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Make a public declaration of your love. Submit your love letter to your beloved and we’ll post the best letters on the homepage of our website on Valentine’s Day. It’s a bit like a marriage proposal on the Giants’ big screen during a baseball game. Imagine, you’re on the internet, surfing together, and you land (quite accidentally of course) at www.copperfieldsbooks.com where your love will find your letter. We think that’s kind of romantic! Email your letter on or before February 10 to: loveletters@copperbook.com.

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Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Tased and Confused

Tase the dog, the mailman, the car, and everything else BY WILL SHONBRUN

I

recently read an article about a guy who got tased at the Sacramento International Airport because he wouldn’t go back and retrieve something he’d forgotten on his plane. Got me to thinking. Dog won’t stop barking? Tase it. Cat refusing your handouts? Tase it. Husband misbehaving? Tase the blighter. Wife giving you lip? Give her a taste of the old taser. Kids acting up? You get the message. Why should only cops get to electrocute people? It’s not fair. It’s un-American. This would not pass muster with our Founding Fathers or Mothers. And muster wasn’t the only thing they passed in those hot little convention rooms of yore. One can only imagine the smell in there. But I digress . . . Those frock-coated, high-heeled gents of old would have tased the shit out of each other given half a chance had they the technology. I think we should all be issued tasers at birth, graded in size as we age. Is this not a right? Why has the ACLU been so glaringly quiet about this? Where’s the gun lobby? Are they holed up with the civil rights freaks plotting some kind of takeover? This smells of conspiracy. And conspiracy smells a lot like . . . well, you know what. How many times in a given day could you have pulled the ol’ taser out and given some schmuck a few extra volts to show your dissatisfaction? What’s happened to us God-fearing Americans? Have we been so pussified by the politically correct, bleedingheart, pacifist “om” chanters we can no longer express our true feelings in public? I cry (metaphorically) for my country gone astray. Truth now, aren’t you tempted to give those Republican presidential candidates a taste of the taser every time they say, “What Americans want is . . . ”? And as for the other party, tasing is too good for them. They all need the old dropping-the-radio-intothe-bathtub trick. Now if there was only a way to get them to all bathe together. I’ll work on that. But in the meantime, remember: the family that tases together, stays together. Will Shonbrun is a writer living in Sonoma. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Power of Transformation

I’ve been going to Phas3 Martial Arts since January 2011 (“Sock! Bam! Pow!” Jan. 18). The place truly is transformative. They work you hard but are the nicest people, both students and teachers. It’s an incredible workout mixed with learning and inspiration. I’m a 44-year-old father of three, and it’s been a great release for stress and helped me with my business and family life.

as a symbol that a part of him is also a part of me. My name will always be Zura and I am forever Young, even though I have joined up with the Johnson clan.

ZURA JOHNSON Online

Common Good Nice article (“Uprising!” Jan. 18) Albino! has so much going; I love the band, especially the dancing! But for things to really change a lot needs to happen, hopefully for the good of us humans and the world as a whole.

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KURT HOFFMAN

Online

Sonoma County

The Lucy Stone League Rides Again I’m thinking about name changes a lot right now (“The Feminist Wife,” Jan. 18). I live with Hans Eriksson and 10-monthold Freja Eriksson, and I’m Kristen Miller. I feel a little left out, but I like my name, and Kristen Eriksson just sounds and looks odd to me. I know of quite a few Swedes who have created their own new last name or taken a different family name. My sister-in-law and her husband are now Wunderlich. It is a maternal grandmother’s name that was never carried on. She was an amazing woman and he wanted to keep the Wunderlich name alive. At the end of the day, though, a name is just a name, right? But it’s so much more! Great article, Reena!

