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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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BOHEMIAN

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Combating misogyny on SSU’s campus BY LACIE SCHWARZ

I

am not a feminazi. In fact, I’ve been dealt more male characteristics than female. But at what point did we females become content with being mere objects? When did we become content with our less-than-equal status in comparison to our male counterparts? Maybe it occurred somewhere around the time that the idea of females as being inferior became background noise, a silent threat that crept in with pop culture. Walking in the quad Monday at Sonoma State University, where I’m a senior, I found myself knocked on my ass by the DJ playing music from some less than talented rap artist (“artist” being used loosely) spewing lyrics along the lines of “bitch drop it low,” with the word “bitch” repeated more times than is necessary to write here. This event was put on by our Associated Students. This noise could be heard in the computer lab in Salazar Hall, where I was working, and in Darwin Hall where I have class. Now, I completely stand behind the First Amendment, as I believe everyone deserves an outlet to be heard, no matter what content they spew. But I don’t need to expose myself to it, especially when it’s objectifying the whole female population. All this right here at SSU, a school that is almost 70 percent female. At a school that prides itself on becoming more accepting and diverse. At a school that’s had more than its fair share of oncampus rape and sexual assault. When I emailed SSU president Ruben Arminaña, his response was nonchalant: “I do not have any role in the selection of the music or bands. You should take your concerns with Campus Presents in [Associated Students].” Well, Mr. President, maybe you should make it a point to take some interest in the concerns of your students. I’m not out to rid the world of shitty, misogynistic music, but I’d simply enjoy the opportunity not to have it forced on me. If it’s not your problem, maybe you can use your $331,359 annual salary and make it your concern. Lacie Schwarz is a student at Sonoma State University. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the Bohemian. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Working Wages

I am writing to challenge several of the premises stated and alluded to in your cover story on the Harvest documentary (“Fruits of Their Labor,” April 11). I am willing to provide documentation and allow the Bohemian access to our financial records where appropriate in order to support my positions. The writer claims that the women in the film “occasionally get stiffed” on their just pay, that they were paid less than the men, and leaves the reader with the impression the women were not paid enough for the work they did. The writer also connects one of my clients to this crew as their supervisor, when in fact he had nothing to do with them. Employees fill out their own time cards for hours worked. They are paid by the hour unless they pick at certain levels; then they are paid by the pound. Each worker gets a copy of his or her time card. We prepare a document based on the certified weigh tag (we also bill our clients based on the exact same documents) of the grapes picked, clearly showing how much money workers made by the hour and how much money they made picking based on weight. We pay the higher of the two amounts. This process is documented through the winery and every hour, pound and penny is accounted for. Workers have copies of and access to all these records. Certainly questions and disputes arise during the year because of the complexity of harvest, but all disputes are resolved based on the facts of the hours worked and the weights. We also pay bonuses at the end of the season to compensate for achieving quality goals, attendance and effort. All employees received these season-ending bonuses. Rates of pay are the same for every picker, man or woman. No one made as much money as hoped this past harvest. There was a lot of picking by the hour for all crews, male and female, due to the extraordinary low yields and the amount of rain-induced infections in the vineyards. When yields and the weather are good, pickers sometimes make more

than triple their hourly rate. It just didn’t happen this year.

Related to the claim the pickers are undocumented, the documentary never makes that claim. Every worker must complete a government form known as an I-9 before beginning work. They are required to have a Social Security card and driver’s license (issued in the States), a U.S. passport or U.S.A. Resident Alien card. Finally, the article refers to Matt Reilly as having some supervisory responsibility for these women. That is incorrect. Mr. Reilly has never worked for Bacchus Vineyard Management in any manner and has no authority or responsibility related to these women. Nor does he have knowledge of how much they picked or what they were paid. He represents the owner of a vineyard where we happen to work. It is very common for winemakers or growerrelations persons to be in the vineyard when we pick. They are there to ensure and ascertain grape quality. In closing, I would simply say we gave these women a chance to form their own harvest crew and work through the season—something that is very rare in our industry and something they continue to tell me they are grateful for. If it had been a great crop year, the documentary and the article would have been about all the joys of the season. Unfortunately, it was the worst harvest in 50 years.

GLENN ALEXANDER, BACCHUS VINEYARD MANAGEMENT Fulton

Beyond Chatter I am responding to Judy Walenta’s letter in the April 4 issue. Amazing how two Bohemian readers could get such different conclusions after reading Leilani Clark’s close look at the Judi Bari bombing (“A Tangled Web,” March 21). Ms. Walenta! You got it wrong. Thorough reporters like Clark should be respected for going to the trouble to present most of the theories, angles and court decisions for the past years associated with the bombing mystery. And it is a mystery. For anyone to conclude there


THIS MODERN WORLD

is an answer to the bombing is “idle chatter” in my humble opinion. I agree “aging activists” has an odious tone. Sixties-sounding words like “activist” have lost their meaning, and “aging” sounds like a putdown (irrelevant oldies; confused old biddies hanging on to the past glory days?). But young reporters whose integrity and checksourcing skills are exemplary are forgiven. The call for DNA sounds respectable, if the caller knows it exists. But if the caller knows DNA has been degraded and can’t be used in a courtroom, it’s all “chatter” and smoke and mirrors. I have my theories about who made the bomb, and who placed it in Bari’s car, and why, but they are only theories. The reporter had the courage to present the theories and possibilities, all thoroughly checked resources—hardly a crime of chattering.

JOHANNA LYNCH Cazadero Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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Nicolas Grizzle

Paper

Since 1989, the ACLU of Sonoma County has honored Sonoma County residents who’ve “furthered the cause of civil liberties.” This year, they honor David Grabill, a 40year law veteran who’s worked on civil rights cases from the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota to housing discrimination cases in Napa County. A Santa Rosa resident, Grabill participated of the March on Washington in 1963; he’s currently focused on the struggle for affordable housing in the North Bay. Keynote speaker Jeanne Woodford, former San Quentin warden turned anti-death penalty activist, will talk about why she decided to buck her career and fight the death penalty. The ACLU awards celebration is on Friday, April 27, at the Friedman Center. 4676 Mayette Ave., Santa Rosa. $55; $21 low income. 5:30pm. 707.765.5005.

Teaching for the 99% T-MINUS ONE The earth could very well be hit by an asteroid, says Rusty Schweickart, but it won’t be like it is in the movies.

The Wrong Stuff Apollo 9 astronaut Rusty Schweickart takes on Hollywood’s poor science BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

A

s a decorated astronaut, Russell “Rusty” Schweickart can forgive a bit of artistic license taken with the science in some space movies. But when he sees it taken to extremes, he says, it can shape public perception, which can also

shape government action— and that is a dangerous prospect. “When you’re talking about something that potentially deals with real possible events, such as asteroid impacts on the earth, then those misunderstandings can be really harmful, frankly,” says the Sonoma resident, who piloted the lunar module in the 1969 Apollo 9 mission.

Schweickart’s career includes degrees from MIT and service as a jet pilot in the Air Force before starting with NASA. During the Apollo 9 mission, he was the first to test the Apollo lunar module, which was later used by the first men to land on the moon. He saved the Skylab space station from failure in 1973, and that year was honored with the ) 10 NASA Distinguished

Occupy Santa Rosa continues its “Spring Awakening” with a series of public teach-ins coordinated by members of the Free School Working Group. The eight-weeklong series kicked off last week with “Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Occupy But Were Afraid to Ask.” The teach-ins are open to the public on Thursdays, from noon to 1:30pm, in Santa Rosa’s Courthouse Square. Upcoming sessions include “Occupy Your Food Supply” on April 19, “Global Workers and the Global Economic Crisis” on April 26, “Democracy in the Workplace” on May 3, “Fair Trade and Grassroots Globalization” on May 10, “Building Resilient Local Economies” on May 17, “Good Jobs and Living Wages for All” on May 24 and “Solidarity: What Does MovementBuilding Mean for the 99%?” on May 31. For more, see www.occupysantarosa.org. —Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Service Medal and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. Though Schweickart is mostly retired these days, he gives a 90-minute illustrated lecture at the Rafael Film Center in San Rafael on April 22 to explain why the science in Hollywood blockbusters like Armageddon and Deep Impact is wrong and, furthermore, why that can be dangerous. “There’s a lot of embedded misunderstanding that has to be overcome when you’re dealing with a real threat and something that can be done about it by society,” Schweickart says. Currently, there are plenty of real threats—401 near-Earth asteroids, or NEAs, that we know of today. Of those, the one with the greatest chance of hitting this planet, named AG5, has a one in 500 chance of doing so. Schweickart likens it to the odds of getting in a car accident in the next three weeks. It’s predicted to hit on Feb. 5, 2040, Schweickart says, and we will know for sure by 2023 when it comes closer to Earth. If at that point it passes through a small region in space—a “keyhole”—then it’s all but certain the asteroid will hit the planet on its next trip to Earth, in 2040. Twenty-eight years may seem like plenty of time to plan for such an occurrence, and it is, but funding has to be allocated beginning in the next few years. The organizations with which Schweickart has been involved in his post-NASA career, including the NASA Advisory Council Ad-Hoc Task Force on Planetary Defense, are dedicated in part to this very problem. But defending the planet isn’t just about raising money. There are multiple fights in Schweickart’s battle. A project to deflect an asteroid may only cost about $1 billion (paltry when considering other recent government expenditures). But if an NEA were to hit Earth, where would it land? Who would be most affected, and who would be responsible for preventing it? Or, as Schweickart asks, “Whose money? Whose taxpayers?”

He does not doubt at all that it will be possible to deflect an asteroid, from a technological standpoint, by the time it is deemed necessary. One foundation he headed for about 10 years was the B612 Foundation, which is striving, among other goals, to develop and deploy an infrared telescope into solar orbit to search for asteroids. But society itself may be the bigger obstacle. “The geopolitical issues are, in many ways, much tougher than the technical ones,” he says. The United States, which has for decades been a leader in space technology, has been deflecting the issue. There is nothing in NASA’s charter about public safety, and that’s precisely what deflecting an asteroid is all about. With budgets slashed in recent months, it’s not likely more funding will become available within the agency, so money would have to be reassigned. “There is no tax dollar that is not competed for ferociously,” says Schweickart. “And this is a new kid on the block; it’s something that happens once every several hundred years, and the public doesn’t really understand it. So why should NASA get into a losing battle?” These are topics likely to be touched on at the talk in San Rafael, interspersed with clips of Bruce Willis and friends trying to blow up an asteroid by burying a nuclear bomb within it, thereby saving planet Earth. It’s an unusual program on its own, let alone one led by the Apollo 9 astronaut known for, among many other accomplishments, taking the first untethered space walk. The program is part of the Rafael’s “Science on Screen” series, sponsored by two nonprofit groups, which present programs like this across the country. This is the third program of this type at the Smith Rafael Film Center this year, says director of programming Richard Peterson. “It’s a nice thing for us to do something different and something thoughtful like that.” He hopes there will be more programs like this coming this year. “Films are, by and large, for

entertainment,” Schweickart says. “There’s certainly no obligation in film to legitimately portray science. At the same time, film is such a powerful medium that it miscommunicates science to a lot of people, and that presents a very serious problem for science in the sense of people misunderstanding—because of film, in some instances—the reality of the world.”

Currently, there are 401 near-Earth asteroids that we know of today. This could lead to disbelief of government officials, Schweickart cautions, and belief in conspiracy theories of hidden or untrue information. Films he discusses include Meteor, Melancholia, Deep Impact and Armageddon. He won’t go into Hollywood films about astronauts (although he does refer to The Right Stuff as “pure poppycock”). Asteroids hitting the earth are not uncommon. “We get hit about a million times a night,” says Schweickart. Most of them burn up in the atmosphere, leaving a bright tail, which we call shooting stars. But larger NEAs could make it through with devastating results. If AG5 were to hit, the impact would have more power than 900 of the bombs dropped on Hiroshima. “[In general] nobody ever thinks about it because it’s supposedly so far away from us,” says Peterson. “But I’m glad to know that are people thinking about it.” ‘Asteroid Impacts: How Hollywood Misses Reality,’ presented by Russell Schweickart, takes place Sunday, April 22, at the Rafael Film Center. 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael. 7pm. $12. 415.452.1222.


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Celebrating Earth Day in Jenner BY JULIANE POIRIER

W

aving a “we are here” flag to tourists and locals alike, folks behind Jenner’s first Earth Day celebration have organized a day of outdoor activities meant to showcase the West County way of having fun in nature—and exploring the out-of-car experience on numerous levels.

The event is vaguely reminiscent of the original Celebration of the Russian River, the hike-bike-paddle-and-prayyour-gratitude event created by Russian River “Queen” Kay McCabe in 1998. But Jenner’s April 21 event is presented by local business owners, including Richard Murphy, owner of the Jenner Inn, who with his colleagues is inviting participants to honor Earth Day in the “active, Russian, environmental way.” This party includes a celebration of the Russian River bicentennial, with biking, kayaking, hiking and taking rides in authentic Russian

longboats. There will even be a Native American blessing. “We want to educate people about what it means to get out of their cars,” explains Murphy, who in his 33 years as a Jenner innkeeper shakes his head at locals who have no idea what his region offers in the way of hiking trails and biking paths. “Everybody knows Annadel and Sugarloaf,” says Murphy, “but how well do they know the West County? When locals complain there’s no hiking [in Jenner] I say, ‘We’ve got 10,000 acres of state parkland north and south of here—so where have you been? And how can you live in an area where there are 75 miles of coastline and not go to the beach?’” Earth Day visitors will have plenty to do at the beach this Saturday in Jenner. There are history talks and guided tours, kayaking, racing, an electric car show (see the new Tesla without the carbon costs of viewing in Detroit), chair massages, a barbecue featuring organic foods and wines from Sonoma County, live music by Thomas Yeates and friends plus Un Deux Trois, and even a screening of a shark film. Randy Johnson of Getaway Adventures is one of several greenleaning business owners promoting West County eco-tourism under the nonprofit umbrella Eco-Ring. “It’s a grassroots thing, a cooperative effort of businesses and organizations, and not well funded,” explains Johnson, adding that west Sonoma County, via Eco-Ring, is developing the eco-tourism niche by working to open pathways all the way to Marin for hikers, cyclists and even equestrians. Just as Napa and Healdsburg draw tourists for their glamorous and more sedentary offerings of food and wine, explains Johnson, the Eco-Ring group wants the world to know what west county does best, which is getting people out of cars and into nature. For out-of-car Earth Day info and registration, see www.ecoring.org.

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Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call ďŹ rst for conďŹ rmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Insalataâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mediterranean.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Cafe Cape Fear Cafe. $$. Comforting atmosphere and Southern-kissed California flavors. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 25191 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.9246.

