge, Performance showcases Napa Valley High and college poets. Free. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville 707.944.0500.

Dan Piraro After 25 years at the drafting table, acclaimed cartoonist Dan Piraro, creator of “Bizarro,” has just drawn his 10,000th cartoon. He’s putting his pens down and heading out on tour. Apr 27, 8pm. $20. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Al Young Former California poet laureate is keynote for evening of poetry and food, which also includes readings by Sonoma County’s 2012 poet laureate Bill Vartnaw and others. Apr 27, 6:15pm. $45. Flamingo Hotel, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

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Sebastopol California

415.927.0960. Apr 30 at 7pm, “Dirt,” with David Vann. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

in 1942, is presented by Ross Alternative Works. Various dates and times. Apr 27-May 6. $15. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

( 35

Book Passage Apr 27 at 7pm, “1812: The Navy’s War,” with George Daughan. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 415.927.0960. Apr 28 at 4pm, “Coming Full Circle,” with Lynn Andrews. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 415.927.0960. Apr 29 at 4pm, “Embracing Israel/ Palestine,” with Rabbi Michael Lerner. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 415.927.0960. Apr 29 at 7pm. “God’s Hotel,” with Victoria Sweet. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera.

Theater An Evening with Madame F Claudia Stevens presents onewoman total performance drama using talents as singer, actress and pianist to embody an Auschwitz survivor. May 1, 4pm. Warren Auditorium, Ives Hall, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Riding the Changes Reading, performance and talk with Conrad Bishop and Elizabeth Fuller based on their memoir “Co-Creation: Fifty Years in the Making.” Apr 25, 7pm. Free. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Silver Spoon Romantic musical comedy by Si Kahn and Amy Merrill presents story of Polly, who, like all of us here at the Bohemian, is both a member of the alternative press and a rising star in her familyowned Wall Street brokerage house. When she falls for a working-class grape boycott committee leader, she faces a conflict universal to any selfrespecting bank-heiressturned-hard-nosedaltweekly-reporter. In fact, the plot is nearly identical to a typical Monday in our Fifth Street office, with just a little more singing but roughly the same amount of jazz hands. Various dates and times. Through May 5. $20-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

To Kill a Mockingbird Southern classic directed by Steven David Martin. Fri, Apr 27, 8pm, Sat, Apr 28, 8pm and Sun, Apr 29, 2pm. $15-$20. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Laugh your toga off to the story of a slave who attempts to win his freedom by helping his master woo the girl next door. Various dates and times. Through Apr 29. $12-$25. Novato Theater Company, 484 Ignacio Blvd, Novato.

Harmony in Hiding Based on the book “Memoirs of a Jewish Boy,” this true story of 12-year-old Horst Ferber, an aspiring pianist forced into hiding from the Nazis

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


ŵŹ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Real Arts Real News Real Culture

The new Bohemian.com


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Astrology

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of April 25

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “True life is lived when tiny changes occur,” said Leo Tolstoy. I agree. It’s rare for us to undergo rapid, dramatic transformations in short periods of time. That’s why it’s delusional to be forever pining for some big magic intervention that will fix everything. The best way to alter our course is slowly and gradually, by conscientiously revamping our responses to the small daily details. Keep these thoughts close at hand in the coming weeks, Aries. Be a devotee of the incremental approach. Step by step. Hour by hour. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

“What people really need and demand from life is not wealth, comfort or esteem, but games worth playing,” said psychiatrist Thomas Szasz. I love that thought, and am excited to offer it up to you right now. You have been invited or will soon be invited to participate in some of the best games ever. These are not grueling games foisted on you by people hoping to manipulate you, nor pointless games that exhaust your energy for naught. Rather, they are fun challenges that promise to stretch your intelligence, deepen your perspective and enhance your emotional riches.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Is it conceivable that you’ve gotten a bit off track? As I close my eyes and ask my higher powers for a psychic vision, I get an impression of you staring at a blurry image of a symbol that is no longer an accurate representation of your life goal. Now of course there’s a chance that my vision is completely unfounded. But if it does ring at least somewhat true to you—if it suggests a question worth asking yourself—I invite you to meditate on the possibility that you need to update your understanding of what your ultimate target looks like. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

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From an astrological point of view, it’s prime time for you to attend a networking extravaganza or collaboration spree. Likewise, this is an excellent phase in your long-term cycle to organize a gathering for the close allies who will be most important in helping you carry out your master plan during the next 12 months. Have you ever heard of the term “temporary autonomous zone”? It’s a time and place where people with shared interests and common values can explore the frontiers of productive conviviality. It might be a dinner party in an inspirational setting, a boisterous ritual in a rowdy sanctuary or a private festival for fellow seekers. I hope you make sure something like that materializes.

LEO (July 23–August 22) To begin one of his performances, comedian and musician Steve Martin ambled onstage and told his audience what to expect. “Before every show,” he said, “I like to do one thing that is impossible. So now I’m going to suck this piano into my lungs.” That’s the kind of brag I hope to hear coming from you sometime soon, Leo—the more outrageous the better. Why? Because I’d love to see you cultivate a looser, breezier relationship with your actual ambitions. To make boastful jokes about wacky or farfetched goals might inspire you to be jauntier and friskier about those real ones. And that would rouse a burst of fresh motivational energy.