KRISTEN MILLER Online

What’s in a name? A rose by any other name would smell as sweet, so Reena Burton would if she were not Reena Burton called. That said, your name belongs to you, and it has to be your choice. I took my husband’s last name

Business as Usual I am aghast at the incompetence and railroading of the pro-business community in Sebastopol for the CVS / Chase development on the old Pellini property. How shortsighted that an EIR is not being required for what will surely be a glut of traffic at an already clogged entrance to town. How foolish that small “Sebastopol-friendly” promises of pedestrian walkways and rain gardens are somehow seen as saviors of this overall imposing, corporate-friendly project. How sad that Sebastopol is ready to welcome with open arms Chase Bank, a key player in the financial meltdown, and CVS, which bought Longs Drugs and quickly ruined everything good about the Bay Area institution. Isn’t the council considering the proposed Barlow center right across the street, which will bring even more bumper-to-bumper traffic? It won’t be long until we start seeing that familiar bumper sticker from the ’90s: “Three Lanes All the Way.” But this time, it will be for Highway 12.

JOHN MCKEOWN Forestville


Rants By Tom Tomorrow

REVVIN REVVING REV VVI VIN NG UP UP OUR O OU UR UR ECONOMIC EECONOM CON NOM OMIC M ENGINE EENG NG GINE INE CREATING CREATING T 1,000 JJOBS OBS PHASEE 1 CCONSTRUCTION ONSTR RUCTION IN PHASE

SMART means mor SMART more e than just j train engines. W We e are are creating creatting an Bay. We’re hard economic engine for the North N Bay y. W e’r e e working har d to put SMAR T on the tracks, buil d a parallel SMAR T bike-walk path, p and SMART build SMART way, bringing along the way y, prime the pump p of our economy by bring ging jobs Bay. to the North Bay y. Monday,, January 9 SMART Board Directors awarded On Monday 9, the SMAR T Boar d of Dir ectors awar rded a $103 Area process million contract to a Bay Ar e construction firm that is in the ea e pr ocess of subcontractors creating hiring many local subcontra actors and suppliers, thus cr eating g 1,000 jobs Rafael. as part of Phase I between North Santa Rosa and San Rafae el.

A Confederacy of Dunces Here’s some uplifting debate dialogue from the Republican statesmen wanting to be our president: “You’re a liar . . . Am not . . . Am too. Your husband/wife is a doofus . . . Is not . . . Is too. You’re gay . . . Am not . . . Am too. You took dirty money. Did not . . . Did too. Like blondes . . . Do not . . . Do too . . . Didn’t matter. You flip and flop. Did not . . . Did too . . . Maybe once. You want higher taxes . . . Do not . . . Do too . . . Only more or less than you. Legalize pot . . . Will not . . . Will too. Trust me . . . Cannot . . . Can too. Jerry Springer or Donald Trump for your vice president . . . May do . . . Me too.”

NEIL DAVIS

Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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tough With bids coming in lower than t expected — and some toug gh economicc climate — we are negotiating in this economi are going to be able to add more two mor e stations to Phase I — North Novato/Atherton and d North SMART Santa Rosa at Coddingtown n Mall. Under this contract, SMA RT will miles also begin rreplacing eplacing 38 mile es of antiquated track, building 9 new train bridges crossings. stations, 1 tunnel, 20 bridge es and many rail cr ossings. December, SMART completed bond-financing In December r, SMAR T comp pleted a $ p $171 million bond-financ cing g construction. package to fund constructio on. That will allow us to ramp up faster and finish sooner — adding an additional a 1,500 jobs. SMART tens SMAR ns of millions of dollars in state and a federal T is also attracting ten funds that will flow to local contractors including $31 million n in rregional egional from Metropolitan Transportation transportation funds fr om the th he Metr opolitan T ransportation r C Commission. SMART amidst Our job is to get SMAR T done do one and get it done right, amid st the We hard worst rrecession ecession since the 1930s. 1930s. W e are are working har d to get g the train on track. For more more information about SMART, SMART, website at www.SonomaMarinTrain.org www.SonomaMarinTrain.org visit our website

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Paper THE

GOOGLE MANIA Homework relies ever more on internet research, so why aren’t effective search skills being taught?