Hang Ah Dim Sum Chinese-dim sum. $. Low prices and good variety make it pleasing. Buffet-style quality and greasiness can be a letdown. Lunch and dinner daily. 2130 Armory Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7873.

Kirin Chinese. $$. Specializing in Mandarin, Szechuan and Peking styles. Kirinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pot stickers are the best in Sonoma County. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1957.

La Gare French. $$$. Dine in an elegant atmosphere of Old World charm. Dinner, Wed-Sun 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4355. Madrona Manor Eclectic California cuisine. $$$$. Romantic fine dining in grand historic landmark mansion. Seasonal menu and superior wine list. Dinner daily. 1001 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.4321.

Phyllisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an oldfashioned patty. Lunch and dinner daily. Three locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.989.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

Real DĂśner Turkish. $-$$. Casual, cafe-style ordering from a friendly staff. Get the coffee and buibal yuvasi dessert. Lunch and dinner daily. 307 F St, Petaluma. 707.765.9555.

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly, plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Williâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wine Bar Small plates/wine bar. $$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

MARIN CO U N T Y Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent

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celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840.

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$$$. Simple, high-impact dishes of exotic flavors. Lunch and dinner daily. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700.

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Mountain Home Inn

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American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

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Salitoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $.

40 Mendocino Ave, Downtown Santa Rosa 409 os a 7707.579.5999 07.579.5999 ccross ross sstreet treet 5th 5th Ave, Healdsburg 11280 280 Healdsburg Healdsburg Av e, H e al d sb u r g 707.433.2954 Dry Creek 70 7.433. 2954 ccross ross sstreet t re e t D ry C reek RRoad oad www.SizzlingTandoor.com w w w.Siz zlingTandoor.com

Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-inthe-wall as they come. Lunch and dinner daily. Two San Rafael locations: 732 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903.

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Cindyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

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Coleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;nostalgiaâ&#x20AC;? )

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Woodenhead Award Winning Hand-Crafted Pinot Noir, Zinfandel and Syrah too!

Thank you Sonoma! Best Syrah Best Winetasting Room Honorable

cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

5700 River Road Santa Rosa Open Thurs thru Mon 10:30 to 4:30 www.woodenheadwine.com 707-887-2703

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguel’s Mexican-

NEW MANAGEMENT NEW CHEF, NEW MENU

NEW LOOK!

Californian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Bring in this ad for

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Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

SMALL BITES

The Godfather Both parties in the Francis Ford Coppola vs. Tavola Italian Kitchen lawsuit are staying mum, but the good news™ for the Novato restaurant is that the legal flap has been good for business. Earlier this month, Francis Ford Coppola’s attorneys filed suit against Tavola Italian Kitchen in Novato, claiming the restaurant’s name is a trademark infringement on “a tavola,” an Italian term that means “to the table,” which Coppola copyrighted to describe an off-the-menu style of dining he offers at his Geyserville restaurant, Rustic. In the suit, Coppola’s attorneys claim use of the term constitutes trademark infringement, unfair competition, false advertising and other transgressions—because, you know, it’s easy to mistake a dinner at a $30 million restaurant and resort in Geyserville called “Rustic” for a restaurant across from Safeway in Novato. Tavola chef Ryan Favini (pictured) says Marin County diners have rallied around the restaurant. “We’ve have great support from the people in the area,” he said. “It definitely has not hurt us. I will tell you that.” There’s no such thing as bad press™, unless you’re Coppola. The director has been hammered for his heavy-handed, litigious approach. Attorneys for Coppola would not comment on the case, but they’re just doing what attorneys do: filing suit. They can’t be expected to have foreseen the bad publicity the suit would produce. Well, Mr. Coppola, I have an idea. It’s an offer you can’t refuse.™ Tavola’s owners are restaurateurs of modest means. I respectfully suggest Coppola drop the lawsuit and, in a gesture of goodwill and a celebration of Italian food that both parties love, he attend an a tavola– style dinner at Tavola. It could be a joint affair where chefs from Rustic and Tavola get together to make a meal, while Coppola and Tavola’s owners break bread™ and make peace™. Profits from the meal could go to cover Tavola’s legal fees. What do you say, Mr. Coppola? Come on™. Do the right thing. —Stett Holbrook™


Wineries

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Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y De La Montanya Vineyards & Winery Small family winery turns out diverse small lots culled from the best of a large vineyard operation, just for kicks and giggles. Tucked under Westside Road in a casual barn setting, fun tasting room offers good wines and cheeky diversions: De La Montanya wine club members get both case discounts and the opportunity to pose in fishnets on “PinUp” series labels. 999 Foreman Lane, Healdsburg. Monday– Friday, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.3711.

Francis Coppola Winery A Coney Island of the wine that candidly promises fun for the whole family, from Rosso table wine to Director’s Cut Pinot Noir; from poolside cabanas to an Argentinean-Style grill, plus movie memorabilia from The Godfather, Apocalypse Now, and more. 300 Via Archimedes, Geyserville. Tasting daily, 11am–6pm; restaurant till 9pm. 707.857.1400.

Keller Estate Nestled in rolling hills above the Petaluma River, the winery, designed by a prestigious Mexican architecture firm, was built with stones from China’s Three Gorges dam project. No crowds, and excellent Pinot, Chard and Syrah. 5875 Lakeville Hwy., Petaluma. Thursday–Sunday 11am–4pm. $10 fee. Call ahead. 707.765.2117.

Little Vineyards All of the Little’s wines are made from their 15-acre estate vineyards, and they’re serious about their product. Zin and Syrah are stars here. 15188 Sonoma Hwy., Glen Ellen. By appointment. 707.996.2750.

owned winery was the original Williams-Selyem location. 850 River Road, Fulton. Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm or by appointment. Tasting fee $5. 707.578.3148.

Timber Cove Inn Joyride to the coast or winetasting? Do both at the Sonoma Coast Wine Tasting Room. Installed inside the landmark hotel during a remodel—under the stairs—this cozy corner features a rotating lineup of local notables like Hirsch, Flowers, and Peay. 21780 North Coast Hwy. 1, Timber Cove. Saturday–Sunday, noon–5pm. $20 for two. 707.847.3231.

MARIN CO U N TY Pey-Marin Vineyards A Marin wine adventure where cow country meets conifer forest, at the historic, hospitable Olema Inn. Discover razor-lean “Shell Mound” Marin County Riesling, opaquely purple, yet eminently food-friendly “Punchdown” Syrah, and more. 10000 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Olema. Open daily from noon to 4pm. $12 fee. 415.663.9559.

Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Ross Valley Winery In existence since 1987, the Ross Valley Winery produces Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc and Zin port wines. 343 San Anselmo Ave., San Anselmo. Open Tuesday– Sunday, 1–7pm. 415.457.5157.

N A PA CO U N TY

Old World Winery Meaning, a simpler time when grapes were trodden under bare foot and wine was made the natural way? Yes. Fun fact: the small, family-

Castello di Amorosa Not only an “authentic Medieval Italian castle,” but authentically far more defensible than any other

winery in Napa from legions of footmen in chain mail. In wine, there’s something for every taste, but don’t skip the tour of great halls, courtyards, cellars, and–naturally–an authentic dungeon. . 4045 N. St. Helena Hwy., Calistoga. 9:30am–5pm. Tasting fees, $10–$15; tours, $25–$30. Napa Neighbor discounts. 707.967.6272.

Folie à Deux A good picnic or party wine, the Ménage à Trois–white, red and rosé–are tasty blends. 3070 N. St. Helena Hwy, St. Helena. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 1.800.473.4454.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

Velo Vino Napa Valley Cycling-themed bungalow is filled with enough gear to outfit a peloton, plus wine and espresso, too. Tastings include spiced nuts and dried cherries, but sample-sized Clif and Luna Bars are readily available for your impromptu energy bar and wine pairings. 709 Main St., St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 6pm. $10–$25. 707.968.0625.

The Healthier Choice

Grass-Fed Beef Burgers Premium Humboldt County Beef OPBEEFEIPSNPOFTtOPBOUJCJPUJDT WFHFUBSJBOEJFUtMFTTGBU MPXFS DIPMFTUFSPMBOEGFXFSDBMPSJFT 0QFO%BZTtBNoQN 3135 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa

707.526.4878 www.brodysburgers.com

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8–5pm Now Open for Lunch on Saturdays 11am–3pm

LES SALADES Orchard Harvest Quinoa & Roasted Carrot Garden Nicoise Poached Chicken Salad Duck Confit


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Pfendler Vineyards

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t’s a million-dollar view. A multimillion-dollar view. It’s a view that’s not without controversy in these parts, but Pfendler Vineyards is in a process of transformation. If there’s anyone who looks good coming out of a chrysalis, it’s got to be Kimberly Pfendler.

Standing beside a two-story, white fireplace in her Mediterranean-styled villa on a recent morning, Pfendler, blonde and winsome, describes to a group of assembled journalists on a press junket who are sipping Pfendler 2010 Sonoma Coast Chardonnay ($38)—baked apple, crème brûlée with grassy lightness over solid, chalky acidity—how her late husband moved here while still in his 40s, to ranch cattle. Locals may remember that from his perch on this aerie, Peter Pfendler wrestled with the city of Petaluma in a decade-long dispute over adjoining Lafferty Ranch, a would-be public park. Pfendler, a Vietnam combat pilot and aircraft-leasing entrepreneur who died in 2007, is remembered as an ardent conservationist in some circles, as the grinch who stole Lafferty in others. Anyhow, after some tumult, and after the issue had long faded from the front page, he met and married Kimberly in 2004. A graduate of UCLA film school, Kimberly worked in the film industry. Through friends she met Pfendler Vineyards winemaker Greg Bjornstad, whose experience at Flowers Vineyard established him as a Pinot Noir guru. Bordeaux-man Peter had planted some iffy grapes up here in the crosshairs of the cool Petaluma Gap winds, later experimenting with Pinot Noir; Bjornstad has T-budded vines to old, so-called California clones like Calera and Swan, which are said to ripen more slowly than more recent imports. Up here at 2,000 feet, says Bjornstad in the little Helgren Vineyard, the vines get plenty of sun for photosynthesis, without the heat. Down below, overlooking a vineyard named for Kimberly’s parents, he hands out samples of the new 2011 Pinot Noir. It’s deep and brooding, with notes of mint, anise, and licorice. Kimberly’s father, a hale Minnesotan who is no stranger to construction, attractively rehabbed this 1960s ranch house, hand-salvaging stones from around the property. Louis XV–style furniture dots the spacious front room, but there is no public tasting here. Pfendler wines are on offer at Healdsburg’s new Vin Couture Lounge. The 2010 Pinot Noir ($45) is deep in color, deeper in aromas of black licorice and cherry, and coats the palate widely in black cherry fruit and even tannins. Clearly, these grapes have benefited from their prime real estate—it’s like drinking in a million-dollar view. Pfendler Vineyards, Petaluma. 707.765.5997. Vin Couture Lounge, 320 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. By appointment or Swirl After Six, 6–10pm, Thursday–Saturday. 707.431.8161. —James Knight


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HELLO, SIDNEY Neve Campbell’s house in ‘Scream,’ like many other locations in the hit movie, is easily visited on a day trip of local Hollywood sites.

Where Was It Filmed?

Our resident tourist guide visits the North Bay locations used in famous— and not so famous—Hollywood movies BY LEILANI CLARK, JENNIFER CUDDY, SUZANNE DALY, RACHEL DOVEY, NICOLAS GRIZZLE, GABE MELINE AND MICHAEL SHUFRO

W

e in the North Bay love visiting historic sites. Not just important locations in classroom history, either. We like to drive by a place and say things like “That’s where Lance Armstrong ate when he was in town,” “Barbra Streisand stayed at this hotel in the 1970s,” and—perhaps with a tone of caution— “These are the mountain

bike trails once rode upon by George W. Bush.” And there’s no local quip like a movie-related local quip. The North Bay has had an up-and-down relationship with Hollywood filmmaking, from Hitchcock’s The Birds and Shadow of a Doubt and the presence of icons like Francis Ford Coppola and George Lucas to one of the biggest Hollywood battles in local history. Scream, the 1996 Wes Craven horror film that went on to make $173 million at the box office,

was originally set to be filmed at Santa Rosa High School. But parents were worried about glorifying violence on a school campus, and after months of the school board delaying filming, Craven was forced to film in Sonoma instead and kill off his big star, Drew Barrymore, within the first 12 minutes of the movie. He famously retaliated in the film’s closing credits: “No thanks whatsoever to the Santa Rosa City School District Governing Board.” The controversy was not without precedent. One rallying

cry among concerned parents around the Scream brouhaha was “We don’t want another Smile, do we?” Smile, a brilliant satire of small-town beauty pageants, was also filmed and set in Santa Rosa in 1975. But the film’s irreverent skewering hit a little too close to home for residents, whose excitement turned to scorn upon its release. Since, we’ve been a too-cautious bunch toward Hollywood, and vice-versa. Five years after the Scream debacle, when the Coen brothers made The Man Who


‘Stop or My Mom Will Shoot’ If you’ve ever wanted to see Sylvester Stallone in nothing but a dress shirt and giant cloth diaper, ‘Stop or My Mom Will Shoot’ is for you. If you’re a Sonoma County resident and you find that mental image more confusingly horrific than Justin Bieber fathering a child, there’s another reason to watch this Dgrade classic: it was filmed at the Santa Rosa Air Center. Posing as the Brunswick Air Strip, this one-hanger landing field off Wright Road sets the film’s climactic showdown, in which Stallone chases a cargo plane down the runway in a detached semi. He finally grounds the plane, but things look bleak until his frail mother (Estelle Getty) saves the day with a stolen gun, a wicker handbag and the line “Nobody hurts my baby!”

it in stock. He turns away from the counter, and mutters, “Santa Rosa sucks.” The camera shop’s location was part of the 12 square blocks that were razed to build the Santa Rosa Plaza, and is no longer there. It calls to mind another line in the film: “Santa Rosa is so beautiful,” says a blank-eyed, perpetually smiling pageant contestant. “I mean, I thought the shopping mall in Anaheim was great, until I saw yours!”—G.M.

‘Smooth Talk’

KEEP SMILING ‘Smile’ outraged locals, but its keen satire deserves reappraisal.

The final scenes of Stop or My Mom Will Shoot were shot over a period of several weeks, though by the film’s 1992 release, the small airport had closed. It’s now an empty field, with some barracks doubling as artist studios, near Wright Road at Finley Avenue. Of course, if panoramic sweeps of the Santa Rosa hills shot from a speeding semi aren’t your thing, this cult flick is a treasure trove of other Stallonian nuggets. You can listen to him refer to love as “the feeling stuff.” You can revel in the classic wit of lines like “I give you an inch and you take an entire New Jersey turnpike.” You can watch him shake a terrier named Pixie. And there’s always that diaper—complete with a giant safety pin and strategically draped flap—that will haunt you for the rest of your days.—R.D.

