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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Your Journey to Graduate School Begins February 25 8=7<CA4=@/A>317/:>@=5@/;=<1/;>CA7<A/<B/0/@0/@/ BVWaa^SQWOZ=\S2Og7\b`]RcQbW]\]\ AObc`ROg4SP`cO`g #VOaPSS\RSaWU\SRb] UWdS^`]a^SQbWdSabcRS\baOQ][^`SVS\aWdS W\b`]RcQbW]\b]>OQW¿QO¸a5`ORcObS7\abWbcbS¸a c\W_cSSRcQObW]\OZTSObc`Sa

Experience PaciďŹ caâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interdisciplinary curriculum through characteristic classroom presentations Learn about the degree programs at facultyled, program-speciďŹ c information meetings Explore the Ladera Ln. & Lambert Rd. Campuses Visit the Opus Archives and PaciďŹ caâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bookstore Learn about admissions and ďŹ nancial aid Meet PaciďŹ ca alumni, faculty, staff, and other prospective students

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Saying ‘Sorry’ Why do we apologize for every little thing? BY BARBARA STEPKA

W

hat’s that phrase about never having to say you’re sorry?

Well, maybe it’s not “never” having to say to say you’re sorry, but for some reason I have been realizing that “sorry” has become my new catch-all word for just about everything I do these days. I’m always saying sorry when I don’t even have anything to be really that sorry about. And it’s not just me. I’ve been hearing many other people doing it also. What is this phenomenon? “Sorry,” as you almost bump into someone in the Goodwill store. “Sorry,” when you do not have the correct change. “Sorry,” for the time it takes to gather correct change. “Sorry,” if you reach the wrong phone number. “Sorry, I gained 5 pounds,” I tell myself as I spoon another gob of delicious store-bought white cake and ice cream into my mouth. “Sorry,” I forgot to call you back (not). “Sorry,” with a little backward wave, I almost cut you off with my car and ran you into the ditch back there. “Sorry,” I don’t have time to take or want another telemarketing call. Heck, I’m even telling my cat sorry when I am stepping over him—as if he cares! He never says sorry to me. Saying sorry has become as mundane and incidental as saying “Bless you” when someone sneezes. My theory? I think it may have something to do with the general reality of this economy. We all know people without jobs, living paycheck to paycheck, working two-plus jobs to make ends meet. And vacation? What’s that? We are a sorry bunch of people right now in general—but with great manners. When it comes right down to it, saying sorry is a nice thing to do. But I admit, I am getting tired of saying it. There are a lot of other people out there who really need to say it much more often . . . and mean it . . . and act on it. Hint: can you spell l-e-g-i-s-l-a-t-o-r-s? Now that would be a great phenomenon!

Barbara Stepka is a writer at www.farmgirlstudios.com based in Petaluma. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

We Lose the Spelling Bee

On the cover of the Feb. 8 Valentine’s Day issue are the words “Losing our VIRIGNITY.” Does this mean we are proud of our virginity? Or are we are losing our virginity in an undignified manner? Is a new word being “coined”?

WILDFLOWER LEASE Graton Whoops. —The Ed.

What’s the Priority? Alternatives to driving in west Marin are difficult or dangerous. Marin County’s transportation priority is motor vehicles, which discriminates against those who can’t drive. This is possibly why West Marin has 20 percent fewer residents since the last census. “Waiting for the Bus” by Rachel Dovey (The Paper, Feb. 1) examined bus service in the northern part of West Marin. Direct bus service to Point Reyes, the social services hub of West Marin, from southwest Marin (Stinson Beach and Bolinas, because Muir Beach isn’t served) was cancelled by the county. It was costing 50 bucks a passenger, so few used the infrequent and inconvenient transit. No county official proposed making service convenient and frequent enough to be used by more riders. Yet many more millions in “emergency” funds were found to replace one collapsed section of Terrace Avenue on a crumbling cliff in Bolinas, which had become a pleasant pedestrian and bicyclist route after being closed to motor vehicle traffic. The subsidy per motorist using the repaired road and for the dozen or so houses off of Terrace has not been calculated.

The staggering amounts spent on “transportation” mostly come from general funds. Fuel taxes and vehicle fees pay only a small portion of road, traffic enforcement and parking costs, and none of the medical costs. Ninety-nine percent of transportation spending in the United (“by freeways”) States has benefited motor vehicles, most transporting only the driver. The subsidy costs per user is standard transportation policy in Marin and elsewhere. That’s why those who can’t drive wait for the bus.

STEPHEN SIMAC Stinson Beach

In Defense of George Lucas The last sentence in the film review of Red Tails (Jan. 18) by Richard Von Busack didn’t make any sense. Why does the author assume that pilots wouldn’t talk a fair amount of smack when in the act of shooting down an enemy? Prayer before going up into the skies would seem like a commonplace act as well, especially so when one considers that the odds were fairly good that they wouldn’t be returning. The reason for the CGI is simple; there simply aren’t enough of the vintage planes depicted flying these days to make it practical to use them. So George Lucas used WWII footage as the idea for Star Wars. How does that detract from the movie? There’s nothing wrong with adding a little melodrama to make a movie more palatable to the moviegoers that know very little about the war. The reviewer would have one believe that the movie was a bust with regard to its historical accuracy, when really what he didn’t like was that it pulled at heartstrings. My father was a Tuskegee Airman, and I’m quite sure that if he were alive today, he wouldn’t have had nearly as much of a problem with the way his comrades were depicted as the reviewer did. Totally lame review, or rather, reviewer.

JIM KEENE Via Online


Rants

Taking a Break I was delighted to read the new USDA guidelines requiring schools to serve meals with twice as many fruits and vegetables, more whole grains, less sodium and no meat for breakfast. The new guidelines offer a welcome change from USDA’s tradition of using the National School Lunch Program as a dumping ground for meat and dairy surpluses. Not surprisingly, 90 percent of American children are consuming excess fat, only 15 percent eat recommended servings of fruits and vegetables, and one-third have become overweight or obese. Parents should continue to insist on healthful plant-based school meals, snacks and vending-machine items.

LARRY ROGAWITZ Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1

Here’s to all the beautiful daughters in the world born so conveniently at 4:30am

2

Summerfield Cinemas to run Woody Allen film series starting in March

3 Phil Lesh announces 12

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Real Doner in Petaluma— still the total bee’s knees

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Paper THE

EMPTY AISLES In Sonoma County, only 42 percent of those eligible are enrolled in CalFresh.

Stay Hungry Despite an overhauled food-stamp program, the majority of those eligible aren’t using it. Is it fear of dependency or something deeper? BY LEILANI CLARK

R

ichard” works nearly full-time at Home Depot, earning $10.60 an hour. Each month, he brings home just enough to cover the basics. “It’s a struggle because I can’t save any money,” says the Sonoma County

father of a preteen son. “If something catastrophic happens, I don’t have any buffer.” When his roommate qualified for CalFresh, the program still colloquially known as “food stamps,” Richard realized that he too might be eligible. After stacks of paperwork and a four-hour

wait at the Department of Human Services, he qualified to receive $100 a month. “It’s not like we’re starving,” he says. “But it’s one of those things where every little bit helps.” Yet Richard’s story isn’t typical for the estimated 3.7 million California adults experiencing food insecurity. According to a 2012 report by the California Food

Policy Advocates titled “Lost Dollars, Empty Plates,” California ranks last among all states for participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the federally funded program known state-wide as CalFresh. Joelle Brignoli, CalFresh planner analyst at the Sonoma County Department of Human Services, says that only 42 percent of eligible individuals in the county receive nutrition assistance. “There’s a big push to increase enrollment statewide,” says Brignoli. “Our caseloads continue to grow in large amounts.” She adds that enrollments increased from 11,708 in February to over 14,000 by November 2011. Still, why is it that 58 percent of those eligible are not taking advantage of CalFresh benefits? In a county known for abundant food and wine, the repercussions of unused benefits go beyond empty stomachs. “The USDA has shown that for every dollar in SNAP expenditures there is an economic stimulus of $1.79,” says Tia Shimada, nutrition policy advocate for California Food Policy Advocates. “So for every $1 in Cal Fresh benefits coming into California, we are generating $1.79 in economics.” Shimada explains that the expenditures are put back into economies by being spent, for example, at local grocery stores, affecting staffing levels, deliveries and orders, an effect that ripples out into the local economy. Also, for families on extremely tight budgets, money spent on food might otherwise be spent on taxable goods, potentially generating sales tax revenues for states and counties. Right now the overall “lost” county tax revenue is around $51 million, according to the “Lost Dollars” report. The report commends modernizations enacted by the CalFresh Act of 2011 (AB 6) that eliminated finger imaging and photography requirements, and in 2012 switched to a semi-annual reporting period rather than a


â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;If something catastrophic happens, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any buffer.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something that happens to your psyche when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re being taken care of,â&#x20AC;? she says, describing how she â&#x20AC;&#x153;spiraledâ&#x20AC;? down ďŹ nancially after the economic downturn left her out of work. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It makes you feel weaker. I know I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like the feeling.â&#x20AC;? Her saving grace, she says, is that the whole process has been easier than she ďŹ rst anticipated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I expected it to be slow and arduous, but it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t,â&#x20AC;? says Caroline. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The employees make it very courteous, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s handled in a respectful way. The process is as speedy as they can make it, considering how overloaded they are.â&#x20AC;? Pedro Toledo, director of community and governmental relations at the Redwood Community Health Coalition, says changes enacted by AB 6 might encourage more people to apply. But he says for many families, especially those with language barriers or nonlegal status, the process can be daunting.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pretty complicated application,â&#x20AC;? says Toledo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never ďŹ lled out a public-assistance application before, it can be difficult.â&#x20AC;? Joelle Brignoli says that myths still persist, despite efforts to educate the public. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still inaccurate information out thereâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;particularly in the Spanishspeaking populationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that CalFresh is a public charge, and applying for beneďŹ ts will jeopardize their chance of citizenship down the road,â&#x20AC;? she says. In addition, those who are homeless can qualify, despite beliefs to the contrary, and some of the elderly and disabled might think that â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too much work for not enough beneďŹ ts.â&#x20AC;? Toledoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organization has seen a positive upswing since combining health insurance screenings for children with CalFresh applications; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve successfully screened 2,000 applications in Sonoma County alone. In Napa County, where only about one-third of those eligible actually receive beneďŹ ts, enrollment workers have screened 14,000 kids for CalFresh; about 4,000 of those have been deemed eligible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If someone submits their own application,â&#x20AC;? says Toledo, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the chance of it being accepted is about 30 percent, but if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s submitted through our program, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about a 70 to 90 percent approval rating. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The fact that so many people are eligible and are not enrolled is pretty tragic when so many kids have health issues related to malnutrition,â&#x20AC;? adds Toledo. Keeping the beneďŹ ts rolling can be overwhelming for working parents. Richard came up against this recently when, after just three months, his $100 in beneďŹ ts got cut off. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d missed the deadline on an important piece of paperwork. After calls to his case worker, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still waiting to hear back. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was my ďŹ rst time doing it, and I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize the gravity of the deadline,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I made one clerical error, and that cut them off. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s frustrating.â&#x20AC;?

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On Feb. 7, registered nurses at Sutter Santa Rosa Medical Center voted for a new 30-month collective-bargaining agreement. Initially, the hospital administration intended to implement reductions in beneďŹ ts and working conditions, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;takeaways,â&#x20AC;? as reported in these pages (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hospital Heartbeat,â&#x20AC;? Oct. 26, 2011). After continued negotiations, the hospital withdrew these demands and the 350 RNs accepted the new contracts.

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Trail Blazers As the number of bicycle and walking enthusiasts in the North Bay grows, so does the need for bike trails, especially ones that connect cities. On Feb. 8, the Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition (SCBC) announced fundraising efforts for the PetalumaSebastopol Trail, an 11-mile, paved, multi-use trail that will link the two towns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The trail will offer a safe, dedicated route for transportation and recreation by people who walk, bike, use wheelchairs, ride horses and use other nonmotorized modes,â&#x20AC;? according to Sandra Lupien, outreach director for the SCBC. To that end, the SCBC is spearheading a six-week campaign to raise $19,000 in matching funds; the goal is to help support a $190,000 Community Based Transportation Grant to fund a feasibility study on the planned trail project. Matching funds must be collected by March 15. For more info., or to donate, go to www.bikesonoma.org or call 707.545.0153.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark

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9 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

three-month quarterly paperwork turn-around. This move has made online and telephone applications easier. Yet for some, all the streamlining in the world wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make the issue of pride go away. On a Friday afternoon in January, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carolineâ&#x20AC;? ďŹ lled out paperwork at the Human Services office in Santa Rosa. Caroline, willing to talk on the condition of anonymity, is in her 40s with a college-aged daughter. She says that she waited two years to apply.


Breathe B reat he Easy Ea asy

Green Zone Photo courtesy Basel Action Network 2009

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

10

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WELLNESS

CENTER Health Starts Here! Engine 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 28-Day Challenge Each Weds. 2/15 - 3/14/12 - 6:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:00pm Ends with a FREE graduation dinner for all participants. Reserve your spot: misty.humphrey@wholefoods.com

Stay Young & Sexy with Natural Hormone Balance 2/21/12 - 6:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:30pm Hormone imbalance can cause fatigue, weight gain, depression, anxiety, PMS, chronic pain, & menopausal symptoms.