Searching in the Dark For a new generation, students are trusting too much in— and not raging against—the machine BY CLIVE THOMPSON

W

e’re often told that young people tend to be the most tech-savvy among us. But just how savvy are they? A group of researchers led

by College of Charleston business professor Bing Pan tried to find out. Specifically, Pan wanted to know how skillful young folks are at online search. His team gathered a group of college students and

asked them to look up the answers to a handful of questions. Perhaps not surprisingly, the students generally relied on the web pages at the top of Google’s results list. But Pan pulled a trick: he changed the order of the results for some students. More often

than not, those kids went for the bait and also used the (falsely) top-ranked pages. Pan grimly concluded that students aren’t assessing information sources on their own merit—they’re putting too much trust in the machine. Other studies have found the same thing. High school and college students may be “digital natives,” but they’re wretched at searching. In a recent experiment at Northwestern, when 102 undergraduates were asked to do some research online, none went to the trouble of checking the authors’ credentials. In 1955, we wondered why Johnny can’t read. Today the question is, why can’t Johnny search? Who’s to blame? Not the students. If they’re naive at Googling, it’s because the ability to judge information is almost never taught in school. Under 2001’s No Child Left Behind Act, elementary and high schools focus on prepping their pupils for reading and math exams. And by the time kids get to college, professors assume they already have this skill. The buck stops nowhere. This situation is surpassingly ironic, because not only is intelligent search a key to everyday problem-solving, it also offers a golden opportunity to train kids in critical thinking. Consider the efforts of Frances Harris, librarian at the magnet University Laboratory High School in Urbana, Ill. (Librarians are our national leaders in this fight; they’re the main ones trying to teach search skills to kids today.) Harris educates eighth and ninth graders in how to format nuanced queries using Boolean logic and advanced settings. She steers them away from raw Google searches and has them use academic and news databases, too. But, crucially, she also trains students to assess the credibility of what they find online. For example, she teaches them to analyze the tone of a web page to judge whether it was created by an academic, an advocacy group or a hobbyist. Students quickly gain the ability to detect if a top-ranked page about Martin Luther King Jr.


In 1955, we wondered why Johnny can’t read. Today the question is, why can’t Johnny search? One can imagine even more entertaining ways to help kids grok the intricacies of the search world. Why not let students start a class blog on a subject and see how long it takes for it to show up in search results? Mind you, mastering “crap detection 101,” as digital guru Howard Rheingold dubs it, isn’t easy. One prerequisite is that you already know a lot about the world. For instance, Harris found that students had difficulty distinguishing a left-wing parody of the World Trade Organization’s website from the real WTO site. Why? Because you need to understand why someone would want to parody it in the first place, knowledge the average eighthgrader does not yet possess. In other words, Google makes broad-based knowledge more important, not less. A good education is the true key to effective search. But until our kids have that, let’s make sure they don’t always take PageRank at its word.

Johnny Otis, 1921–2012 Johnny Otis, who died last week at age 90, improved the quality of music not just for the world at large but for broadcast all across Northern California. Starting in the 1980s, like clockwork, I turned on my radio, tuned into Otis, and listened to the rock ’n’ roll hits and the rhythm and blues melodies that he played religiously, week after week, on Saturday mornings. When he departed from KPFA, it seemed as though the airwaves went silent. With his death, and with the death of his discovery Etta James two days later, a chapter in the history of contemporary American music has come to resounding close. Otis was born John Alexander Veliotes on Dec. 28, 1921, a Greek child who embraced black American music. But it didn’t matter to me whether he was Greek, Congolese or Jewish. I loved the raspy sound of his voice, loved the way he hugged the microphone and loved that he talked as though he knew everyone in Radio Land who was out there singing along with the music. When he moved to Sebastopol, started broadcasting from the Powerhouse Brewing Co., opened a market and talked about his organic farm on the air, I began to take organic farming more seriously. Otis’ mix of rock ’n’ roll and organic fruits and vegetables made both all the more appealing. I read his books, heard him perform live with his son, Shuggie, and grandson, Lucky, both of whom he loved immeasurably. But Johnny Otis and radio were practically one and the same, and when I heard the words “Johnny Otis, Johnny Otis” at the start of every show, I knew I was in store for something special. Hail Hail, Johnny Otis.—Jonah Raskin