‘Smile’ When director Michael Ritchie included a scene filmed at Santa Rosa’s Howarth Park in the 1972 Robert Redford vehicle The Candidate, he took note of the city as a perfect backdrop for small-town dysfunction. A few years later, in 1975, ‘Smile’ took advantage of the all-American town gone awry: the cops are horny, the parents are drunk and

Santa Rosa is a barren wasteland. Locals hated Smile upon its release, but there’s a lot to love in the film’s very funny, insightful skewering of young-miss beauty pageants, with performances by Bruce Dern and, in an early role as a beauty contestant, Melanie Griffith. Anyone who lives in Santa Rosa should seek it out. Watch for the opening montage with scenes of Highway 101, Coddingtown, Denny’s and the Journey’s End mobile home park. Most of the film is shot at the Veterans Memorial Building on Maple Avenue, across from the fairgrounds, where all the beautypageant action takes place. Certain scenes were filmed on Stevenson Street, behind the Vets Building. Bruce Dern’s car lot is on Corby Avenue (you can see the Chevrolet sign in the background), and at one point he takes his son to Community Hospital on Chanate Road. There’s also a bizarre fraternalclub initiation in Howarth Park, which is changed to “Ripley Park” in the film. The line that always has residents howling in theaters—on the rare occasion that the film is screened locally—comes when a boy trying to buy film discovers the camera shop doesn’t have

A disturbing coming-of-age drama, ‘Smooth Talk’ stars Laura Dern as a bored yet sexually aroused 15-year-old, and Treat Williams as a smooth-talking sexual predator—and was filmed, in 1985, largely at a Sebastopol Victorian home and two shopping malls in Santa Rosa. In the movie, the vintage home at 2074 Pleasant Hill Road where Connie and her family live is being painted white by Connie’s mother (Mary Kay Place). Today, the house is pink and can be seen from the road through the filter of the same apple trees, but now boasts a renovated front porch, landscaped flower gardens and a paved driveway. The current owners who moved there in 1995 recall being told about the movie by local apple-farm workers, who said the house was chosen because it was so run-down. For fun, Connie and her friends go shopping at Santa Rosa Plaza, in downtown Santa Rosa, and are dropped off in front of the now-defunct Mervyn’s (now it’s Forever 21). Inside, the girls come down the escalator with Macy’s visible in the background, but then a strange change occurs that only locals would notice—they’re suddenly in the Coddingtown Mall instead. They follow some guys into a clothing store, currently the location of Work World Clothing, inside the mall across from Macy’s. And later that night, Connie gets stranded in the mall parking lot, lit by the neon of the old JC Penney’s sign.—S.D.

‘Storm Center’ For decades, those enamored of Shadow

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Wasn’t There—their declared homage to Shadow of a Doubt— they set the story in Santa Rosa but tellingly filmed it elsewhere, in Orange County. Just this month, George Lucas bitterly shelved plans to build a movie studio in Marin over protests by homeowners in nearby upscale Lucas Valley Estates, and vowed instead to sell the land for lowincome housing. Still, there’s nothing like watching a movie and then visiting the places where it was filmed. Our resident tourist guide this year is meant to inspire day trips to those very movie locations, and we’ve included directions and street addresses to the more un-Googleable spots. (Please, do not disturb private residences.) We’ve also tried to dig a little deeper beyond the usual suspects of locally shot films, and hope you’ll learn more about Hollywood history in the North Bay. There are dozens of films we coudn’t fit here—Bottle Shock, The Lady From Shanghai, Phenomenon, A Walk in the Clouds, I Know What You Did Last Summer, Inventing the Abbots— which you can find more about online at www.bohemian.com. Aaaaaaannnnd—action!


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‘True Crime’ Seen from a ferry boat on San Francisco Bay and beautifully lit by the setting sun, the view of San Quentin prison makes one wonder at the value of this astounding piece of Marin County property. Thus opens ‘True Crime,’ a 1999 murder mystery set in the greater Bay Area, which focuses on a San Quentin deathrow murder case. Produced and directed by Clint Eastwood, the film follows the downward arc of Steve Everett (Eastwood), a hasbeen Oakland Tribune journalist and serial womanizer. Viewers find a 69-year-old Everett at Petaluma’s Washoe House (2840 Stony Point Road), trying to work his magic on a 23-year-old co-worker, Michelle (Mary McCormack). An exterior shot of the 1859 roadhouse appears to be taken from across the street, the neon sign rosily glowing through the rain and fog. Inside, Everett and Michelle are enjoying drinks, sitting at the far end of the brightly lit bar, which in reality is quite dim. You can park your buns in the same seat as Clint; just turn the corner of the bar so you’re seated facing the door. In the movie, a white Stroh’s sign hangs over the door; it’s now replaced with a green and white Beck’s sign. Everett, unsuccessfully making a pass at Michelle, watches her weave her way out the door to her car, illegal in today’s world. Michelle turns right onto Roblar Road, guns the engine while playing with the radio and crashes on “Dead Man’s Curve,” a nonexistent feature of this road. After Michelle’s death, Everett picks up the case she was ) 24

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of a Doubt have long missed the opportunity to see another black-and-white film shot on location in Santa Rosa: ‘Storm Center’ (1956), starring the great Bette Davis. In it, Davis plays a librarian who refuses to remove a book, The Communist Dream, from the downtown library. She is fired by the city council and her alleged red ties are scapegoated to advance the campaign of a local politician. The film had been unavailable on VHS, and then DVD, for years. In 2010, Sony finally released a master on DVD. That may be because it’s not a very good film. It tries and ultimately fails to make an emotional connection, although it deserves credit as the first movie out of Hollywood to bravely take McCarthyism head on. Not only is Davis’ character scorned in the film, but according to Turner Classic Movies, “during the shooting of the film in Santa Rosa, local women’s groups harassed Davis with letters warning her of the film’s dangerously subversive content.” Interstingly, Davis wouldn’t land a major feature role for another five years. Storm Center takes place mostly at the beautiful old Carnegie library on Fourth and E, where only a cornerstone remains—it was torn down in 1964. There’s a town meeting at a recognizable hall that’s now the Masonic Lodge on Seventh and Beaver, and quick scenes in front of the old courthouse, now torn down. Watch for a scene where Davis is chatting with local children—she walks down the 700 block of Fourth Street, and you can make out the storefronts of what used to be Sawyer’s News and the Last Record Store (it’s now Simply Chic). Businessmen and city workers conduct casual business in a restaurant, Morrissey’s, which no longer exists. Local resident Steve Sherrill, whose parents were extras in Storm Center, says later scenes inside a bar were filmed at the old Santa Rosa Golf & Country Club off Highway 12 near Los Alamos Road. The movie

is so dear to Sherrill—“the old library scenes are just precious,” he says—that he’s donated a copy of the film to Video Droid in Santa Rosa. Sherrill’s brother Robert notes that even though Storm Center’s theme was serious, the mood on the set among the extras was convivial. During filming of the terrifying final fire, “mom got a little too drunk and was laughing,” he says, laughing himself, “and the director had to cut the scene.”—G.M.


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working on, and returns to the Washoe House. The hundreds of dollars pinned to the ceiling are unchanged since the movie’s filming, according to waitress Addie Clementino, who has worked there for 29 years. Clementino adds that Eastwood found the location when he stopped in one day with a few of his Bohemian Grove friends. Although she waited on Eastwood during subsequent visits, Clementino and the staff weren’t allowed to work during filming. They were, however, paid for their time off.—S.D.

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The 1999 film ‘Mumford’ begins with an old-timey shot of Tomales and the voiced-over line “I got out of the truck in this two-bit town.” But though the idyllic, fictional town of the movie’s title is actually a mashup of nearly every Sonoma County city, the West Marin hamlet isn’t among them. Instead, Tomales forms the backdrop to a minor character’s twisted fantasies, filled with obliging landladies, their even more obliging teenage daughters and nurses who know tricks “they didn’t teach in nursing school.” Out of creepdom and in Mumford’s “real” setting, a variety of local landmarks can be spied by the watchful resident eye. The main character, a supposed therapist also named Mumford (Loren Dean), and his friend/ client, techy wunderkind Skip Skipperton (Jason Lee), sit down for a drink at Old Main Street Saloon in Sebastopol. Mumford goes home to a Petaluma house, eats lunch in Healdsburg, visits a client in Sonoma and routinely hikes up to vantage point overlooking his piecemeal town in Calistoga. Analy High School was used for several scenes in the film, as well. Dave Wiseman, now a manager at Video Droid, was an extra in the film. You can see him sitting in an alley next to Zooey Deschanel’s character in a montage scene near the end of Mumford, wearing a generic shirt (he’d worn one with his band logo on it, to hopefully

show it off in the film but was told he had to change). The alley that they’re sitting in connects Kentucky and Keller streets in Petaluma, by the Phoenix Theater. In addition to getting $50 for his day of work, he and his friends were given free packs of cigarettes. Deschanel played a chain-smoking, magazineobsessed high schooler, but in reality, the wide-eyed actress didn’t smoke, and she looked unnatural with her cigarettes, Wiseman recalls, so the director told her to watch and learn from the cast of local extras. Wiseman had another interaction with the now-wellknown actress: he asked her out on a date. “She politely said she was too busy,” he recalls. “But I asked. She’s super-famous now, but she wasn’t at the time. For years, every time she’d be in a movie, I’d get more excited, because more people would know who she was when I told the story.”—R.D.

‘Thieves’ Highway’ Before he was exiled to France on a Hollywood blacklist for alleged communist ties, the great director Jules Dassin filmed ‘Thieves’ Highway’ (1949), a masterful story set inside the fruit-trucking industry. Though most of the film takes place in and around the Ferry Building in San Francisco, key early scenes at an apple orchard were filmed at George F. Ramondo’s orchard at 595 Gold Ridge Road in Sebastopol. Ramondo’s daughter Sherry Marcucci was only five years old when movie crews visited her home, but she still lives in the area and says that Dassin even borrowed some of Ramondo’s trucks for filming. The property was sold long ago, but go there today and there’s still an old apple orchard off the side of the road; it’s between Roberts Orchard and Devoto Gardens, both with gated driveways. In the opening exposition scene of a small town where Richard Conte’s character visits his family, locals will notice a familiar structure in the distance—it’s the Petaluma Grain Mill on Copeland


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SIX BITS The orchard from ‘Thieves’ Highway’ still stands in Sebastopol.

Street. In the foreground is the old Petaluma Junior High School. The long trucking episodes in Thieves’ Highway feature not only the most incredible tirechanging scene in the history of cinema, but also an epic crash that kills Millard Mitchell and sends apples flying across a field. Long thought to have been filmed on Highway 1 along the Sonoma Coast, the scene was actually shot at a hairpin turn on Highway 29, a mile from Old Faithful Geyser, just north of Calistoga. Take Highway 29 out of town, and right when it crosses Tubbs Lane and hits a tight, 180-degree turn, that’s the spot. If you don’t want to end up like Mitchell does in the movie, drive slowly.—G.M.

‘Cheaper by the Dozen’ The opening credits for ‘Cheaper By the Dozen’ (2003), a schmaltzy family flick that Steve Martin fans should stay as far away from as possible, features a montage that could only be true in Hollywood. The film begins with shots of Martin jogging through the green hills of Petaluma—it’s supposed to be the middle west town of “Midland”—past sleepy cows and countryside, when suddenly he’s running down a small-town block and waving to neighbors, then just as quickly he’s back to the countryside, running up the porch of a farmhouse in the middle of nowhere.

Well, that small-town block is Santa Rosa’s Railroad Square. In the clip, you can see Chevy’s in the background, and the buildings that currently house Furniture Depot, Old Town Furniture and Sacks Thrift Store. In a shot filmed through the window of Omelette Express, you can see the storefront across the street that’s now home to Jack and Tony’s Whiskey Bar and Cast Away Knit Shop. Of course the farmhouse where Martin lives with his wife and 12 children isn’t in the Midwest either. The big, white Victorian is actually located on Two Rock Ranch at 1051 Walker Road in Petaluma. It’s a private home, owned by the Tresch family, and home to an organic dairy and an apple orchard. Santa Rosa makes a reappearance at the end of the film when Martin and his son return to “Midland” by Amtrak. The station that they come home to is none other than the Railroad Square Train Depot—soon to be home to the SMART train. As the family hugs and makes nice, you can see the building where Flying Goat Coffee now resides, in the background, and a little bit of A’ Roma Roasters when the camera angle changes. One word of recommendation: there’s nothing wrong with watching the beginning and the end of this film and fast-forwarding straight through the middle. Your precious life span will thank you ) 26 later.—L.C.

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Res Tourist ( 25 ‘Howard the Duck’ Is it legal to hunt ducks on the Petaluma River? If the duck in question is named Howard, it should be. Nine times out of 10, I have no idea what is going on in George Lucas’ 1987 disasterpiece ‘Howard the Duck.’ But I do know the brown, lazy Petaluma River when I see it, and that police car taking a dive might have been the most sanitary thing to fall into it. Should it prove too tempting to skip the foul-mouthed, raunchy, duck-from-another-world blockbuster, know that there are a few scenes shot in Petaluma. Western Avenue is featured, the aforementioned river and a glimpse of the Petaluma Bridge during Howard’s scamper away from law enforcement (they should have just let him go) in a small-engine glider. That’s it. Maybe the short screen-time is why Petaluma officials and residents don’t exactly boast about being in the movie. Or maybe it’s Lea Thompson’s line, “I just can’t resist your intense animal magnetism,” while she and Howard are snuggling up to watch late-night television.—N.G.

‘Shadow of a Doubt’ The ultimate Santa Rosa movie, Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ (1946) contains vivid scenery and small-town charm galore. Though Joseph Cotten and Teresa Wright are the film’s top two stars, third billing would have to go to 1940s Santa Rosa itself for providing a perfect setting of quaint innocence for the story’s sinister undercurrent. Cotten’s dark nature is foreshadowed as his train pulls into the Santa Rosa train station, emitting a huge cloud of black smoke—a pure Hitchcock touch. The depot is still there today at Fourth and Wilson, as is the Western Hotel, seen in the background (it’s now Flying Goat Coffee), and Hotel La Rose. The Shadow of a Doubt house is at 904 McDonald Ave., and it’s instantly recognizable from the front. The wrap-around

porch, the wrought-iron railing above the porch roof, the split walkway—it’s all there. The scenes “inside” the house were filmed on a Los Angeles set, and the back-door exterior staircase was also a set construction. But walk around on Fourteenth Street and you’ll find the garage, the site of a terrifying scene late in the film. (The original double doors, important to the action, have been upgraded.) Sadly, almost all of Santa Rosa’s downtown today is unrecognizable from the film. The towering courthouse was torn down in 1966. The ivy-covered Carnegie library, where young Charlie asks for a newspaper late at night, was demolished in 1964. The American Trust building where Uncle Charlie makes a deposit, also gone, and the Tower Theater, where young Charlie runs into some friends, torn down. The Til-Two bar, once at the southwest corner of Third and Santa Rosa Avenue, is an empty commercial building. The white church at the close of the film is now a concrete parking garage. However, a few features remain. Scenes of a policeman directing traffic on Fourth Street show the Empire Building and its stillworking clock tower. On her way to the library, young Charlie walks by Arrigoni’s Market, on Fourth and D—squint and you can see the sign—which is still there. The Rosenberg Building at Fourth and Mendocino is still the same, now home to Pete Mogannam’s Fourth Street Market. And when Uncle Charlie leaves Santa Rosa, in the background is a vaguely Spanishstyle building, which still stands as Chevy’s restaurant. Since it release, Shadow of a Doubt has given generations of Santa Rosans a new appreciation of their city. But during the funeral scene at the film’s end, it’s hard not to feel an extra eulogy for the city depicted in the movie—the Santa Rosa that once was.—G.M.

