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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Say It Ain’t So, Joe

Trader Joe’s needs to support GMO labeling initiative BY ABRAHAM ENTIN

I

have been a regular customer of Trader Joe’s markets since 1978. As of today, I will no longer shop there.

Trader Joe’s presents itself as a company that respects its customers, and a big part of its marketing strategy is to tell the story behind the food. Its monthly “Fearless Flyer” is filled with stories of how buyers wander the planet looking for great food at great prices, and includes details on the processes that make Trader Joe’s offerings different. It seems to have worked—what started as a little store in Pasadena has become a nationwide chain of highly profitable specialty stores. Today, people like me who shop at Trader Joe’s are engaged in a struggle to know what is in the food that we eat. This would seem to be a no-brainer for a company like TJ’s. And yet it has neither endorsed nor supported Proposition 37, which would mandate the inclusion of genetically modified ingredients as part of the labeling on food and food products. Why doesn’t Trader Joe’s want us to know this? Why doesn’t the company help? Oliver’s Market does, as does Community Market, Strauss Dairy and many other food companies. Trader Joe’s is owned by a German family trust. People in Germany get this information. Everyone in Europe does. So do people in China. In fact, GMO labeling is mandatory in more than 40 countries. These people are free to know what is in the food they eat, but in the United States, we are not. I do not expect Safeway or Kroger to support labeling. I am not shocked that Whole Foods does not stand with its customers. But Trader Joe’s—it wooed me and treated me with respect. It hurts to find out it is just like the rest: on our side until it really counts. Say it isn’t so, Joe. Show us you haven’t sold us out. Until you do, I must say bye-bye to buying at your shop. Abraham Entin lives in Santa Rosa. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Cheat to Learn

I am a former math teacher now volunteering at a San Quentin prison education program. Your article on hightech cheating (“A Cheating Situation,” Aug. 15) made me think that this may expose the folly of the current testing frenzy and reliance on multiple-choice, fill-in-thebubble skills rather than real learning. I have a colleague who gives only takehome, open-book tests and permits collaboration with others as well as the use of the internet when taking the test. All work must be shown. If he suspects that a student has simply copied the answer, he interviews that student and asks for a detailed explanation of how the problem was solved. Of course, this requires more time than computer correction of filled-in bubbles, and it cannot be done online, but it provides an accurate assessment of the student. It also is cheat-proof. Perhaps the proliferation of cheating will force administrators and teachers into providing a better learning environment than what currently passes for education.

JACK LIEBERMAN San Anselmo

Death Becomes Them The arguments in support of the ballot measure to abolish the death penalty are exaggerated at best and, in most cases, misleading and erroneous (“Lethal Blow,” Aug. 8). Proposition 34 is being funded primarily by a wealthy, left-wing company out of Chicago, the ACLU and similarly oriented trust funds. It includes provisions that would only make our prisons less safe for both other prisoners and prison officials and significantly increase the costs to taxpayers due to lifetime medical costs, the increased security required to coerce former death-row inmates to work, etc.

The amount “saved” in order to help fund law enforcement is negligible and only for a short period of time. Bottom line, the SAFE Act is an attempt by those who are responsible for the high costs and lack of executions to now persuade voters to abandon it on those grounds. Obviously, these arguments would disappear if the death penalty was carried forth in accordance with the law.

CHRIS BERNSTIEN Via online

On Display In the Aug. 15 Open Mic, Susan Simon Corwin asked, “What explains the lemminglike nature of so many women subjecting themselves to ultra-high heels?” I’d like to share something I came across not to long ago in a book called Yoga and Vegetarianism, by Sharon Gannon: “When naked and walking in high heels, a human female, viewed from behind, bears a striking resemblance to the hindquarters of a cow, goat, or pig— animals whose hooves have the effect of elevating their rumps, making them look like they are walking on tip-toes. Advertisements for rib joints or barbecue restaurants often use images of pigs and cows wearing high heels and skimpy clothes.” It stems from a culture rooted in exploitation of nature’s gifts. Women are objectifying and exploiting themselves also, with leg shaving and tanning, making their legs look like roasted, skinless, hairless drumsticks, on display, ready to consume. They want to be hot “chicks,” with a nice piece of ass, nice hams, thighs and large breasts. So back to the question, what explains the lemming-like nature? A culture that exploits nature, animals, people and life for profit! And what justifies their willingness? Well, this is a free-will planet! Each person must decide to wake up on his or her own. I personally, will be walking around on my flat-footed, furry human-animal legs, setting an example of bodily self-acceptance.

CHARLENE KAPRAUN Santa Rosa


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Good for the Goose California isn’t the only place looking out for the welfare of ducks and geese (“Opportunity Quacks,� June 27). The Compass Group, a British company that caters events such as Wimbledon, has decided it will no longer serve foie gras due to ethical concerns. It’s an important reminder that California’s foie gras ban was the right thing to do, even as chefs and restaurants look for sneaky loopholes to continue serving diseased livers to diners. Hopefully, other businesses and states will also agree that it is better to have a heart for animals’ welfare than to dine on their engorged livers, especially when chefs are capable of creating so many other wonderful options.

CHEF TANYA PETROVNA Palm Springs

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Paper THE

TUNNEL VISION The CEO of Mercury Insurance has spent millions to overturn voter-approved insurance reform.

Driving in Circles Proposition 33, funded by a billionaire insurancecompany owner who says he’s acting in your best interests, reappears on the ballot BY CATHERINE ZAW

I

f approved in November, Proposition 33 would allow auto insurers to offer discounts to new customers who have had continuous coverage for the past five years. Sound familiar? It should. The initiative is a

reincarnation of Proposition 17, which was shot down by a narrow margin in June 2010. It now rises from the dead, equipped with some changes that proponents hope will sway voters. The new proposition now allows exemptions for military personnel, individuals who have been unemployed for up to 18 months and children living

at home with their parents. Furthermore, the initiative would provide currently uninsured drivers a discount proportional to the number of years they have had insurance in the previous five years—“an 80 percent discount if you can piece together four years of coverage” and “up to a 40 percent discount for two years,” calculates Rachel

Hooper, spokesperson for the supporting campaign. So far, Proposition 33 seems to have some bipartisan support— along with the Republican Party, former Senate president pro tempore Don Perata and California State Sen. Juan Vargas, both Democrats, openly endorse it. “Proposition 33 benefits both those that currently have car insurance and those that don’t,” explains Hooper. “It gives more power to the consumer with the power to shop for insurance companies,” she adds, likening it to the ability to switch mobile phone carriers. As with its predecessor, Proposition 33’s main proponent is Mercury Insurance, and to date, founder George Joseph has personally provided over $8 million to fund the proposition. Going bumper to bumper against the practically singlehandedly supported proposition is Consumer Watchdog. The proposition will negatively affect millions of California drivers, states spokesperson Carmen Balber. In previous years, according to Balber, Mercury Insurance had illegally surcharged customers without prior coverage by 40 percent. Additionally, in states where Mercury had been legally allowed to add the surcharge, rates rose from 35 to over 100 percent. “We’re talking at least a 35 to 40 percent increase in insurance rates; in the standard family, that could easily increase rates by a thousand dollars a year or more,” she concludes. The two opponents have been driving up each other’s walls since 1988 with the passage of Proposition 103, composed by Consumer Watchdog founder Harvey Rosenfield. Proposition 103 illegalized the practice of determining auto insurance rates based on a person’s history of insurance, instead requiring rates to be based on the insured’s safe driving record, annual mileage and years of driving experience. Before Proposition 103,


Domestic Workers Bill In the last legislative session, the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights won on the Assembly floor by a 49–19 vote. Introduced by Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, the proposal has gained traction with its goal of extending basic labor protections, including overtime pay and meal breaks, to domestic workers. On Aug. 16, the bill of rights, also known as AB 889, passed through the Senate Appropriations Committee and is now headed to the Senate floor. In the North Bay, the Graton Day Labor Center and ALMAS, the Alianza de Mujeres Activas y Solidarias (Women’s Action and Solidarity Alliance) have been mobilizing forces in favor of the bill since it was first introduced in 2011. Throughout August, they’ve been hosting rallies in support of a favorable vote by the Senate that would send the bill to the governor’s desk.

All Eyes on the Library The beleaguered Sonoma County library system may face new overhauls if County Supervisor Mike McGuire has something to say about it. On the heels of controversy surrounding library director Sandy Cooper, McGuire says that he’d like to see more collaboration among the library, cities and county. The review will look at the library’s operating and joint powers agreement and at how there might be increased oversight by the county. Critics say this could lead to more problems for the already financially struggling library system, including increased political pressure. Either way, with steadily decreasing hours and budgets, something has to give when it comes to the public library’s health and success. —Leilani Clark

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insurance rates were set by companies without approval from an insurance commissioner. “Proposition 33 is trying to make legal what is currently illegal— placing a surcharge on people that, under the current law, wouldn’t have had to pay extra,” warns Balber. “If voted to pass this year, Proposition 33 would overturn the central protection that Proposition 103 provides.” As of right now, Mercury is the second largest provider of car insurance in the state, and other providers are wary of their competitor’s actions. “We believe in our own loyalty discount program which provides our customers with an incentive to continuously maintain coverage,” states Sevag A. Sarkissian, spokesperson for State Farm Insurance, which has taken a middle-of-the-road position on the initiative. He adds that if the proposition is passed, State Farm will analyze it to determine how it can be used to benefit its customers. “I think that for most of the insurance companies, this is a fight that they’re not willing to take on,” Balber says. “This is a measure that [Mercury Insurance] has tried and has failed to pass for the last 10 years. If I were another insurance company, I wouldn’t want to throw my money away.” Though wording has been altered to address military personnel and the unemployed, opponents point out that many other populations would be negatively affected by the initiative’s passage. Those who consciously decide not to drive a car for five years would be ineligible, as would those who choose alternate forms of transportation, like riding a bike or taking public transit. Those who simply couldn’t afford a car would be punished as well. “At the end of the day,” Balber says, “if I were a responsible agency, I wouldn’t want to be associated with something that could take insurance away from underprivileged populations.”


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Climate change more than just a temperature concern BY JULIANE POIRIER

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ill McGuire’s latest book is called Waking the Giant: How a Changing Climate Triggers Earthquakes, Tsunamis, and Volcanoes. Perhaps even world governments, slumbering through every alarm to decelerate climate change, may sit up when the metaphorical sleeping giant of the earth’s crust stirs more frequently and catastrophically in response to climate change. Earth’s last epoch of rapid climate change gives us a glimpse into our future, according to McGuire, gifted storyteller and professor of geophysical and climate hazards at University College London. McGuire’s 303-page science-based treatise sheds light on how the earth’s crust may react to present climate change—in terms of earthquake, tsunami and volcano activity—based on how it reacted to similar change in the past. Despite the provocative title, McGuire warns in his preface that Waking the Giant is not “a speculative rant . . . but a straightforward presentation of

what we know” about climate interacting with the earth’s crust. Next week’s column will address the complex climate-geosphere relationship outlined in the book. Simpler, though perhaps more likely to induce hair-tearing, is the relationship between widespread human denial and climate change, as McGuire examines how information for public consumption, such as the “2007 Fourth Assessment Report” by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, omits the bleakest of presently recorded statistics. (The IPCC looked at partial climate data through 2006, which had to be governmentapproved.) Criticisms that the IPCC’s “Fourth Assessment” is “over-optimistic and too conservative,” McGuire explains, are “understandable, given that prior to publication every sentence is scrutinized to ensure acceptability by representatives of the world’s governments, many of whom can hardly be described as sympathetic to the idea of anthropogenic climate change; the U.S.A. and Saudi Arabia spring particularly to mind.” McGuire points to governments failing humanity, including the failure to approve binding greenhouse-gas laws during the Cop 16 gathering of nations. Among the science ignored by world leadership is Earth’s last “great heat spike mystery,” known as the PETM (Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum), when up to 7,000 billion tons of carbon were dumped into earth’s atmosphere. McGuire shows the complicated scientific processes by which the rate of our human-made carbon releases—even at the comparatively lower rate of 8.3 billion tons added in 2009—can trigger another PETM. McGuire posits that, as it did in the past, rapid climate change will likely “bend the solid earth to its bidding” eliciting “a vigorous response.” Next week: McGuire on earthquake, tsunami and volcano responses to climate change.