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was actually posted by white supremacists. “I see them start to get really paranoid,” Harris says. “The big thing in assessing search results is authorship—who put it there and why have they put it there?” Or, as pioneering librarian Buffy Hamilton at Creekview High School near Atlanta says, “This is learning how to learn.”


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Solar Fun and Profit Twin Hills leads nation in school-based charging stations BY JULIANE POIRIER

T

he first public schools in the United States to be equipped with solar-powered charging stations are in Sonoma County, where four schools turn sunlight into money.

“It’s an awesome project,” says Les Crawford, superintendent of Sebastopol’s Twin Hills District, which used local and federal bond money for a solar-energy system and vehicle-charging stations. “This solar project exceeded our expectations. Not only do we no longer use PG&E power, they are paying us a one-time incentive bonus of about $350,000 paid over five years, which will go into a maintenance fund for our solar equipment.” Twin Hills now saves $80,000 per year on power, a savings that can now be used for educational purposes. So while other districts are making cuts due to the state’s financial crises, Twin Hills can

boast to have retained staffing, avoided scheduling cuts, added classes and increased enrollment. Alexis Persinger, architect for Twin Hills, explains that schools and solar systems make a perfect fit because schools can sell the power accumulated but not used during summer months. “PG&E wants people to use less power during the summer, because the statewide grid doesn’t have enough electricity to run all the air conditioners in Los Angeles,” says Persinger. “PG&E charges 30 cents per kilowatt hour at that time and will buy it at that same rate.” Persinger encouraged Twin Hills—along with a number of other school districts—to apply for an Obama administration Clean Renewable Energy Bond, which allows them to borrow money at a low interest rate. Combined with the local bond money raised last fall by Measure M, Twin Hills was able to finance the project and start saving immediately. “There aren’t years to wait before you make money back,” Persinger explains. “The first day you run the system, the district is making money, which is very important right now as the state is cutting back schools. Any money you can bring in is revenue.” Crawford says the solar-power system brings “added value” to the schools by raising the quality of life and inspiring new learning opportunities. “Rather than roof panels, we placed most panels on kid ports for shade or rain protection, bus waiting areas and car ports. And areas that were once dark in winter are lighted now, which is nicer and much safer. The solar project has also been a springboard for some powerful curriculum about sustainability.” Persinger also sees added value in the charging stations. “They’re a way for the district to encourage parents and employees to move into this new era of electric cars and solar panels.”


UNDER WRAPS Climate-controlled vines in Oakville supply Zinfandel to a different winemaker each year.

Watch the Clone UC Davis’ Heritage Vineyard project

“G

eez, every grape’s the same!” winemaker Scott Harvey remembers musing to himself the first time he peered into a hopper full of Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. “No wonder people like making wine here!”

Harvey was used to making Zinfandel in the Sierra Nevada foothills, and had every reason to feel spoiled in Napa. Unlike those perfectly uniform clusters of purple Cabernet grapes, Zinfandel

tends to vary within each cluster, and clusters vary within each vine. To make matters more complicated, the unique heritage of each vineyard may affect the flavor as well. At its best, Zinfandel makes for a devilishly good wine, but as with all things wine, the devil is in the details. Because similarity in Zinfandel grapes is so desirable, most modern vineyards are planted with clones, nearly identical grapevines that were propagated from one original vine, or even one bud of one vine, that has been certified disease-free by California’s Foundation Plant Services (FPS). When, in earlier days, farmers just