‘The Village of the Damned’ & ‘The Fog’ In 1980, horror flick maestro John Carpenter filmed the


‘Scream’ This horror classic is a treasure chest of local scenery, but due to conservative concerns over the violent nature of the film, as mentioned, ‘Scream’ (1996)

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HEDREN’S HAVEN Perhaps the most popular local film site of all, the old schoolhouse in Bodega from ‘The Birds’ hasn’t much changed over the years.

couldn’t be filmed at Santa Rosa High School. Its replacement as the film’s Woodsboro High was the Sonoma Community Center at 276 E. Napa St. in Sonoma, still standing and looking exactly the same. Interestingly, in Craven’s cameo scene as a janitor, there’s a hanging banner in the hall reading “Panthers,” the mascot for Santa Rosa High School. Other hallway scenes were filmed at the abandoned Yeager & Kirk lumberyard on Santa Rosa Avenue, now demolished. Many scenes of Woodsboro were filmed in Healdsburg, especially in the Healdsburg Plaza, right downtown, and in front of buildings on Center Street. The Woodsboro police station was the old Healdsburg police station at Center and Matheson, which is now Oakville Grocery and looks completely different. The grocery store scene was filmed at Pacific Market, on Town & Country Drive in Santa Rosa, still there and largely the same. And the video store scene was filmed at Bradley Video, in the shopping center at 3080 Marlow Road, which is now closed. Scenes at Tatum and Dewey’s house were filmed at 824 McDonald Ave. in Santa Rosa, which is the most accessible Scream house to view from the

street—you can still see the wraparound porch where Neve Campbell sat in the film. Casey’s house, where Drew Barrymore is killed, is on Sonoma Mountain Road in Glen Ellen near Enterprise Road, but it’s gated and set far back from the road. Sidney’s house is at 1820 Calistoga Road, but it, too, is set off from the road and has been remodeled since the film. The final party-scene house is in Tomales, at the very end of a long driveway marked 3871 TomalesPetaluma Road. Caution: it’s a private drive.—G.M.

‘American Graffiti’ Filmed in the summer of 1972, George Lucas’ coming-of-age classic ‘American Graffiti’ pays tribute to the groovin’ tunes and stylin’ rides that defined his adolescence while cruising the strip—then Highway 99—in Modesto, Calif., during 1962. To capture the true experience of “the strip” in its heyday, Lucas selected San Rafael as the film’s central location for its thenauthentic sixties-era look and feel. But after neighborhood residents barraged the set with noise complaints, the cast and crew hurriedly relocated to downtown Petaluma, known by the movie’s fans today as “Graffiti Town.”

Once every year in May, American Graffiti enthusiasts prowl the streets in their candycolored classic cars, groove to live rock ’n’ roll and revisit some of the film’s moviemaking history. Among the neighborhood blocks and streets captured in the movie—Petaluma Boulevard, D Street and Washington Street (the main drag for cruisers)—film watchers can also catch some of Petaluma’s architectural history. In front of the old opera house (149 Kentucky St.) Curt Henderson, played by Richard Dreyfuss, is connived into joining the Pharaohs gang; today the opera house is occupied by law offices and an Irish pub, but on the outside, the building remains unchanged. Fans will also recognize the used car lot right next to the McNear Building (15–23 Petaluma Blvd. N.) where Henderson manacles the axle of a police car to a metal pole. Today, the lot remains as a small enclave for parking cars, but next door, then the State Movie Theater, is the Mystic Theatre.—M.S.

‘Gattaca’ On watching ‘Gattaca’ again for the first time since 1997, I am reminded of two things: first, how bad of an actor Ethan Hawke really is, and ) 28

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fishing-town-leper-zombie massacre flick ‘The Fog’ around Inverness and the Point Reyes Lighthouse. It’s at the creepy, wind-swept lighthouse that ’80s film star Adrienne Barbeau, as small-town radio DJ Stevie Wayne, first has to defend herself from the dooms-bearing killer fog. Carpenter liked West Marin so much that he ended up buying a house in Inverness, and 15 years later again chose the area as a film location for the 1995 remake of ‘Village of the Damned.’ (Later, a Point Reyes local told the San Francisco Chronicle that the filmmakers treatment of locals was “really, really rude and harsh.”) The film, like it’s predecessor, features long, dramatic shots of waves crashing against the Point Reyes Seashore. Christopher Reeve, in his last role before being paralyzed in a horseriding accident, tutors the evil, white-haired children in the red schoolhouse that’s still home to Nicasio Elementary School located at 5555 Nicasio Valley Road. The white-and-greenshingled house where Reeve lives with his doomed-to-suicide wife is in Chimney Rock, just above Drake’s Estuary. To get there, head west on Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, through Inverness, until you get to the Chimney Rock turn off; walk about a mile down the trail to see the house, now used as a residence for the park staff. Other locations in Nicasio are prominently featured, including the town’s main square, baseball field, and reservoir. The red barn where the children start their malevolent commune is actually owned by the federal park district and was used for storage at the time of filming. With all this in mind, West Marin might just be the perfect spot for a John Carpenter film tour, eh? —L.C.


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Res Tourist ( 27 second, how cute Jude Law was when he still had all of his hair. For those who haven’t seen it, the film tells the story of Vincent, who is born naturally to lovestruck parents sometime in the “not too distant future,” at a time when most babies are formulated for genetic perfection at birth. Naturally, Vincent is born with a heart condition, one that banishes him to a life of low-wage, manual labor, when all he wants to do is fly to the stars. He comes up with a plot that allows him access to the elite Gattaca Space Center, working his way up to a space trip as a “borrowed ladder.” The scenes at the neo-futuristic headquarters were actually filmed at the Marin Civic Center; it was used for both exterior and interior shots, including some really gorgeous images of the building from a distance at night. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1957, the large, sand-colored architectural wonder can’t be missed from its perch above Highway 101. It can’t be missed in the movie either, appearing so much that it’s practically another character. At one point, Vincent cleans the 80foot central dome, which is home to the central branch of the Marin County Library. In another scene, rocket ships fly in the sky beyond the massive skylights that line the ceiling of the upper floor. For those who want to recreate their favorite Uma Thurman and Ethan Hawke scenes from the film, the Marin Civic Center is free to enter on most weekdays. One-hour long docent tours are offered on Wednesdays at 10:30am for $5, no reservations required. And since NASA recently declared Gattaca to be the most plausible science-fiction movie ever made, maybe someday soon genetically modified humans will be running the Marin Civic Center instead of regular, gene-flawed politicians.—L.C.

‘Pollyanna’ Set in turn-of-the-century Smalltown, U.S.A., Disney’s ‘Pollyanna’ prominently features Santa Rosa’s famed McDonald

Mansion at 1015 McDonald Ave. as the home of the main characters. There are plenty of great shots of the three-story home, but when you see it today—it’s in the final stages of a complete restoration—keep in mind that a false facade was added by Disney to make it look more like New England. The gated driveways on the gem of McDonald Avenue give view to a stellar garden and the half-faux Victorian architecture. And if you’re looking for the tree that Pollyanna uses trying to sneak back inside after a late night out, you won’t find it—that was a set, too. The film features scenery from other areas of Sonoma and Napa counties, and reportedly cast members stayed at the Flamingo Hotel during shooting in 1959. The movie didn’t live up to box-office expectations, at the time earning only half of the projected $6 million.—N.G.

‘This Earth Is Mine’

‘This Earth Is Mine’ opens with a close-up of grapes, a shot of Rock Hudson in a cowboy hat and a gorgeous, sweeping view of Inglenook Winery. And the film, dear reader, goes downhill from there. Shot on location in the Napa Valley, the film offers fine vineyard scenery and the inclusion of Claude Rains and Jean Simmons. But the movie drags, despite the best intentions of the screenwriters. The plot centers around two winemaking families struggling to get by during Prohibition. Bootleggers want to buy their wares, but only one, Hudson, is willing to sell. He also knocks up a vineyard worker—a “common, scheming trollop”—and courts Simmons, who is unimpressed with winery life. “Do you like our valley?” she’s asked upon arrival. “It’s very large,” she sighs. Shots of barrels containing 1927 Cabernet aren’t the only fun props here. Period-era cars and dialogue featuring the real-life Stag’s Leap pepper the film, and an old depot—Yountville? Rutherford?— figures into several scenes.—G.M.


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OLD TOWN ‘Shadow of a Doubt,’ the quintessential Santa Rosa movie.

‘The Birds’ Here’s a fun game for Santa Rosa residents: rent Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘The Birds’ and each time they mention Santa Rosa, scream loud and wave your hands over your head like you’re fighting off devil birds. It never fails to entertain. In 2012, it’s difficult to retrace the exact traces of the film’s shooting locations, since the town in the movie is actually a composite of Bodega, Bodega Bay and studio sets—but it’s not impossible. One thing: don’t go searching for the Tides Restaurant, featured so prominently throughout the film, since the original location of the restaurant burned down, just as it did in that great dramatic scene where the gas station blows up. Since The Birds release in 1963, the Tides has been rebuilt twice; the original location was actually on the driveway leading up to the current restaurant, gift store and fish market. Fortunately, according to the book Footsteps in the Fog: Alfred Hitchcock’s San Francisco, the wharf where Tippi Hedren first sets sail to deliver the lovebirds to Kathy Brenner still exists. Other landmarks to look for: the Casino restaurant

on Bodega Highway, where cast and crew ate meals during filming, and where chef Mark Malicki cooks his gourmet, locally sourced meals today; and the Potter Schoolhouse, up near the St. Teresa de Avila church in the actual town of Bodega (though don’t look for Annie Hayworth’s cottage next to the schoolhouse, as that was a false front made for the film). The schoolhouse is a private residence, but don’t let that stop you from taking photos of yourself screaming in front of the grand, old white building on Bodega Lane. You also might want to recreate the scene where the schoolchildren run away from the schoolhouse as birds peck away at them, so head for Taylor Street Hill in Bodega Bay, and run and scream loud on your way down. The Brenner Farm across the bay, where the final standoff with the birds occurs, was the home of Rose Gaffney, the woman behind the successful campaign to prevent PG&E from building a nuclear power plant on Bodega Head in the 1960s. Hitchcock transformed her broken-down ranch into the little farmhouse where Mitch Brenner lived with his mother and ) 30

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‘Peggy Sue Got Married’

sister. To find the site, drive down Westshore Road toward Bodega Head and look for a sign that says “Restricted Access-Bodega Marin Laboratory Housing” and a grove of cypress trees. Make sure to scream in terror when you get there.—L.C.

‘Peggy Sue Got Married,’ Francis Ford Coppola’s 1986 film is chock-full of Santa Rosa and Petaluma sightings. When Peggy Sue travels back to 1960, she wakes in the Santa Rosa High School gym. In the next scene, the front of the school on Mendocino Avenue is featured in all its retro-glory. Later, Peggy and her friends drive through the streets of downtown Petaluma. They cruise past the classic iron-front buildings on Western Avenue, between Petaluma Boulevard and Kentucky Street, and the historic Lan-Mart building at 10 Kentucky St., now home to restaurants, a hair salon and a spa. A grand building adorned with a stylized Carithers sign is at 101 Kentucky—it’s now a furniture store. Peggy’s family lives in a lovely white Victorian on the edge of Petaluma, located at 226 Liberty St. It’s across the street from a house that was used in the filming of Mumford, and it recently was available for rent on Craigslist. Peggy visits her future husband Charlie (Nicolas Cage, weird as ever) at his home, located at 1006 D St., but don’t look for it; it was torn down over 10 years ago. One of the coolest buildings in the movie is “the Donut Hole Cafe,” which was actually Millie’s Chili Bar at 600 Petaluma Blvd. S. A brownie-gift shop for a bit, it currently sits empty. Later in the film, Peggy Sue and her beatnik boyfriend head to Lena’s Restaurant in Santa Rosa. Lena’s, once the oldest restaurant in Santa Rosa, was razed in the ’90s; Chop’s Teen Club was built in its place at 509 Adams St. If you look carefully, you can see the neon sign for Michele’s restaurant, now Stark’s Steakhouse. Unlike Kathleen Turner and Nick Cage, that building has aged relatively well.—L.C.

‘Bandits’ Starring Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Thornton and Cate Blanchett, ‘Bandits’ is both the true story of a bank-robber love triangle gone wrong and a tour of the North Bay’s funkiest hotels. First, there’s Mill Valley’s Fireside Inn, the white, freeway-side icon that’s been converted into apartments since the film’s 2001 release. After yet another successful heist, bandits Joe (Willis) and Terry (Thornton) and their all-too willing hostage (Blanchett) crash at the inn and gaze out from its Colonial-style porch. Then there’s Santa Rosa’s classic dive-mansion, the Flamingo Hotel. After an unlucky encounter with a Clover dairy truck (sporting the motto “Here’s lickin’ at you, kid”), Terry and Blanchett hide out at the hotel during a cosmetic convention. Forced to bunk together in a pinkand-white wallpapered room, the pair become intimate, sharing their secret fears (black-andwhite movies, antique furniture), eating takeout and giving each other facials. Finally, there’s Nick’s Cove in Marshall. In Bandits, it looks like little more than a roadside biker bar, with a neon blue sign advertising “music and mollusks.” The trio finally falls apart at this West Marin destination (which has undergone significant remodels since 2001). They order whiskey and warm milk, Terry hyperventilates and collapses on the dance floor and the men brawl. Heartbroken and declaring that the male duo together make up “the perfect man,” Blanchett leaves her bank robbers, forcing them to head down the coast to the film’s final setting in Southern California.—R.D.

For more local movie locations—there are dozens we couldn’t fit here—and a slideshow of film stills shot in the North Bay, see www.bohemian.com.