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2 for 1 Entreès (Dine-in only. Valid with purchases of 2 beverages. Not valid on holidays. Cannot combine offers.) Exp. 8-31-12

707.829.8889 707.575.9296 In Downtown 2478 W Third St Sebastopol Santa Rosa thaipotrestaurant.com


SLIDING INTO GOLD Cordoza’s Deli don’t throw nothin’ into their meatballs but beef, ya hear me?

Gastro-Gymnastics Training for delectable decathlon pays off at Taste of Petaluma BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

N

ow that the Olympics are over, the real training can begin. The Taste of Petaluma offers a chance to eat at 10 restaurants in half a day, and, much like an Olympic athlete’s, diners’ caloric intake should be steadily rising in preparation for the main event. Let the gastrogymnastics begin.

“We have more participants this year than ever,” says organizer Laura Sunday. There are almost 60 options for food and drink in the walking culinary tour, and each taster gets 10 tickets. “We usually recommend going to the website,” she adds, “and planning ahead.” In the spirit of preparedness, here are 10 stops that will not disappoint. 1. Sugo, the crown jewel of the Theater District, offers up housemade bresaola and coppa carpaccio with dressed arugula and fennel salad. This might make the other

options on the tour jealous, so if any of them ask, pretend you haven’t been to Sugo. 2. Hiro’s offers up California rolls, as it has each of the past four years. This might be to showcase its mastery of the basics, demonstrating that its sushi rice can elevate even the most pedestrian sushi to a higher level, even if the boast of “fresh crab” may or may not be 100 percent accurate. 3. To purists, myself included, chicken on pizza is a crime against nature. But Brixx somehow makes

it work on the Sweet Heater: chicken breast, bacon, jalapeno, smoked gouda, mozzarella and barbecue sauce. It’s not really pizza at this point, but it is damn good. (Please don’t tell the foodies I said that.) 4. Cordoza’s Deli defies the current trend and makes a meatball with only one meat. The all-beef meatball slider is wonderful, with good texture and just enough excitement to cut through the fat slice of provolone smothering it. 5. Santa Rosa’s Rosso has expanded to include the train stop to the south, but this location focuses on house-made buffalo mozzarella. Try the burrata on bruschetta with prosciutto and olive pesto here, and you might forget they even make pizza. 6. Halfway through, it might be getting tough to cram anything else down that gullet. Champion eaters always have liquid to wash down all that chow. Dempsey’s carnitas slider and lime cabbage slaw comes with a taster of beer, so it’s a must have. (Though dipping a carnitas slider into a glass of beer is not recommended.) 7. Something small should help now. How about a decadent snack of Point Reyes blue cheese? Crackers and grapes help you pretend it’s healthy. There are two spots hosting this tasting, I Leoni and Mayfield & Co. 8. Vegetables! We need 200 cc’s of vegetables, stat! All this meat and cheese is probably clogging up the works at this point, so stop by Everest Indian Restaurant for a veggie tikka kabob. 9. More sliders, you say? Taps offers beer-braised barbecue pork sliders with orange cream slaw. Probably tastes really good with Anderson Valley Summer Solstice Cerveza Crema. 10. Stumble to Viva Cocolat to finish your delicious decathlon with chocolate fondue. Hopefully, there will be bacon available. America takes the gold again—this time for most weight gained in a single day. Taste of Petaluma takes place Saturday, Aug. 25, throughout Petaluma. 11:30am–4pm. $35–$40. www.tasteofpetaluma.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 22–28, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Nicolas Grizzle

Dining

13


Dining

Bay View Restaurant & Bar AT THE INN AT THE TIDES

Traditional Italian Cuisine

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call ďŹ rst for conďŹ rmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Bruno’s on Fourth American. $$-$$$. There’s real sophistication lurking in these upscale American comfort staples like flat-iron steak and fries, macaroni-ham casserole and stellar braised lamb shank. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner only, Sat; brunch, Sun. 1226 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8222.

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Della Santini’s Italian. $$. Casual chic, family-run combination trattoria/ rosticceria/pasticceria featuring traditional Tuscan fare and emphasizing spitroasted meats and housemade pastries. Lunch and dinner, daily. 133 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.0576.

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W NTO N JOE W

Hallie’s Diner American and more. $-$$. Classic diner food with a gourmet touch, plus Latin American items and homemade pizzas. Great for breakfast. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 125 Keller St, Petaluma. 707.773.1143.

’S

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

DO

ummer elebrations Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Roasted Mushroom Gruyere Tartelette Petit Four Platter Full Catering Menu Available

The First and Last Place to Meet 902 MAIN ST, NAPA 707.258.2337 | downtownjoes.com

BR E ERY W

photo: Marilee Koll

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 22– 28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

Thai House

Your first massage age only only $39! 39!

Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

Karma Bistro Indian. $$. A variety of flavorful regional specialties. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 7530 Commerce Blvd, Cotati. 707.795.1729. Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

The Restaurant at Sonoma Mission Inn California cuisine. $$$. In this world-class spa setting sample Sonoma County-inspired dishes or an elegant traditional brunch. Dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 18140 Sonoma Hwy, Boyes Hot Springs. 707.939.2415.

Risibisi Italian. $$-$$$.

An oasis of urbanity that will transport you to New York, Paris even. The menu keeps freshly seasonal and changes weekly. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 154 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.766.7600.

Sizzling Tandoor Indian. $-$$. A Sonoma County legend for almost 20 years, and for good reason. Of the more than 100 menu choices, all are worthwhile. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.5999. Stark’s Steakhouse Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever have. “Other than steak� menu changes seasonally. Happy hour Mon-Fri, 3 to 6. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

Stout Brothers Pub & Restaurant Irish. $$. Atmospheric, if a little faux, but a great ploughman’s lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

Tonayan Mexican. $ Truly wonderful Sonoran-style classics at rock-bottom prices. The enormous El Jefe combination can’t be beat. Lunch and dinner daily. 500 Raleys Towne Center, Rohnert Park. 707.588.0893.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Sun; dinner, Fri-Sat. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Water Street Bistro

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$.

Eclectic. $$. Homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and entrĂŠes. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.9563.

Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Sat-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly

Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.


Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-inthe-wall as they come. Lunch and dinner daily. Two San Rafael locations: 732 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903.

N A PA CO U N TY Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch

15

SMALL BITES

Spinster’s Success Santa Rosa’s South A neighborhood is in a constant state of near-revival, but the Spinster Sisters might just complete the task. Everyone, it seems, is talking about this new restaurant. On a recent visit, casually dressed folks sat around the expansive bar, sipping wine and nibbling on small plates of olives, ricotta and calamari; the ambiance only improved at sundown, when ceiling lamps began glowing softly. The food is “new American,” and it’s made in a kitchen helmed by former Santi chef Liza Hinman. To start, we ordered the deviled egg with bacon and kimchi ($3) and a warm, heavenly goat-cheese crottin with caramelized figs, arugula and grilled sourdough ($11). When I admitted to the server that I didn’t know how to pronounce “crottin,” rather than making me feel like a dunce, she said, “Don’t worry, I don’t know how to pronounce it either!” We paired the meal with a Dogfish Head 90 Minute IPA ($6), one of many quality beers on draft. Small plates shared familystyle seem to be the way to go here, but we also ordered the crispy chicken thighs with white beans, arugula, grilled nectarines ($16) and the grilled hangar steak with roasted corn cake, tomato and avocado salad ($21). Crispy Kennebec fries, made-to-order and served with a tangy and sweet sauce ($6), completed the meal. This is definitely a restaurant that merits a return visit. Spinster Sisters, 401 South A St., Santa Rosa. Open Tuesday–Friday, 7am–10pm; Saturday–Sunday, 9am–10pm. 707.528.7100. —Leilani Clark

at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 22–28, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 22– 28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N T Y

stop: Côte-Rôtie on the way to Beaune. 8400 Graton Road, Sebastopol. Thursday-Monday 10am-4:30pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.829.8500.

Bohème Wines Earthy,

Simi Winery Pioneered

balanced Chardonnay and Pinot Noir from an enterprising young winemaker who’s found a home in this redoubt in the redwoods. Also try the Bodega Rancho coolclimate Syrah. 3625 Main St., Occidental. Friday, 3pm to 6pm, Saturday–Sunday, noon to 5pm, or by appointment. No fee. 707.874.3218.

Cotati Corner Fine Wines What a funky college town like Cotati needs in a wine shop is friendly, unpretentious, with a small but unique selection of under $20 wines. And that they have. Thursday tastings. 1818 La Plaza, Ste. 106, Cotati. Open Tuesday–Saturda; tastings, Thursday–Friday, 5–8pm. 707.793.9357.

HKG Estate Far-flung outpost of iconic Russian River Valley winery Hop Kiln is a vision of its future: their best estate Chard and Pinot paired with delectable small bites, all made by a small crew of young vintners and chefs. Special Friday menu. 13647 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, noon–6pm; Fridays to 9pm. Tasting, $5; food pairing, $22. 707.938.7622.

Mercury Geyserville No fee, 20 percent discount for Sonoma County residents and 12-pack wooden crates of mini-jug wine; two turntables, an LP record player–put on your winged shoes, it’s time to party in sleepy Geyserville! Also pickled comestibles, jam, peppers–and pretty good Pinot, Cab, Cab Franc, and Merlot. 20120 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open Thursday– Monday, 11am–6pm. No fee. 707.857.9870.

Red Car Wine Co. Lay some track to the “Gateway to Graton” and take your palate on a ride with Boxcar Syrah and Trolley Pinot from Sonoma Coast vineyards. Next

female winemaking by hiring the first female winemaker in the industry. The tastingroom experience is mediocre, but the wine is fantastic and worth the wait. Excellent Chard, Sauvignon Blanc and Cab. 16275 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.473.3213.

Talisman Wine Wineindustry husband-and-wife team play out their passion for Pinot in unassuming warehouse space. Don’t miss the taste test between the Dijon and Pommard clones. 21684 Eighth St., Sonoma. Limited tasting availability, by appointment. 707.996.9050.

Wilson Winery Scenic setting and rustic-modern tasting room makes for an atmospheric, recommended visit. Single-vineyard Zinfandels, Cabernet Sauvignons, Cabernet Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah win awards for good reason— namely, even curmudgeons take one sip and turn into believers. 1960 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am to 5pm. Tastings are $5; $10 for reserves. 707.433.4355.

N A PA CO U N TY Bennett Lane Winery The old trope “beer-drinking NASCAR fans vs. Chardonnaysipping highbrows” runs out of gas at a winery that sponsors an annual NASCAR race and has its own car, emblazoned with grapes. A Roman emperor who appreciated hearty vino as much as a good chariot race inspired Maximus White and Red “feasting wines.” 3340 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. 707.942.6684.

Chimney Rock Winery International beverage man

Sheldon S. “Hack” Wilson built this winery in a Cape Dutch style. Now owned by the Terlato Group, produces distinctive Bordeaux-style wines. 5350 Silverado Trail, Napa. Daily 10am to 5pm. $20–$30. 707.257.2641.

Fantesca Estate & Winery (WC) Set on land that was the dowry gift when Charles Krug married in 1860, this estate winery specializing in Cab features a wine-aging cave built right into the side of Spring Mountain. 2920 Spring Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.968.9229.

Madonna Estate Millennial contingent of multigenerational family winery, once known as Mount St. John, finds success running it old-school: touristy, oldfashioned, and wildly popular. Refreshing Gewürztraminer for summer picnics. 5400 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. Daily 10am to 5pm; $5–$10. 707.255.8864.