BY JAMES KNIGHT took cuttings from one vineyard to plant a new one, each generation had the potential to differ slightly from the last. For well over a century, that’s how Zinfandel was planted. Some vineyards became renowned. Others ended up being dumped into a sea of White Zinfandel. But how much of that is due to the vine’s parentage vs. its climate, or to a particular winery’s craft— in other words, to nature vs. nurture? The Heritage Vineyard project aims to find out exactly that. In the 1990s, the trade group Zinfandel Advocates and Producers (ZAP) persuaded UC Davis to collaborate on a plan

to collect samples from some of California’s best Zinfandel vineyards. A key participant was Joel Peterson, whose Ravenswood Winery helped spur Zin’s resurgence in the 1980s. “We’re really on the verge of a new era for people who choose to plant Zinfandel,” says Peterson. After scouring the state for vineyards that were planted before 1930, the group submitted dozens of samples to the FPS, which were then planted in the UC Davis experimental plot in Oakville. This way, the variable of climate could be eliminated. Drum roll, please? Not so fast. As intoxicating as it must be for someone who’s devoted his life to teasing out the complexities of Zinfandel, Peterson is realistic about the near-term prospects. “It’s one of those projects that takes a lifetime, ultimately,” he admits. “It’s not like raising rabbits or cabbages.” Just to get to the point where the wine from one clone can be submitted for evaluation can take from four years up to a decade. “These projects tend to have a long life, and probably take a few generations of humans,” Peterson says. Still, progress is being made. “I would say there are two broad differences,” says Peterson. “There’s a group that produces wines that are more claret-like, that have more structure, a hightoned character, bright fruit, higher acidity and good color. Then there’s another selection which produces more fruity wines that tend to be softer, that tend to have more of what I categorize as a sweet fruit character.” Meanwhile, a portion of the grapes are vinted by a different winemaker each year. Sales of this Heritage Vineyard blend benefit ZAP’s ongoing research efforts. In 2011, winemaker Scott Harvey was up at bat. Having grown up with his grandfather’s 1869 vineyard, helped build Amador County’s Renwood Winery and launched successful brands like Ménage à Trois, Harvey knows a thing or two about Zinfandel. Yet ) 12

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

James Knight

Dining

11


12

Zinfandel ( 11

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

his early schooling in one of Germany’s few red wine regions helps inform a more European style. In Zinfandel, Harvey looks for ripeness, but not too much. He wants a wine to tell the story of where the grape is from, “and the riper they get, the less ability they have to tell you those stories,” he says.

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The 2011 vintage gave him the perfect opportunity. Tasted from a barrel in Harvey’s production space—coincidentally enough, part of a complex that once pumped out Sutter Home Winery’s Olympic-sized volumes of White Zinfandel—the new wine shows bright red fruit flavors of cherry and raspberry. As adept as he is after 38 years of walking Zinfandel vineyards, Harvey can’t say which out of the several acres of identically pruned, head-trained vines are his grandfather’s “1869” clone. The vines are planted in a repeating pattern in the interest of science, and to dissuade clonerustlers, their identities are a closely guarded secret. To this generation, at least. The 2009 Heritage Vineyard Zinfandel, made by Ted Seghesio, will be at ZAP’s 21st Annual Zinfandel Festival. Events include the Grand Tasting on Saturday, Jan. 28, at the Concourse, Eighth Street at Brannan, San Francisco. 2–5pm. $59–$69. www.zinfandel.org.


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

on what’s fresh. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, Mon-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.3620.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and

Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500.

flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Boca South American. $$$-

SONOMA COUNTY Abyssinia Ethiopian/ Eritrean. $. Authentic and filling, and a welcome culinary addition. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 913 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.6455.

Gary Chu’s Chinese. $$. Fine Chinese food in elegant setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 611 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5840.