Gluten Intolerance Group of Sonoma County 2/23/12 - 6:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:00pm Led by Dr. Justin Hoffman, this group discusses challenges of gluten intolerance whilst sharing ideas & recipes.

Whole Kids Nutrition Club 2/25/12 - 12:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1:00pm Monthly interactive group for kids aged 6-12 yrs, teaching nutritional habits to last a life time. Parent participation requested. Sign up: misty.humphrey@wholefoods.com Wellness Center events are free unless otherwise noted.

$PEEJOHUPXO.BMMt4BOUB3PTB

Store open daily 8am-9pm (707) 542-7411 calendar: wholefoods.com/coddingtown

Go Team! Toxic exports from Afghanistan, Haiti and the U.S. BY JULIANE POIRIER

I

f toxic-waste dumping strategies were viewed with as much interest as strategies of Super Bowl teams, the public would gather in bars and living rooms to watch a contest in which all countries of the world are teamed up according to performance levels. The global losersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lowest ranking teamâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;would comprise Afghanistan, Haiti and the United States.

The winning teams are the ones that agree to ban hazardous-waste export to developing countries. Winners of highest ranking are those agreeing to the most strenuous degree of regulations: Belgium, Bulgaria, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Ghana, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Trinidad and Tobago, and the United Kingdom. Yay, team! This game is more than three decades running. In the 1980s, the public outcry against toxic waste dumping in Africa led to the 1989 Basel Convention in Switzerland, at which 178 countries proposed

guidelines for how toxic waste could cross borders. In 1995, an additional amendment was proposed to actually ban toxicwaste exportâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but ratiďŹ cation of that amendment, known as the Basel Ban Amendment, has been tied up for years. However, at the 10th meeting in October of last year, it was agreed that the Basel Ban Amendment could be ratiďŹ ed by only 68 of the 90 countries that were parties to the 1995 Convention. That means only 17 more countries need to sign on. Will ours be one of them? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The U.S. signed the original Basel Convention, but never ratiďŹ ed it,â&#x20AC;? explains Jim Puckett, director of the Basel Ban Action Network. Puckett tells the Bohemian that the United States is the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only developed country that has not ratiďŹ ed it. The only other countries that have signed but not ratiďŹ ed the original convention are Haiti and Afghanistan. The Basel Ban Amendment includes restrictions that â&#x20AC;&#x153;most thought would be in the original treaty but wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t because the U.S. didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want it there,â&#x20AC;? says Puckett. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When ratiďŹ ed, the ban will become international law. Unfortunately, it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t apply to the United States unless we become party to the convention. And part of the reason weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never accepted the ban is that the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is against it, as is the trade association for the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries that is lobbying against the ban.â&#x20AC;? In the midst of its reluctance to ratify the convention and the ban amendment, the United States continues to produce the most waste per capita. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a shame and a sham,â&#x20AC;? says Puckett. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope they will join the rest of the world.â&#x20AC;? Two bills before Congress (HR 2284 and SB 2070) could change things. In the meantime, Puckett advises keeping old cell phones and computers from becoming toxic exports by using only certiďŹ ed e-recyclers and not â&#x20AC;&#x153;hidden exporters.â&#x20AC;? For more, see www.ban.org.


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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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ON THE LINE Roughly 300 to 400 students are enrolled in the SRJC’s culinary program.

Kitchen Confident Great deals, top-notch meals from student chefs at SRJC’s new Culinary Arts Center BY JESSICA DUR

W

hat’s a chef to do when presented with 60 gallons of chopped cabbage that must be used as soon as possible? At the Santa Rosa Junior College Culinary Institute, such superfluity is a weekly occurrence, as students in knife class learn the cuts of the trade by slicing and dicing pounds of fresh produce.

But instead of going to waste, these expertly chopped ingredients become part of the

weekly menu at the SRJC’s brandnew Culinary Cafe, which serves gourmet food at shockingly affordable prices. No wonder it’s so hard to get a seat. Now housed in the impeccable $20 million B. Robert Burdo Culinary Arts Center, directly across from the JC campus, the cafe occupies a windowed dining room that abuts an open kitchen agleam with stainless steel equipment. When I arrived promptly at 11:30am on a recent Wednesday morning, I was handed a to-go menu with a phone number printed at the bottom. “We’re totally full,” said

Betsy Fischer, instructor of front house operations. “You can call to make a reservation.” When this tactic proved fruitless (Friday was completely booked as well), I realized I’d need to be more tenacious if I was to eat at a restaurant that’s open only seven and a half hours a week, from 11:30am to 2pm, Wednesday through Friday. Even with such specific hours, it’s easy to understand why they’re serving a hundred people a day. “Our menus are more complex than restaurants’,” chef Michael Salinger, program coordinator and instructor since 1993, tells

me. Twenty-six students make all of the food, from scratch, using produce from the JC’s own Shone Farm. “Each week, you can expect something grilled, stewed, roasted and sautéed,” he explains, “which reflects the variety of skills my students are learning.” The cafe’s aesthetics—black leather chairs, creamy linens, stylish light fixtures, white-clad cooks-in-training—belie the menu’s prices, where no item tops $10. In addition to seasonal soups, salads, pizzas and sandwiches, entrées run from pan-roasted pork tenderloin and grilled beef satay with peanut sauce to winter vegetable potpie and shrimp kebabs with tropical fruit salsa. Those who can’t make it for lunch can stop by the bakery, which opens at 7:30am, for a dizzying variety of sweet treats. Enormous pieces of fresh cake—German chocolate, lemon chiffon, angel food with raspberry chantilly—sell for just $2.50, less than what most coffeehouses charge for their saran-wrapped, often disappointingly cold and spongy versions. A coconut macaroon is just 75 cents. When he took over, Salinger revised the program to guarantee that students would be job-ready in just two semesters. Certificates in five programs—culinary arts, baking and pastry, front house operations, dining room service and restaurant management— carry a $2,500 price tag, a fraction of the cost of most culinary schools. “When I started, we had about 16 students working toward certificates,” Salinger tells me. “Today, we’ve got 300 to 400 students.” He credits the rise of the Food Network, with its attendant glamorizing of chefs, for the sharp increase in popularity in the last decade. “Plus,” he points out, “we still have jobs in our industry.” Santa Rosa Junior College Culinary Arts Center, 1670 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. In the warmer months, the cafe opens its patio area with outdoor grill, smoker and pizza oven. For now, booking a reservation in advance is recommended at 707.522.2796.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Leilani Clark

Dining

13


Dining

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Barndiva California cuisine. $$-$$$. Delicious food with outdoor seating great for balmy summer nights. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 231 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.431.0100.

Carneros Bistro & Wine Bar Californian.

Appetizers, Choice of: Rellenos de Papa a potato fritter with seasoned ground beef

or Platanutres con Dip de Aguacate plantain chips and avocado dip

Entree, Choice of: Pollo Guisado, stewed chicken or Bistec Empanado, breaded sirloin angus steak Dessert, Choice of: Pastelillos de Guayaba, guava & cheese empanada or Flan de Coco, de Pina, or de Queso, coconut, pineapple or cheese flan

19 prix fixe

$

$$$$. As fancy as foie graschestnut froth parfait for dinner, as simple as huevos rancheros for breakfast, and all superb. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 1325 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.931.2042.

JoJo Sushi Japanese. $-$$. Hip downtown eatery features fresh sushi, sashimi, teriyaki, and innovative specials. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 645 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8588.

Juanita Juanita Mexican. $. Fun and funky. Lunch and dinner daily. 19114 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.935.3981.

400 Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa 707.542.8868 www.elcoqui2eat.com

The Red Grape Pizza.

Sweetheart Soaks & Massage Ther apy

$-$$. Delectable New Havenstyle thin-crust pizzas with fresh ingredients and a dazzling array of toppings. Lunch and dinner daily. 529 First St W, Sonoma. 707.996.4103.

Sapporo Japanese. $$. An excellent choice when the sushi urge hits. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 518 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.0631.

Scopa Italian. $$. For true Tuscan flavors. Can be crowded, but you get to see what the neighbors ordered. Dinner, Tues-Sun. 109-A Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.5282.

Mermaids Spa miner al baths & massage

707-823-3535

Gift Cards By Phone

115 S. Main St., Sebastopol | mermaidsspa.com

10 Year Best Of Winner

Sonoma-Meritage Martini California-French. $$$. The menu, which changes daily, is well-rounded with plenty of options, thanks in no small part to the fresh seafood

bar. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner, Wed-Mon; brunch, SatSun. 165 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.5556.

Sushi Tozai Japanese. $$. Spare, clean ambiance and some of the freshest sushi you’ll ever eat. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 7531 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9886.

Thai Issan Thai. $$. Popular full-spectrum Thai restaurant. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 208 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.762.5966.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Volpi’s Restaurant Italian. $$-$$$. Festive atmosphere teams with great traditional Italian dishes at one of county’s oldest eateries. Accordion in the speakeasy if you’re lucky. Dinner daily. 124 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.2371.

Washoe House

$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Easy Street Cafe American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Hatam Persian. $. Fresh and lushly seasoned regional fare. Lunch and dinner, TuesSun. 821 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8888.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

Roadhouse. $$. Since 1859, serving straightforward roadhouse grub and Italian fare. Canned green beans, buffalo burgers, amazingly satisfying pies. The bar alone is worth a trip. Lunch and dinner daily. Stony Point and Roblar roads, Cotati. 707.795.4544.

M&G’s Burgers & Beverages American. $.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Boca South American. $$$-

The ultimate in American cuisine. Crispy fries, good burgers and friendly locals chowing down. Lunch and dinner daily. 2017 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.454.0655.

Robata Grill & Sushi

Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner


Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, TuesSun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

French Laundry alumnus Ari Weiswasser is opening a 32seat restaurant in Glen Ellen with his wife, Erinn Benziger-Weiswasser, the former East Coast sales manager for the Benziger Family Winery. The Glen Ellen Star, a farmhouse-style restaurant, will open this spring, featuring a wood-burning brick oven, an eight-seat counter, an outdoor patio and a menu described as “refined rustic.” The food will revolve around the brick oven, and draw on flavors of smoke, caramelization and char. In addition to the Laundry, Weiswasser has worked in New York at Daniel, Picholine and also Corton, where he served as chef de cuisine under chef Paul Liebrandt. The move to Glen Ellen is a homecoming of sorts for Benziger-Weiswasser. She worked for her family wine business and Kobrand Wine and Spirits on the East Coast, but says she longed for home. After she and Weiswasser were married, they searched for a West Coast restaurant site. When daughter Noa was born, moving closer to family in Glen Ellen made sense. Weiswasser’s menu will draw on local products and produce, and include housemade ice cream offered in half-pints for tableside or offsite consumption. The restaurant will be open for dinner seven nights a week, and for lunch Friday through Sunday.—Stett Holbrook

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Fujiya Japanese. $$-$$$. Good, solid sushi. The Fujiya Deluxe combo is a standout. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat. 921 Factory Stores Dr, Napa. 707.257.0639.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most

remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

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15 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

N A PA CO U N TY

Rising Star

A M H LU 8T TA PE CH AM AR NO M SO Y, ON A M AT SD 0 P ER R 9:0 SH HU TO T :00 6

Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists with its fresh catches. A wide selection of nigiri, depending on what’s fresh. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, Mon-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

SMALL BITES

IL TA CK & IT CO N F A TIO NE DK TI BE VO PE G A M IN CO AST T

daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16

Restaurant Week Menu

Tandoori T andoori G Grill ri l l IIndian ndian Cuisine Cui s ine

SSame a me O Owners w ners aass SSizzling i z z l i ng T Tandoor a ndoor IIII JJenner e n ne r

Lunch L unch Buffet Buffet $

899

PP

Ro h n e r t Rohnert Park P ark Only O n ly

SStudent tudent SSpecial pecial SShow how ID ID

110% 0 % off off Dinner Dinner 111:30–2:30 1:30 –2:30 M Mon–Sat, on–Sat, 55–9 –9 D Daily a i ly

707.795.6892 70 7.7 . 9 5. 6 8 9 2

The Bay View Restaurant at The Inn at the Tides RESTAURANT WEEK MENU

February 29–March 4, 2012

1199 99 SSouthwest out hwest B Blvd, lvd, R Rohnert o h ne r t P Park a rk

now available on draft at Ol Oliver’s iver’s Marke Market et hand crafted in small batches with organic/fair trade ingredients ingrredients

FIRST COURSE CHOICE OF: Steamed Black Mussels tomato, garlic, white wine, lemon

Arugula Salad gorgonzola cheese, candied walnuts, shaved fennel, beets, balsamic vinaigrette

MAIN COURSE CHOICE OF: Lasagne Bolognese meat sauce, béchamel, Grana Padano cheese

Eggplant Parmigiana layers of sautéed eggplant, tomato sauce, mozzarella cheese

Grilled Salmon béarnaise sauce, red onion marmalade, rösti potatoes

DESSERT CHOICE OF: Tiramisu layers of ladyfingers, mascarpone cheese, rum and coffee cocoa powder, whipped cream

Warm Chocolate Lava Cake moist chocolate cake with a heart of creamy rich chocolate $ 29 per person, plus tax & gratuity

reservations: 707.875.2751 or email: reservations@innatthetides.com

deliciously refreshing kombucha

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Bella Vineyards (WC) Specializing in Zinfandel, Bella Vineyards farms three vineyards in Sonoma County: Big River Ranch in Alexander Valley, and the Lily Hill Estate and Belle Canyon in Dry Creek Valley. 9711 W. Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 4:30pm. 866.572.3552.