Saintsbury A contrarian enterprise in the 1970s, now a hallowed hall of Carneros Pinot Noir. Visitors may linger under shade trees in fair weather or sit down for a serious tasting adjacent the office. 1500 Los Carneros Ave., Napa. Monday– Saturday, by appointment. 707.252.0592. Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethen’s heyday was in the ’60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.255.7700.

Frog’s Leap Winery A ‘sense of place’ with a sense of humor BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

n a valley chockablock with competitive brands, a good story is nearly as important as good wine. Frog’s Leap does a neat job on both. Founder John Williams pitched a tent, unannounced, on John Turley’s property in the 1970s, having recently swapped his cheesemaking focus at Cornell for vinting. Williams found a job with Stag’s Leap Winery, and the pair later made a batch of wine they cheekily named “Frog’s Leap.” The New York Times took note, and the frog leapt into history.

But the fact that Williams doubled down on a method of farming that is largely seen as, well, historical, is the main narrative today. Frog’s Leap vineyards are dry-farmed, grown with only water that the soil soaks up in the rainy season and a system of tillage. As Williams points out, this is how the great wines that established Napa Valley’s reputation were grown. Although it looks typical of big, old farm houses seen throughout the valley, the Vineyard House was built in 2005. Staff are as numerous and professional as in any Napa hospitality joint, but in place of a tasting bar, the relaxed mood is set by a cozy drawing room, complete with fireplace, stuffed chairs, shaggy dog and lap-seeking, sleepy cat. When the tour begins, Williams’ dog Abby bounds after us, as if it were the highlight of her day. Our tour guide totes a wicker basket and a bottle of 2010 Napa Valley Chardonnay ($26), a crisp, floral Chard with hard cider and golden-raisin flavors, that we enjoy with an informative talk on dryfarming, flavored with just a dash of hyperbole. As we wind through the vineyard, the rustic 1884 winery and the barrel chai, he finds more bottles along the way, like Easter eggs. By the frog pond, we get a tall tale and a pour of the cool, juicy 2010 Napa Valley Zinfandel ($27), deep with red cranberry fruit, accented with gingersnap. The 2009 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($42) has the kind of clarity and what some call minerality—like sucking on shale, in a good way—that you might expect from a wine deeply connected to the soil, with juicy blue fruit flavors. The tour ends with a walk through a garden brimming with produce, laden with tree fruit. Visitors may also order up a seated tasting on the wraparound porch, sip a 2011 Rutherford Sauvignon Blanc ($20), razor-edged with gooseberry, lime and kiwi fruit flavors, and find that dry-farming—who knew?—can produce a beverage more thirst-quenching than water. Frog’s Leap Winery, 8815 Conn Creek Road, Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–4pm. Tastings, $20; tours Monday–Friday, $20. 707.963.4704.


17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 22–28, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Straight Dope Tired of the euphoria, anxiety and crash from being stoned? Nonpsychoactive cannabidiol supplies health benefits without the typical effects of THC BY MELINDA MISURACA

M

edical marijuana has gotten a bad rap in Northern California, and perhaps for good reason. In Marin and Sonoma counties, the cannabis dispensaries that haven’t yet been shut down are often located near adult video “shoppes” and liquor stores, and are guarded by surly bouncers who buzz people in from behind bulletproof glass. Dispensary logos typically feature a red cross backlit by

a neon pot leaf, with maybe the image of a wheelchair and the word “compassion” squeezed in somewhere; meanwhile, a “nudge-nudge, wink-wink” atmosphere pervades many a dispensary waiting area, filled as they are with a high number of male “patients” between the ages of 18 and 40 who are here to be treated for “back pain” and “insomnia,” their prescriptions written by doctors who advertise in the classifieds and on billboards. It’s not surprising

that the boundary between recreational and medicinal cannabis can sometimes seem as hazy as the interior of a reggae dance hall. That smoky haze is about to clear. New research in medical marijuana is shocking scientists in the industry right out of their white lab coats, and its implications for treating medical conditions that range from cancer to schizophrenia are poised to take the federal government by storm. If THC is marijuana’s quintessential party girl, a lesser known molecule called cannabidiol (CBD) is her quieter

littler sister, a new wave wonder child with a good-girl twist. Not only has CBD shown seemingly supernatural effects on a variety of ailments, it is nonpsychoactive, moderating the euphoric “stony” effects of THC and allowing patients to use their medicine without ending up on the couch all day watching whole seasons of Weeds.

Cannabis Through the Ages To better understand the CBD revelation, let us first take a stroll down Mary Jane ) 18 Lane with the help of


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 22– 28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18 Straight Dope ( 17 a new book. Smoke Signals, a vast compendium on cannabis by Healdsburg resident Martin Lee, is just out from Scribner. Diminutive with a shock of madscientist hair and a perpetual look of bemusement, Lee is an investigative journalist and one of the founders of the organization FAIR (Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting). Equal parts social history, compelling research and political commentary, Smoke Signals is populated with the artists, writers and thinkers for whom cannabis lit a green fuse of inspiration—from Balzac to Baudelaire, the Beatles to Bob Dylan—as well as the scientists and activists who have doggedly fought to liberate the perennially misunderstood Dona Juanita. In his initial research, Lee was simply trying to understand why California law enforcement continues to harass and bust medical marijuana patients after the passage of Proposition 215, which legalized use of the herb (with a doctor’s prescription) for a handful of ailments. Along the way, he learned of the plant’s “rich cultural history involving poetry, music, science, medicine, law and many other elements.” He also discovered groundbreaking research into the medical use of cannabis. “The science is amazing and little known outside of academic circles,” says Lee. “I felt it important to draw attention to marijuana’s underreported medicinal attributes.” The pot narrative began 6,000 years ago. First cultivated in the Hindu Kush region near China, invading Aryan tribes brought it to India where it was associated with the Hindu god Shiva, and was smoked, ingested and made into fuel, cloth and rope. After observing its usefulness in the East, W. B. O’Shaughnessy introduced cannabis to the West in the 1800s, where it was listed in The United States Pharmacopeia and the National Formulary until the 1930s. Prescribed for over a hundred ailments, marijuana was ingested by our grandparents in the cough remedies, nervines and

analgesics common in the day and bought from such upstanding establishments as Sears, Roebuck and Company. Lee’s book describes how during the Great Depression the newly created Federal Bureau of Narcotics found itself without budget or scapegoat, inspiring the agency’s director, Harry Anslinger, to fashion himself into a righteous anti-pot crusader, erroneously classifying the plant as a narcotic and fabricating the reefer madness propaganda that today is lampooned on T-shirts and posters. Anslinger gave his governmentsanctioned agenda a blatantly racist top-spin. “Reefer,” he said, “makes darkies think they are as good as white men,” causes “white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes” and inspires the creation of “Satanic music of Jazz and Swing.” The bureau also linked the herb with insanity and claimed a direct correlation between marijuana and violence, and even death. The U.S. government’s policy on cannabis has hardly budged in 80 years, despite the findings of numerous committees, here and in Britain, such as the La Guardia and Wootton reports, and results from the National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse, headed by Raymond Shafer in the early 1970s. All confirm what generations of marijuana users have always known: that there is no connection between pot and any illness or disorder (other than a tendency among some slackers toward excessively vegetal behavior).

also discovered a vital chemicalsignaling system in the body with which THC interacts. Composed of naturally produced molecules called endocannabinoids (often called “the body’s own marijuana”) and their corresponding receptor sites, this unique system influences appetite, mood, memory and pain sensation. Here’s the magic: marijuana contains its own inherent cannabinoids that mimic and enhance those in the body with potency and complexity. Like a pantheon of superheroes, these phytocannabinoids and their sidekicks—the terpenes and flavanoids—create an “entourage effect,” a team effort that regulates, modulates, stimulates and protects virtually every cell in the body. While the THC in marijuana has been shown to have powerful biological effects on the body, especially in the areas of pain and inflammation, cannabidiol is now taking center stage. Recent findings based on preclinical and human studies show that CBD has anti-inflammatory, antipsychotic, anticonvulsant, anti-tumorigenic and analgesic properties. Cannabidiol kicks serious booty against cancer, as well as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and multiple sclerosis. It helps prevent and treat heart disease, diabetes and stroke, and appears to improve such psychological conditions as schizophrenia, social anxiety disorder, depression and ADHD, often working better than the drugs typically prescribed, and with virtually no side effects. Cannabidiol has even been shown in vitro to be effective against the difficult-to-treat bacterial infection MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). One of those on the forefront of CBD science, Dr. Sean D. McAllister, works at the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, where his studies have

One user describes smoking CBD as ‘marijuana with a seat belt.’

Good Green Medicine Modern research in medical marijuana began in 1964, with the isolation and synthesis of marijuana’s controversial molecule, delta-9tetrahydrocannabinol—better known as THC—by Israeli scientist Raphael Mechoulam, who

shown cannabidiol’s devastating effect on human cancer cells. Like a ninja assassin, CBD targets these renegade cells and systemically weakens, starves, stops them from spreading and reproducing, and, McAllister reports, ultimately kills them off. “What’s different here [versus] conventional cancer drugs,” says McAllister, “is that cannabinoids have a very low toxicity profile, so they cause few side effects.” McAllister found that CBD behaves differently than THC in the body. “The CBD molecule itself does not interact efficiently with endocannabinoid receptors,” he explains. “However, it does interact with other biological pathways.” In his cancer studies, McAllister used synthetic CBD produced by a British firm for research purposes, but he is interested in continuing his work with a whole plant extract. Currently, he’s testing the hypothesis that THC and CBD work in concert, and mentions evidence showing that the terpenes and flavanoids in whole cannabis also have a modulating effect. “There are many anecdotal reports on the usefulness of the whole marijuana plant,” says McAllister. “Preclinical evidence backs them up.” Unfortunately, nobody has yet offered funding to McAllister for whole-plant cannabis research. “There is a history among pharmaceutical companies not to get into plant extracts because they are so hard to patent,” he said. Sativex is the only clinically tested and standardized whole-plant cannabis extract currently available on the world market. Manufactured by GW Pharmaceuticals in a secret location somewhere in the English countryside, it is approved for use in Britain, France and Canada, though not in the United States. Sativex contains a one-to-one ratio of CBD to THC, radically different than currently popular strains with their skyrocketing THC content and often negligible CBD. The company has animated videos that illustrate the difference between treating illness using synthetic drugs (side effects) and cannabinoids (few side effects).