The Girl & the Fig Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner daily. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

Gohan Japanese. $$-$$$. Superb Japanese favorites with modern twists like green-tea cheesecake and wakame snow-crab caviar salad in a martini glass. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 1367 McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.789.9296.

Karma Bistro Indian. $$. A variety of flavorful regional specialties. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 7530 Commerce Blvd, Cotati. 707.795.1729. Khoom Lanna Thai. $$. Outstanding Thai dishes and seasonal specialties with an authentic cooking style. Fresh ingredients, serene dining room, convenient Railroad Square location. Lunch and dinner daily. 107 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8424.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. All kinds of burgers imaginable; fries Friday only, no shakes, da Jets. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Santa Rosa. 707.528.FAST. 560 Hwy 116 N, Sebastopol. 707.823.7492.

Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Sugo Italian. $-$$. Bang-up fresh food at prices that seem like a steal. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat. 5 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.782.9298. Thai Issan Thai. $$. Popular full-spectrum Thai restaurant. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 208 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.762.5966.

Tres Hombres Mexican. $-$$. Excellent food in Petaluma’s Theater District, and a fun place to hang before or after a flick.Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.773.4500.

Willi’s Seafood & Raw Bar Seafood. $$. Delicious preparations of the freshest fish and shellfish. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 403 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.9191.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

M A R I N COUNTY Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Mombo’s Pizza Pizza.

Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh

$. The crust is thin and the toppings eclectic. Delivery. Lunch and dinner daily. 1800 Mendocino Ave,

Thai food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some of the best fried bananas to be

$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Chez Pierre French-

N A P A COUNTY

Italian-American. $$. A former Denny’s turned Parisian bistro, with surprisingly competent cozy French favorites like escargot and chicken Cordon Bleu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7330 Redwood Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4233.

Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

Citrus & Spice Thai/

Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly

Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists with its fresh catches. A wide selection of nigiri, depending

French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

13

SMALL BITES

Reigning Champs Cochon 555 returns to the North Bay Jan. 29 with a porcine-themed competition at the Culinary Institute of America in St. Helena that pits five local chefs against each other. Last year, Sonoma County’s own Duskie Estes and John Stewart, of Zazu and Bovolo, walked away with the national championship. This year, they’ll be competing against Chris L’Hommedieu of Michael Mina; Mark Dommen of One Market; Michael Tuohy of Dean & Deluca; and Lars Kronmark of the Culinary Institute of America. The winner will be chosen by both a panel of judges and the audience, and will advance to compete for the title of King (or Queen) of Porc at the 30th anniversary of the Food & Wine Classic in Aspen, Colo., on June 17. In addition to sampling more than 20 pork dishes, attendees will taste wines from five small production wineries, meet farmers and see a live butchering competition. The event is part of a 10-city tasting tour and culinary contest aimed at promoting heritage pig breeds and “snout-to-tail” utilization of said pigs. Other stops on the annual tour include New York City, San Francisco, Memphis, Portland and Miami. Tickets start at $125 and are available at www.cochon555.com.—Stett Holbrook

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Fujiya Japanese. $$-$$$.

Good, solid sushi. The Fujiya Deluxe combo is a standout. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat. 921 Factory Stores Dr, Napa. 707.257.0639.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Dining

found. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner, Sun. (Cash only.) 809 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.458.8845.


Wineries

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA COUNTY

Amazing gardens, and great place to explore food and wine pairings. 5007 Fulton Road, Fulton. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.571.8100.

Annapolis Winery

Timber Cove Inn Joyride to the coast or winetasting? Do both at the Sonoma Coast Wine Tasting Room. Installed inside the landmark hotel during a remodel—under the stairs—this cozy corner features a rotating lineup of local notables like Hirsch, Flowers, and Peay. 21780 North Coast Hwy. 1, Timber Cove. Saturday–Sunday, noon–5pm. $20 for two. 707.847.3231.