Benovia Winery Unfussy cellar tasting in barn-style winery, refined Chard and Pinot; but “ooh, have you had their Zinfandel?” 3339 Hartman Road, Santa Rosa. By appointment only, 10am–4pm daily. 707.526.4441. Inspiration Vineyards

sustainably created, brewed, fermented, bottled in Sonoma County

revivedrinks.com

facebook.com/revive facebook.com/revivedrinks edrinks

The colorful pastoral depicted on the label does exist, but this small, family-owned labor of love is sensibly located in the Pinecreek Business Park. Stylish tasting room; Chard, Cab and Blanc. 3360 Coffey Lane, Ste. E, Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–4:30pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.237.4980.

Longboard Vineyards If serious surfers are said to anticipate an approaching wave with focused contemplation, then it only follows that they’d pursue winemaking with corresponding studiousness. That’s the case at Longboard. 5 Fitch St., Healdsburg. Open Thursday–Saturday, 11am– 7pm; Sunday, 11am–5pm. 707.433.3473.

Michel-Schlumberger Highly recommended, but by appointment only. The family has been making wine in France for 400 years. Wellknown for Chardonnay. 4155 Wine Creek Road, Healdsburg. 707.433.7427.

Topel Winery Hailing from

800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

Hopland, Topel offers estategrown Meritage and other wines in this well-appointed tasting room with casement windows open to the street, across from Oakville Grocery. Cedar, chicory, chocolate

and brown spice–makes one hungry for a portobellomushroom-on-focaccia sandwich. 125 Matheson St., Hopland. Open daily, 11am– 7pm. Tasting fees, $5–$12. 707.433.4116.

Wilson Winery Scenic setting and rustic-modern tasting room makes for an atmospheric, recommended visit. Single-vineyard Zinfandels, Cabernet Sauvignons, Cabernet Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah win awards for good reason— namely, even curmudgeons take one sip and turn into believers. 1960 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am to 5pm. Tastings are $5; $10 for reserves. 707.433.4355.

N A PA CO U N TY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Bouchaine Vineyards Venerable producer of estategrown Burgundian style wine in the rustic wind-scraped hills of Carneros. Pinot Noir and Pinot Meuier with a coolclimate, cherry-skin crispness that nearly crunches in the mouth, and Chardonnay with a “mouth of butter.” 1075 Buchli Station Road, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–4pm; tasting fee $5. 707.252.9065.

Charles Krug Winery Founded 1861, and owned by the Peter Mondavi family since only 1943, Krug is among Napa’s most historic wineries. Taste awardwinning Sauvignon Blanc and reserve Cab in unassuming low building across from the original stone winery. 2800 Main St., St. Helena. Tasting daily, 10:30am to 5pm. Fees vary; complimentary for “Napa neighbors.” 707.967.2229.

Frank Family Vineyards A media mogul imagineered a Napa Valley winery that’s surprisingly no-frills, friendly and free of charge, from the flute of bubbly welcome to the last sip of award-winning Cab. Emphasis is on the historic Larkmead winery, the wine and, natch, the guest at this popular tasting room set in the winery’s remodeled craftsman farmhouse. Frank Family Vineyards, 1091 Larkmead Lane, Calistoga. Tasting daily, 10am–4pm, $10; reserve, $25. 707.942.0753.

Hess Collection Winery An intellectual outpost of art and wine housed in the century-old Christian Brother’s winery. Cab is the signature varietal. 4411 Redwood Road, Napa. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.255.1144.

Round Pond Estate Estate Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc served tableside on the terrace with scrumptious food pairings. Who can’t imagine cozying up next to the big gas-burning hearth, watching the sun set and savoring that Rutherford dusk? 875 Rutherford Road, Rutherford. Tastings by appointment daily, 11am to 4pm. $25. 888.302.2575.

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

Velo Vino Napa Valley Cycling-themed bungalow is filled with enough gear to outfit a peloton, plus wine and espresso, too. Tastings include spiced nuts and dried cherries, but sample-sized Clif and Luna Bars are readily available for your impromptu energy bar and wine pairings. 709 Main St. St. Helena. Daily, 10am–6pm. $10–$25. 707.968.0625.


I

f the label looks familiar, it might be because nearly every time a glossy magazine publishes a story about Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel, a bottle of Nalle lurks amid the lineup of usual suspects. The winery, although camouflaged under a thick mat of rosemary bushes, is hard to miss, rising above the vineyards like some kind of New Age bunker. It would be easy to imagine that this is some kind of slick, green-tech hospitality center . . .

At the end of a dusty driveway, the greeter is a black-andwhite dog named Pella. The hostess, Lila, presents visitors with a complimentary soggy tennis ball. Inside the cool cellar are some dozens of barrels, a basketball hoop, a folding table. On the table are bottles of wine. You may buy the wine on any Saturday afternoon—no waiting list. Like many of the valley’s best-known names—as seen in glossy magazines—this is just a little family-run winery, after all. Not that there haven’t been changes at Nalle, founded in 1985 by Doug Nalle. A new winemaker has been brought in, for instance, one whose skill set is perfectly tuned to the house style: Doug’s son, Andrew. Wearing a Nalle baseball cap, Andrew is a self-described sports enthusiast and university philosophy graduate who says that for his wine education he studied at “the university of Doug.” When a winetaster asks a question, the younger Nalle talks at length about the relationship between tannin and alcohol, prompting the visitor to say, “I wish I had that on tape!” Nalle admits that he can easily get into the wine-wonky zone: “That’s just how we talk.” Next, a couple of recentlyweds drop by, because they had shared a bottle of Nalle while on their honeymoon—in Copenhagen. Not a bad reach for a winery of just 1,200 cases. The 2008 Russian River Valley Chardonnay ($42) has a butterscotch aroma, candied pear flavors, but crisp acidity that enlivens each sip. The 2009 Henderlong Nalle Zinfandel ($42) is a field blend from the family’s old vines directly outside the door. The 2009 Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel ($36) is fresh and focused, with silky, cherry-berry fruit, and is labeled just 13.6 percent alcohol; a fresh barrel sample of 2011 Cabernet Sauvignon clocks in at an unheard-of 12.5. But Nalle doesn’t tout the low alcohol. Instead, he talks about the physicality of the wine, the crispness of the tannins, how it speaks to him. “I’ll have to bring this into the lab,” he decides after pulling a suspect barrel sample. To subject it to chemical tests? No, he says—having grown up with this wine, his nose is going to tell him everything he needs to know. Nalle Winery, 2385 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open Saturdays, noon–5pm. No fee. 707.433.1040.—James Knight

Appetizers The Royal Soup Dil Pasand

Exotic Entrees Served with Cucumber Raita, Basmati Rice Pilaf & Fresh Naans

“The Heart’s Desire” Lentil Soup Maharaja’s

Dal Bukara

or Maharani’s Salad

black lentils, spices & fresh herbs

Organic Green Salad with walnuts and our house mango dressing

homemade cheese in spinach curry

or Saag Paneer or Navratan Korma

Signature Appetizers Vegetable Pakoras

assorted vegetables, creamy tomato gravy with fresh herbs & exotic spices

served with cilantro chutney, sweet ‘n sour tamarind chutney & spicy chana dal chutney

Heavenly Dessert Mango Dream Cloud mango ice cream with warm cloud of Gajar Ka Halwa—carrot pudding

19 prix fixe

$

409 Mendocino Ave, Downtown Santa Rosa 707.579.5999 cross street 5th 1280 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg 707.433.2954 cross street Dry Creek Road www.SizzlingTandoor.com

It’s A Culinary Nirvana Here! ®

$29 $ 29 prix p r i x fixe f i xe First F ir st C Course: ou r se : Nonni's Nonni's SSpecial pecial CCaesar, aesar, hhearts ear t s of of romaine r omaine llettuce e t t uce topped t opped with with our our marinated m a r in a t e d

ssun un dried dried ttomatoes, omat oes, ccrumbled rumbled bblue lue ccheese heese aand nd ppine ine nnuts uts orr BBeet eet IInsalata, nsalat a, llocally ocally ggrown rown ssweet weet beets beet s with with mandarin mandarin oranges oranges & ccreamy reamy ggoat oat ccheese hee s e r usche t t a, toasted t oa s t ed Pugliese Pugliese bread, br e a d , m mozzarella, ozzarella , ggarlic, ar lic, aand nd fresh f r esh ttomatoes oma t oe s or BBruschetta,

Second S econd Course: C ou r se : Nonni's Nonni's Homemade Homemade Gn Gnocchi, occhi, ppotato o t a t o dumplings, dumplings , ffresh r esh sage s age inin a Gorgonzola G or gonzola and and PParmesan ar mes an cheese cheese ssauce a uc e or Hom Homemade emade Ravioli, Ravioli, PProsciutto, r osciu t t o, sspinach pinach aand nd ccheese heese rravioli avioli ttopped opped wwith ith ffresh r esh bbasil, a sil, garlic, gar lic, and and tomato t oma t o sauce s a uc e or RRisotto, iso t t o, Italian t alian rrisotto iso t t o with w i t h locally locally grown gr own mushrooms mushr ooms and and chicken chick en

Third T hi r d C Course: ou r se : Nonni's Nonni's FFamous amous TTiramisu ir amisu or Amaretto A mar e t t o Creme Cr eme Brulee B r ulee or Chocolate Chocolat e Express E x pr es s Flourless F lour less Torte Tor t e

420 Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa 707.527.0222 www.nonnisrestaurant.com

APPETIZERS A PPET PET I Z ER S Caesar Salad C ae s a r S a l ad hhearts ear ts ooff rromaine, omaine, P Parmesan ar mesan ccheese, heese, ggarlic arlic ccroutons ro u t o n s &h house o u se m made ade C Caesar aesar ddressing, ressing, sserved e r ved w with it h a ccambozola ambozola crostini. c r os t i n i .

orr C o Cup up F French re nc h O Onion n io n S Soup oup sserved e r ved w with it h a S Swiss w iss cheese chee se brioche. b r i o c h e.

ENTREES E N T R EES Stuffed Breast St u f fed Chicken C h ic k e n B re a s t ppanko-breaded, anko - breaded, pan pan fried, f r ied, & stuffed st u f f e d w with ith sspinach, pin a c h, ssun-dried un - dr ied ttomatoes, omatoe s, bacon ba con & ccambazola ambazola cheese c h e e se

orr W o Winter i nt e r V Veggie eg g ie P Pot ot P Pie ie rroasted oa sted winter w inte r vegetables vegetable s in in a béchamel béchamel sauce, s a u c e, bbaked aked inside in side a fflaky laky w whole h ol e w wheat, heat, ccream rea m cheese chee se crust. c r u st .

DESSERT D ES SERT Chocolate C ho c o l at e M Mousse ou s s e rrich ich & ffluffy, luf f y, H Harvest a r v e st F Fair a ir D Double oubl e G Gold old W Winner inn e r $

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prix i f ixe i

345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg 707.433.2337 www.bearrepublic.com

®

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Nalle Winery

8ZLUO

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Just Desserts The fragile art of the pastry chef can make or break a meal; meet four with the gift of sugar, egg and cream BY STETT HOLBROOK, SUZANNE DALY, NICOLAS GRIZZLE ˜ AND JACQUELYNNE OCANA

W

e elevate chefs to celebrity status, giving them their own TV specials or competitions. We revere the heroic butcher and the ability to break down whole animals. We pick select cocktail bartenders and adorn them with “mixologist” status.

But for some reason, pastry chefs have yet to get their due for the sweet things they create. It’s not right. Appetizers and entrées can be great, but for many diners, dessert is what they’re truly waiting for—and given that dessert comes last, a pastry chef can either make or break a diner’s experience. Serve a dessert that’s over-the-top or too sweet, and a diner staggers away stuffed and uncomfortable. Serve a dessert that’s underwhelming, and it can cast a shadow over the entire meal But a pastry chef who exercises a light touch, who can crown an enjoyable meal with a few wellchosen bites of something sweet, will send a customer off into the night satisfied, happy and eager to return. Creating desserts requires more than a sweet tooth. Making pastries and sweets is an exacting profession that’s as much chemistry as it is cooking. Grilling a steak or sautéing a pan of vegetables? That requires intuition and gut feeling, sure, but baking a cake or preparing a chocolate soufflé is a delicate science. If proportions or temperatures are off by even a slight amount, the results can be disastrous.