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A growing number of medicinal marijuana users are gravitating toward these new CBD-rich strains, and some dispensaries are catching on. In the pot-friendly community of Sebastopol—where a yearly “harvestâ€? festival hosts revelers in full hemp regalia, sparking spliffs and jamming to didgeridoo—the local dispensary Peace in Medicine offers educational literature explaining the beneďŹ ts of CBD. “We have thousands of active members,â€? says Peace in Medicine’s general manager Johnny Nolan. “They live normal lives with jobs and families. Before, they had to put up with THC when they needed the beneďŹ ts of the medicine. With CBD they have more options.â€? Patient consultant Royce Park, who in typical dispensary-speak talks of “patientsâ€? who “medicateâ€? using â€œďŹ‚owers,â€? certainly knows his science. Park regularly attends conferences and keeps up with the latest studies to help patients choose cannabis strains for their individual needs. Park himself prefers to medicate with CBDrich cannabis, ďŹ nding it “very functional.â€? Cannabidiol users contacted through a medicinal-cannabis support group report a markedly different experience than what is typically associated with weed. “Relaxed, yet focused and alert,â€? said one user. Another described smoking CBD as “marijuana with a seat belt.â€? One person reported, “CBD gives me a perfect balance: a nice body high where the stress and aches get smoothed out, while leaving my mind calm and present.â€? “For me,â€? said a CBD-rich cannabis grower, “the biggest advantage to CBD is its ability to relieve anxiety. For someone with an active mind and a difficult personal history, anxiety is always present. When I use CBD, relaxation sets up a base camp, guarded by a sentinel with arms folded who allows no trouble or fear to get close. CBD makes room for good things to happen.â€? Research into CBD-rich cannabis continues. Martin Lee recently attended a conference

in Germany where scientists presented new information documenting CBD’s ability to stop the proliferation of colon cancer cells and to limit traumatic brain injury caused by strokes. “Using cannabis in any form can have positive health beneďŹ ts, regardless of the user’s intention,â€? says Lee. “CBD-rich pot is especially powerful.â€? Along with Fred Gardener, Lee cofounded Project CBD, “a nonproďŹ t educational service dedicated to promoting and publicizing research into the medicinal potential of cannabidiol.â€? Yet CBD-high weed is still very difficult to source, even in California, where new cannabis strains are developed as often as wine varietals. With the recent forced closure of so many dispensaries, those left standing struggle to keep a steady CBD supply. Peace in Medicine’s Park admits the dispensary can’t obtain enough of it to satisfy demand, as cultivators have yet to catch on to this less psychotropic pot. While CBD continues to show immense promise in the lab, cannabis remains ďŹ rmly entombed in the federal government’s airless mausoleum of Schedule I controlled substances, while speed and meth are granted the lesser classiďŹ cation of Schedule II, and alcohol, in seeming disregard of the number of crimes and deaths associated with its use, is hardly controlled at all. It appears that cannabis researchers and activists will continue to push legitimate medical science—like a humongous green boulder—up a relentlessly steep bureaucratic hill, and maybe for a very long time. Still, there is hope. “Facts don’t necessarily inuence policy makers,â€? says McAllister, “but I do believe that over time, facts will push government policy in the right direction.â€? Lee agrees. “The science shows that CBD is a potent medicine,â€? he says. “It is also a potent myth-buster. It explodes the myth that medical marijuana is just for stoners.â€? It’s a sentiment we might do well to put in our pipe and smoke.


20 NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 22-28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

CULTURE The week’s events: a selective guide

S A N TA R O S A

Popsicle Toes Jazz seems to be having a moment. With top-selling artists like Esperanza Spalding and Melody Gardot, this creative, at times erratic, music is definitely enjoying some time in the sun. Grammy winner Diana Krall (pictured above) is one of several artists at the forefront of this scene. Krall, who will be performing at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts on Aug. 28, is known for her sultry sound and whispery lyricism. For those who haven’t listened to her before, you can expect a swanky club vibe, a few classic covers and some wry between-song patter. Still aren’t sure that Krall’s sound is for you? Elvis Costello married her, and many would argue that he has pretty good taste. Sway to the sensual beat on Tuesday, Aug. 28, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. $69.75–$89.75. 8pm. 707.546.3600.

G R ATO N

HEALDSBURG

N A PA

Flavor Saver

In the City

Long on Cash

Calling all Tom Selleck look-alikes. Or Magnum, P.I. diehards. Or people who like wine and pizza. Red Car Winery is inviting you to its Magnum P.I. Party. Red Car was founded in 2000 with 50 cases of Syrah, and today, the winery has added Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Rosé to its repertoire. The tasting room is a nod to a romantic time in L.A. history when electric trolleys were zipping about, but also has a hipster element—in a good way. The place has a record player and an old couch, which are the makings for a good shindig. If you have an especially good mustache, you certainly shouldn’t miss out—the best mustached attendee wins a free Red Car Magnum. Get it? Magnum? Come investigate on Saturday, Aug. 25, at Red Car Tasting Room. 8400 Graton Road, Sebastopol. Free for wine club members, $20 for public. 2pm. 707.829.8500.

It’s rare that a musician falls so in love— or addicted, as the case may be—with a city that he creates a whole album about said city. But if that city is San Francisco and if that musician is Chuck Prophet, it makes a little more sense. Prophet has, as he describes it, been chasing the San Francisco dragon his whole life. Many of the songs on his San Francisco–themed album Temple Beautiful have political underpinnings, but this is nothing new for Prophet. As a singer-songwriter, guitarist and producer, the California native is well loved locally, meaning his free concert this week at the Healdsburg Plaza will probably fill up quickly. With any luck, he’ll play “After the Rain,” with its reference to the Russian River, on Tuesday, Aug. 28, at the Healdsburg Plaza Bandstand. Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg. Free. 6pm. 707.431.3300.

Johnny Cash left a hell of a legacy in his wake. One happens to be his daughter, Roseanne Cash. And while Roseanne may not have exactly the same don’t-givea-shit attitude as her father, she does have his talent running through her veins. Roseanne Cash is a multi-genre singer and songwriter, Grammy award–winning artist and published author. She’s also collaborated with some of the biggest names in music, including Sheryl Crow and Bruce Springsteen. Her gentle voice offers a softer side of country, which represents the biggest departure from her father’s musical style. For those who prefer sweet lullaby music to twangy-country tunes, Roseanne Cash fits the bill. Enjoy her brand of Cash on Saturday, Aug. 25, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. $50–$60. 8pm. 707.259.0123.

—Holly Abrahams


NO FIREWORKS The natural world is Robert Haas’ muse in a new collection of essays.

Soul’s Choice

With ‘What Light Can Do,’ Robert Hass’ attention to detail sharp as ever BY LEILANI CLARK

L

ast November, during a welldocumented police crackdown on Occupy Berkeley, Robert Hass was beaten with a baton. It happened quickly, just after those same police had knocked down his wife, the poet Brenda Hillman. Hass, distinguished UC Berkeley professor and award-winning essayist and poet, was trying to assist

her when he was “whacked hard in the ribs twice and once across the forearm,� according to his own account. In the New York Times, 70year-old Hass wrote of the ordeal, noting that police had beaten students and professors on the same steps named for Mario Savio, leader of the Berkeley Free Speech movement. The op-ed showed Hass’ remarkable gift for attention; that same ability shines in Hass’ new collection of essays,

What Light Can Do: Essays on Art, Imagination and the Natural World (Ecco; $29.99), released last week. Hass appears Aug. 28 at Book Passage in Corte Madera. Though it’s become a compulsion among so many to click from link to link, never stopping to process the barrage of words and images online, Hass cultivates the art of “seeing� what’s before and behind him. The essays in What Light Can Do settle in, taking the reader on intellectual jaunts, whether through the natural and political

history of oak groves on the UC Berkeley campus or the author’s changing relationship with the poetry of Wallace Stevens. Unifying the book is a calm, steadfast deliberation to the topics at hand, often with an anchor in the natural world. There are no ďŹ reworks here. At this stage in his career, Hass has nothing to prove. A Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner, Hass served as poet laureate of the United States from 1995 to 1997. He became so dedicated to spreading the gospel of poetry that one colleague recalled the laureate doing everything but “going door-to-door.â€? “We have to act as if the soul gets to choose,â€? writes Hass in the ďŹ nal sentence of What Light Can Do. It’s a poetic call to arms, and a summary of what Hass himself practices throughout these elegantly crafted essays. In the section “Some California Writers,â€? Hass combs through the lives and writings of Jack London, Robinson Jeffers, Maxine Hong Kingston, William Everson and Mary Hunter Austin. I’d never heard of Mary Austin or her book The Land of Little Rain, a study of the southeastern region of California at the turn of the century, but the stunning portrait of Austin’s talents and backstory inspired me to rush out and ďŹ nd a copy of this little known treasure. A true sense of Hass’ talents comes when the poet reads to an audience. Here’s a man who’s built an empire on his capacity for attention to the details and complexities of human life, not to mention our undeniable dependence on the natural world—one much too strong to be beaten out by a wanton baton. Robert Hass appears on Tuesday, Aug. 28, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 7pm. Free. 415.927.0960.

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Cinnabar finds magic in forgotten ‘Rainmaker’ musical BY DAVID TEMPLETON

S

imple little things,” sings the lonely dreamer Lizzie, in the long-forgotten 1964 musical 110 in the Shade, “Simple little dreams will do.” As evidenced by this pleasantly corny but charming Broadway confection, simple little things can be plenty.

Now running at Petaluma’s Cinnabar Theater under the direction of Elly Lichenstein with musical direction by Mary Chun, this obscure 50-year-old artifact is given a warm and affectionate staging, making a pleasant experience out of what is, ultimately, not much of a musical. Based on Richard Nash’s celebrated 1954 play The Rainmaker, 110 in the Shade was created by Tom

Jones and Harvey Schmidt (The Fantasticks), with book by Nash. After running more than a year on Broadway, the show quickly faded away. A major Tonynominated Broadway revival in 2007 brought the show back into public awareness, and since then— assisted by a bouncy original cast recording featuring Audra McDonald and John Cullum— 110 in the Shade has become increasingly popular among community theater companies. The plot is its own “simple little thing,” perhaps a little too simple for the play’s two-and-a-half-hour run time, which at points feels a little stretched out and threadbare. In the midst of a crop-destroying heat wave, a silver-tongued con man named Starbuck (a perfectly cast Tim Kniffin) visits the tiny town of Three Point sometime in the 1930s. Promising that for $100 he will make it rain within 24 hours, Starbuck captures the imaginations of everyone but Lizzie (Kelly Britt, with a strong operatic voice), recently convinced her dreams of romantic love will never come true. As she slowly warms to Starbuck’s wild stories, and his insistence that she’s more beautiful than anyone can see, Lizzie undergoes a profound personal awakening that ends up taking everyone—her father, brothers and especially herself—by surprise. Jones and Schmidt’s songs are pretty but instantly forgettable, disappearing from memory as fast as a drop of water on a frying pan. And the datedness of the material, with its pre-feminist obsession with women’s need to appeal to and take care of men, is historically accurate but less than charming. Still, there are marvelous moments here, from Starbuck’s rousing entrance to Lizzie’s spectacular, beautifully acted moment of selfdiscovery. As she finally sees her own inner beauty, Britt transforms before our eyes, suddenly glowing with delighted confidence. The songs may not be memorable, but that one magical moment will be hard to forget. ‘110 in the Shade’ runs Friday–Sunday through Sept. 2 at Cinnabar Theater. 3333 Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma. 8pm, Friday–Saturday; 2pm, Sunday. $25$35. 707.763.8920.


DELICIOUSLY UNEXPECTED ...Frank Langella is impeccable.” - Kenneth Turan, LOS ANGELES TIMES

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BLOWHARD Chris Rock and Julie Delpy deal with visitors in Delpy’s latest.

Big Apple Blues ‘2 Days’ series alights in New York BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

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ood comedians have tragic eyes, and Julie Delpy, the director, star and co-writer of 2 Days in New York, has a particularly high level of anxiety in her gaze. This film’s more farcical than Delpy’s 2 Days in Paris (2007), and the quickness of its bicultural reversals sharpens the material. A movie about New York, after all, should move faster than a movie about Paris. Delpy’s Marion has a talented partner to quarrel with in Mingus (Chris Rock). The two share a hut-sized Greenwich Village apartment with a child each from previous relationships. And then three visiting foreigners arrive: the half-clad and prowling sister Rose (Alexia Landeau), her pothead boyfriend, Manu (Alex Nahon), and Marion’s widowed father, Jeannot (Albert Delpy). Albert Delpy stole his daughter’s last film and comes back for a new haul. In real life, Albert did a bit of alternative theater back in the 1960s, and he’s a joy assaying this proudly smelly old man. Face set in a goaty leer, Albert is always asking extremely personal questions that he doesn’t really have the English to properly form. Being left behind in the language gap amplifies Mingus’ straight-man solitude, giving him nightmares of the invading family as a flock of Peter Greenaway aristos in wigs and lace, smacking their chops over an ogre’s feast. Left alone, Mingus bounces questions off of his most reliable pal, a cardboard cutout of Obama. 2 Days in New York unspools with genial bits. Marion, an artist, tries a conceptual piece in selling her soul on Halloween and gets a sinister purchaser. She poses as a malade, resulting in a volunteer house call from a doctor (Dylan Baker) who is distracted by Rose’s butt. The film’s last third wobbles, but it’s fairly nimble. Maybe the funniest part is unintentionally so: Mingus is allegedly supporting this ménage on a salary writing for the layoff-wracked Village Voice. ‘2 Days in New York’ is at the Rafael Film Center in San Rafael through Aug. 23, and opens at Summerfield Cinemas in Santa Rosa on Aug. 24.