Decades before the cool Sonoma Coast became hot property, the Scalabrini family quietly planted their vineyards high above the coastal fog. Small, family-run, and a popular wedding spot; the Gewürz sells out fast. 26055 Soda Springs Road, Annapolis. Open daily. 707.886.5460.

Benovia Winery Unfussy cellar tasting in barn-style winery, refined Chard and Pinot; but “ooh, have you had their Zinfandel?” 3339 Hartman Road, Santa Rosa. By appointment only, 10am–4pm daily. 707.526.4441. Benziger Winery A nontraditional, organic, biodynamically farmed winery. Don’t miss the daily 45-minute tram ride replete with a tour of the vineyard, wildlife sanctuaries and caves. 1883 London Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 888.490.2739. Hart’s Desire Wines

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Brash Zinfandel and sensuous Pinot Noir from the label with the come-hither eyes. Brick walls plastered with art, participatory painting, and a jukebox also entertain in this old warehouse shared with Christi Vineyards and J. Keverson Winery. 53 Front St. (Old Roma Station), Healdsburg. Thursday–Monday, 11am– 5pm. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.3097.

Keller Estate Nestled in rolling hills above the Petaluma River, the winery, designed by a prestigious Mexican architecture firm, was built with stones from China’s Three Gorges dam project. 5875 Lakeville Hwy., Petaluma. Thursday–Sunday 11am–4pm. $10 fee. Call ahead. 707.765.2117. Kendall-Jackson K-J produces the popular wines gracing most American tables.

Woodenhead Damn good wine. Pinot, Zin–yum, yum, yum. 5700 River Road, Santa Rosa. Open Thursday– Monday, 10:30am–4:30pm. 707.887.2703.

NAPA COUNTY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Bouchaine Vineyards Pinot Noir and Pinot Meuier with a cool-climate, cherryskin crispness that nearly crunches in the mouth, and Chardonnay with a “mouth of butter.” Patio service in fair weather, cozy hearthside tasting in cooler days; good-humored hospitality throughout. 1075 Buchli Station Road, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–4pm; tasting fee $5. 707.252.9065.

Brown Estate Vineyards (WC) A beautifully restored and converted stone and redwood barn is the winery and tasting room facility at Brown Estate. And the construction of a 6,500square-foot subterranean wine cave was completed in 2005. Visitors are currently limited to wine club members by appointment only.

3233 Sage Canyon Road, Napa. 707.963.2435.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Chateau Boswell Winery (WC) This small, boutique winery is open by appointment only, selling most its wine directly via post to club members. 3468 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.963.5472.

Clos Pegase Winery (WC) Practically an art museum. A 2,800-square-foot “cave theater” plays frequent host to parties and more. Tasting flight of four wines, red and white, $10. 1060 Dunaweal Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 800.366.8583.

Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.257.2345. Del Dotto Vineyards (WC) Caves lined with Italian marble and ancient tiles, not to mention Venetian chandeliers and mosaic marble floors. They host candle-lit tastings, replete with cheese and chocolate, Friday–Sunday. Opera resonates until 4pm; rock rules after 4pm. 1055 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.963.2134.

Schramsberg (WC) Sparkling wine at its best. The “tasting room” is a branch of the cave illuminated with standing candelabras. 1400 Schramsberg Road, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4558.

Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethen’s heyday was in the ’60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.255.7700.


8ZLUO

15

K-J Goes Undercover

great workout!