Sara Sanger

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

18

Yet dedicated, hardworking pastry chefs often labor in anonymity, quietly whipping cream and caramelizing sugar out of the limelight. We hope to correct this injustice. We sat down with four Sonoma County pastry chefs to talk the mystery and majesty of sugar, butter and flour. All of them create confections for restaurants participating in Sonoma County Restaurant Week, running Feb. 27– March 4, so if you’ve got a sweet tooth, now’s a good time to satisfy your craving.—Stett Holbrook

Jennifer McMurry, Viola Pastry Boutique & Cafe Walking into Viola is like coming home to the comfort of mom’s kitchen for lunch. Red

tulips grace the wooden tables, and family photographs smile down from the creamy walls, many of Grandma Viola, the cafe’s namesake. But how many moms’ homes have a glass pastry case just inside the door, filled with delicious jewel-like lemon tarts, chocolate mousse domes and chocolate caramel tarts with sea salt? And isn’t dessert served after you eat your vegetables and clean your plate? At Viola’s, owner and chef Jennifer McMurry offers diners the best of both sweet and savory worlds, and Vickie McMurry, Jennifer’s mother, does indeed greet patrons at the door. Jennifer McMurry grew up baking alongside her grandmother, who lived on a farm in south Santa Rosa. “My grandparents raised all their own fruits and vegetables and meat,” says McMurry proudly.

“Grandma made her own cheese and salami, and canned everything, even homemade pickles. She was always working in the garden.” The farm is still there, adjoining Grandpa George’s business, Bataeff Salvage. “I grew up working at flea and farmers markets, selling stuff from grandpa’s store and produce from the farm,” McMurry recalls. Five years after earning a business degree, McMurry changed careers, reaching back to her roots. She found her passion while attending pastry school at the Culinary Institute of America in St. Helena. “I love to make pastry; it was the most exciting at the time,” says McMurry. She graduated from the CIA and moved to Las Vegas to work at Wolfgang Puck’s trifecta of Spago, Wolfgang Puck’s Bar and Grill, and Postrio. “It was the best thing I could have done,” enthuses McMurry. “It built a foundation for everything I’ll ever do. Las Vegas was crazy. You’ve got to jump in. While working at the pastry station, I was next to the pizza station. When they got backed up, I’d move over and help make pizzas.” McMurry’s bestseller is her lemon tart, but, she says, “now I prefer the savory side of cooking. The cafe brings both sides together.” Viola’s showcases homemade English muffins, fluffy croissants and breads served with eggs Benedict or an appetizing selection of sandwiches. “For me, it’s a great balance. I get to do both. I’m happy with something as simple as a warm chocolate chip cookie out of the oven.” Viola Pastry Boutique and Cafe. 709 Village Court, Montgomery Village, Santa Rosa. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 707.544.8830. —Suzanne Daly

Casey Stone, John Ash & Co. Casey Stone knows how to butcher an animal, slice up a whole fish and take the heat of a kitchen’s open grill. But early on in his culinary career, the softspoken, 31-year-old cook realized


and taste to gauge when a dessert is sufficiently delicious. While a pastry chef must follow recipes to the letter, there’s a tactile element that comes with time, an ability to determine when a dough or cream filling is ready by how it feels or the way it looks. “I like that it’s something that only I can do,” he says. John Ash & Co. 4350 Barnes Road, Santa Rosa. Dinner daily. 707.575.7350. —Stett Holbrook

Jamon Harper, Dry Creek Kitchen

Dry Creek Kittchen, 317 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Dinner daily; lunch, Friday–Sunday. 707.431.0330. —Jacquelynne Ocaña

Sara Sanger

It was the romance of the wine country that lured Jamon Harper back to the mainland. After a recent three-year tour with the Fairmont Orchid resort on the Big Island of Hawaii, Harper returned and in January took the helm as executive pastry chef at Healdsburg’s Dry Creek Kitchen. The importance of sourcing local ingredients, held by everyone from the area’s best food trucks to the finest restaurants, weighed prominently in Harper’s decision. “It was one of the reasons I wanted to come back to California,” he says, “to get into the farmersmarket scene. In Hawaii, you can go buy coffee directly from the coffee farmer. That is the closest you can possibly get to food.” The farm-to-table ideology has been ingrained in Harper since his childhood days on the

Caribbean island of Barbados. The mystique of his mother’s flawless baking—always by memory—drew Harper onto his culinary path, and, subsequently, to New England’s prestigious Johnson & Wales University. Honing his talents for the wonders of sugar and glaze, he moved directly into the assistant pastry chef position at Barbados’ iconic Sandy Lane resort, creating wedding cakes for the likes of Tiger Woods and other A-list celebrities. Along the way, he has served as resident pastry chef with the Four Seasons in Boston and West Palm Beach. A fan of the culinary classics, Harper cites such standards as Burt Wolf’s Table as largely

19

influential in choosing the wideranging study of desserts. But it’s Anthony Bourdain who keeps him excited about the industry. “To me, he shows, if not what a chef is, what is in their minds,” asserts Harper about the controversial food personality. “The fact that he is so poetic and philosophical about the food, that he doesn’t just show luxury places—he goes and eats street food. That’s what it is all about, that’s where the food is.” This animated take on culinary fare ties into Harper’s passion for pastry. Showcasing a rather unusual addition to gourmet desserts is one of his signature ingredients, popcorn. “It is an amazing thing to me,” he says, “that it starts off as this little kernel and it explodes into this huge, beautiful, fluffy white thing. It brings everyone back to childhood—I don’t think there is anybody that doesn’t like popcorn.” His zeal for cooking unvarnished by his depth of experience, Harper adds: “Passion fruit, now that’s my number two. We used to have a passion fruit vine with the most beautiful flowers when it’s blooming. There is nothing like it, it’s unreal. How can you resist this thing?”

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Stett Holbrook

he preferred cream and whisks to flesh and sauté pans. “It just kind of hit me that I wanted to do pastry,” he said. The Hawaiian native has been the pastry chef at Santa Rosa’s John Ash & Co. for eight years. He oversees all the desserts, breads and pastries for the restaurant and special events at the adjoining hotel, the Vintners Inn. His path to desserts took root at Oregon’s Western Culinary Institute; he then began cooking in Hawaii, but soon realized he wanted to pursue pastry. He enrolled in the pastry arts program at the Culinary Institute of America’s Greystone campus in St. Helena, and eventually landed a job at John Ash & Co., where he’s been ever since. His desserts are fairly traditional—crème brûlée, gelato, molten chocolate cake—but he utilizes the gardens and fruit trees that dot the Vintners Inn spread, as well as other less traditional ingredients like beer and herbs. “I draw inspiration from walking around the property,” he says. “I get to be super-creative.” He also likes using atypical ingredients. Stone makes a bread pudding accented with the heady aromatics of rosemary. His cheesecake is made with fromage blanc, a fresh cheese produced by Marin County’s Cowgirl Creamery. And he makes liberal use of salt, shying away from cloying desserts. Stone’s ideas for new desserts often start from ingredients or wine pairings. The Vintners Inn is owned by Ferrari-Carano, and he often finds inspiration in sweet wines when creating his desserts. Once, he tasted a late harvest zinfandel and knew instantly what he wanted to make. “The first thing that popped in my head was blue cheese,” Stone says. “My ideas usually just start with tasting something.” The result was a Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Company blue cheese mousse, paired with a brown butter cake. With eight years on the job, Stone says making people happy with his end-of-the-meal creations is what keeps him engaged. He also likes the sensual aspect of cooking—using feel, touch, smell


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

"We have all come to this life on a soul errand to complete and fullfill our golden purpose"

Journey True North www.journeytruenorth.com

Jullianna Brooks LCSW

In these current times the culture and social climate is loaded with material expectations and misleading guidance which can waylay our purpose JOURNEY TRUE NORTH provides practical tools to recalibrate the internal compass and support the continued journey towards a personal north star and golden purpose.

Pastry Chefs ( 19 Sara Sanger

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As is the case with many chefs, Amber Simpkins doesn’t get fancy when talking about her favorite dessert. “Anything with chocolate,” she says. Specifically, her pleasure is a simple fudgey chocolate cake with chocolate frosting, accompanied by a glass of milk. But her creations at Healdsburg’s Spoonbar are more than just simple pleasures. Not only does Simpkins create fresh, new desserts on a nightly basis for the restaurant, she’s in charge of confections for h2h hotel guests, and for making bread each day. Though she was educated at the Culinary Institute of America in New York, Simpkins says she essentially started her career around age 10, when she would help her mom bake in the winter (“It helped keep the house warm,” she says), and tagged along during catering gigs. Now Simpkins likes to take advantage of the local bounty, using seasonal fruit for a pop of color. She rarely uses a recipe more than once for dessert, which bodes well for frequent guests. Simpkins is modest about her abilities and sees her job as no different than anyone else’s. “People think it’s this glamorous job,” she says, “but it’s not.” She stretches out her burn-marked

arms as evidence, and motions to the lingering darkness outside during a 6am interview. Asked what else she might be doing, Simpkins pauses for a minute. She might be a stay-athome mom, she mentions, with her two-year-old daughter and fouryear-old son, but Simpkins doesn’t escape the critics when she gets home. Her husband was also a chef at Spoonbar when she started, and her daughter can be a picky eater. Luckily, her son “pretty much eats everything,” she says. Simpkins has been at Spoonbar for almost two years (since about the time it opened, she says), assisting the previous pastry chef before stepping into her current role in October. Though she arrives at work sometimes as early as 3:30am, even being surrounded by fresh pastries doesn’t tempt Simpkins to drink coffee—it makes her jittery. Sometimes she naps after work. This easygoing personality might be traced back to her growing up in Jenner. “There’s not much to do there,” she quips of the tiny town, “if you’re not a surfer.” Spoonbar, 219 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Dinner daily; lunch, Thursday–Monday. 707.433.7222. —Nicolas Grizzle


CULTURE

GOODBYE CALIFORNIA Jolie Holland serenades the Hopmonk Tavern on Feb. 22. See Concerts, p27.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Crush The week’s events: a selective guide

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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ArtsIdeas

NEW DIGS, INDEED The concert hall at the Green Music Center is inspired by Tanglewood, in Massachussetts.

To the Rafters

Santa Rosa Symphony to kick off 85th season in new concert hall BY RACHEL DOVEY

A

ccording to Santa Rosa Symphony music director Bruno Ferrandis, the acoustics at the newly constructed Weill Concert Hall at Sonoma State University are good. Maybe too good. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything is better, the

reverb and the precision,â&#x20AC;? he says, comparing the orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future residence to its current home at Wells Fargo Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But that means that you hear a pin drop. If we make one mistake, it will be heard.â&#x20AC;? The maestro is seated in symphony headquarters in downtown Santa Rosa, a black turtleneck contrasting sharply

with his ďŹ&#x201A;yaway hair. His Frenchaccented English is augmented with quick hand gestures and helpful onomatopoeic sounds as he explains how the new acoustics are more blessing than curse in the long run. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It reveals the faults of the orchestra, it reveals what we need to work on,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe a fuller sound in the strings, maybe

a more accurate, distinctive articulation in the woodwinds . . . All of that is to be played with now. The game is only starting.â&#x20AC;? The orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rehearsal to an inaugural audience on Feb. 8 marked the end of a long, controversy-fraught chapter in Sonoma County music history. Ground was broken for the Green Music Center at Sonoma State University, where the hall is located, in 2000. In the decadeplus since, the cost of the hall has skyrocketed to an expected $120 million, after a projected price tag of $48.7 million. Despite its critics, the ďŹ nal hall, with its 1,400 beechmaple seats and state-of-the-art design, will usher SRS into a 2012â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;13 season ďŹ lled with classics and contemporary compositions alike. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the contemporary aspect that inspires the conductor. Though the symphony is no longer receiving funding to stage the works of living and emerging composers through the Magnum Opus series, Ferrandis says itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a practice heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s excited to continue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want living composers around us, because they are a source of life, they are a source of oxygen, they are creating possibilities around us to enliven our public.â&#x20AC;? In October, the orchestra will host UC Berkeley professor and composer Edmund Campion, who also happens to be co-director for the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New Music and Audio Technologies center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s working on electronics,â&#x20AC;? Ferrandis says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;so I want the young people of this community to realize that electronic music is already mixing with acoustic music. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bridge to them. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to see for the future, to see that we can renew our audience.â&#x20AC;? Along that theme, the 2012â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;13 season will include the world premiere of Petaluma-based composer Nolan Gasserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sonoma


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Help Us Find Bitsy’s

MODERN MAESTRO Bruno Ferrandis plans to keep new works and daring programming alive.

Overture and the American premiere of Martin Matalon’s De Tiempo y de Metal. Ferrandis, Matalon’s friend and former collaborator, previously conducted the composer’s accompaniment to the famed silent film Metropolis. The Green Music Center officially opens with a guaranteedto-sell-out performance by worldrenowned pianist Lang Lang on Sept. 29. The next night, the Santa Rosa Symphony kicks off its 2012– 2013 season in the new venue with the presence of conductors emeritus Corrick Brown and Jeffrey Kahane. But even when the symphony plays the classics next season, Ferrandis cautions, audiences shouldn’t expect pastoral soothers. The December program, for example, is a clash—“literally, it’s intended by me,” he says— between Verdi and Wagner. Both musical greats were born in 1813, and 200 years later, Ferrandis wants to explore their separate works and different styles. “I don’t know if they liked each other, but surely they respected each other,” he says, adding, “There’s nothing better than a clash.” For season and ticket info, see www.santarosasymphony.com.