CULTURE

N A PA

CORTE MADERA

Reality Bites

Personal Best

Is there any chance you really, really liked the 1994 romantic comedy/drama Reality Bites? If so, then this weekend could be the best weekend ever for you. Believe it or not, Lisa Loeb and Squeeze are coming to Napa. Unfamiliar with their work? Lisa Loeb is best known for her song “Stay (I Missed You)” and for her cat-eye glasses that she wore in the song’s video, where she’s pouting in an empty room. Squeeze is the British band, more popular in the U.K. than the U.S., who made a name for themselves over here after the release of the hit “Tempted,” which Janeane Garofalo sings, awkwardly, while driving a car in Reality Bites. See Squeeze on Wednesday, April 18, at the Uptown Theatre (1350 Third St., Napa; 7pm; $55; 707.259.0123) and Lisa Loeb on Saturday, April 21, at the Napa Valley Opera House (1030 Main St., Napa; 8pm; $25; 707.226.7372).

Sometimes things happen that are all too easy to turn a blind eye to, or just completely disregard, because it makes us uncomfortable. Local author Melanie Thorne addresses a personal topic that many people probably have some experience with. Her novel Hand Me Down involves a young girl in a broken home who tries to protect her younger sister from her alcoholic father, but they eventually become separated after a drastic decision by her mother. After considering whether it was better to write the story as a novel or not, she decided to stick with fiction, because “it reveals truths more cleanly and clearly then they appear in real life,” she says. See a brave author and her inspirational novel on Tuesday, April 24, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 7pm. Free. 415.924.3838.

TIBURON

S A N TA R O S A

The Player

Funny Games

It’s that time of the year again—time for the 11th annual Tiburon International Film Festival! Providing movie enthusiasts with over 100 different films from 50 countries, this year’s lineup promises nonstop movies from up-and-coming film directors, as well as old hands. Moviegoers will also have a chance to hear professor of cinema Joseph McBride from San Francisco State University. A screenwriter and author, McBride has written biographies of Steven Spielberg and John Ford. On Friday, April 27, there will also be a dinner and awards ceremony at Sam’s Restaurant. Why settle for daytime television and mediocre romcoms? Get out to this international experience and follow TIFF’s motto by “Understanding the World through Film.” It runs this Thursday, April 19, until Thursday, April 26. Various locations. For complete schedule and pricing, see www. tiburonfilmfestival.com or call 415.789.8835.

Birbiglia? It’s Italian. But not real Italian—more like “Olive Garden” Italian, as Mike Birbiglia likes to describe himself. This comedian makes everyone else’s uncomfortable moments in life look like minor, silly misunderstandings when he talks about his experiences. A regular contributor on NPR’s This American Life, his one-man show keeps the crowds feeling sarcastically satisfied with his outlooks on life’s experiences. His shows “Sleepwalk with Me” and “My Girlfriend’s Boyfriend” have won and been nominated for many awards as an outstanding solo act, and “Sleepwalk with Me” was recently turned into a film that won the audience award at the Sundance Music Festival. Come watch Mike talk about the embarrassing escapades that most people would rather forget on Friday, April 20, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $30– $45. 707.546.3600.

—Jennifer Cuddy

IDOLATRY ‘American Idol’ star Frenchie Davis belts it out JulyDEBBIE 3 at the DELIGHTFUL Russian Resort. Debbie Reynolds, a great movieRiver location unto See Concerts, her own, appears at the Marin Center onp32. April 22. See Concerts, p36.

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Crush The week’s events: a selective guide


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GOD, THAT’S GOOD! Napa’s take

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Could Sweeny Todd actually have a touch of humanity? BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

’ve been looking forward to being evil,” explains actor Michael Bulatao, currently playing the title character in Stephen Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, at Napa Valley College. “That part of this role really appealed to me,” Bulatao adds, with sweet, engaging smile, “the evil part.”

In Sondheim’s celebrated musical, a vengeful barber wreaks havoc on Victorian England, slitting the throats of wealthy upper-class gentlemen and delivering the remains to his pie-making accomplice Mrs. Lovett (Suzi Gilbert), who grinds up the victims and serves them

to customers as tasty entrées. After landing the role, however, Bulatao learned that the show’s director, Jennifer King, didn’t want him to play Sweeney Todd as merely a murderous, onedimensional villain. “Jennifer wanted me to find the humanity in Sweeney Todd,” he says, “so I was very careful not to play him as simply twisted and evil. Once we got into rehearsals, I discovered that Sweeney Todd is actually just a very damaged human being. He’s suffering from living in a social system that pits the classes against each other. He’s been extremely hurt by that.” Whether evil or human, there’s something hypnotic about bloody Mr. Todd. The Napa Sweeney is just one of two college productions currently happening in the North Bay. (The other, directed by Leira Satlof, opens this weekend at the Santa Rosa Junior College.) In the Napa production, with musical direction by Dr. Eve-Anne Wilkes, Bulatao is thrilled to be playing such an iconic character. It’s his first time playing Sweeney, though his second time in a show by Sondheim; Bulatao was in the cast of the 2004 Broadway revival of Sondheim’s Pacific Overtures. “What surprised me about Sweeney was how loving he was,” Bulatao suggests. “There was a time when he was a gentle, loving person, with a wife and daughter, but when all of that is taken away, it leaves him empty. That’s why he finally embraces his evil side. “That,” Bulatao says, “was an incredibly important thing to discover—that Sweeney Todd’s evil comes from his having lost so much. And with Sondheim’s lyrics and music, so clever and beautiful, it all just makes this a wonderful character for an actor to play.” ‘Sweeney Todd’ plays Thursday– Sunday through April 22 at the Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center (2277 Napa-Vallejo Hwy., Napa; Thursday–Saturday at 8pm, Sunday at 2pm; $20–$25; 707.256.7500) and Thursday–Sunday through May 5 at SRJC’s Burbank Auditorium (1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa; Thursday–Saturday at 8pm, Sundays at 2pm; $12–$18; 707.527.4343)


DEFINITIVE DOCUMENTARY

ON THE MUCH BELOVED KING OF REGGAE.”

Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Chimpanzee (G; 78 min.) Disneynature’s fourth original documentary follows an abandoned chimp and his adoption by a new mother in Africa’s Ivory Coast jungle. Co-produced by the Jane Goodall Institute and narrated by Tim Allen. (GB) Damsels in Distress (PG-13; 99 min.) Three friends at a college dominated by men set out to change the school’s environment. Directed by Whit Stillman (The Last Days of Disco). (GB)

In Darkness (NR; 144 min.) In Nazi-occupied Poland, a sewer worker helps hide a group of Jews in the city’s tunnels. In Polish with English subtitles. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB)

The Kid with a Bike (NR; 87 min.) Belgian drama about an abandoned boy who latches on to a woman he meets at a doctor’s office. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB)

The Lucky One (PG-13; 101 min.) After returning from Iraq, a soldier searches for the unknown woman whose photograph gave him hope and courage. Based on the Nicholas Sparks’ novel. (GB) Think Like a Man (PG-13; 120 min.) After learning their wives are soaking up the advice in Steve Harvey’s real-life self-help book Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man, four men try to turn the tables on their mates. From director Tim Story (Barbershop). (GB)

“ two brothers who must save padre’s ranch from a powerful drug lord. With Gael García Bernal and Diego Luna. (GB)

The Deep Blue Sea (R; 98 min.) Rachel Wiesz stars as the wife of a prominent judge who leaves her marriage for an ex-RAF pilot in drama set in 1950s postwar Britain. At the Rafael Film Center. (GB)

Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (PG; 94 min.) Universal Pictures takes quite a few liberties in this 3-D animated version of the classic Seuss story. With the voices of Danny DeVito, Taylor Swift and Ed Helms. (GB)

Friends with Kids (R; 107 min.) The last pair in a circle of thirtysomething friends, all having children, adopt a plan to remain platonic while having a child after witnessing how offspring have affected their friends’ relationships. With Jon Hamm, Kristen Wiig and Maya Rudolph. (GB)

The Hunger Games (PG-13; 142 min.) Droolingly anticipated adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ bestselling young adult novel about a dystopian future where teens kill teens in annual rated-PG-13 bloodsports. (GB)

The Island President (NR; 101 min.) When climate change threatens a three-foot rise in sea level that would render the Maldives uninhabitable, President Mohamed Nasheen develops a plan in his first year in office to make the islands completely carbon-neutral. From Bay Area documentary filmmaker Jon Shenk. Opens April 6 at the Rafael Film Center. (GB)

Jeff Who Lives at Home (R; 82

ALSO PLAYING American Reunion (R; 115 min.) Fourth in the original American Pie series sends the original cast back to Michigan for their 10-year high school reunion. (GB)

The Cabin in the Woods (R; 105 min.) Director Drew Goddard and Joss Whedon aim to return quality chills to the horror genre in film about a group of friends vacationing in a remote cabin. Nifty movie poster. (GB)

Casa de Mi Padre (R; 84 min.) Will Ferrell and Adam McKay team again for comedy (in Spanish!) about

in.) Zero-ambition 30-year-old steps out from mom’s basement to stalk his brother’s adulterous wife in indie comedy starring Jason Segel. (GB)

Jiro Dreams of Sushi (NR; 81 min.) An inside look at top Michelinrated sushi restaurant Sukiyabashi Jiro, in Tokyo, and the chef who founded it. (GB)

John Carter (PG-13; 132 min.) Bigscreen adaptation of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ series about a Confederate Civil War captain transported to Mars. Live-action directorial debut of Pixar’s Andrew Stanton (Finding Nemo, WALL-E). (GB)

Lockout (PG-13; 110 min.) A

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES

government agent (Guy Pearce) falsely accused of espionage is offered amnesty if he can rescue the president’s daughter from a space prison that’s fallen to the inmates. Screenplay by Luc Besson (Nikita, The Fifth Element). (GB)

Mirror Mirror (PG; 106 min.) Tarsem Singh (The Cell, The Fall) directs live-action adaptation of Snow White tale starring Julia Roberts as the evil queen. With Sean Bean, and Lily Collins as Snow White. (GB) Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (PG-13; 111 min.) Ewan McGregor plays a fisheries expert who helps realize a sheik’s dream of creating a river for fly-fishing in the desert. With Emily Blunt and Kristin Scott-Thomas. (GB)

The Salt of Life (NR; 90 min.) Retired, 60-year-old Gianni takes the advice of a friend and searches for a young mistress in Italian comedy from the director of Mid-August Lunch. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB)

The Secret World of Arrietty (G; 94 min.) The new film from Hayao Miyazaki’s Studio Ghibli features the voices of Bridgit Mendler, Will Arnett, Amy Poehler and Carol Burnett. (GB)

Steinbeck Country: Monterey to Big Sur (NR; 53 min.) Neither documentary nor travelogue, Steinbeck Country seeks to capture “daily scenes in specific locations,” according to filmmaker John Harris. Against a soundtrack Harris himself composed, the film unfurls with scenes of nature alongside surfers, lighthouses, the Bixby Bridge and more. (RvB)

The Three Stooges (PG-13; 85 min.) The Farrelly brothers bring the classic trio to the big screen in an original story starring Chris Diamantopoulos as Moe, Will & Grace’s Sean Hayes as Larry and Mad TV’s Will Sasso as Curly. (GB) 21 Jump Street (R; 109 min.) Action-comedy based on the TV show co-stars Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill (who co-wrote) as cops who go undercover as high school students to bust a drug ring. (GB) Wrath of the Titans (PG-13; 99 min.) Computer-generated demigods break loose to the annoyance of humanity in fantasy sequel to 2010’s over-the-top Clash of the Titans. (GB)

SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

– Jordan Mintzer, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

ffff REVELATORY.”

– THE GUARDIAN

Join the fun at a free family-friendly celebration SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 11 AM – 6 PM MARIN CIVIC CENTER LAGOON PARK Exhibitors · Luscious Food Celebrity Chefs · Guest Speakers Bike to Earth Day · Craft Fair Fun for Kids · Teenspot Earth Day All Stars Band · Zulu Spear

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OFFICIAL SOUNDTRACK AVAILABLE NOW ON 2CD & 3LP

A FILM BY KEVIN MACDONALD

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A

Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim Book by Hugh Wheeler From an Adaptation by Christopher Bond

April 20, 21, 26, 27, 28, May 3, 4, 5 at 8:00 PM April 21, 22, 28, 29, May 5 at 2:00 PM SRJC Burbank Auditorium, 1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa, CA Buy Tickets Online: www.santarosa.edu/theatrearts Box Office: 707.527.4343 RECOMMENDED FOR AGE 18 AND ABOVE. CONTAINS STRONG LANGUAGE, ADULT CONTENT, AND VIOLENCE SWEENEY TODD is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Phone: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684 www.MTIShows.com

las, 4/20 is upon us. Have you spaced on plans? Whether you want to hit the dance floor or melt into your chair, the North Bay offers plenty of post-tax relax. While some consider April 20 just another day, it’s the stoner’s holiday, and it means a serious smoke-athon. Regardless of whether or not you toke, we can all appreciate 4/20’s Marin County roots and give thanks for the natural vibes of the Northern California experience by seeing some live music. From his roots as a lead singer for Black Uhuru, Junior Reid has evolved into an accomplished individual artist and producer. A

recent side project is his dancehall chant for marijuana emancipation, “I Love Chronic.” Starry-eyed Reid floats through phosphorescent ganga in this video anthem to herbal abundance. (April 20 at 19 Broadway, 19 Broadway Blvd., Fairfax; 9pm; $25; 415.459.1091.) Daniel “Bambaata” Marley, son of Ziggy, is a Marley youth maturing into his own sound. As Bob’s eldest grandson, he builds upon a lifetime of grooming by a family of reggae royalty. “The Bay’s been good to me,” says Marley, approving the natural qualities of Northern Cali grade while relenting that “some herbs have chemicals, and that’s not dope.” His repertoire ranges from the Southern rap “600 Spliffs” to the smooth dancehall of “Live It Inna Fear.” (April 20 at the Mystic Theater, 23 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma; 9pm; $16–$20; 707.765.2121.) On a West Coast Rootz Releaf Tour, Jamaicans Rootz Underground have a retro-reggae sound blending roots and lovers rock. The Releaf Tour is their mission of reforestation; opening is hip-hop reggae vocalist Ancient Mystic accompanied by Sonoma County’s finest reggae dancehall DJs. (April 20 at Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol; 9:30pm; $20–$25; 707.829.7300.) Soul Pie is a Fairfax quartet soulfully blending sounds of the Meters and early Red Hot Chili Peppers, with a polished sound uniquely their own. Cozy up 4/20style to some upbeat funk-rock at Sonoma’s favorite watering hole. (April 20 at Steiner’s Tavern, 465 First St. W., Sonoma; 9:30pm; free; 707.996.3812.) Local roots-rock reggae posse Sol Horizon get crowds lifted when they take the stage with Sebastopol’s own Gypsy rag-time band the Jug Dealers. (April 20 at the Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St., Santa Rosa; 9:30pm; $10.) And two blocks away, ELEMENTAL is “an audio-visual journey through the elements that create us” says artist Ananta. She guides a full-on sensory trip with original music compositions and NASA images of the universe. (April 20 at the Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa; 8pm; $5–$15; 707.528.3009.)