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VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

The text for this week’s oracle comes from Frederick Douglass (1818–1895), a great American statesman who, after escaping slavery, became a leader of the abolitionist movement. “Those who profess to favor freedom and yet depreciate agitation,” he said, “are people who want crops without plowing the ground; they want rain without thunder and lightning . . . The struggle may be a moral one, or it may be a physical one, or it may be both. But it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand.” Please apply these thoughts to your own situation, Virgo. You have entered the liberation phase of your cycle.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22)

I’m about to list some declarations that I hope will come out of your mouth at least once in the next three weeks. If for any reason you’re not finding yourself in situations where these words would make sense for you to utter, please rearrange your life accordingly. 1. “There’s nothing else I’d rather be doing right now.”

2. “Is it OK with you if we take this really slow?” 3. “No one’s ever done that before.” 4. “Squeeze my hand when it feels really amazing.” 5. “It’s like we know what each other is thinking.” 6. “Can I have some more, please?”

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) A political strategist told me one of her most important rules: To win an election, you have to help your candidate choose the right fights. I think that would be an excellent guiding principle for you in the coming weeks, Scorpio. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will be getting invitations to spar, joust and wrangle. Although it might be exciting to leap into each and every fray with your eyes blazing, I suggest you show careful discernment. Try to confine your participation to those tangles that will downplay your weaknesses and highlight your strengths.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) In the famous children’s book The Little Prince, the hero lives on an asteroid with three volcanoes, two active and one dormant. One day he decides to leave home and travel to other realms. Before departing, he meticulously scours all three volcanoes. “If they are well cleaned out,” the narrator reports, “volcanoes burn slowly and steadily, without any eruptions.” I recommend that you take after the Little Prince, Sagittarius. It’s high time to attend to the upkeep of your volcanoes. Make sure they will burn slow and steady in the coming months, even when you’re not at home. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) One of the classics of ancient Sanskrit literature is the Kama Sutra, which gives practical advice about erotic love. The most popular edition of the book offers instructions on eight kinds of kisses and 64 sexual positions, with additional tips on styles of embracing and caressing. This would be an excellent time for you to get inspired by information like that, Capricorn. Your relationship with the amorous arts is due for expansion and refinement. You don’t necessarily need to rely on book learning, of course. You could accomplish a lot of empirical exploration simply by getting naked and firing up your imagination. AQUARIUS (January 20–Feb. 18): Singersongwriter Tom Waits was strongly influenced by Bob Dylan’s down-to-earth album The Basement Tapes. “I like my music with the rinds and the seeds and pulp left in,” Waits testifies. “The noise and grit” of Dylan’s rootsy, intimate songs, he says, creates a mood of “joy and abandon.” That’s the spirit I wish for you in the coming weeks, Aquarius. Wherever you are and whatever you’re doing, get down to the gritty, organic core of things. Hunker down in the funky fundamentals. Hang out where the levels of pretension are low and the stories are fresh and raw. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

You’re not really breaking the rules, right, Pisces? It’s more like you’re just testing their elasticity; you’re helping them become more supple and flexible. I’m sure that sooner or later people will thank you for how you’re expanding the way the game is played. It may take a while, but they will eventually appreciate and capitalize on the liberties you are now introducing into the system. In the short run, though, you might have to take some heat for your tinkering and experiments. Try not to let that inhibit your eagerness to try creative risks.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


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Rocks and Clouds Zendo Memorial Day Weekend Meditation Retreat. Fri, May 25–Mon, May 28. Email us with any questions: daterra@sonic.net. Find us on the web at 222.rocksandclouds.org or call 707.824.5647

Connections

Finding inspiration and connecting with your community

The Journey Center: A Place for Transformation

Berkeley Psychic Institute presents Psychic Faire

Resources for your spiritual journey (contemplative prayer/meditation practices, workshops/retreats, spiritual direction, art gallery, reading room, bodywork). 1601 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa www.journeycenter.org 707.578.2121

April 28 1:00–6:00pm

NEW!! Weekly Contemplative Prayer/Meditation Group in Sebastopol. Centering Prayer and the Prayer of the Imagination. Encounter Christ in silence, contemplation and imagination as we practice Christ-centered forms of meditation. Weds, 12–12:45pm. Journey Center, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org

PRAYERS FOR WORLD PEACE Sundays, 10:30–11:45am. Please join us in creating a peaceful world. Led by meditation teacher Minnie Marroquin. FREE. Compassion KBC, 436 Larkfield Center, Santa Rosa. 707.477.2264. www.meditateinsantarosa.org. Everyone is welcome!

Workshops Wiccan Priestess, Cerridwen Fallingstar, author, The Heart of the Fire, offers her 20th year-long pprenticeship program beginning Mid-May. Call/email for brochure/interview. 415.488.9641 c.fallingstar@gmail.com www.cerridwenfallingstar.com

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Mahakaruna Buddhist Meditation Center Offers ongoing classes for all levels of practice and interest. Eveyone is welcome. $10 donation requested per class. Prayers for World Peace: Sun, 10:30–11:45am Noontime Meditations: Tuesday–Saturday, 12:00 General Programs: Tues & Weds, 7:30–8:30 304 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma, 707.776.7720 www.meditateinnorcal.org

Unity Church of Santa Rosa Sunday School & Service 10:30am, Non-traditional. Inter-denominational. A spiritually-minded community. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org Starting Mon, Apr 30, join us for Prosperity Plus, a 10 wk prosperity class that features videos by Mary Morrissey with Karen Joyce. Materials $55. See details on www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Mondays from 7:00 to 8:30pm at Jessel's Studio Gallery. We will explore Buddhism and the spiritual path, and what it means in our lives. The classes are $10 drop in; no commitment is needed, and they are open to both beginning and more experienced meditators. For information, call Mike Smith at 415.717.4943 or www.meditationinnorcal.org Jessel Gallery is at 1019 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. 707.257.2350 www.jesselgallery.com

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