This sweet little kink-tail Tortie has had a tough time at our shelter. Came in as a kitten, sweet and loving, and then had 2 successive knee surgeries, YIKES! She’s fine now but no wonder she’s a bit grumpy at times (and other times a lap kitty)!! She thrived in a foster home but is struggling in our shelter. She needs a quiet, loving, and above all, PATIENT home.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Forever Home!

Photo: Adria Swan, Gabriel Stephens

Can you sympathize and give Bitsy a chance?

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our Oaxacan tradition: mole & mezcal pairing …full of passion

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Invite you to hop on board the Old Roma Transcontinental Express To Celebrate Presidents’ Day, Sunday February 19th from 11am to 4pm Hop on board the Old Roma Transcontinental Express and enjoy delicious regional cuisine from the heartland to our coastlines while you sample from over 40 limited production wines from the boutique vintners of Old Roma Station.

707.433.2411 www.Agave-Mex.com 1063 Vine Street, Healdsburg

Tickets are $20* per person. Order tickets online at www.OldRomaStation.com or call 707-433-2364 for reservations. *$5 from each ticket will be donated to the Healdsburg Museum and Historical Society

At the intersection of Hudson and Front Streets, Healdsburg, where the river meets the tracks.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Stage Ed Smith

AFTER

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SAME COIN Kevin Rolston and Khris Lewin play officers solving a drive-by.

Two of Clubs

VOTED BEST PLASTIC SURGEON

MTCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Steady Rainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; a tense police story BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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othingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more riveting than a good, taught story, except, maybe, for two. In Keith Huffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s riveting play A Steady Rain, the simultaneous tales told involve crime, alcoholism, adultery, high-speed car chases and a touch of cannibalism. They are told by not one, but two disgraced Chicago cops, each extolling his own version of the gritty events that changed their lives and shook their friendship forever. Nominated for a Tony award in 2009, Rain is a remarkably well-crafted exercise in tandem storytelling, requiring pitch-perfect performances by its two actors. In the stylish new production at Marin Theatre Company,

director Meredith McDonough stages the action on a spare stage, with little more than a pair of chairs and two low-hanging interrogation lamps. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needed, because the story the actors tell is a whopper, loosely based on a legendary incident of bad decision making on the part of two stressed-out police officers. Denny (Khris Lewin), a thinly disguised racist known for shaking down the drug dealers and prostitutes on his inner city beat, is clearly in trouble. Though his side of the tale begins with the innocuous announcement that his household has been chosen to be a Nielsen family, it takes little time for the story to turn ugly. Denny takes turns with Joey (Kevin Rolston) to describe the drive-by shooting that shattered Dennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s front window and critically injured his infant son. As the two decidedly different police officers (can you say â&#x20AC;&#x153;good cop, bad copâ&#x20AC;??) prowl, hover and skulk across the off-kilter slab of a set, the intensity gradually builds. Each of these guys has done bad things, including one or two of them to each other, and each man is an expert at revealing enough of his own ďŹ&#x201A;aws to make him seem credible. But credibility isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the same thing as honesty. Because of the many layers of fabrication put in place by Huff (one of the writer-producers of Mad Men), each one tucked between juicy slices of probable truth, the primary pleasure in watching this 85-minute â&#x20AC;&#x153;dualogueâ&#x20AC;? is trying to determine which one is which. In classic noir stories, circumstances always put our hero smack in the middle of a gradually tightening circle. In the entertainingly lurid A Steady Rain, we get two such â&#x20AC;&#x153;heroes,â&#x20AC;? each bringing to vivid life the ageold adage that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe everything you hearâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even when you happen to be the one saying it. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;A Steady Rainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday through Feb. 26 at Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Showtimes vary. $20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$55. 415.388.5208.


COLIN LAMBERT MOMENTS OF VISION January 7 to March 4

GO GET â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;EM Arrietty is yet another of Miyazakiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strong role models for young girls.

Miyazaki Magic â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Arriettyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; a fantastical new world BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

Gifts of Clay and Cloth

SEBASTOPOL GALLERY 150 N. Main St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.7200

H

ayao Miyazaki, famed Japanese ďŹ lmmaker of such acclaimed animated movies as My Neighbor Totoro, Spirited Away and Ponyo, is in his 70s now. Though The Secret World of Arrietty, which Miyazaki co-wrote, is based on the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tale The Borrowers, it seems like an older manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movie: slow, contemplative and ringed with loss. The main male character is a young convalescent, bedridden as he waits for a dangerous operation. This mortality is discussed in blocky dialogue, adding an extra tinge to the seeming hopelessness of the friendship between the full-sized boy and tiny girl. In keeping with Miyazakiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s penchant for strong female leads, 14year-old, ďŹ ve-inch high Arrietty desires to spy on the world of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;beansâ&#x20AC;? (human beings), despite the warnings of her father, who endures perils to â&#x20AC;&#x153;borrowâ&#x20AC;? food, and her mother, a little woman in constant terror of the consequences. Miyazakiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Studio Ghibli excels at the charm of the miniature, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve created a lambently green world for children over age ďŹ ve to exploreâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;grass, bugs and foliage everywhere. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also added another role model for young girls. With Hiromasa Yonebayashi as director, The Secret World of Arrietty counters Disneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prettiďŹ ed princesses with a brave-girl protagonist who ties her hair back, carries a straight-pin sword at her side and scales the cliff-like walls of kitchen cabinets. Carol Burnett voices the harassing housekeeper who suspects something funny is going on; this maid is so broad-faced she looks like Alfred E. Neumanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aunt. Next to her, the funniest thing in the ďŹ lm is an overfed, bob-tailed cat who dislikes tiny people. Forbidden to hunt them, she looks balefully at them, a ringer for the old Orson Welles staring down an advertising director. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Secret World of Arriettyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opens in wide release Feb. 17.

Exhibiting a diverse selection of unusual antique, modern and contemporary artworks.

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Film

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26 22/17 /17 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2/23 2 / 23

NEW MOVIES

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The Secret World of Arrietty (G; 94 min.) The new film from Hayao Miyazakiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Studio Ghibli features the voices of Bridgit Mendler, Will Arnett, Amy Poehler and Carol Burnett. See review, adjacent page.

This Means War (PG-13; 98 min.) CIA buddies Tuck and Foster discover theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dating the same woman (Reese Witherspoon) in this action-romcom from McG (Charlieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Angels). With Chris Pine and Tom Hardy. (GB)

ALSO PLAYING Albert Nobbs (R; 117 min.) Glenn Close stars in the adaptation of George Mooreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1927 story about a woman living life disguised as a man. (GB)

The Artist (PG-13; 100 min.) French romance and homage to silent film, The Artist stars Jean Dujardin (OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies) as a silent-film star in love with an aspiring actress during the rise of the talkies. In black-andwhite with French subtitles. (GB)

Being Flynn (R; 102 min.) Robert De

Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Upcoming Events

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Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

Niro stars as an estranged father and selfproclaimed great wirter who reaches out to his son after his eccentricities leave him penniless. Co-stars Julianne Moore and Paul Dano. (GB)

Big Miracle (PG; 123 min.) Drew Barrymore and John Krasinski co-star in the adaptation of Tom Roseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book Freeing the Whales, about a 1988 international effort to rescue gray whales trapped under ice near Alaska. (GB)

Chronicle (PG-13; 83 min.) Three teens develop superhuman abilities after stumbling on a mysterious substance in a crater. (GB)

Eric Bibb

Friday, February 17, 8:00 pm

Soulful and Gospel infused Folk-Bluesâ&#x20AC;Ś

The Descendents (R; 94 min.) Matt King (George Clooney) is forced to reconnect with his kids after his wife suffers a boating accident in Hawaii. With Jody Greer, Matthew Lillard and Beau Bridges. (GB) Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (R; 158 min.) David Fincher directs the Englishlanguage version of the hit 2009 Swedish film, based on the first in Stieg Larssonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Millennium series.â&#x20AC;? Co-stars Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara, as Lisbeth. (GB)

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Tim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien

Sunday, Feb. 26th, 7:30 pm Folk, Bluegrass, Irish, Scottish â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A veritable smorgasbord

Also Coming Soon

Girlyman â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 16 Dervish â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 24

Tickets/Info: www.seb.org s   1511

The Grey (R; 117 min.) Liam Neeson plays Ottway, an Arctic legend busted down to wolf shooter on an Alaska oil-drilling rig. The flight home doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it through a storm, and he and his cohorts are picked off by a pack of wolvesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;large, computer-animated, almost human in their malice. (RvB)

Haywire (R; 93 min.) A freelance operative is doublecrossed after a mission rescuing a hostaged Chinese journalist in the latest from Steven Soderbergh. (GB) Hugo (PG; 127 min.) Hugo, a young boy sent to live with his uncle who maintains the clocks at a railway station, searches for the missing part, the key to the heart, of the automaton his clockmaker father had found before his death. Directed by Martin Scorsese in an adaptation of Brian Selznickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret. (GB)

The Iron Lady (PG-13; 115 min.) Meryl Streep plays Margaret Thatcher in biopic costarring Jim Broadbent, Nick Dunning and Richard Grant. From the director of Mamma Mia! (GB) Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG; 94 min.) The sequel to 2008â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Journey to the Center of the Earth stars Dwayne Johnson, Luis Guzman and Michael Caine (?). (GB)

My Week with Marilyn (R; 106 min.) An assistant on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl in 1956 recounts his week spent with the bombshell while her husband Arthur Miller is out of town. Stars Michelle Williams as Marilyn. (GB)

Norwegian Wood (NR; 133 min.) Adaptation of the novel by Haruki Murakami follows a young man in the late â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s and his attachment to two women. In Japanese with English subtitles. At the Rafael Film Center. (GB) Oscar Nominated Short Films This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s live-action and animated shorts with an Oscar nod screen at the Rafael Center and Summerfield Cinemas. (GB) Pina (PG; 106 min.) Wim Wendersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; glorious cinematic festschrift for German choreographer Pina Bausch, who passed away in 2009. The dancers deliver their memories of Bausch straight to the camera, and we can see why they fell in love, despite what Bausch demanded from them. However rarefied it seems in descriptions, Bauschâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art was all about hard work and ordinary pain. (RvB) Safe House (R; 117 min.) When a CIA safe house is attacked by Cape Town rebels, the paper-pushing agent must step up to transport the secured criminal to an even safer house. With Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds. (GB) The Vow (PG-13; 104 min.) A young husband (Channing Tatum) tries to rekindle the affection of his wife (Rachel McAdams) after she wakes from a coma with no memory of her life with him. (GB) The Woman in Black (R; 95 min.) Daniel Radcliffe plays a widowed lawyer processing a will in an eerie village where the sight of a spectre foretells the death of another child. From recently reborn Hammer Film Productions! (GB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Fred Eaglesmith Canadian alt-country singersongwriter shares snippets of rural life. Feb 16, 7:30pm. $25. Studio E, Address provided with tickets, Sebastopol, www.northbaylive.com.

Fat Tuesday Dance Party Rhythmtown Jive lords over neighborhood parade and dance party. Feb 21, 5:45pm. $11. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Gomez Eclectic five-piece shares new album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whateverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Your Mind.â&#x20AC;? Feb 19, 8pm. $26. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Jolie Holland Songwriter and founding member of the Be Good Tanyas sings from fourth studio album. Feb 22, 7:30pm. $10. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Leo Kottke Folk great sings from impressive back-catalogue. Feb 18, 8:30pm. $33-$36. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Songwriters in Sonoma February edition features John Courage, B.C. Fitzpatrick and Judah Nagler. Feb 16, 7pm. $10. Meadowcroft Wines,

23574 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.934.4090.

Zion-I Oakland hip-hop duo shares numbers from reggae and dub-inspired latest album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Atomic Clock.â&#x20AC;? Feb 18, 9pm. $15. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

MARIN COUNTY Dan Bern

Stellar jazz violinist from royal family plays with new project, Reverse thread. Feb 17, 8pm. $25-$40. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Zappa Plays Zappa Dweezil, son of Frank, plays dadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brain-shivering classics. Feb 16, 7pm. $45-$55. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

David K Matthews

Aqus Cafe

Twenty-first annual New Orleans R&B dance party with Rythmtown-Jive and Bonnie Hayes. Feb 17, 9pm. $15-$17. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Neil Bergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 102 Years of Broadway Broadway touring revue entertains audiences with numbers from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Les Miserables,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evita,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tommyâ&#x20AC;? and more. Feb 19, 3pm. $25-

Tickets: $20 per day or $35 for weekend

Regina Carter

Clubs & Venues

Mardi Gras Mambofest

2777 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa www.flamingoresort.com 707.545.8530

NAPA COUNTY

Singer, songwriter and novelist who composed numbers for Judd Apatow spoof â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story,â&#x20AC;? appears with Common Rotation. Feb 18, 9pm. $22-$24. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850. Former Tower of Power member and Santana keyboardist performs with Grammy-winning singer Tony Lindsay. Feb 17, 9pm. $16-$20. Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

ta2izzy@yahoo.com contact: Izzy 530.340.0517

SONOMA COUNTY Feb 17, Festival of Friends. Feb 18, Ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Misbehavinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Feb 16, Blank Tapes, Ash Reiter Band. Feb 17, Soft White Sixties and 7 Zins. Feb 18, Hudost and Aries Fire Collective. Feb 19, Mr. P. Chill and the Trunk of Funk. Tues, 7pm, ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; limelight open mic with Tawnie. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Cinnabar Theater Feb 18, Aioli Trio. 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

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Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Reservations Advised

DIN N E R & A SHOW

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Feb 16 SINGER/S ONGWRITER SERIES HOSTED BY LAURALEE BROWN Thur

7:00pm / No Cover

Coffee Catz Third Friday of every month, 7pm, West Coast ) Songwriters

28

THE STRING RAYS Feb 17 Original Americana, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;n Soul Fri

Sat

Feb 18 Sun

Feb 19 Mon

8:00pm / No Cover Rancho Debut!