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 22–28, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Film

SLY AND DELIGHTFUL, 23


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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 22-28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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A Look Inside…

Nearly 45 years ago, Andy and Katie Skikos settled with their 5 children in Sonoma County, and opened a small fruit stand on the outskirts of Sebastopol. Along with his wife, his brothers and their families, Andy worked day and night seeking the freshest fruits and vegetables possible. By 1969, Andy bought his first Peterbilt to initiate his humble foray into what is now a booming trucking division. As Sebastopol matured as a town, Andy’s kept up with the growing demands of the community by continuously expanding its small retail store.

North Bay Business Profiles

Andy and Katie Skikos

1691 Gravenstein Hwy Sebastopol

707.823.8661

Evolving into the most prominent openair produce market in northern California, Andy and his family have upheld their integrity and commitment to quality that locals and tourists alike have come to expect from this unique agricultural region. In addition to premium fruits and vegetables, Andy’s offers organically grown produce, a packaged bulk food and grocery section, all natural health and beauty products, and a wide variety of local Sonoma County wines and gourmet specialty foods. As a true family-run institution, many family members are still involved in the market's daily functions.The entire family and staff at Andy’s invite you to come in and enjoy friendly and knowledgeable service while browsing through their grand selection of firstrate produce and products.

www.andysproduce.com

Our professional staff at Empire Eye Doctors would like to extend a warm welcome to all who want to experience a high level of family eye care, located in the heart of downtown Santa Rosa. Our practice is family owned and operated dating back to the early 1950’s when Vernon F. Lightfoot, M.D. began his practice in Santa Rosa, CA.

Aware of dietary changes, we were one of the first to offer McDougall options and we are now gluten-free friendly: 2 desserts made in-house are gluten free.

When Vernon retired, the practice was then continued by his two sons Dan R. Lightfoot, M.D. and David V. Lightfoot, M.D who have special interests in retina, glaucoma, cataracts and intraocular implants. They soon established a reputation as leaders in the optometric community taking on the name Empire Eye Doctors Medical Group, Inc. and established an Optical Department that features Licensed Opticians, an in-house lab and hundreds of Designer Frames.

We are part of Sonoma Vermiculture’s beta program…“our worm farm reduces the need for landfills by returning food scraps back into soil…in a matter of days” says wormapreneur Daniel Stitzel.

In order to provide complete service to their patients and customers they have extended their practice to include:

Empire Eye Doctors Medical Group Sonoma County Dining Legend for 36 years! Cricklewood serves aged, Black Angus slow cooked Prime Rib and charbroiled steaks (natural, hormone and antibiotic free). See our website for a full menu. One dining room is all booths; the other room can accommodate large parties (up to 60).

Sonoma County wines are featured along with a full bar in our cozy fireplace lounge where you can grab a quick drink or relax with friends for appetizers and drinks before catching a show at the near-by Wells Fargo Center for the Arts.

Cricklewood Restaurant Lunch weekdays 11:30 to 2:30pm Dinner nightly 5pm 4618 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa

www.cricklewoodrestaurant.com

Bringing your world into focus

Empire Eye Doctors

707-575-3800 Empire Optical

707-527-7444

720 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa

Edward L. Feldman, M.D. Janet M. Caddell, O.D. Stewart I Wolfe, O.D. and Susan E.Hewlett, O.D.


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Ŵŷ Feed your soil to feed your plants… instead of adding synthetic fertilizer to only feed your plants. Fall is around the corner and is a perfect time to add fertilizer. The winter rains will break it down and push the nutrients into the soil so you can have a vibrant garden in the spring/summer. Barlow Hauling, located in Petaluma, CA, provides a hauling service to bring you the fertilizer of your choice from local farms. Please look at my website www.sonoma-county-hauling.com to view the different fertilizers I sell and compare the organic analysis of the manure to fit your needs. I can be reached at 707.321.9251 or timothysbarlow@yahoo.com for any questions. Thanks.

We at Peace in Medicine advocate and support a proactive and holistic approach to health management. In this spirit, we offer numerous services including therapeutic massage, acupuncture, guest speakers, peer counselors and empowering educational materials. Peace in Medicine is a non-profit mutual benefit corporation with a unique business model firmly based in three overarching tenets: the importance of local support and supporting locally; the belief in patient access to alternative medicine, information and education; and an unwavering adherence to environmental integrity. Recognizing the importance of community, we reinvest a significant portion of any surplus income into local causes, community services, charities and social movements. With two locations in Sonoma County, it is easy to “Find Peace in Medicine.” Downtown Santa Rosa 1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College M, T, F, Sat 10am–5pm W, Th 12pm–7pm, Closed Sun

Downtown Sebastopol 6771 Sebastopol Ave @ Hwy12 M–Sat 11am–7pm Sun 12pm–7pm

707.843.3227

707.823.4206

Four F our Paws Paws Pet Pet Ranch R a n ch

Barlow Hauling Petaluma

707.321.9251 www.sonoma-county-hauling.com

Boardin B o a r d i n g - Da D a yca y c a re re Grooming

Four Paws Four Paws Pet Pet Ranch Ranch iiss a family family owned ow n e d pet pets p et care care facility. facility. We We know know tthat hat yyour our p ets our aare re family family members. members. They They capture capture o ur h hearts, earts, sshare hare our our homes homes and and lives. lives. That's That's w why hy choosing choosing the the right right care care for for them them is is       tĞƉƌŽǀŝĚĞĂĐĂƌŝŶŐĂƚŵŽƐƉŚĞƌĞŽĨƐŽĐŝĂůĨƵŶĂŶĚĂĐƟǀŝƚLJŽŶŽǀĞƌ ĞƉƌŽǀŝĚĞĂĐĂƌŝŶŐĂƚŵŽƐƉŚĞƌ   iimportant. mportant. t 5 acers acers aand nd full full grooming grooming services. services. It’s Itt’’s like like a day at the spa! We invite you to stop by and and take take a tour. tour.

www.fourpawspetranch.com w ww.fourpawspetranch.com

707-542-3766 7 07-542-3766 Visit our website e for for v valuable aluable coupons. coupons . 3410 3 4 1 0 Guerneville Guerneville R Road o a d SSanta a nta R Rosa, osa, C CA A 95401 95401

Shutterbug providing free loaner gear at the 2012 air show

Professional service starts with a professional staff. Shutterbug has been serving Sonoma County more than 44 years! The combined photography experience of our staff equals well over 100 years. Our locally owned stores have a complete selection of camera and photo accessories for the new photographer or the seasoned pro. In addition to having the latest gear from companies that help us support you, Shutterbug also has a complete schedule of classes and workshops to help you improve your skills. After helping you take great images, Shutterbug will help you turn them into cherished memories. With beautiful photo books, canvas wrapped art,

3011 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa

707.546.3456 #1 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707.762.4079

and even metal prints we’ll help you wow your friends and family. Shutterbug has been giving back to the community through their support of fundraising for local schools and charities. With over $3600 in services donated over the last year alone. We love supporting and encouraging photographers in beautiful Sonoma County. We’ve been providing Santa Rosa and Petaluma with great deals, top-quality equipment, and expert photography advice since 1968. What once was a small one-man shop has evolved into 2 full-service operations: Our 7500 square foot main store in Santa Rosa, and our Petaluma location…all in the heart of the beautiful Sonoma County Wine Country. Come and experience Shutterbug's fast and easy to use kiosks to get the quality prints you want. Both the Santa Rosa location and Petaluma offer Express Digital processing for 4x6, 5x7 and 8x10 prints made in minutes! From Instant prints to beautiful 48" x 60" posters, or photo mugs and jewelry, we have lots of ways to help you share your vision. Watch for our 3rd store to open in downtown Novato this fall!

www.shutterbugcamera.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 22-28, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Peace in Medicine provides safe access to quality medicine for qualified patients in a professional and friendly environment. Peace in Medicine has successfully established itself as a role model for medical cannabis dispensaries and healing centers nationally.


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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 22-28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Louis Thomas is fine men's clothing on a first name basis. For over 60 years we have specialized in bringing customers stylish and well made gentleman's apparel. Louis Thomas hand selects casually-elegant apparel that fits your bay area lifestyle. We offer select garments for work, play, and formal occasions. We also create made-to-measure suits and custom dress shirts built just for you with a wide variety of gentlemanly accessories.

Rebecca was born in 1978 and grew up in Sebastopol, California. She graduated from Sonoma State University with a degree in Kinesiology and Psychology. Her passion is fitness, nutrition, and health. Rebecca enjoys swimming, mountain biking, skiing, snowboarding, rock climbing, kiteboarding, etc…sports of all kinds. After destroying her left knee joint from overuse, a friend introduced her to Bikram Yoga. She was amazed at what practicing Bikram Yoga did for her body. Her knee joint slowly became stronger and stopped throbbing with pain. Her body's alignment, posture, balance, and strength improved incredibly. Her athletic abilities greatly increased in all of the sports she plays. As long as she does Bikram Yoga three or more times per week, her knee stays strong and can take the impact of running, mountain biking, etc… With regular Bikram Yoga practice, Rebecca also noticed that her stress level began to decrease and she was able to sleep better at night.

522 Wilson St, Santa Rosa

707.545.9642

www.bikramyogaofsantarosa.com

INFO STOR is a Sonoma County “Home Grown Success Story” that initially started in 1993 as Security Vault & Storage, Inc., a company that offered private safe deposit boxes and secure storage room rentals Over the next ten years, INFO STOR departed these initial offerings in order to pursue the higher demand for full service record storage and management services. In doing so, the company became the North Bays’ largest commercial

CALL TODAY TO RESERVE YOUR SAFE DEPOSIT BOX

Rebecca has practiced Bikram Yoga for eight years. She has seen how much Bikram Yoga has helped not only herself, but everyone who practices around her. She has seen those of all ages, sizes, and abilities benefit greatly from a regular Bikram Yoga practice. She has seen so many students transform their bodies, and reduce aches and pains. Rebecca went to teacher training in April 2010. She absolutely loves teaching Bikram Yoga and motivating students to stay healthy and strong.

records center storing in excess of 1 Million Cubic Feet of Confidential Business Information. Currently, INFO STOR is reaching back to resurrect the safe depository services and offering sizes larger than banks in our high security fullscale vault.

A Service of Info Stor, Information Storage Centers, Inc.

707.569.2900

Look for long and short sleeve sportshirts from Georg Roth of Germany, fine gauge knits from Toscano of Italy and silk shirts from Burma Bibas. For your relaxed lifestyle we offer Agave Jeans, Alberto Denim, Tori Richard and Tommy Bahama shirts and slacks. Dress for success with Jack Victor and Petrocelli suits and sport coats with elegant shirtings by Ike Behar, Enro and XMI.

707-765-1715

150 Kentucky Street, Petaluma Mon–Sat 10–6pm, Sun 11am–4pm

415-924-1715

211 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera Mon–Fri 10–8pm, Sat 10–6pm, Sun 12–5pm

Come by and check out the gorgeous fabrics on the new fall arrivals. Our friendly staff will ensure a proper fit and consult on style for every occasion.

Best Men’s Store

www.louisthomas.com


POWERHOUSE Esperanza Spalding says she’s ‘failed’ at getting her music on the radio.