ŵŷ

F ITZ & T H E T A N T R U M S s P O R T U G A L . T H E M A N A M A D O U & M A R I A M s WOLFGANG GARTNER s F U N . D R. DOG s THE WALKMEN s W ASHED OUT CITY & C O L O U R s TWO GALLANTS OF MONSTERS & MEN s MIMOSA ALABAMA SHAKES s REGGIE WATTS TRA M P L ED BY T URT L E S TAME IMPALA s JOVANOTTI THE BE GOOD TANYAS s Y A C H T SHARON VAN ETTEN s GEOGRAPHER SEAN HAYES s BOMBA ESTEREO D I R T Y D O Z E N B R A S S B A N D s BIG GIGANTIC THEE OH SEES s WALLPAPER s TENNIS s ZOLA JESUS WHITE DENIM s A L L E N S T O N E s THE M MACHINE MICHAEL KIWANUKA s T A N L I N E S s F A T H E R J O H N M I S T Y ELECTRIC GUEST s CAVEMAN s YELLOW OSTRICH s PAPA HONEY ISLAND SWAMP BAND s ANIMAL KINGDOM AND MANY MORE!

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Music

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AP R I L 1 8 – 24, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Cinnabar Chamber Singers Mixed male and female voices explore a variety of musical styles. Tuesdays, 7:15pm through May 22. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Connect the Dots Curated by Kerry and Kevin McCracken, day of art and music draws on the talents of Christian Joy, Julia Davis, Brian Glaze and others. Apr 22, 2-11pm. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

John Courage Multitalented songwriter throws all-out shindig to celebrate latest album, “Don’t Fail Me Now,” featuring extended seven-piece band. Apr 21, 8pm. $10-$12. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Daniel ‘Bambaata’ Marley

Sonoma County Chamber Singers Choral music with seasonal themes and selections. Apr 21, 7:30pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Tech N9ne Kansas City rapper named for a semi-automatic goes Wayne and tries out some rock ‘n’ roll, with Machine Gun Kelly opening. Apr 24, 8pm. $35. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Alpha Yaya Diallo & the Bafing Riders Guitarist and singer from Guinea in West Africa strums dexterously in acoustic and electric formats. Apr 21, 8pm. $12-$24. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Debbie Reynolds Legendary singer, dancer and actress, otherwise known as “America’s Sweetheart,” visits Marin. Apr 22, 3pm. $25-$60. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Enso String Quartet

The Romeros

Much-sought-after New York City quartet presents Russian River Chamber Music’s season finale concert. Apr 20, 7:30pm. Free. Healdsburg Community Church, 1100 University Ave, Healdsburg.

This “royal family of guitar” has roots going back to the ‘60s. Apr 21, 8pm. $20-$45. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Lisa Ferraro and Erika Luckett create a blend of two voices and one guitar that nourishes the ear. Apr 21, 8pm. $20. Occidental Center for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Apr 20, Amy Hogan Trio. Apr 21, Liquid Sun Day. Apr 22, Rusty String Express. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Apr 19, Afia Walking Tree and friends. Apr 20, Abatis, Salty De Vito and Over the Falls. Apr 21, Apple Blossom After Pary with Pepperland. Apr 22, Foxes in the Henhouse. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Coffee Catz

MARIN COUNTY

Grandson of Bob, son of Ziggy, sings, drums and writes on themes from love to personal freedom, with Pure Rootz opening. Apr 20, 9pm. $16-$20. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Gratitude & Awe

Buy tickets at livenation.com. To charge by phone (800) 745-3000. Limit 6 tickets per person. All dates, acts and ticket prices are subject to change without notice. All tickets are subject to applicable service charges.

Jane White. Apr 19, 7pm. $10. Meadowcroft Wines, 23574 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.934.4090.

Frontline opening. Apr 18, 8pm. $55. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Paula West Jazz vocalist performs with George Mesterhazy on piano, John Wiitala on bass and Jason Lewis on drums. Apr 19, 8pm. $22-$30. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Mon, 6pm, open mic. Third Friday of every month, 7pm, West Coast Songwriters showcase. Sat, 2pm, Bluegrass jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Doc Holliday’s Saloon Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 138 Calistoga Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.623.5453.

First Edition Apr 21, Counter Culture with special guests Dewey and the Peoples. Apr 22, Carl and Paul Green. 1420 E Washington Ave, Petaluma. 707.775.3200.

Flamingo Lounge Apr 20, Sugarfoot. Third Saturday of every month, Decadance. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Apr 20, Un Deux Trois. Apr 21, Hot Frittatas. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden Apr 18, Celtic Jam. Tues, Jim Adams. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Tavern

The Grouch

Lisa Loeb

Erstwhile MC appears in small club. Apr 21 at 8pm. $15-$20. Society: Culture House, 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa.

Singer of hit “Stay (I Missed You)” brings Grammynominated voice to Napa. Apr 21, 8pm. $25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Apr 19, Juke Joint with Star Gaze. Apr 20, Rootz Underground. Apr 21, Mother Hips. Apr 25, Michelle Shocked’s 2012 Roadworks Tour: Roccupy. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Squeeze

Hotel Healdsburg

Remnants of the new wave London ‘70s featured with

Apr 21, Lee Charlton with Greg Hester and Rob Wright.

Songwriters in Sonoma Josh Staples and Guy Henry perform with Mendocinoraised songstress Emily

NAPA COUNTY


CRITIC’S CHOICE

DINNER NNER NER & SHO SHOWS! WS! S! A APRIL PRIL 1 18–22 8 –22

Last Day Saloon Apr 20, KC Mosso presents Sol Horizon and Jug Dealers. Apr 21, The Hootenanny presents John Courage and the Great Plains album release with Big Eagle, Ben Weiner and Waters. Mon, karaoke. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenanny’s Pick-Me-Up Revue. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station

Perfect Circles Enso String Quartet completes Russian River Chamber Music’s season In Japanese calligraphy, one of the most sacred symbols is the enso, a single-line circle completed in one stroke. When painting the enso, often on delicate silk or rice paper, the artist must attain as much perfection as possible with no chance of modification. Similarities between Zen practice and performing music have often been made, most notably in Bill Evans’ liner notes to Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue. It’s no surprise, then, that the New York City– based Enso String Quartet takes the same inspiration. A recent album of the complete quartets of Argentinean composer Alberto Ginastera is an instructive signpost for the group. Ginastera’s quartets demand a high level of technical virtuosity, and Enso make it sound all too easy. Twice nominated for Grammy awards, the in-demand quartet this week performs work from Boccherini, Britten and Grieg as part of Russian River Chamber Music’s season finale. Admission is free, and there is no better way to introduce a friend or loved one to classical string quartets than a free concert by world-class musicians. Donations, naturally, are encouraged. The Enso String Quartet performs on Friday, April 20, at Healdsburg Community Church. 1100 University Ave., Healdsburg. 7:30pm. Free. www.russianriverchambermusic.org. —Gabe Meline

25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Apr 18, Brainstorm with Love

and Light. Apr 20, J Curtis Presents Below the Belt Comedy. Apr 21, Smasheltooth Apple Blossom Extravaganza.

Apr 19, Susan Sutton. Apr 20, Haute Flash Quartet. Apr 21, Wendy DeWitt. Apr 22, Phat Chance Trio. Apr 24, Maple Profant. Sun, Kit Mariah’s open mic. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Meadowcroft Wines Apr 19, 7pm, Songwriters in Sonoma with Josh Staples, Guy Henry and Emily Jane White. 23574 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.934.4090.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Apr 19, Tonewoods. Apr 20, David Thom Band. Apr 22, EZ Kewl. Wed, 7:30pm, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Thursday T hursday April A pr i l 1 19 9

“Pat “ Pat Jordan Jordan nB Band” and”

Fabulous live Fabulous live m music u s ic 5 nights nights in in a row! row!

B ohe mian B Bohemian Best e st Band Band Award! A w a rd ! N or th e n C a l iforn ia H ome grown Northen California Homegrown Artist A r tist

Friday, A Friday, April pril 2 20 0 70’s Costume 7 0’s C ostume Party! Par ty!

Saturday S aturday April A pr i l 2 21 1

“CounterBalance” “ CounterBalance”

“A “ A PIECE PIECE OF OF MY MY HEART” HEART” Janis JJoplin Janis oplin ccover over b band. and . C Come ome d dressed re s s ed bell iin n 70s 70 s wear, we ar, with with tie-dye, tie- dye , big big hair, hair, b ell bottoms. b ot toms . Costume Costume party par t y with with prizes pr i z e s

Th i s h This high igh energy e nerg y stage stage show show full full o ound, lights lights and and aaction c tion will will off ssound, have dancing, h ave yyou ou d ancing , smiling smiling and and w a nti n g m ore !! wanting more!!

Sunday S unday April A pr i l 2 22 2

“Court “ Cour t ''n' n' D Disaster” isaster” Countr y Band Country B and & Line Line Dancing Dancing F undr aiser ffor or T he C ere s Fundraiser The Ceres C ommunit y Project Pro je c t Community

Mystic Theatre Apr 20, Daniel “Bambaata” Marley. Apr 21, Women for Solomon present Maria Muldaur & Her Red Hot Bluesiana Band. Apr 22, Matthew Sweet’s “Girlfriend” tour. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

North Light Books & Cafe

aatt H Hwy12 w y12 iin n tthe he S Safeway afe w waa y S Shopping h o ppi n g C Center e n te r

www.restaurantbarsantarosa.com w ww.re r staur u antbarsantarosa .co om m 707.537.0308 7 07.537.0308

Like L ike us us on on Facebook Facebook

Apr 19, Easy Leaves.Thurs, 5:30pm, open mic. 550 E Cotati Ave, Cotati. 707.792.4300.

Northwood Restaurant Thurs, 7pm,Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

Papa’s Taverna Fri, 7pm, live music. Sat, 7pm and Sun, 4pm, Kefi. Sun, 1:30 and 3:30pm, Greek dance lessons, live music and bellydance show. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

Phoenix Theater Apr 24, Tech N9ne with Machine Gun Kelly. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe Apr 20, Redwood Combo. Apr 21,

138 1 38 C Calistoga a l i s to g a R Road, oad, Santa Santa Rosa Ro s a

) 38

37 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AP R I L 1 8 – 24, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Apr 25, Brainstorm with Freddy Todd. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.


Music ( 37

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Piezoelectric Effect. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR SINGLES MEET S INGLES TO M E ET BEST B EST BAR BAR HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HONORABLE HONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC MUSIC VENUE VENUE HONORABLE HONOR ABLE

THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APR APR 1 19 9

WEEKLY W EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

GHETTO G HET TO FFUNK/BOOGIE U N K / B O O GI E B BREAKS/GYPSY R E A K S / GYP SY D DOODLE O O D LE

STAR S TAR G GAZE AZE

+ AI M A T +AIMA THE HE D DREAMER R E AM E R H HOP OP S SCOTCH COTCH FFEAT. EAT. A ANAHATA NAHATA S SOUND OUN D DJJ D D DELHI, E LH I , D DAKINI AK I N I S STAR, TAR , E ERICA R IC A D DEE EE HU HUMMINGBIRD MMINGBIRD T THUNDER HUNDER

River Theatre DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER FRI /2 s 8:PM DOORS s $6 !DV/$2 DOS s  PURE ROOTS

DANIEL â&#x20AC;&#x153;BAMBAATAâ&#x20AC;? MARLEY ROCK/POWER POP

Apr 21, The Grouch. Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

35.s0-$//23s!$6$/3s

$$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS

PLUS SUMMER TWINS

REGGAE/DANCEHALL/HIP R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL / HIP HOP HOP

ROOTZ ROOTZ UNDERGROUND UNDERGROUND 420 4 20 CELEBRATION CELEBRATION +ANCIENT + ANCIENT MY MYSTIC STI C

$$20 20 A ADV/$25 DV/$25 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APR APR 2 21 1

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS 5TH 5T H A ANNUAL NNUAL B BEER EER B BLOSSOM LOSSOM F FESTIVAL ESTIVAL N NIGHT IGHT SHOW SHOW WITH: W ITH :

MOTHERHIPS M OTHERHIPS ++TITANS TITANS UP UP

$$20/DOORS 20 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM/21+ DAY D AY SHOW SHOW WITH: W ITH : D DAVID AVID LLUNING UN ING

M R DECEMBER DECEMBER MR HANNAH JERN JERN MILLER MILLER HANNAH

GIRLFRIEND TOUR

WED 5/2s0-$//23ss ROCK

THE FREEWHEELING TO LA TENGO 4(52s0-$//23ss COUNTRY

STEEP CANYON RANGERS

PLUS CARRIE RODRIGUEZ .O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

7 WWWMCNEARSCOM

FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 1PM/ALL 1PM/ALL A AGES GES

SUN S UN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APR APR 2 22 2

MONTHLY M ONTHLY E EVENT VENT HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S SSTAND TAND UP UP COMEDY COMEDY

SOCOFU S OCOFU M MONTHLY ONTHLY C COMEDY OMEDY S SERIES ERIES $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 7PM/21+ 7PM /21+

CALIFORNIA HONEYDROPS

MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT EDUTAINMENT EDUT TAINMENT

Wed, Apr 18 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Apr 19 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7am; 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Dance Club Fri, Apr 20 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm North Bay Country Dance Society/ Contra Dance hosts WHIMSICAL Sat, Apr 21 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9am; 9:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:15am Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm DJ Steve Luther hosts the CALIFORNIA HONEYDROPS Sun, Apr 22 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:30am Zumba Gold with Toning 1:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3:30pm Vintage Dance 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Apr 23 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm North West Pacific Model Railroad Meeting Tues, Apr 24 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7am; 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

REGGAE/DANCEHALL R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL

DJJ JJACQUES D ACQUES & DJ DJ GUACAMOLE GUACAMOLE

$3 $ 3 RED RED STRIPES STRIPES & $4 $4 JAMESON JAMESON ALL ALL NIGHT NIGHT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FFREE REE B B44 111/DOORS 1/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM/21+ TUES T UES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APR APR 24 24 W WEEKLY EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT BILL B ILL DECARLI DECARLI PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT

FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGESâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10PM AGESâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10PM

WED W ED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APR APR 25 25

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS INDIE/ROCK/FOLK INDIE E / R O C K / FO L K

MICHELLE M ICHELLE SHOCKEDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SHOCKEDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