Rancho Debut!

DANNY CLICK & THE HELL YEAH! The Bohemianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Marin Band 2011 8:30pm JOHN LEE SANDERS

Phenomenal Musician/Singer 4:00pm / No Cover The California Bluegrass Assoc. Presents

Feb 20 THE FOGHORN STRING BAND Old Time Mardi Gras Night 7:00pm

Fri

Feb 24 Sat

Feb 25 Sun

Feb 26

EDDIE NEON BLUES Rancho Party Band 8:00pm / No Cover Debut! PETTY THEFT

The Ultimate Tom Petty Tribute 8:30pm

THE FRED EAGLESMITH

House. See Concerts, above.

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Coming in March

TAKE A BOW Jazz violinist Regina Carter plays Feb. 17 at the Napa Valley Opera

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On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

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27 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

$60. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.


Music ( 27

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28

showcase. Sat, 2pm, Bluegrass jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Doc Holliday’s Saloon

THUR T HUR –FEB –FEB 1 16 6 W WEEKLY EEKLY E EVENT VENT JJUKE UKE JOINT J O I NT

Feb 17, Soul Patrol. Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society jam. 138 Calistoga Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.623.5453.

BURLESQUE/CABARET/VARIETY BUR LESQUE/ CABARET/ VARIET Y

JJUKE UKE JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

CABARET C AWBAA RET D DE EC CALIENTE ALIENTNOEVA + JJODI ODI WASECA/I SECA/ I CANDY/PYRP CANDY/ PYRP PANTERA/KARA PANTERA/ K ARA NOVA MOLOTOV/ANDI MOLOTOV/ ANDI STARDUST/JENNY STARDUST/JENNY RIVERO R IVE RO KINKIE KINKIE D’ORLEANS/MISS D’ORLEANS / MISS KITTY KIT T Y CHARISMA CHAR I SM A EVE EVE D D’LUSCIOUS/DJ ’ LU S C I O U S / D J M MALARKEY AL AR K E Y

First Edition Feb 19, Carl and Paul Green. 1420 E Washington Ave, Petaluma. 707.775.3200.

$$44 JJAMESON'S A M E SO N ' S & O ORGANIC R G AN I C G GUAYAKI UAYAKI CO COCKTAILS CKTAILS

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/SHOW 8PM / SHOW 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

F FRI RI – F FEB EB 17 17

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S WORLD/SOUL/REGGAE W ORLD / SOUL / REGGAE

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+ DAKINI DAKINI & DELPHI DELPHI ((GODDESS GODDESS A ALCHEMY) LCHEMY) $$10 10 A ADV/$12 DV/$12 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

S SAT AT – F FEB EB 18 18

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S HIP H IP H HOP/SOUL/RAP OP/ SOUL / RAP

ZION ZI ON I

+S SPENDS PENDS QUALITY QUALITY

$$15 15 A ADV/$18 DV/$18 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 99PM/21+ PM /21+ SUN–FEB S UN–FEB 19 19 MONTHLY M ONTHLY E EVENT VENT HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S SSTAND TAND UP UP COMEDY COMEDY

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SUN SUN – FEB FEB 19 19

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REGGAE/DANCEHALL R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL

DJJ JJACQUES D ACQUES & DJ GUACAMOLE DJ GU ACAMOLE

$ 3 RED $3 RED STRIPES S T R I PE S A ALL LL NIGHT N I G HT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FFREE REE B B44 111PM/DOORS 1PM/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+ TUES T UES – FEB FEB 21 21 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT BILL B ILL DECARLI DECARLI PRESENTS PR E S E N T S ANYTHING ANY THING GOES GO E S

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT

FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES–10PM AGES–10PM

W WED ED – FEB FEB 22 22

HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R ESE NT S

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

ROOTS/SOULFUL/ROCK RO OTS/ SOULFUL / R ROCK

AN A N EVENING E VE NING W WITH ITH

JJOLIE OLIE H HOLLAND OLLAND JJUKE UKE JOINT J O I NT

GHETTO G HET TO FFUNK/BOOGIE U N K / B O O GI E B BREAKS/GYPSY R E A K S / GY P S Y D DOODLE O O D LE

$$44 JJAMESON'S A M E SO N ' S & O ORGANIC R G AN I C G GUAYAKI UAYAKI CO COCKTAILS CKTAILS

$5/DOORS $ 5/ D O OR S 1 10PM/21+ 0PM /21+

W WED ED – FEB FEB 24 24

HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R ESE NT S ROOTS/SOULFUL/ROCK RO OTS/ SOULFUL / R ROCK

WHISKERMAN WH ISKERMAN + BEAM BEAM THE THE BAND BAND $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Feb 17, Simply Amazing. Feb 18, Decadance. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Feb 17, Un Deux Trois. Feb 18, Hot Frittatas. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden Feb 15, Celtic Jam. Feb 16, Wine Country Swing. Feb 17, Carlos Aguilar. Feb 20, Greg Hester. Feb 22, Da Fe. Tues, Jim Adams. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Sonoma Feb 17, Solid Air. Feb 18, Bobby Jo Valentine. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100. Feb 16, Cabaret de Caliente. Feb 17, Saritah. Feb 18, Zion-I. Feb 22, Jolie Holland. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Feb 17, Susan Sutton, Bill Fouty. Feb 18, Jimmy Gallagher Trio with Adam Schulman and Eric Markowitz. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Wed, Brainstorm (dubstep). 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Last Day Saloon

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 7:30PM/21+ 7: 30PM /21+ THUR T HUR –FEB –FEB 23 23 W WEEKLY EEKLY E EVENT VENT

DECADANCE D ECADANCE D DJ’S J’S & LLENKADU ENKADU

Flamingo Lounge

Hopmonk Tavern

D DINNER INNER $$65/DOORS 65/ DOORS 66PM/21+ PM /21+ MON M ON – FEB FEB 20 W WEEKLY EEK KLY E EVENT VENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT EDUTAINMENT EDUT TAINMENT

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenanny’s Pick-Me-Up Revue. Feb 16, Michael Schenker, Luvplanet, Points North. Feb 17, Love Fool, Rob Cervantes. Feb 18, Time in a Bottle Old School Soul Revue with Norman Greenbaum, Stovall Sisters, Willy Jordan, Levi Lloyd, Brothers of Siren. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

How They Operate Gomez touch down in Petaluma In 1998, “. . . Baby One More Time” all but jammed every airwave, Lauryn Hill owned the billboards and a scrappy rock group named Gomez ascended to stardom in Southport, England. The band’s debut album, Bring It On, offered listeners a genre-blending experience, where old-school rock riffs hung inside ambient rhythms and digital undertones, and was named Album of the Year at the Mercury Awards. Since those early breakthroughs, Gomez have produced 11 albums, each highlighting a thrown-together palette of styles and hooks that build on and refine the band’s signature sound. Between Gomez’s major releases, the band’s individual members have left no rock unturned, endlessly innovating in musical side projects by producing albums in tree forts in Maui and recording songs in the back of their tour bus using only their iPhones. Currently touring for their 2011 album, Whatever’s on Your Mind, Gomez have perfected a mélange of blues, folk, psychedelia and jazz laid down over smooth, atmospheric roots-rock. Those looking for rock ’n’ roll with a unique twist will find it when Gomez play Sunday, Feb. 19, at the Mystic Theatre. 21 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 8pm. $26. 707.765.2121. —Michael Shufro

Main Street Station

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Mystic Theatre

Feb 15, Willie Perez. Feb 16, Susan Sutton. Feb 17, Vernelle Anders. Feb 18, Pat Wilder. Feb 19, Frankye Kelly. Feb 21, Willie Perez. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Feb 15, Elaine Dempsey. Feb 17, Timothy O’Neil Band. Feb 18, Perfect Crime. Feb 19, Arann Harris and the Bad Farmers. Wed, 7:30pm, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Feb 16, Alborosie and the Shengen Clan. Feb 18, Leo Kottke. Feb 19, Gomez, Hey Rosetta. Feb 21, Fat Tuesday Dance Party. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.


Society: Culture House Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Songbird Community Healing Center Feb 17, Scott Grace. 8280 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

19 Broadway Club

Feb 16, Sofi Rox Presents. Feb 18, Charlie Docherty. Mon, reggae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Feb 15, Buddy Owen and Rayner Brock. Feb 16, Jamie Clark Band. Feb 17, Miles Schon Band. Feb 18, Bone Thugs-n-Harmony with the Normal Bean Band. Feb 19, Lonestar Retrobates and Pure Cane. Feb 22, Gail â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Mojoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Muldrow and Eddie Neon and Blue Roux. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Sweetwater Music Hall Feb 17, Mardi Gras Mambofest with Rythmtown Jive and Bonnie Hayes. Feb 18, Dan Bern. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Opera House

Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. Feb 17, Wild Mint, Bourbon Oasis. Feb 18, Duran Duran Duran. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Feb 15, Halstead. Feb 17, Tom Finch Group. Feb 18, Chrome Johnson. Feb 19, Whiskey Theives. Feb 20, Billy Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Open Mic. Feb 21, The Opera and Seven-Year War. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Studio E

Rancho Nicasio Feb 17, String Rays. Feb 18, Danny Click and the Hell Yeah. Feb 19, John Lee Sanders. Feb 20, Foghorn String Band. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Feb 17, Lydia Pense and Cold Blood. Feb 18, Garage Band 101. Feb 19, Kim Prevost and Bill Solley. Feb 21, Pulsators. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Sleeping Lady

Uptown Theatre

Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Thurs, 9pm, Texas Blues. Sat, 2pm, juke jam. Sun,

Feb 16, Zappa Plays Zappa with Dweezil Zappa. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Feb 16, Fred Eaglesmith. Address provided with ticket purchase, Sebastopol. www.northbaylive.com.

Toad in the Hole Pub Mon, open mic with Phil the Security Guard. Third Sunday of every month, Robert Herrera, Brianna Lee, Josh Barrett. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Feb 17, Regina Carterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reverse Thread. Feb 22, Song, Music and Poetry of the Golden West. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Feb 16-17, David Nelson Band. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Finneganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marin

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Pomplamoose Quirky YouTube sensations in danger of being usurped by even-more-twee Karmin. Feb 18 at Great American Music Hall.

Trey Songz â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bottoms Up,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neighbors Know My Name,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Invented Sexâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;hits galore here. Feb 19 at the Paramount Theater.

Feb 16, Jeff Campbell. Feb 18, Who Too. Mon, open mic with KC Turner. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Hot Chelle Rae

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

The Fray

Feb 16, Mindy Canter, Fluteus Maximus and Moâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Fone. Feb 17, David K Matthews. Feb 19, Lansdale Station. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Maxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of Corte Madera Feb 17, Michael DiFranco Trio. 60 Madera Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.924.6297.

McInnis Park Club Restaurant Feb 17, Dancing Through the

Interminably peppy boy-toy rock band pose for cameras, sing about love, invade tweensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hearts. Feb 20 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Piano-rock torchbearers from Colorado deliver majestically on Christian-church roots. Feb 20 at the Fox Theater.

Cursive Long-running Omaha emo powerhouse return with new album â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Am Geminiâ&#x20AC;? and free in-store. Feb 21 at Amoeba SF.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

Wed, Feb 15 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

Thur, Feb 16 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7am; 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Dance Club

"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER 4(5s0-$//23s!$6$/3s REGGAE

Fri, Feb 17 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am: 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise North Bay Country Dance Society/ Contra Dance host RIGHT TO PARLAY

Sat, Feb 18 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9am; 9:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:15am Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm Mardi Gras Ball with DJs Freddie 707.331.4162 Marsh-Lott and Fred Loebenstein

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

ALBOROISE & THE SHENGEN CLAN PLUS DJ JACQUES (WBLK)

3!4s0-$//23s!$6$/3s FOLK

AN EVENING WITH

LEO KOTTKE

Sun, Feb 19 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:30am Zumba Gold with Toning 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10

35.s0-$//23s$26 s INDIE ROCK

Mon, Feb 20 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Feb 21 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm African and World Music Dance

GOMEZ

PLUS HEY ROSETTA! 45%s0-$//23ss!,,!'%3 AMERICAN ROOTS/R&B 21ST AL U ANN MARDI GRAS MAMBOFEST

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RHYTHMTOWN-JIVE SPECIAL GUESTS

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Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

7 WWWMCNEARSCOM

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Great Prices! Coffee too!