For the People

Esperanza Spalding evolves jazz to a wider listening base BY GABE MELINE

I

’m going to murder Esperanza Spalding” isn’t the nicest thing to say on the internet, but in the wake of Spalding’s Best New Artist Grammy win last year over Justin Bieber, it wasn’t surprising. Bieber has a crazed fan base, and Spalding, assessing her death threats—there were many more—was smart enough to blow them off. “What are you gonna do?” she tells me on the phone from Brooklyn. “That was nothing. I think that was a total farce. I remember what it’s like to be a preteen or a teen, and when something happens, you get so emotional about it, it seems like the end of the world.” Indeed, Spalding, who plays the Wells Fargo Center on Aug. 24, is resilient, both in Bieber circles and the jazz world. Two years ago, the incredibly talented 25-yearold bassist, singer and composer had been a fast-rising crossover success in contemporary music

when she was given a chance to demonstrate her vigorous jazz muscle playing with McCoy Tyner and Ravi Coltrane in small clubs, filling the role with immense understanding and ability. But it was her comments about Tyner, printed in the New Yorker several months later, that jeopardized what credibility she’d attained. (I heard about the quotes from local fans who’d seen Spalding at an early, small show at Barndiva as part of the 2009 Healdsburg Jazz Festival.) Playing with the 71-yearold Tyner, she said, reaffirmed her belief that “the most important artist and the most important time is, like, right now. It’s the people who are learning now and creating new things right now. Idol worship doesn’t help this music in any way.” I ask Spalding if she ever heard from Tyner after the profile was published. She didn’t. “I honestly doubt he’s too concerned about it either way,” she tells me, but I gather she’d heard from others, based on the clarification that follows. “We talk about it as a conceptual thing, the art form, and that’s good

For more of Esperanza Spalding’s interview, see bohemian.com.

27

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Wednesday W s day 18 18+ +

Electric E ric Music Mu s played byy the t h e Hottest Ho t t DJ's and

BEER P PONG! O N G! Thursday day 18 18+ +

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Hot L Local o c al A Acts and nationally t i o n a l l y known k n o w bands rock our u r stage s t a g e on o n Fridays.

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Esperanza Spalding plays Friday, Aug. 24, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $35–$65. 707.546.3600.

www.maverickssantarosa.com w .maverickssa ar osa.com ffacebook.com/maverickssantarosa a ook.com/mave ckssan t ar osa Mavericks M av er icks N Nights ig t s L Live: i ve: ffacebook.com/MavericksNightsLive ac ook.com/Mave cksNigh t sL i ve

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 22–28, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

. . . . the cerebral aspect of it and thinking about what it means and where we’re headed with it, and blah blah blah,” she says. “But the day-to-day reality of making music is just to do it. I mean, that’s the priority, to sit down every day and explore it.” She continues: “You have those folks who are total bebop heads, who really see that as the pinnacle of the music. And then people who don’t want to have anything to do with that, and say, ‘Well, that was the language of back then, and now we live in today. We have to keep cultivating the idiom and forget about that. That was one strand in the stream of what music is, so let’s keep on evolving and not clinging to that.’ And the beautiful thing is, there’s really room for everything. There should be multiple philosophies in the music, because theoretically, it’s a music that’s open to everybody.” Throughout Spalding’s newest album, Radio Music Society, the “open to everybody” theory is applied liberally. It opens with a paean to commercial radio, while tracks like “Cinnamon Tree” and “Hold on Me” could squeeze comfortably between Joni Mitchell’s Hissing of Summer Lawns and Wayne Shorter’s Native Dancer. According to Spalding, the album was a challenge to be sure that “we feel proud and confident that what we’re sending out is a true representation of the art that we love, and maybe through an arrangement or through the sonic quality or how we record it or whatever, we can do things that might give it a better chance of ending up on mainstream radio.” And? “And we failed,” Spalding says. “I failed in the sense that every song is longer than three minutes, which automatically disqualifies it, and they all have instrumental solos, which pretty much automatically disqualifies it.” It’s sad to say, but it looks like at least for radio play, Justin Bieber wins in the end.


28 NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 22– 28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Unity Festival 

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Celebrating J\gk\dY\i(+#(,(the sacred Arden Park Roots * Clear Conscience through musicart-dance- Stone Senses * Talawa * Hula Skirt * Trevor Lyon DJ education & Rootman J & Zionyouth Crew comm-unity

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Mystic Roots * The Simpkin Project * Midnight Sun Massive 3 days Shoreline Rootz * Madi Simmons & The Mra * Ras Indio of music- Highest Intention * Counter Culture food-camping Just added to our late night Saturday! Cornflower & fun Dysphunctional Species * Outpost * Selector Science <Xicp9`i[Xcc n\\b\e[gXjj jXc\10,# Xkk_\^Xk\1(*, ;Xpk`Zb\kjM@G  k`Zb\kjXmX`cXYc\ JXkCXk\E`^_k  (,X[m#)'[fj M`j`kn\Yj`k\]fi k`Zb\kjXc\j 

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Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Aug 23

CD RELEASE PARTY

THE BILLYLOVE EXPRESS

Dance to Funky, Soulful Originals

8:00pm  ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL WEEKEND  Sat ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL

Aug 25 In the Rancho Room Sun

Aug 26

8:30pm BBQ ON THE LAWN!

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL

PLUS THE MUDDY ROSES Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm

THE COVERLETTES Aug 31 1960â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Girl Groupâ&#x20AC;? Fri

Rancho ut! Singing Sensations 8:30pm Deb

 LABOR DAY WEEKEND  BBQS ON THE LAWN! Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm Sun

Sept 2 Mon

Sept 3

CHARLIE MUSSELWHITE

LUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;AU ON THE LAWN!

WILLIE K BAND

 BBQ ON THE LAWN! Sun

Sept 9

MARCIA BALL

Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm Fri

Sept 14

Red Hot Blues Woman

CANDYE KANE

WITH GUITARIST LAURA CHAVEZ 8:30pm Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Brandi Carlile Singer-songwriter tells â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Storyâ&#x20AC;? from the big stage. Aug 25, 8pm. $36-$46. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Fishbone Groundbreaking, genrecrossing, groove-inducing, moshpit-instigating rock group still going, 25 years strong. Aug 26, 8:30pm. $25. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

$90. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Men of Worth Celtic duo spikes traditional tunes with tales about their homelands and plenty of unscripted comic interplay. Aug 29, 7pm. $20-$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

SoCo Unplugged Music Fest Dgiin, Heather Combs, David Luning and Elliot Randall. Aug 26, 1pm. $20. Boon Hotel, 14711 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville, 877.869.2721.

Friday Night Live

Sonoma Music Festival

Cloverdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer-long series features Natasha James on Aug 24 . 7pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Featuring Talk That Talk, Rett Hamer Blues Band and Sean Carscadden & Marty Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly. Aug 29, 5:30pm. $20. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.579.ARTS.

Frobeck

Esperanza Spalding

North Bay funkstersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; album release party. Aug 25, 8pm. $12-$15. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Grammy winner for Best New Artist brings her Radio Music Society big band. Aug 24, 8pm. $35-$65. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Diana Krall The only jazz singer to debut atop on Billboard charts eight times appears with Denzal Sinclaire. Aug 28, 8pm. $70-

DIN N E R & A SHOW Thur

Music

Tuesdays on the Plaza Summer concert series in Healdsburg plaza features Chuck Prophet on Aug 28.

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

MARIN COUNTY Asleep at the Wheel The kings of Texas swing stet through the Bay Area. Aug 25, 8:30pm and Aug 26, 4pm. $37.50-$40. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Hapa The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Simon and Garfunkel of Hawaiian Music.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Aug 24, 8pm. $25-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Pete Escovedo & His Orchestra Celebrate Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 77th birthday with a Latin jazz party night. Aug 25, 8:30pm. $20-$35. Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Summer Music Festival Musical acts include the Tickets Band, Amy Wigton Band, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Til Dawn, Sewer Band and Class of Brass. Aug 26, noon-5pm. $10$15. Hamilton Amphitheater Park, Main Gate Road, Novato.

NAPA COUNTY George Benson Jazz guitar legend performs songs from his 2001 album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitar Man,â&#x20AC;? and more. Aug 24, 8pm. $120-$135. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Rosanne Cash

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

Country music royalty touring in support of her greatest hits album. With Shawn Mullins. Aug 25, 8pm. $50-$60. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER 4(52s0-$//23s$26 s sROCK

STEVE KIMOCK WITH BERNIE WORRELL, WALLY INGRAM, AND ANDY HESS FRI 8/24s8PM DOORSss DANCE HITS/PARTY BAND

Clubs & Venues

POP FICTION PLUS METAL SHOP

35.s7PM DOORSss ROCK/POP

BROWNOUT

SONOMA COUNTY

3!4s8PM DOORSs!$6$/3s AMRICAN SINGER/SONGWRITER

Arlene Francis Theater

LANGHORNE SLIM & THE LAW

Aug 24, Eight Belles, Odd Bird, Brian Fitzpatrick. Aug 26, the New Trust, Classics of Love, Iditarod. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

PLUS HOOTS & HELLMOUTH

FRI 9/7s0-$//23s!$6$/3s ROCK

JASON ISBELL & THE 400 UNIT

Aubergine

PLUS KASEY ANDERSON & THE HONKIES .O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

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6pm. Free. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg.

STEVIE & BERNIE Steve Kimock plays with Bernie

Worrell Aug. 23 at the Mystic Theatre. See Clubs, p29.

Aug 23, Funkstrosity. Aug 24, Sunday Gravy. Aug 25, Sol Horizon. Last Sunday of every month, Irish Seisun with Riggy Rackin. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.


CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aug 23, Nothing to Lose. Last Saturday of every month, Good Hip-Hop. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Guinga transports listeners with seductive jazz guitar Some of the best performers of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jazz grace the Healdsburg Jazz Festival, but year-round, organizers present events such as this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jazz in the Galleryâ&#x20AC;? series featuring Guinga, a famed Brazilian guitarist and composer. Guinga, real name Carlos Althier de Souza Lemos Escobar, is known for his sultry mix of Afro-Brazilian and jazz music. Guinga was born with lighter than average Brazilian skin, which earned him the stage name â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gringo,â&#x20AC;? which he pronounces â&#x20AC;&#x153;guinga.â&#x20AC;? The Rio de Janeiro native learned guitar and music composition at a young age, leading to a five-year study of classical guitar with Jodacil Damasceno, a skilled music professor, performer and transcriber. With numerous albums under his belt, Guinga has performed with many of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best vocalists, as Guinga doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fancy himself a singer. He plays two solo performances at Jazz in the Gallery on Saturday, Aug. 25, at the Healdsburg Center for the Arts. 130 Plaza St., Healdsburg. $25. 7pm and 9pm. 707.431.1970.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Holly Abrahams

Aug 22, Grandpa Banana. Aug 23, David Thom Band. Aug 24, Jason Bodlovich. Aug 25, Whisky Pills Fiasco. Aug 26, the Pine Needles. Aug 29, Nate Lopez. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776. Aug 24, Jah Sun. Aug 25, Dgiin. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pick-Me-Up Revue. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Aug 29, Kirtan Ambrosia. 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4543.

Doc Hollidayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Saloon Aug 24, Damage, Inc. Aug 25, Ozzy Alive. 138 Calistoga Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.623.5453.

Flamingo Lounge Aug 24, B-4 Dawn. Aug 25, Jeff Edwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dance Band.

2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Aug 22, Celtic Jam. Aug 27, Neil Buckley Octet. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Tavern Aug 23, AfroMassive with Lafa Taylor. Aug 24, Volker Strifler. Aug 25, Frobeck. Aug 26, Fishbone. Aug 27, Cutty Ranks. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment.

Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

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Aug 23, Whitney Lockert. Aug 24, Midnight Sun Massive. Aug 25, High Country. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

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Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

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Mystic Theatre Aug 23, Steve Kimock with Bernie Worrell. Aug 24, Pop Fiction. Aug 26, Brownout, Monophonics. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts Aug 26, Friends of the Islands. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater Aug 24, Blaus, Jason H, Daggerpoint. Aug 25, Naked Aggression, Sharp Objects, Just Breathe. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Russian River Brewing Co Center for Spiritual Living

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary

Aug 25, Major Powers & the Lo-Fi Symphony. Aug 26, Noah and the Megafauna. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Aug 24, Gabriel Ayala. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Shiloh Sophia Gallery

Wed, Aug 22 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Aug 23 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Aug 24 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther presents MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;N ROLL

Sat, Aug 25 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:30pm SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE with Gary Thomas Sun, Aug 26 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING $10 Mon, Aug 27 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Aug 28 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

Aug 25, TradisĂłn. 126 Plaza St, Healdsburg. ) 707.318.8189.