2012 2 012 ROADWORKS ROADWORKS TOUR: TOUR :

ROCCUPY! R OCCUPY!

$$23 23 A ADV/$25 DV/$25 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 77:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

FRI F RI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APR APR 2 27 7

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS DANCE/VARIETY D ANCE/ VARIET Y /SHOW / SHOW

SER S ER LLA AM MUSE USE ART A RT A AFFAIR FFAIR

$$12 12 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

Society: Culture House

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apr 20, Symptomatics. Apr 21, Pulsators. Apr 22, Love Fool. Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Osteria Divino Apr 18, Jonathan Poretz. Apr 19, Elaine Lucia. Apr 20, Ken Cook Trio. Apr 21, Joan Getz Quartet. Apr 22, Vernon Bush Choir. Apr 24, James Moseley. Apr 25, JP Buongiorno. 27 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Apr 18, Continentals. Apr 18, Continentals. Apr 19, Rahmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Songwriters in the Round. Apr 21, Rusty Evans and the Ring of Fire. Apr 22, Rivereens. Apr 24, Overcommitments. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Sausalito Seahorse

Apr 19, Les Sans Culottes. Mon, open mic. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Apr 18, Marcelo and Seth. Apr 19, Del Sol. Apr 20, Los Boleros. Apr 21, James Moseley. Apr 22, Candela. Tues, jazz jam. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Tradewinds

Sleeping Lady

Toad in the Hole Pub

Apr 18, Pure Cane. Apr 20, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Apr 21, Reed Fromer. Apr 25, Counter Culture. Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Apr 19, Steve Wolf and Teja Bell. Apr 20, Arann Harris and the Farm Band. Apr 24, Drake

Jazz Band. Apr 25, Tom Finch Student Showcase. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apr 19, Sofi Rox Presents. Apr 20, Jimbo Trout & the Fish People. Apr 21, Dgiin. Mon, reggae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

NAPA COUNTY Billcoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Billiards Apr 19, Pint Night with live music from the Robbers and Merchants. Apr 21, 6pm-2am, Live Music Extravaganza. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apr 20, Xstatic. Apr 21, Bates Motel Survivors. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Napa Valley Opera House Apr 21, Lisa Loeb. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apr 18, Jeff Madnik and friends. Apr 20, Deborah Winters. Apr 21, Jr Boogie. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Apr 18, Squeeze. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Wells Fargo Center

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

MON M ON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APR APR 23 23

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

MATHEW SWEET

FRI F RI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A APR PR 20

Apr 21, Zulu Spear and Beso Negro. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Reid plus Counter Culture. Apr 19, Rayner Brock with Buddy Owen. Apr 21, Clusterfunk with Bay Gay Farmer. Apr 22, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstromâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz Society. Apr 25, Gail â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Mojoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Blues Band. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Apr 22, Pops Tribute Ladies of Motown. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Saturday, April 21

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Apr 20, 8pm, Ken Waldman. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Palace

Refused Swedish band whose â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shape of Punk to Comeâ&#x20AC;? has actually lived up to its title. Apr 18 at the Warfield.

Charles Lloyd New Quartet Famed saxophonist with excellent sidemen appears with guest vocalist Maria Farantouri. Apr 22 at Herbst Theatre.

Apr 21, Alpha Yaya Diallo and the Bafing Riders. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

M83

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

Screaming Females

Apr 19, Troy Lampkins Group. Apr 20, Reckless in Vegas and Miles Schon. Apr 21, Evolution. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Lark Theater Apr 19, Paula West. 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

19 Broadway Club Apr 18, the Skunks, Bone Dweller and Terese Taylor. Apr 19, 420 Party with Junior

Ultra-cinematic, majestic pop poised to properly overtake those tiny white earbuds. Apr 22-23 at the Fillmore.

Tuneful New Jersey trio with actually only one screaming female, with latest LP, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ugly.â&#x20AC;? Apr 24 at Bottom of the Hill.

St. Vincent Brooklyn chanteuse and guitar-shredder Annie Clark appears in double bill with tUnE-yArDs. Apr 24 at the Fox Theater.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.


Galleries OPENINGS Apr 19 At 4pm. University Art Gallery, “BFA Exhibition 2012,” featuring work of 13 graduating students. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. TuesFri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

Apr 20 At 7pm. Sebastopol Veterans Auditorium, Art Workshop of Western Sonoma County hosts work of over 100 artists as part of Apple Blossom Festival. 282 S High St, Sebastopol.

SONOMA COUNTY Blue Door Gallery Through Apr 20, Paintings on display by Michelle K Irwin. 16359 Main Street, Guerveville. 707.865.9878.

Calabi Gallery Through May 20, “100 Years of Bay Area Art,” featuring local art from 1910-2010. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Gallery One Through Apr 22, “Two Points of View,” featuring works of Jennifer Jaeger and Michele Rosett. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Gallery 300 Through Apr 28, “Having a Ball,” featuring new work by Jennifer Hirshfield. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Apr 21

Graton Gallery

At 4pm. Marin MOCA, “Altered Books,” showcases the work of 150 Bay Area artists who re-imagine, reconstruct and rework old, discarded books. Opening talk by Donna Seager. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Through May 27, “Inverness,” impressionist oils by Jill KellerPeters, John Gruenwald and Phil Wright. Reception, Apr 22, 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912.

At 5pm. Towers Gallery, “Cloverdale: Where the Vineyards Meet the Redwoods,” with various artists in various media. $15. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

Through May 28, “A Culture Within: The Japanese American Experience through Art,” featuring the works of Henry Sugimoto. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Apr 22 At 2pm. Graton Gallery, “Inverness,” impressionist oils by Jill Keller-Peters, John Gruenwald and Phil Wright. Reception, Apr 22, 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912. At 3pm. Ions, “Inner Landscapes,” featuring paintings by Al Longo. 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma.

Ions Apr 22-30, “Inner Landscapes,” featuring paintings by Al Longo. Reception, Apr 22 at 3pm. 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma.

Petaluma Arts Center

Petaluma Museum Apr 21-July 1, “Native Words, Native Warriors,” exhibit on codebreaking and Native Americans in WWII. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Phantom IV Gallery Through Apr 29, “Bohemia Ranch Waterfalls Vernissage,” featuring new paintings and lithographs by Ryan Douglas and William Wheeler. 9077 Windsor Rd, Windsor. 707.527.5447.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through May 20, “Beyond Words: New Portraits and

Places,” by Kai SamuelsDavis. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

GEM FAIRE May 4, 5, 6

Riverfront Art Gallery Through May 5, “Showin’ on the River,” juried photography exhibit. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Sonoma County Fairgrounds { Grace Pavilion, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd. }

FRI. 12-6 | SAT. 10-6 | SUN. 10-5 - General admission $7 weekend pass -

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Through Apr 28, “The Art of Light,” a juried exhibition of work in a variety of media that applies, handles and utilizes light as a primary attribute. Through Apr 28, “Still Scratching,” scratchboard still lifes by Diana Lee. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Veteran’s Auditorium Apr 21-22, Art Workshop of Western Sonoma County hosts 43rd Annual Members’ Show featuring the work of over 100 artists as part of Apple Blossom Festival. Reception, Apr 20 at 7pm. 282 S High St, Sebastopol.

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Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Jun 10, “Color Theory: The Use of Color in Contemporary Art,” featuring work of nine artists from across the country. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Towers Gallery Through Jun 24, “Cloverdale: Where the Vineyards Meet the Redwoods,” with various artists in various media. Reception, Apr 21 at 5pm. $15. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

University Art Gallery Apr 19-May 12, “BFA Exhibition 2012,” featuring work of 13 graduating students. Reception, Apr 19 at 4pm. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY Claudia Chapline Gallery Through Jun 5, Farm art exhibit, featuring the works of Tamae )

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

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Arts Events

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Arts Events

40 NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AP R I L 1 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 24, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Agnoli and others. 3 445 Shoreline Hwy, Stinson Beach. Hours: Sat-Sun, noon to 5, and by appointment. 415.868.2308.

Gallery Route One Through May 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emergences,â&#x20AC;? featuring the art of Mimi Abers. Through May 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Traves de Neustros Ojos,â&#x20AC;? the Latino photography project featuring Gisela Alvarado, Ariana Aparicio and Mario Garcia. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through May 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Muslim Eyes,â&#x20AC;? featuring religions and secular art by 35 Muslim artists. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Field Trips

Halfbreed Comedy Tour

Burbank Open House

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One-of-a-kind comedy event features host Kirk Mc Henry, G King and Ricky del Rosario. Apr 21, 8pm. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Take a self-guided tour of Burbank-created plants covering three acres. Apr 2122, 10am-4pm. Free. Luther Burbank Experiment Farm, 7781 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9492.

Howie Mandel

Earth Day Marin

Comedian and host of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deal or No Dealâ&#x20AC;? brings outrageous style to wine country. Apr 19, 8pm. $35.50-$45.50. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Enjoy music, speakers, workshops, a kid zone and leading organizations, businesses and farmers/food producers moving towards a healthy environmental. Apr 21, 11am-6pm Free. Lagoon Park, Marin Civic Center, San Rafael.

Dance

Pope Valley Day

Marin MOCA Apr 21-May 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Altered Books,â&#x20AC;? showcases the work of 150 Bay Area artists who re-imagine, reconstruct and rework old, discarded books. Opening talk by Donna Seager and reception, Apr 21 at 4pm. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Apr 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photo Phantasies,â&#x20AC;? featuring photos of the strange, unfamiliar and unexpected. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Youth in Arts

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re changing the way you smoke, one volt at a time

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Through Apr 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where We Live,â&#x20AC;? featuring depictions of Marin landscapes by young artists. 999 Fifth St, Ste 290, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Gatehouse Gallery Through Jun 10, new work by Hung Liu. $10. Di Rosa Preserve, 5200 Carneros Hwy 121, Napa. Wed-Fri, 9:30am to 3; Sat, appointment only. 707.226.5991.

Comedy Mike Birbiglia Chronically befuddled comedian shares romantic blunders. Apr 20, 8pm. $30$45. Wells Fargo Center, 50

Sonoma State University Apr 20-28, Dance Concert, Four contemporary dance pieces and the talents of 30 dancers featured in dance concert. Various dates and times. $9$16. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park 707.664.2880

Events April Showers Stories Stories of spring rain and flowers for children. Apr 18, 6pm. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Earth Day Santa Rosa Earth Day with McKenna Faith, Earth Amplified, Fill-up the Clown and Captain Jack Spareribs, in addition to food, scavenger hunt, raffle and more. Apr 22, noon-4pm. Courthouse Sq, Santa Rosa.

Experience Songbird Saturday Sample various classes and alternative healing techniques. Apr 21, 1-4pm $10. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8280 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Quarryhill Earth Day Earth Day Open House and Quarryhill 25th anniversary features sustainable marketplace filled with birds, bees, master gardeners and more. Apr 21, 10am-3pm Free. Quarryhill Botanical Gardens, Highway 12, Glen Ellen.

Set in various locations around historic Pope Valley, tour sponsored by Napa County Historical Society features history, architecture, food and wine. Apr 21, 10am-4pm $25$75. Pope Valley, Pope Valley, Pope Valley.

Film Amadeus NVM presents the story of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, as told by Antonio Salieri, who seeks revenge on the talented composer. Apr 19, 7pm. $5. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Being Adept Documentary sheds light on why Sonoma and Marin counties are experiencing the highest rate of bingedrinking and drug use among adolescents in decades. Apr 24, 7pm. Free. Jackson Theater, Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 707.284.3200.

Haiti, Rising from the Ashes Documentary screened with light supper as fundraiser for Haitian school. Apr 21, 7:30pm. $5-$20. First United Methodist Church, 9 Ross Valley Dr, San Rafael.

No Way Out But One Bay Area premiere of awardwinning documentary with filmmaker Garland Waller. Apr 22, 7pm. $20. Lark Theater,


Reservations Advised

DIN N E R & A SHOW

Apr 19 SINGER /SONGWRITER SERIES HOSTED BY LAURALEE BROWN Thur

7:00pm / No Cover

THE MUDDY ROSES Apr 20 Harmonious, Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Country Fri

Sat

8:00pm / No Cover

MITCH WOODS AND HIS ROCKET 88S Apr 21 Boogie Woogie and Swing 8:30pm BELLE MONROE Apr 22 AND HER BREWGLASS BOYS Sun

5:00pm / No Cover

THE JESSE BREWSTER BAND Apr 27 Original Rock, Americana, Alt-Country Rancho Fri

8:30pm

VOLKER STRIFLER BAND Apr 28 Original Blues and More Sat

BOTTOMS UP Four new contemporary dance works are presented at SSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spring

Dance Show running April 20-28. See Dance, adjacent page.

Sun

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8:30pm

WTJ2 FEATURING WENDY FITZ Apr 29 5:00pm / No Cover Coming in May

549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Om Shanti Om Romantic reincarnation epic about an artist who falls for a superstar. Apr 20, 7pm. $5-$6. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Seldom Seen Flicks Classic, rarely seen films and documentaries. Apr 24 at 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;San Francisco.â&#x20AC;? Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

She Stoops to Conquer Streaming of London National Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of the Oliver Goldsmith play. Apr 2324, 7pm. $21-$23. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Tiburon International Film Festival Eleventh annual festival shines the spotlight on Spanish cinema. For complete lineup of films and panels, visit TiburonFilmFestival. com. Apr 19-27. Various prices and locations; many films at Playhouse Theater, 40 Main Street, Tiburon. 415.381.4123.

Two Music Documentaries â&#x20AC;&#x153;John Allair Digs In,â&#x20AC;? in which the â&#x20AC;&#x153;original rock and roll piano player in Marin Countyâ&#x20AC;? appears in a documentary and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Miracle in a Box,â&#x20AC;? which traces the delicate restoration of a 1927 Steinway piano. Apr 23, 7:30pm Free. Mill Valley Library, 375 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.389.4292.

Food & Drink Chew On This Eat a gourmet dinner, drink wine and talk with 18 local authors to benefit the library. Apr 21, 6:15-10pm. $100. Central Library, Third and E streets, Santa Rosa. 707.545.0831.

Dinner, Dance and Auction Black tie fundraiser for Lifehouse features food and wine from over 50 Bay Area restaurants and wineries. Apr 21, 6pm. $250. Firemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fund Insurance Co, 777 San Marin Dr, Novato.

Earth Night Merchants celebrate Earth Day with special offers. Apr 21, 5pm. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Preservation Ale Release Join Marin Brewing Company and Marin County Parks for new aleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official release and kick-off to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer of Celebration,â&#x20AC;? celebrating 40 years of Marin County Parks. Apr 19, 5pm. Marin Brewing Company, 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Sat, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Taste of Sonoma Food fair features food galore and music by Dgiin, Jen Tucker, the Linda Ferro Band and Pulsators. Apr 21, noon5pm. Free. Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market, 546 East Cotati Ave, Cotati. 707.795.9501.