Antique Society 2661 Gravenstein Hwy So. (Hwy 116) on Sebastopolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Antique Row Open daily! 707 829.1733 www. AntiqueSociety .com

TOYS & DOLLS â&#x20AC;˘ ARTS & CRAFTS â&#x20AC;˘ POST MODERN

Tradewinds Feb 15, Feral Moon. Feb 17, Levi Lloyd and the 501 Band. Feb 18, Rock Hounds. Feb 19, Frankie and Friends. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

29

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Decades with Rumors. 350 Smith Ranch Rd, San Rafael. 415.492.1800.

LIGHTING â&#x20AC;˘ KITCHEN TOOLS â&#x20AC;˘ ARCHITECTURAL â&#x20AC;˘ GLASS

The Rocks Bar & Lounge


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30

Music

THE VOICE How should we have

treated a talent like Whitney Houston?

Broken Hearts

Whitney and us BY GABE MELINE

F

or most of us, the death of Whitney Houston was experienced in the swift, economical manner made de rigueur in the 21st century: find news online, confirm with reputable news site, compose concerned/ sorrowful/witty post to Facebook or Twitter, wait for Jennifer Hudson tribute, move on. At least that’s how we do it in public. In private, we might stare into the back cover photo from her 1985 debut album, back to memories of being young, gazing at the figure of Whitney Houston: glistening, on the beach, arched like a swan and possessed of all the confidence in the world. The photo, burned into our retinas. The songs, soundtrack to a thousand awkward junior high dances and “Greatest Love of All” graduation sing-alongs. The voice, impeccable, unwavering, perfect to

the degree of caricature upon the release of The Bodyguard and its inescapable 100.1-FM staple “I Will Always Love You.” We ignored everything afterward—the tabloid headlines, the drug abuse, the reality show, Bobby Brown. Like the blacksheep sister who shows up late to Thanksgiving reeking of booze and mumbling a mix of self-wallowing and outlandish declaration, Whitney was a problem we didn’t want to acknowledge. Unless, of course, a ballad came on the radio. “I Wanna Dance with Somebody” was designed for Esprit shirts, Vuarnet sunglasses and Benetton ads from Seventeen magazine Scotch-taped to our lockers, but it was the ballads that lasted. “Saving All My Love,” “Didn’t We Almost Have It All,” “Where Do Broken Hearts Go”— these are the ones that caught us offguard into the aughts, and laid out so irrefutably an air-tight case for Houston’s hopeful return. What have we learned in the wake of Houston’s death? We’ve learned that ex-husband Brown carried on with a concert the night of her passing; that her final performance was in L.A., of the gospel song “Jesus Loves Me”; that Sony Music, incapable of ever earning enough scorn to affect their massive market share, raised the price of Houston’s Ultimate Collection by $4.70 within 30 minutes of her death; that on recent live recordings, her voice was not nearly as shot as TMZ would want us to believe; that she died like so many others, on pills, in a bathtub, alone, in a moment of whatever peace she’d found for herself far from the hailstorm of criticism and abuse and cheap digs and cheaper punch lines. What we haven’t learned is how to properly treat a talent like Houston, like all those who died before her and all who will be next. We may never learn the knack of this game, of propping up and knocking down. For the moment, at least, cue up “Where Do Broken Hearts Go,” entertain a sliver of compassion in the place where society tells us to laugh and allow Whitney Houston’s onceindomitable voice to sink in.


31

From 6pm to midnight. Backyard Boogie, “Twenty-One Gun Salute,” artistic collaboration and celebration of 21 years of friendship between street artists Jared Powell and Ricky Watts. 1609 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.256.9483.

Feb 19 At 2pm. RiskPress Gallery, “Creative Illusions,” featuring the works of Kath Root, Chris Stover and Andrea Way. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

SONOMA COUNTY ARThouse Gallery Through Feb 29, second exhibit of Ed Coletti paintings. Also through Feb 29, new work by Ken Berman and Cat Kaufman. 13758 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.3513.

Charles M Schulz Museum

Through Feb 26, “Intriguing and Mysterious,” featuring assemblages and sculptures by Judith Samborski and Marcia Kent. 620 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma. 707.776.6061.

Graton Gallery

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Apr 7, “Seventh Anniversary Exhibit,” with work by Hamlet Mateo, Mary Jarvis and Luke Damiani. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Rohnert Park Community Center Through Mar 28, featuring oil paintings by Dee Fay and pastel landscapes by Tim Brody. Free. 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.584.7357.

Pelican Art

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Through May 9, retrospective of the works of painter Susan Adams. 143 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Open Tues-Thurs and Sat, 11 to 6; Fri, 11 to 8; Sun-Mon by appointment only. 707.773.3393.

Through Mar 16, “Blue,” a juried exhibition of work in a variety of media. Through Mar 17, “Quintet,” features ceramics by Denis Hazlewood. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Petaluma Arts Center

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

Through Mar 4, “Clay and Glass Exhibit,” featuring sculpture and functional works in clay and glass by members of Association of Clay and Glass Artists of California. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Mar 11, “Women Who Fought for Civil Rights” features 25 women of different races and cultures from the Civil Rights movement. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Quercia Gallery Through Feb 27, “Time and Materials,” featuring works from the archives of DA Bishop. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Feb 26, “Bakers Dozen 2012,” featuring the work of 13 artists. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

RiskPress Gallery Through Feb 27, “Creative Illusions,” featuring the works of Kath Root, Chris Stover and

Through Mar 18, “Undiscovered,” features five dynamic artists from Sonoma County. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

www.raventheater.org

Towers Gallery Through Apr 1, “Seasons,” including works by Nancy Burres, Jim Van Deren and many others. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Through Mar 2, “Lightscape/ Darkscape,” featuring artworks by Kala Art Institute students. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Backyard Boogie Through Mar 17, “TwentyOne Gun Salute,” artistic collaboration and celebration of 21 years of friendship between street artists Jared Powell and Ricky Watts. Reception, Feb 17, 6pmmidnight. 1609 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tue-Thu, noon-8pm; Fri-Sat, noonmidnight; Sun, noon-8pm. 415.256.9483.

Bolinas Museum Through Mar 11, woven photographs

) 32

433-6335

Through Mar 4, “Invitational Exhibition,” featuring fine art by 31 master painters. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Through Mar 4, “Living Life” paintings by Kathleen Deyo and “Color in Motion” photopaintings by Jerrie Jerne. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

www.raventheater.org

CW Gallery

Through Mar 2, “Along the Russian River and Water Quilt,” textiles exhibit featuring work by Pointless Sisters Art Quilt Group. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Riverfront Art Gallery

433-6335

Through Apr 2, “Hit the Road, Snoopy!” featuring the beagle’s most famous road trips. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Andrea Way. Reception, Feb 19 at 2. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

433-6335

Feb 17

Through Mar 17, bronze figurative nudes by Bruce Wolfe, paintings by William Cutler and William O’Keeffe, paintings and lithograph prints by Sandra Oseguera and bronze “Un-edibles” by Valerie Brunmeier and Matt Hart. 707.887.2373. 6525-A First St, Forestville.

www.raventheater.org

OPENINGS

Llewellyn

433-6335

Galleries

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Arts Events

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 Known by Deadheads worldwide, Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart is working on a new album due out April 2012. $5 discount to first 25 to buy tickets online with the coupon code “Hart.” www.raventheater.org

®

PERFORMING ARTSTHEATER

115 North St., Healdsburg


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15–21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

32 Arts Events of constructed landscapes, by Julie V Garner. Through Mar 11, “Women in Print,” etchings from Paulson Bott Press. Gallery talk with Renee Bott, Print publisher, Feb 18 at 2pm. Through Mar 17, “Attic Treasures,” featuring artifacts from the history collection. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Mar 9, “H2O: Fragility and Strength,” featuring works by California Society of Printmakers, juried by Don Soker. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Through Mar 7, A survey of paintings by John McNamara. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Feb 19, “Duration,” annual juried show featuring works by “Best of Show” Ellen Litwiller and others. Through Mar 4, “Photography: A Fine Art,” featuring the work of Tim Fleming, Alan Plisskin and Sister Adele Rowland. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

( 31 Headlands Center for the Arts Through Mar 4, “Demobbing: Landscape, Structure and Bioform,” featuring 20 California artists reflecting on the idea and effects of demobilization. Bldg 944, Fort Barry, Sausalito. Sun-Fri, noon to 4. 415.331.2787.

Marin MOCA Through Feb 26, “Fresh,” featuring new work by resident artists. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4,. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Mar 3, “How Do You See It: Through the Artist’s Eyes,” a juried member show featuring still life, landscapes, figuratives and abstracts.. Through Mar 3, Marin Watercolor Society showing, featuring Noel Ryan and others. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Feb 28, “Red,” juried by artist and self-proclaimed alchemist Toni Littlejohn. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley.

Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Feb 28, “Executive Order 9066,” featuring the teenage watercolors of Kasumi Gus Nakagawa, whose Japanese-American family was sent to an internment camp in Poston, Ariz. Through Feb 29, Group show by students of Marty Meade’s College of Marin class. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Napa Ongoing, “Momentum: Art that Moves (Us),” second annual interactive public art exhibition ARTwalk. Free.. 707.257.2117. First Street and Town Center, Napa.

Yountville Community Hall Through Mar 12, “Mustard and More” juried exhibit sponsored by Napa Valley Photographic Society. 6516 Washington St, Yountville.

Mardi Gras king and queen and a less lucky smoked pig. Feb 18, 12pm. $45. Meadowcroft Wines, 23574 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.934.4090.

Mardi Gras Casino Party Sunrise Rotary Club of Sebastopol and Russian River Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence come together for gambling, silent auction and food festival to benefit Food for Thought. Feb 18, 7pm. $50. Sebastopol Veteran’s Auditorium, 282 S High St, Sebastopol.

Single Mingle Appetizers and mixer games sponsored by Society of Single Professionals. Feb 21, 7pm. $10. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Field Trips Explore Pepperwood

Comedy Swami Beyondananda Political comedian offers wisdom with a twist. Preshow dinner by reservation only. Feb 18, 6:30pm. $20. Isis Oasis, 20889 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville.

Dance Playhouse Feb 17-18, 8pm and Sun, Feb 19, 2pm, “Tango Tales” director/choreographer Debbie Goodwin uses Argentinian tango to tell tales of passion and fantasy. $20-$25. 27 Kensington Rd, San Anselmo. 415.258.4640.

Events

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Workshop teaches participants how to discover and record plant life and wildlife sightings on their smartphones. Feb 18, 10am. Free. Pepperwood Preserve, 3450 Franz Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.591.9310.

Sugarloaf Hike Special hike at Sugarloaf will raise funds to help save the park. Meet at main parking lot and bring $25 donation to help cause. Feb 18, 9:45am. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

Film Battle in Seattle Screening benefits new venture, the North Bay Occupied Press. Feb 17, 6:30pm. $10. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Mystic Man

‘Why Not Now?’ explores Alan Watts’ legacy Marin is full of lingering aftereffects of the 1960s, when the area produced unforgettable people and places. There’s one man most locals remember as especially vibrant. His name was Alan Watts. Watts moved from England to the United States to further his own education and to teach Asian studies in San Francisco in the 1950s. Ten years later, Watts was known as “the bridge between the Eastern and Western worlds.” After publishing The Way of Zen, his Eastern thought brought new light to popular culture in the ’60s. A counterculture celebrity by the end of the decade, Watts provided insight on nearly everything—including psychedelic drugs, to which he concluded, cautiously, “When you get the message, hang up the phone.” Watts resided in a houseboat in Sausalito and an isolated cabin on Mt. Tamalpais until his passing in 1973. This week, a documentary on Watts called Why Not Now? is shown with never-before-seen footage. His son, Mark Watts, leads a discussion afterward on Friday, Feb. 17, at Dance Palace. 503 B St., Point Reyes. 8pm. $12. 415.663.1075.—Jennifer Cuddy

Bury the Hatchet Featuring wine-tastings, pygmy goat shows and the music of Gator Beat. Feb 16-20. $5-$7 admission. Cloverdale Fairgrounds, 1 Citrus Fair Dr, Cloverdale. 707.894.3992.

Film about hidden New Orleans tradition, sponsored by Sonoma Film Institute. Fri, Feb 17, 7pm and Sun, Feb 19, 4pm. $4-$6. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Mardi Gras

Chocolat

Featuring live music, a lucky

Series of foodie films benefits

Citrus Fair

YOUR GIRLFRIEND Work by Jared Powell, above,

and Ricky Watts opens at Backyard Boogie in San Rafael on Feb. 17. See Openings, p31.

local celebrity chefs. Feb 16, 2pm, “Chocolat.” $30. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3946.

“Cendrillon.” Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

Live Theater Broadcasts

Film about green engineering. Feb 16, 7pm. Free. Sonoma Valley Grange, 18627 Sonoma Hwy, ) Boyes Hot Springs.

Classic ballet and opera broadcast live from around the globe. Feb 19, 1pm,

The Next Frontier

34


33 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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34 Arts Events Why Not Now Director’s cut of film on Alan Watts shows never-beforeseen footage. Featuring post-show discussion with Mark Watts. Feb 17, 8pm. $6$12. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Library Beer Tasting Special tasting of MBC’s vintage cellar beer, including the Quad, the Bourbon Barrel Aged Beers and others. Feb 15, 4pm $25. Marin Brewing Company, 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

( 32 service. Feb 22, 4pm. Free. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 1.800.564.SRJC.