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1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;28, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Hotel Healdsburg Aug 24, Robb Fisher and Keith Saunders. Aug 25, Chris Amberger Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 22– 28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Gaia’s Garden International Vegetarian Buffet

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Wed, Aug 22, 7–9pm Authentic and unplugged

THUR T HUR – AUG AUG 23 23

Celtic Session

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Fri, Aug 24, 8–10pm Folk, Americana Dave Hamilton and Friends

((OUTDOOR OUTDOOR FFIRE IRE D DANCE ANCE SSHOW) H OW ) + M MALARKEY ALAR RKEY

Sat, Aug 25, 8–10pm Solo Sax and Trax

AFROMASSIVE A FROMASSIVE & LLAFA AFA TAYLOR TAYLOR @ FIRE FIRE FLY FLY $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

Michael Bolivar: By request

FRI F RI – AUG AUG 24 24

Mon, Aug 27, 8–10pm '50s cool jazz

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Music ( 29 Society: Culture House Wed, Gallery Wednesday. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Fourth Friday of every month, Kaleidoscope. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Spancky’s Aug 24, Electric Funeral. Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Taft Street Winery Aug 26, Rhythm Rangers. 2030 Barlow Lane, Sebastopol. 707.823.2849.

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Toad in the Hole Pub

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$$13 13 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Thur, Aug 30, 8–10pm Guitar and Pedal Steel

Wine Country Swing

Aug 25, Baby K & the Kinettes. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

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Sat, Sept 1, 8–10pm Queen of the Boogie Woogie!

SAT S AT – AUG AUG 25 25

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Wendy deWitt Wed, Sept 5, 7:30–9:30pm Smooth Jazz

+ THE THE COUCH COUCH TOMATOES TOMATOES

$$12 12 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Shade

SUN S UN – A AUG UG 26 26

&INE"EERS7INESs$ 4 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

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Mon–Sat 11:30am–9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

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$$25 25 A ADV/DOORS DV/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

+ SSEBASTOPOL EBASTOPOL FILM FILM FESTIVAL FESTIVAL P PRESENTS R E S E NT S EVERYDAY E VERYDAY SUNSHINE SUNSHINE ((TICKETS TICKETS SOLD S LD SO

707.544.2491 www.gaiasgardenonline.com

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Aug 24, Doc Kraft Dance Band. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

FACIALS

Aug 25, Jennifer Saito. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

MARIN COUNTY

George’s Nightclub

EM MINOR INOR & THE THE DIR DIRTY TY DIAMONDS DIAMONDS

Aug 24, Hapa. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Aug 24, Notorious. Aug 25, Pete Escovedo and His Orchestra. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

19 Broadway Club Aug 22, La Fiva, Major Powers & the Lo-Fi Symphony, Peck the Town Crier. Aug 24, Avocado Sundae. Aug 26, Cathey Cotten’s All Star Evil Plan. Aug 29, Ned Endless & the Allnighters. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

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$$10 10 ADV/$13 ADV/$13 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

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Old Western Saloon

$$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

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1311 W. Steele Lane, Suite B Santa Rosa, CA 95403 www.KokeshiSpa.com

Aug 23, the Billylove Express. Aug 25-26, Asleep at the Wheel. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Aug 23, Borelli. Aug 24, Eddie Neon. Aug 25, Trenz. Aug 26, Candela with Edgardo Cambon. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Aug 22, John Molloy. Aug 24, Liv Gibson. Aug 25, Tommy O’Mahoney Trio. Aug 26, Namely Us. Aug 28, Amanda Addleman. Aug 29, Cutcodemzon. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Aug 24, Jimbo Trout & the Fish People. Aug 25, Avocado Sundae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Terrapin Crossroads Aug 22, Gary Vogensen & Austin deLone. Aug 25, the Gary Gates Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Billco’s Billiards Aug 23, AudioFarm. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Aug 23, Brian Cline. Aug 24, Ralph Woodson Trio. Aug 25, the Voltones. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Napa Valley Opera House Aug 24, George Benson. Aug 26, Richard Glazier. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Station House Cafe

Silo’s

Aug 24, Paul Knight. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Aug 24, Daluna & Via Coma. Aug 25, Lucas Ohio & the Shamblers. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Sweetwater Music Hall Aug 22, James Nash and the Nomads. Aug 23, Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic. Aug 24, Shana

Aug 24, Esperanza Spalding. Aug 25, Brandi Carlile. Aug 28, Diana Krall. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

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WAXING SPA TREATMENTS

Rancho Nicasio

Morrison & Caledonia. Aug 25, New Orleans Funky Bohemian Soul Circle. Aug 26, Mindy Canter. Aug 28, Underground Illuminati. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Uptown Theatre Aug 25, Rosanne Cash. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Wells Fargo Center

142 Throckmorton Theatre

FRI F RI – AUG AUG 31 31

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Twin Oaks Tavern

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Aug 24, Down Dirty Shake. Aug 25, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Aug 22 and Aug 26, Timothy O’Neil Band. Aug 29, Bobby Voltage. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Vino di Amore

MON M ON – AUG AUG 2 27 7

MONDAY N MONDAY NIGHT IGHT EEDUTAINMENT DUT TAINMENT N W WITH ITH DANCEHALL DANCEHALL LEGEND LEGEND

Tradewinds

Elliott’s Evil Plan. Aug 25, Honeydust. Aug 26, Slowpoke. Aug 28, the Undercover Band. Aug 29, (W+T)J2. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Aug 25, Tom Huebner & the Real Deal. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Aug 22, Swoop Unit. Aug 24,

San Francisco’s City Guide

AM & Shawn Lee London meets Los Angeles in this matchup of dusty soul and fuzzed-out soundtracks. Aug 22 at Cafe du Nord.

Cannibal Corpse The only band whose albums are strictly banned from Everyday Music in Portland, Ore. Aug 24 at the Fillmore.

Larry Coryell With Jimmy Cobb, Joey DeFrancesco and others, guitarist honors Wes Montgomery. Aug 24-26 at Yoshi’s Oakland.

Fred Frith Unpredictable guitarist does something expected: playing his essential album “Gravity” in its entirety. Aug 25 at Slim’s.

Bomb the Music Industry New York band invites fans who know their songs on stage to plug in and play along. Aug 27 at Bottom of the Hill.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.


Galleries OPENINGS Aug 24 From 5-7pm. Sonoma County Museum, ‘Artistry in Wood,’ annual showcase of fine regional craftsmanship. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Oct 16, “Culture Shock!” with works by Becoming Independent and community artists. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123. Through Sep 2, “Paint to the Music,” juried show open to all artists. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Gallery 300

Sebastopol Gallery

Gallery One

At 7pm. ECHO Gallery, “Creatures,” sculptures, paintings, photos and drawings by six artists. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Aug 25

Hammerfriar Gallery

At 5pm. Studio 428, “Integration of Art & Architecture: Life, Paintings and ArtDoors,” preview of work by Sargam Griffin. 428 Moore Ln, Healdsburg. 707.433.6842.

Through Sep 8, “Second Nature,” paintings and collages of Jenny Honnert Abell, reflects on the abundance of the natural world. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Aug 30 5-8 pm. Retrospect Gallery, grand opening reception with paintings by Gregory Olde. Reception, Aug 30, 58pm. 104 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. Fri-Sun, 115. 707.291.7058.

SONOMA COUNTY Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery Through Sep 3, “Songs of the Earth: The Joy of Color,” featuring iconic landscapes by Jack Stuppin. 1785 Coast Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. Wed-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.875.2911.

Cornerstone Sonoma Through Sep 30, “Heads Up,” the human head interpreted by seven sculptors in different mediums. 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. Daily 10 to 4. 707.933.3010.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Sep 1, “Face Me” captures the likeness, the personality or even the mood of a person in a self-portrait or portrait. Ninety-one pieces. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Through Sep 1, “Shadow of the Ego,” mixed media by Cat Kaufman. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

At 5pm. Sebastopol Gallery, “Wild Prayer: Listening to Nature,” acrylic paintings by Sandy Eastoak. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

25 artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Aug 27, “Go Figure,” an exploration of body image, self reference, emotion and imagination. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Healdsburg Museum Through Nov 8, “Ancestors of Mexico,” artifacts, photos and more. Free. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Through Sep 30, “Wild Prayer: Listening to Nature,” acrylic paintings by Sandy Eastoak. Reception, Aug 25, 5pm. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Opening Aug 24, ‘Artistry in Wood,’ showcase of fine regional craftsmanship. Reception, Aug 24, 5-7pm. Through Sep 9, “Trees” featuring the large-scale oil paintings of Chester Arnold. Through Sep 9, “Sonoma Oaks: Points of View” featuring Hugh Livingston’s multimedia installations on the patterns and sounds of California oak habitats. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Sep 13, “Cross Pollination,” the art of painter

Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Studio 428

Through Aug 31, Seven artists show their paintings in this summer salon. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Aug 25, 5pm, “Integration of Art & Architecture: Life, Paintings and ArtDoors,” preview of work by Sargam Griffin. 428 Moore Ln, Healdsburg. 707.433.6842.

Towers Gallery Through Sep 30, Frank Oravetz, photography and Melissa Cox, watercolors, celebrate the summer. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY

Seager Gray Gallery

NAPA COUNTY

Clara Bijl Also featuring Dhaya Lakshminarayanan, Eric Murphy and Santa Rosa comedian “Uncle” Charlie Adams. Hosted by Tony Sparks. Aug 25, 8pm. $10. Christy’s on the Square, 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8565.

ECHO Gallery Aug 24-Oct 6, “Creatures,” sculptures, paintings, photos and drawings by six artists. Reception, Aug 24, 7pm.

Marin Community Foundation Through Sep 28, “Beyond Landscape” features artwork focused on sustaining nature and taking care of the planet. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Aug 29, “Bay Area Women Artists,” group show juried by Donna Seager. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley.

Comedy

Through Sep 23, “Entering the Wild” featuring the work of Trish Carney, Adriane Colburn and others. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Through Sep 15, “Kings of Imagination,” featuring works by Bill Dempster, Jack Carter & Stonefox. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855. Through Sep 30, 150 artists each receive a small wooden box to create something amazing. Nothing living, though. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Through Sep 6, “Land, Sea and the People Within,” oil paintings by Dorallen Davis. free. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.968.2203.

di Rosa

Elsewhere Gallery

Gallery Route One

Robert Mondavi Winery

1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Napa Valley Museum Through Sep 23, “Memory Bank II: An Exhibition of Place and People” captures people and places of Napa’s history during an era of transition in photos and film. Through Sep 29, “Secret Life of Paper,” celebrating paper as an art medium. Includes work by Patti Brown, Deborah Donahower and others. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Pop Up Gallery Saturdays-Sundays, noon6pm through Sep 2, “Pushing Boundaries,” featuring artists from the Bay Area, reflects popular culture, urbanism and Art Brut. 3860 Broadway, American Canyon.

Kevin Meaney Veteran funnyman’s act has been called “The precocious love child of Jonathan Winters and Ethel Merman.” Aug 23, 8pm. $20-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Bodega Seafood Art & Wine Festival Juried art, over a dozen restaurants catering, three

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Oct 14, “Body of Art,” figurative art from local artists. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Retrospect Gallery Aug 30-Sept 31, paintings by Gregory Olde. Reception, Aug 30, 5-8pm. 104 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. Fri-Sun, 11-5. 707.291.7058.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Sep 23, “Threads of Illusion,” small-scale weavings by Adela Akers. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Through Sep 9, “Showin’ on the SOMETHING’S FISHY The Bodega Seafood, Art & Wine Festival has music, magicians and seafood galore River,” juried fine art featuring Aug. 25–26. See Events, above.

31 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 22–28, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Arts Events

Lawrence Ferlinghetti. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.