MAY 11: THE FABULOUS BUD E LUV MAY 12: GATOR BEAT MAY 18: BIG SANDY AND HIS FLY-RITE BOYS MAY 20: DEBBIE DAVIES MAY 25 THE JAMES MOSELEY BAND MAY 26 JOHNNY ALLAIR MAY 27 MARIA MULDAUR PLUS HOUSTON JONES MAY 28 ELVIN BISHOP AND RON THOMPSON AND THE RESISTORS 415.662.2219 On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

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12 at the door

6250 Front Street Forestville

Lectures Free to Be Me Oceana Taicher engages in memoir/performance with gripping original concepts like â&#x20AC;&#x153;1960s Woman: Purpose M-RS Degree.â&#x20AC;? Apr 19, 7:30pm. $5. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8280 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Matt Glowacki Lecture explores how media portrays diversity. Apr 23, 7:30pm. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Preserving Our Seed Heritage Paul Wallace of the Petaluma Seed Bank speaks on campaign to label GMOs, Heirloom Seed Festival and more. Apr 24, 2pm. Free. Shone Farm, 6225 Eastside Rd, Forestville.

Yo el Rey Roasting and Arthouse

) 43

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Apollo 9 astronaut and scientist presents illustrated talk on predicting and preventing asteroid impacts. Apr 22, 7pm. $12. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222. Bird Language and Tracking with Jim

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Arts Events

Shri N Parthasarathi Consul General of India in San Francisco and former India Ambassador to South Korea speaks on civilization and culture of India, trade opportunities and the Indian diaspora. Apr 19, 7:30pm. $5. Spring Lake Village Auditorium, 5555 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa.

Writing Comedy: What’s So Funny? Standup comic and storyteller David Pokorny’s Writers Forum February workshop was so successful, he’s back for an encore. Apr 19, 7pm. $15. Petaluma Community Center, 320 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma.

Readings Book Passage Apr 18, 7pm, “The Man Who Planted Trees,” with David Milarch. Apr 19, 7pm, “Kids Beyond Limits,” with Anat Baniel. Apr 20, 10am, “Meet Me at the Moon,” with Gianna Marino. Apr 20, 1pm, “Dorchester Terrace,” with Anne Perry. Apr 20, 7pm, “Let’s Pretend This Never Happened,”

with Jenny Lawson. Apr 21, 10am, “My Mama Earth,” with Susan Katz. Apr 21, 2pm, “No Cheating, No Dying: I Had a Good Marriage. Then I Tried to Make It Better,” with Elizabeth Weil. Apr 21, 4pm, “Daisy’s Perfect Word,” with Sandra Feder. Apr 22, 1pm, “No, They Can’t,” with John Stossel. Apr 22, 4pm, “An Accidental Affair,” with Eric Jerome Dickey. Apr 23, 7pm, “The Right Hand Shore,” with Christopher Tilghman and Peter Cameron. Apr 24, 7pm, an Evening of Young Adult Authors. Apr 24, 7pm, “Hand Me Down,” with Melanie Thorne. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Apr 18, 7pm, “A Million Tiny Things,” with Kenna Lee. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

French Garden Apr 21, 2:30-4:30pm, Voices of Youth, Fundraiser for California Poets in Schools presents readings by local students. $10-$50. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol 707.824.2030.

Marin Poetry Center Apr 19, 7:30pm, “The Second Blush” and “The Paper Garden,” with Molly Peacock. $3-$5. PO Box 9091, San Rafael.

Theater The Dining Room Play by AR Gurney explores human condition. Various dates and times. Through Apr 22. $15. Calistoga Art Center, 1336 Lincoln Ave, 2 nd Floor, Calistoga. 707.942.2278.

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Laugh your toga off to the story of a slave who attempts to win his freedom by helping his master woo the girl next door. Various dates and times. Through Apr 29. $12-$25. Novato Theater Company, 484 Ignacio Blvd, Novato.

A Glass of Cabaret Romantic musical cabaret with Barry Martin and Taylor Bartolucci. Various dates and times. Through Apr 22. $20$30. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

How a Mountain Was Made Imaginists Theater Collective presents adaption-in-progress of Greg Sarris’ Miwok and Southern Pomo creation stories. Apr 21, 7pm. $5-$10. Imaginists Theatre Collective, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

The Marvelous Wonderettes Travel back to 1958

) 44

‘RUSTY WHEELS’ Kathy Byrne is the 2011 Memorial award winner at the Apple Blossom Art Show running April 21–22. See p39.

43 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AP R I L 1 8 – 24, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Sullivan. Apr 19, 7pm $4. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AP R I L 1 8 – 24, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Art PAID ADVERTISING SECTION

REFLECTIONS

Gallery

44

Arts Events ( 43 and meet the Wonderettes, four girls who step up to perform at their senior prom. Various dates and times. Apr 20-May 13. $15$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Othello Aldo Billingslea plays Othello and Craig Marker plays Iago in intimate staging. Various dates and times. Through Apr 22. $34-$55. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Seven Endings Playwrights’ Lab presents staged reading of play by Martin Russell, directed by Phoebe Moyer. Apr 18, 7:30pm. $15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Pastel Paintings by Bert Kaplan March 4 to April 29

SEBASTOPOL GALLERY 150 N. Main St. Sebastopol 707.819.7200

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Romantic musical comedy by Si Kahn and Amy Merrill presents story of Polly, who, like all of us here at the Bohemian, is both a member of the alternative press and a rising star in her family-owned Wall Street brokerage house. When she falls for a working-class grape boycott committee leader, she faces a conflict universal to any self-respecting bank-heiressturned-hard-nosed-altweeklyreporter. In fact, the plot is nearly identical to a typical Monday in our Fifth Street office, with just a little more singing but roughly the same amount of jazz hands. Various dates and times. Apr 20-May 5. $20-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

To Kill a Mockingbird Southern classic directed by Steven David Martin. Thurs, Apr 19, 8pm, Fri, Apr 20, 8pm, Sat, Apr 21, 8pm and Sun, Apr 22, 2pm. $15-$20. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Busy Signals Meet YA’s best and brightest It’s a known fact in the literary world that the young adult market is hot right now—witness the phenomena of The Hunger Games, Twilight and Harry Potter. It’s also well known that YA books are just as entertaining for all ages. Case in point: I just finished reading The Disenchantments, by Oakland writer and high school English teacher Nina LaCour (pictured), and I couldn’t put it down. Narrated by 18-year-old Colby, who roadies for his best friend’s band on their first (and last) tour, the story takes the notvery-good but doggedly passionate band from San Francisco to Portland in a borrowed VW van. The book skillfully captures the fleeting energy of young love, dance parties, SleaterKinney obsession, wistful glances, road adventures and punk rock. Anyone who’s ever been on tour, played in a band, wanted to play in a band or been in love with a best friend will find pieces of themselves in this tale of love, music, art and friends. Pick up a copy of The Disenchantments—for your daughter or yourself���when LaCour makes a stop in Petaluma as part of the YA or Bust! tour. The tour also features young adult novelists Stephanie Perkins (Lola and the Boy Next Door), Gayle Forman (Where She Went) and Jess Rothenberg (The Catastrophic History of You and Me). The writers discuss their work on Thursday, April 19, at Copperfield’s Books. 140 Kentucky St., Petaluma. 7pm. Free. 707.762.0563.—Leilani Clark


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Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of April 18

ARIES (March 21–April 19) You had to take the test before you got a chance to study more than a couple of the lessons. Does that seem fair? Hell, no. That’s the bad news. The good news is that this test was merely a rehearsal for a more important and inclusive exam, which is still some weeks in the future. Here’s even better news: the teachings that you will need to master before then are flowing your way, and will continue to do so in abundance. Apply yourself with diligence, Aries. You have a lot to learn, but luckily, you have enough time to get fully prepared. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Let’s see if you know what these exquisitely individuated luminaries have in common: Salvador Dali, Martha Graham, Stephen Colbert, David Byrne, Maya Deren, Malcolm X, Willie Nelson, Bono, Dennis Hopper, Cate Blanchett, George Carlin, Tina Fey, Sigmund Freud. Give up? They are or were all Tauruses. Would you characterize any of them as sensible, materialistic slowpokes obsessed with comfort and security, as many traditional astrology texts describe Tauruses? Nope. They were or are distinctive innovators with unique style and creative flair. They are your role models as you cruise through the current phase of maximum self-expression.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20)

In December 1946, three Bedouin shepherds were tending their flock near the Dead Sea. They found a cave with a small entrance. Hoping it might contain treasure hidden there long ago, they wanted to explore it. The smallest of the three managed to climb through the narrow opening. He brought out a few dusty old scrolls in ceramic jars. The shepherds were disappointed. But eventually the scrolls were revealed to be one of the most important finds in archaeological history: the first batch of what has come to be known as the Dead Sea Scrolls. Keep this story in mind, Gemini. I suspect a metaphorically similar tale may unfold for you soon. A valuable discovery may initially appear to you in a form you’re not that excited about.

CANCER (June 21–July 22) The devil called together a committee meeting of his top assistants. He was displeased. Recruitments of people born under the sign of Cancer had fallen far below projected totals. “It’s unacceptable,” the dark lord fumed. “Those insufferable Crabs have been too mentally healthy lately to be tantalized by our lies. Frankly, I’m at wit’s end. Any suggestions?” His marketing expert said, “Let’s redouble our efforts to make them buy into the hoax about the world ending on Dec. 21, 2012.” The executive vice-president chimed in: “How about if we play on their fears about running out of what they need?” The chief of intelligence had an idea, too: “I say we offer them irrelevant goodies that tempt them away from their real goals.”

LEO (July 23–August0 22) “If you don’t run your own life, someone else will,” said psychologist John Atkinson. Make that your motto in the coming weeks, Leo. Write it on a big piece of cardboard and hold it up in front of your eyes as you wake up each morning. Use it as a prod that motivates you to shed any laziness you might have about living the life you really want. Periodically ask yourself these three questions: Are you dependent on the approval, permission or recognition of others? Have you set up a person, ideology or image of success that’s more authoritative than your own intuition? Is there any area of your life where you have ceded control to an external source? VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

Here are the last words that computer pioneer Steve Jobs spoke before he died: “OH WOW. OH WOW. OH WOW.” I’d propose that we bring that mantra into as wide a usage as Jobs’ other creations, like the iPhone and iPad. I’d love to hear random strangers exclaiming it every time they realize how amazing their lives are. I’d enjoy it if TV newscasters spoke those words to begin each show, acknowledging how mysterious our world really is. I’d be pleased if lovers everywhere uttered it at the height of making love. I nominate you to start the trend, Virgo. You’re the best choice, since your tribe, of all the signs of the zodiac, will most likely have the wildest rides and most intriguing adventures in the coming weeks.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) A starfish that loses an arm can grow back a new one. It’s an expert regenerator. According to my understanding of

the astrological omens, you are entering a starfishlike phase of your cycle. Far more than usual, you’ll be able to recover parts of you that got lost and reanimate parts of you that fell dormant. For the foreseeable future, your words of power are “rejuvenate,” “restore,” “reawaken” and “revive.” If you concentrate really hard and fill yourself with the light of the spiritual sun, you might even be able to perform a kind of resurrection.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) Too much of a good thing isn’t necessarily good. (Have you ever hyperventilated?) Too little of a good thing can be bad. (Have you ever gotten dehydrated?) Some things are good in measured doses but bad if done to excess. (Wine and chocolate.) A very little of a very bad thing may still be a bad thing. (It’s hard to smoke crack in moderation.) The coming week is prime time to be thinking along these lines, Scorpio. You will generate a lot of the exact insights you need if you weigh and measure everything in your life and judge what is too much and what is too little.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Sculptor Constantin Brancusi had a clear strategy as he produced his art: “Create like God, command like a king, work like a slave.” I suggest you adopt a similar approach for your own purposes in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. With that as your formula, you could make rapid progress on a project that’s dear to you. So make sure you have an inspiring vision of the dream you want to bring into being. Map out a bold, definitive plan for how to accomplish it. And then summon enormous stamina, fierce concentration and unfailing attention to detail as you translate your heart’s desire into a concrete form.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “If there is one door in the castle you have been told not to go through,” writes novelist Anne Lamott, “you must. Otherwise, you’ll just be rearranging furniture in rooms you’ve already been in.” I think the coming weeks will be your time to slip through that forbidden door, Capricorn. The experiences that await you on the other side may not be everything you have always needed, but I think they are at least everything you need next. Besides, it’s not like the taboo against penetrating into the unknown place makes much sense any more. The biggest risk you take by breaking the spell is the possibility of losing a fear you’ve grown addicted to. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) When rain falls on dry land, it activates certain compounds in the soil that release a distinctive aroma. “Petrichor” is the word for that smell. If you ever catch a whiff of it when there’s no rain, it’s because a downpour has begun somewhere nearby, and the wind is bringing you news of it. I suspect that you will soon be awash in a metaphorical version of petrichor, Aquarius. A parched area of your life is about to receive muchneeded moisture. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

Forty percent of Americans do not know that the dinosaurs died out long before human beings ever existed. When these folks see an old cartoon of caveman Fred Flintstone riding on a diplodocus, they think it’s depicting a historical fact. In the coming weeks, Pisces, you need to steer clear of people who harbor gross delusions like that. It’s more important than usual that you hang out with educated, cultured types who possess a modicum of well-informed ideas about the history of humanity and the nature of reality. Surround yourself with intelligent influences, please.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


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Miscellaneous l Services

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Prayers for World Peace: Sun, 10:30–11:45am Noontime Meditations: Tuesday–Saturday, 12:00 Meeting the Mystics: Earth Day— General Programs: Tues & Weds, 7:30–8:30 A Tale of St. Francis 304 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma, and his connection to all things wild. Experience 707.776.7720 www.meditateinnorcal.org St Frances, and life connection to all things wild Unity Church of Santa Rosa and spiritual on Earth Day. Sun, Apr. 22, Sunday School & Service 10:30am, Non-tradi7–8:30pm, Journey Center, 707.578.2121 tional. Inter-denominational. A spirituallywww.journeycenter.org. minded community. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy NEW!! A Holy Longing: Exploring the 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org All spiritual paths are welcome as we listen together for the movements of The Spirit. Sat, Apr. 21, 10am–12pm, Journey Center, 707.578.2121 www.journeycenter.org.

Shamanic Apprenticeship Wiccan Priestess, Cerridwen Fallingstar, author, The Heart of the Fire, offers her 20th year-long pprenticeship program beginning Mid-May. Call/email for brochure/interview. 415.488.9641 c.fallingstar@gmail.com www.cerridwenfallingstar.com

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Family Services


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