Legacies as Lessons: Learning from the Past Holocaust and Genocide Lecture series. Feb 21, 4pm, “Genocide in Sudan” with Hamdan Gouumaa. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Plants & Insects Speaker Frederique Lavoipierre, the Entomology Outreach Coordinator for SSU, speaks on the ancient relationship between the herbs and the bees. Feb 21, 7:30pm Free. Luther Burbank Art and Garden Center, 2050 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa.

SSU Jazz Forums Ron Dziubla appears in performance / lecture Feb 23 at 7:30pm in the Warren Auditorium. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Readings

Stroud. PO Box 9091, San Rafael.

Occidental Center for the Arts Feb 19, 4pm, “Wild Plum Cafe,” with Gretchen Butler. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Theater Burying Our Father Isaac and Ishmael meet to bury their father Abraham in the cave that has become one of the most revered and violently contested holy sites in history. Through Feb 17, 8pm. $15-$20. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Chicago Popular musical set in Prohibition-era Chicago. Through Feb 19. $15-$30. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Fault Lines Debut play of Santa Rosa native Rebecca Louise Miller inspired by Polly Klaas kidnapping. Thurs, Feb 16, 8pm, Fri, Feb 17, 8pm, Sat, Feb 18, 8pm and Sun, Feb 19, 5pm. $15-$20. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

An Olive Odyssey

Book Passage

Olive curers offer delicacies and share recipes. Feb 18-19, 11am. Free. Jacuzzi Family Vineyards, 24724 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.931.7575.

Proof

Feb 15, 7pm, “All In: The Education of General David Petraeus,” with Paula Broadwell. Feb 16, 7pm, “Emotional Equations,” with Chip Conley. Feb 17, 7pm, “Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death and Hope in the Mumbair Undercity” with Katherine Boo. Feb 18, 1pm, “All the Missing Souls: A Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunal,” with David Scheffer. Feb 18, 4pm, “The Golden Hour,” with Margaret Wurtele. Feb 18, 7pm, “Killing the Messenger,” with Thomas Peele. Feb 20, 7pm, “War,” with Sebastian Junger. Feb 21, 7pm, “1616: The World in Motion,” with Thomas Christensen. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Winner of the 2001 Pulitzer Prize, “Proof” follows a troubled young woman as she discovers a revolutionary mathematical breakthrough. Through Feb 26, 2 and 8pm. $10-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Olive Season Finale Weekend Special weekend event offers wine and olive pairings. Feb 18-19, 11am-4pm. Free. Cline Cellars, 24737 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.940.4025.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Sat, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

West End Wednesdays West End merchants offer wine, coffee and food tastings. Wed, 5-7pm. Free. Downtown Napa, First Street and Town Center, Napa.

Lectures

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Feb 18, 7pm, “The Chinese Jars,” with William Gordon. Feb 21, 3pm, “Isabella: Girl on the Go,” with Jennifer Fosberry. 2316 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Willie Brown

Marin Poetry Center

Two-term San Francisco mayor speaks on politics and public

Feb 16, 7:30pm, poetry reading with Robert Sward and Joseph

She Stoops to Conquer Ross Valley Players present comedy of manners by Oliver Goldsmith. Through Feb 19, 2, 7:30 and 8pm. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of February 15

ARIES (March 21–April 19) What do you typically do just before you fall asleep and right after you wake up? Those rituals are important for your mental health. Without exaggeration, you could say they are sacred times when you’re poised in the threshold between the two great dimensions of your life. I’ll ask you to give special care and attention to those transitions in the coming week. As much as possible, avoid watching TV or surfing the internet right up to the moment you turn off the light, and don’t leap out of bed the instant an alarm clock detonates. The astrological omens suggest you are primed to receive special revelations, even ringing epiphanies, while in those in-between states. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Have you ever gazed into the eyes of goats? If you have, you know that their pupils are rectangular when dilated. This quirk allows them to have a field of vision that extends as far as 340 degrees, as opposed to humans’ puny 160–210 degrees. They can also see better at night than we can. Goats are your power animal in the coming week, Taurus. Metaphorically speaking, you will have an excellent chance to expand your breadth and depth of vision. Do you have any blind spots that need to be illuminated? Now’s the time to make that happen.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) In the animated film The Lion King, two of the central characters are a talking meerkat named Timon and a talking warthog named Pumbaa. Their actions are often heroic. They help the star of the tale, Simba, rise to his rightful role as king. The human actors who provided the voices for Timon and Pumbaa, Nathan Lane and Ernie Sabella, originally auditioned for the lesser roles of hyenas. They set their sights too low. Fortunately fate conspired to give them more than what they asked for. Don’t start out as they did, Gemini. Aim high right from the beginning—not for the bit part or the minor role but rather for the catalyst who actually gets things done. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

“He who is outside his door already has a hard part of his journey behind him,” says a Dutch proverb. Ancient Roman writer Marcus Terentius Varro articulated a similar idea: “The longest part of the journey is the passing of the gate.” I hope these serve as words of encouragement for you, Cancerian. You’ve got a quest ahead of you. At its best, it will involve freewheeling exploration and unpredictable discoveries. If you can get started in a timely manner, you’ll set an excellent tone for the adventures. Don’t procrastinate.

LEO (July 23–August 22) You’re so close to finding a fresh perspective that would allow you to outmaneuver an old torment, Leo. You’re on the verge of breaking through a wall of illusion that has sealed you off from some very interesting truths. In the hope of providing you with the last little push that will take you the rest of the way, I offer two related insights from creativity specialist Roger von Oech: (1) if you get too fixated on solving a certain problem, you may fail to notice a new opportunity that arises outside the context of that problem; (2) if you intensify your focus by looking twice as hard at a situation that’s right in front of you, you will be less likely to see a good idea that’s right behind you. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Thirty-two carrier pigeons were awarded medals by the United Kingdom for their meritorious service in the World Wars. Of course, they probably would have preferred sunflower seeds and peanuts as their prize. Let that lesson guide you as you bestow blessings on the people and animals that have done so much for you, Virgo. Give them goodies they would actually love to receive, not meaningless gold stars or abstract accolades. It’s time to honor and reward your supporters with practical actions that suit them well.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) The caterpillar-to-butterfly transformation is such an iconic symbol of metamorphosis that it has become a cliche. And yet I’d like to point out that when the graceful winged creature emerges from its chrysalis, it never grows any further. We human beings, on the other hand, are asked to be in a lifelong state of metamorphosis, continually adjusting and shifting to meet our changing circumstances. I’ll go so far

as to say that having a readiness to be in continual transformation is one of the most beautiful qualities a person can have. Are you interested in cultivating more of that capacity, Libra? Now would be an excellent time to do so. Remember that line by Bob Dylan: “He who is not busy being born is busy dying.”

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) This would be an excellent time to round up a slew of new role models. In my astrological opinion, you need to feel far more than your usual levels of admiration for exceptional human beings. You’re in a phase when you could derive tremendous inspiration by closely observing masters and virtuosos and pros who are doing what you would like to do. For that matter, your mental and spiritual health would be profoundly enhanced by studying anyone who has found what he or she was born to do and is doing it with liberated flair.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) WD-40 is a spray product that prevents corrosion, loosens stuck hinges, removes hard-to-get-at dirt and has several other uses. Its inventor, Norm Larsen, tried 39 different formulas before finding the precisely right combination of ingredients on his 40th attempt. The way I understand your life right now, Sagittarius, is that you are like Larsen when he was working with version number 37. You’re getting closer to creating a viable method for achieving your next success. That’s why I urge you to be patient and determined as you continue to tinker and experiment. Don’t keep trying the same formula that didn’t quite work before. Open your mind to the possibility that you have not yet discovered at least one of the integral components. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) A person who emits a huge angry shout produces just .001 watt of energy. Even if he or she yelled continuously 24/7, it would still take a year and nine months to produce enough energy to heat a cup of coffee. That’s one way to metaphorically illustrate my bigger point, which is that making a dramatic show of emotional agitation may feel powerful but is often a sign of weakness. Please take this to heart in the coming week, Capricorn. If you do fall prey to a frothy eruption of tumultuous feelings, use all of your considerable willpower to maintain your poise. Better yet, abort the tumult before it detonates. This is one time when repressing negative feelings will be healthy, wealthy and wise. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Jeep vehicles always feature seven slots on their front grills. Why? For the manufacturer, it’s a symbolic statement proclaiming the fact that Jeep was the first vehicle driven on all seven continents. Let’s take that as your cue, Aquarius. Your assignment is to pick an accomplishment you’re really proud of and turn it into an emblem, image, glyph or talisman that you can wear or express. If nothing else, draw it on dusty car windows, write it on bathroom walls or add it to a Facebook status update. The key thing is that you use a public forum to celebrate yourself for a significant success, even if it’s in a modest or mysterious way. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

A sign outside the Apostolic Bible Church in Bathurst, New Brunswick, invited worshipers to meditate on a conundrum: “Why didn’t Noah swat those two mosquitoes?” After all, if the builder of the Ark had refused to help the pesky insects survive the flood, we’d be free of their torment today (or so the allegorical argument goes). Please apply this lesson to a situation in your own sphere, Pisces. As you journey to your new world, leave the vexatious elements behind.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


35

Miscellaneous l Services

Pregnant? LAPTOP, Computer, Considering Adoption? LCD Panel Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866.413.6293 (Void in Illinois)

$249, $99, $55—Like New! CRC Computer Repair Center, 3227 Santa Rosa Ave, 95407. FREE checkup, expert laptop repair, tune-up, spyware removal. 9am–5pm, Tues–Sat 707.528.8340

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Shared Housing

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Treat Yourself to a Mini Vacation As you feel the stress melt away and enjoy the best of healing and sensual massage by a lovely lady with a caring touch. Quality and class Accept Visa/MC. Tania. C.M.T. 707.477.1766 Santa Rosa.

Guerneville M4M Massage Mitch, CMT. Mature. Professional. Relaxing intuitive touch. Private discrete studio. 707.849.7409

Therapeutic Massage for men and Women. Deep Tissue, Swedish, Thai, A Safe Place Shiatsu. Walk ins welcome. To Be Real Open 7 days. 10am–8pm Holistic tantric masseuse. 707.934.7488 Unhurried, private, heartfelt. Mon-Sat. February discount. Call after 10:30am STRONG THOROUGH 707.793.2232 30+ yrs. Experience. 25/50/75. SPECIAL: Free 15 min. massage to experience Great Massage my work. Colin Godwin, CMT By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub 707.823.2990 and pool available. Will do www.colingodwin.blogspot.com outcalls. 707.228.6883

LILY’S CHINESE MASSAGE

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Pampering Foot Treatment $25 Women love Jessie Jing`s Pampered Feet Center. 1 hr. only $25. 707.526.1788 jessiejingsmassage.com

• Full Body Massage (includes head, neck $45 hr and shoulders)

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SPIRITUAL

Connections

Finding inspiration and connecting with your community

The Journey Center: A Place for Transformation Resources for your spiritual journey (contemplative prayer/meditation practices, workshops/ retreats, spiritual direction, art gallery, reading room, bodywork). 1601 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa www.journeycenter.org 707.578.2121

Unity Church of Santa Rosa Sunday School & Service 10:30am – Non-traditional. Inter-denominational. A spiritually-minded community. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Mahakaruna Buddhist Meditation Center

Offers ongoing classes for all levels of practice and interest. Eveyone is welcome. $10 donation requested per class. Come Away ... to A Quiet Time: An evening experience of quiet, meditative time Prayers for World Peace: Sun, 10:30–11:45am A drop-in group with a mixture of contemplative Noontime Meditations: Tuesday–Saturday, 12:00 guided experiences, using music, imagination, General Programs: Tues & Weds, 7:30–8:30 poetry, Christian scripture, breath, meditations, 304 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma, 707.776.7720 www.meditateinnorcal.org. art and more. 2nd and 4th Mondays, 7–8pm Journey Center, Santa Rosa, 707-578-2121, Self Realization Fellowship www.journeycenter.org.

Santa Rosa Meditation Group

Happy Health Spa

795 Farmers Lane #22 Schedule: 24/7 VM 707.523.9555 www.srf-santarosa.org

open 10am–10:30pm, 7 days

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707-591-8899

Full Body Sensual Massage With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Visa/MC accepted. Gretchen 707.478.3952

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PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

Place your classified ad here Call 707.527.1200 x206 today!

Share your organization’s inspiration with over 123,000 Bohemian Readers monthly!

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Workshops

Rocks and Clouds Zendo Zazenkai One Day Meditation Retreat, Sunday March 18, 6:00am to 4:00pm. E-mail us with any questions @ daterra@sonic.net Find us on the web @ www.rocksandclouds.org. Or call 707.824.5647

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Family Services


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Citrus Fair Featuring wine-tastings, pygmy goat shows and the music of Gator Beat. Feb 16â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20. $5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$7 admission. Cloverdale Fairgrounds, 1 Citrus Fair Dr, Cloverdale

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM 1901 Cleveland Ave Ste B, Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 ww w.srtp.net Napa Meditation class: Universal Love and Compassion.

Film, Food & Love Series of foodie films. February 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chocolat.â&#x20AC;?$30. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena, 707.963.3946

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