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A E

RIVER THEATER MUSIC SHOWCASE

( 31

stages of entertainment, wine and microbrew beer tasting and much more. Aug 25-26, 10am-6pm. $8-$15. Watts Ranch, 16885 Bodega Hwy, Bodega.

Grassroots Grazing Gala Live music by Honey B & the Pollinators, delectables by chef Sally Briggs, and more at this fundraiser for the West Sonoma county Rural Alliance. Aug 25, 6pm. $45$55. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

FEATURING: MELVIN SEALS

Kathryn Hall Beach Party

SATURDAY AUGUST 25 2012

Tickets; $40 www.g-a-entertainment.com

RIVER THEATER 16135 MAIN STREET, GUERNEVILLE, CA (707)869-8022

Spa Days Available

Cover May Apply

Wed, Aug 22 X6pm

ROLLER GIRLS DINE & DONATE 8pm XPRAIRIE SUN SHOWCASE

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My Grandmother The Beth Custer Ensemble plays a live score to this 1929 Soviet Georgian silent film. Aug 26, 7pm. $15-$18. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

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Free back-to-school haircuts, a street mandala, free minibicycle tune-ups, shopping, outdoor dining, youth music showcase and more. Aug 26, noon-4pm. Free. Downtown Fairfax, Bolinas Road, Fairfax.

With nowhere left to go, a man finds love when heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forced to drive his illegal taxi around New York. Aug 25, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

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Celebration of mustaches, magnum wine bottles and the 1980s, featuring DJ Conrad Moore. Aug 25, 2pm. $20. Red Car Wine Company, 8400 Graton Rd, Sebastopol. 707.829.8500, ext 105.

Earliest morality play, written in the 12th century. Aug 25, 7pm. $10. Church of the Incarnation, 550 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2604.

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Paris Opera Ballet performance of Persian-set ballet of thwarted love. Choreographed by Jean-Guillaume Bart. Sun, Aug 26, 10am and Tues, Aug 28, 6:30pm. $12-$15. Smith Rafael Film Center,

The Royal English Opera Company performs highlights from favorite operas. Sat, Aug 25, 3pm. Free. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

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among many, many others. Aug 25, 3:30-6:30pm. $150. River Terrace Inn, 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. www.cochon555.com.

Taste of Petaluma Forty of Petalumaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest restaurants, galleries, shops, wineries, breweries and food purveyors set up for this walking tour. Aug 25, 11:30am4pm. $35-$40. Helen Putnam Plaza, Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma.

Vegan Cooking Seminar Miyoko Schinner of Miyokoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen and author of three cookbooks presents this culinary adventure. Aug 29, 6:30pm. $25. Sonoma Cutlery, 130 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.6433.

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A Caregiving Journey from Heartbreak to Healing” with Dietrich Stroeh. Aug 25, 7pm, “Two Among the Righteous Few: A Story of Courage” with Marty Brounstein. Aug 26, 1pm, “In Thought and Action: The Enigmatic Life of S.I. Hayakawa” with Gerald and Janice Haslam. Aug 26, 3pm, “Celebrate the Divine Feminine: Reclaim Your Power with Ancient Goddess Wisdom” with Joy Reichard. Aug 26, 4pm, “Only a Girl” with Lian Gouw. Aug 26, 6pm, “Deep Happy: How to Get There and Always Find Your Way Back” with Peter Fairfield. Aug 26, 7pm, “A Daughter’s Inheritance” with Jean Symmes. Aug 27, 7pm, “The Survivor” with Gregg Hurwitz. Aug 28, 7pm, “What Light Can Do: Essays on Art, Imagination, and the Natural World” with Robert Haas. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Napa Copperfield’s Books Aug 25, 1pm, “Cindy’s Supper Club,” with Cindy Pawlcyn. 3900-A Bel Aire Plaza, Highway 29 and Trancas St, Napa. 707.252.8002.

Healdsburg Copperfield’s Books Aug 25, 5pm, “The Joy of Gluten-Free, Sugar-Free Baking” with Peter Reinhart & Denene Wallace. 104 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.433.9270.

River Reader Aug 22, 7pm, “Surrounded by Water” with Stefanie Freele. 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

Theater A Chorus Line Sing along to “Dance 10, Looks Three” and other favorites. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Sep 9. $22-$24. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Circle Mirror Transformation During a six-week adult creative drama class, four strangers and their teacher learn more about themselves than they do about acting. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 26. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

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Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of August 22

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Do you know what a controlled burn is? Firefighters start small, manageable fires on purpose so as to eradicate brush that has accumulated too close to wooded areas. With less fuel around, bigger fires are not as likely to ignite accidentally and turn into conflagrations. I encourage you to use this as a metaphor for your own life, Aries. How? First, identify a big potential problem that may be looming on the horizon. Then, in the coming weeks, get rid of all the small messes that might tend to feed that big problem. Make sure it’ll never happen. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

CHESTED ‘Artistry in Wood’ returns to the Sonoma County Museum Aug. 24–Sept. 23. See Openings, p31.

of comedic radio show. Aug 2627, 5:30pm. $35. Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

The Liar West Coast premiere of a new comedy set in the decadent and flamboyant cavalier period. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Sep 23. $20-$35. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Love Letters Two-person reading of A.R. Gurney’s Pulitzer-nominated play, starring Mary Clay and Bob Dwyer. Sat, 8:30pm, through Aug 25. Free. Indian Springs Art Gallery, 1506 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream Kate Kennedy directs Avalon Players for Shakespeare under the stars. Thurs-Sun, 7pm, through Aug 25. $25. Buena Vista Carneros, 18000 Old Winery Rd, Sonoma.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream Robert Currier directs outdoor production set in Hawaii where the scent of hibiscus and twang of ukuleles will permeate Shakespeare’s story of lunatics, lovers and poets. Dates and times vary. Through Sep 30. $20-$35. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael.

110 in the Shade Musical set in a 1930s Texas heat wave. Directed by Mary Chun (music) and Elly

Lichenstein (stage). Dates and times vary. Through Sep 2. $25$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Our Country’s Good Porchlight Theatre Company presents the historical fiction about a British lieutenant who puts on a play starring prisoners. Times vary. Thurs-Sat through Sep 8. $15-$30. Marin Society of Artists, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers A young bride who hatches a scheme to marry off her six brothers-in-law goes awry when the brothers kidnap six women from a neighboring town. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Sep 16. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Winnie the Pooh When Piglet gets roped into Kanga’s household Pooh goes to the rescue, but his appetite for honey gets him stuck in the door. Sat, 11am, through Aug 25. $7. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Jungian storyteller Clarissa Pinkola Estes advises us to take good care of the untamed aspects of our nature. “The wild life must be kept ordered on a regular basis,” she writes. One way to do this is to keep our uncommon and unruly ideas clear and organized. It’s also important to give them respect and understand that they’re crucial to our spiritual and psychological health. How are you doing in this regard, Taurus? What’s your relationship with the untamed aspects of your nature? According to my reading of the omens, now is prime time for you honor and nurture and cultivate them.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) By my astrological reckoning, you’re not nearly wet enough right now. I recommend that you take immediate and intensive steps to remedy the situation. There should not be anything about you that is high and dry; you need to soak up the benefits that come from being slippery and dripping. If you’re suffering from even a hint of emotional dehydration, you should submerse yourself in the nearest pool of primal feelings. For extra credit, drink deeply from the sacred cup that never empties. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

In the 16th century, Holy Roman Emperor Charles V ruled over a vast swath of land that included 12 modern European nations. According to some historians, he once said, “I speak Spanish to God, Italian to women, French to men and German to my horse.” This is the kind of attitude I recommend that you adopt in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Tailor your language to the people and creatures you’re speaking to. Address them on their own level of consciousness, respecting their limitations and appealing to their particular kind of intelligence. Of course this is always a good policy, but it’s especially important for you to observe now. Fluency and flexibility will be rewarded in ways you can’t imagine.

LEO (July 23–August 22)

Would you like to enhance your relationship with money? If so, do you have any specific ideas about how to do it? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to identify and implement those ideas. Let me make an initial suggestion: keep your magical thinking to a minimum, but don’t stamp it out entirely; a small amount of frisky fantasizing will actually boost the likelihood that your more practical intentions will achieve critical mass. Here’s another tip: imagine the presents you’d get for people if you had some extra cash. Stimulating your generous urges may help motivate the universe to be generous to you.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

A guy I know was invited to hang one of his paintings in a New York gallery—on one condition. It had to be a piece he created on the spot, in the gallery, on the day the show opened. That would be way too much pressure for me to handle. I need to spend a long time on the stuff I make, whether it’s music or writing. I’ve got to fuss over every little detail as I constantly edit and refine and add layers. What about you, Virgo? Could you quickly come up with some new wrinkle or fresh creation that would show the world who you really are? I’m guessing we will soon find out.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) If you’ve been reading my horoscopes for a while, you know I’m not a decadent cynic who thinks “no pain, no gain” is the supreme formula for success. On the contrary, I think it’s quite possible to enjoy tremendous growth spurts when you’re happy and healthy. Pleasurable events can be great learning experiences. Joy and freedom may activate potentials that would otherwise remain

dormant. Having said that, I want to make a suggestion that may seem at odds with my usual approach, even though it’s not. For the next two weeks, I encourage you to explore the necessary power of decay. Harness the archetypes of breakdown and dissolution as you put an end to things whose time is up. This work is key to your future rejuvenation and renaissance.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

I’m going to ignore the Urban Dictionary’s more modern definitions of the word “yeast” and stick to the original meaning: an agent of fermentation that brews alcoholic drinks and makes bread dough rise. Metaphorically speaking, Scorpio, you should be like that for your gang or crew or tribe. I urge you to stir up group morale. Provoke deeper thought and stronger feelings. Instigate some bubbly new trends and effervescent interactions. Be yeasty!

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Sussex is a county in southeast England. Its official motto is “We wunt be druv,” which is Sussex dialect for “We won’t be pushed around.” It’s not bad as mottoes go, I guess. There’s power in announcing to the world that you’re not going to allow anyone to manipulate you or bully you. But I’d like to see you come up with a more robust battle cry for yourself, Sagittarius, one that doesn’t focus on what you won’t do, but rather on what you will do. It’s an ideal astrological moment to articulate your driving purpose in a pithy formula that will give you strength whenever you invoke it. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “Most people consider global warming somewhat of a mixed blessing,” wrote Aaron Sankin on Huffington Post. “On one hand, there’s ocean acidification, deserts gobbling up wide swaths of farmland and the massive die-off of the innumerable species unable to cope with the effects of the world’s rapidly rising temperature. But, on the other hand, you’ll be able to wear shorts for literally the entire year.” Sankin is being deeply sarcastic, of course. Let’s make his satire a jumpingoff point as we consider some sincerely worthwhile trade-offs you might want to implement in your own sphere. Would you be willing to sacrifice a trivial comfort for a new privilege? Would you shed a small pleasure to gain a much bigger pleasure? Might you divest yourself of a pocket of resentment if in doing so you’d attract a cleansing epiphany? AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) I don’t expect your travels in the coming weeks to be like a smooth luxury cruise in a stretch limousine. Your route is not likely to be a straight shot through breathtaking scenery with expansive views. No, my dear Aquarius, your journeys will be more complicated than that, more snaky and labyrinthine. Some of the narrow passages and weedy detours you’ll need to navigate may not even resemble paths, let alone highways. And your metaphorical vehicle may resemble a funky old 1967 Chevy pickup truck or a forklift bedecked with flowers. It should be pretty fun, though. Keep in mind that your maps may only be partially useful. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

In Medieval times, you didn’t need a priest to get married, nor did you have to be in a church or recite a set of vows. You didn’t even have to round up witnesses. All that was required was that the two people who wanted to be wed said “I marry you” to each other. Those three words had great power! In the coming days, Pisces, I’d love to see you draw inspiration from that lost tradition. Your assignment is to dream up three potent declarations that, while not legally binding, express the deepest and most loving intentions you promise to be faithful to in the coming years.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


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