L

et’s imagine there’s a popular reality television show in which a company president secretly spies on his employees while pretending to be a prospective new hire. Say, one day, a TV crew shows up at your workplace with a middle-aged guy who says he wants to switch careers, and nobody says, “Hey, doesn’t that guy work in the office?” In other words, is CBS’ new show Undercover Boss believable? Based on a recent advance screening of this Sunday’s episode, which stars Kendall-Jackson president Rick Tigner, they seem to have pulled it off. With his salt-and-pepper hair dyed black, wearing a ten-gallon hat and sporting a horseshoe stash, Tigner is well-disguised as a grocery store manager from Plano, Texas, going for a dry run at his “dream job in the vineyards.” We learn that Tigner is a sympathetic figure, with a hard-luck upbringing and challenges at home—not the kind of arrogant CEO that viewers would too much relish seeing taken down a notch. Piqued by musical cues, the tears are brought on early and often—but to the show’s credit, it doesn’t romanticize wine country and doesn’t whiplash the viewer with the fast-cut, five-second confessionals typical of the genre. Ten seconds, minimum. As “Jake,” Tigner is paired up with a series of employees who attempt to show him the ropes: an energetic young viticulturist; a potty-mouthed truck driver; a 20-year veteran who started at K-J the same week as Tigner; and a single mother who confides to Tigner, “Not having any benefits for my children, that does get to me.” But who could help? True to format, both reckoning and reward are at hand. Tigner loses the mustache, doffs the hat, slips into a suit and reassumes his seat behind the executive desk. “You know who I am?” he asks the first hapless employee, with a smirk. Some will receive gifts; others have inspired company-wide changes; one will get a second chance. Critics of the show have said that it confirms workplace norms of arbitrary power, in return for the cheap thrill of temporarily discomfiting the chief. But Kendall-Jackson had a different goal. Seeking to put a new face forward at a time when they were losing their paterfamilias—Jess Jackson passed away last April—the company approached reality TV with hesitation. For as much as most consumers may regard K-J as a supermarket ubiquity, it’s a family-run business, whose employees, from top down, constantly frame discussions around Jackson. Ultimately, he is their undercover boss, and he’ll always be watching them. The Kendall-Jackson episode of Undercover Boss airs on Sunday, Jan. 29, on CBS. 8–9pm.—James Knight

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climbing is a


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16

SONIC TRUTH Dane Jasper of Sonic.net vaulted strong criticism of SOPA and PIPA. Though Congressional leaders shelved both bills, chances are

they’ll return.

SOPA Opera

Plot twists evolve storyline in the great debate of online censorship (at least, for now)

I

n a story Hollywood wishes were its own, the tumultuous battle surrounding SOPA and PIPA last week resulted in an inspiring, albeit brief, victory for users of the internet and the voting public at large. But at the awards party, while everyone was high-fiving and chugging Champagne, someone broke in and stole the civil liberties online

users thought had been saved. Now, in our halfdrunk party haze, we try to assess what just happened— and where we go from here.

Quick Plot Synopsis Act I: After months of growing concern online and increasingly worrisome newspaper articles, Wikipedia, Reddit and dozens of other websites go “dark” Jan. 18 in protest of the antipiracy

legislation they fear could “shut down the internet.” This leads to national media coverage putting pressure on Capitol Hill to postpone both bills. Act II: Literally at the same time, the U.S. government shows how this legislation would work—or, perhaps, demonstrates its redundancy—by shutting down file-transfer site Megaupload, which it deemed “responsible for massive worldwide online piracy of numerous types of copyrighted works.” The Department of Justice announced the shutdown

Jan. 19, and the next morning, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., announced he would postpone the vote on PIPA he was so desperately pushing for just one day prior. Act III: This has yet to be fully written. Minutes after the Megaupload shutdown, hacker group Anonymous crashed sites of several organizations affiliated with the process, the FBI and the Department of Justice, as well as entertainment-industry groups like the MPAA and RIAA. But nobody knows what comes next. In a Lost-esque writing style, the script is given to the players with fresh ink. Maybe SOPA and PIPA will be amended to reflect public concern. Maybe they’ll drop out of public eye and pass with little fanfare next month. Or maybe, with the shutdown of one of the world’s largest copyright infringers, proponents


Character Development SOPA (the Stop Online Piracy Act, HR 3261) and PIPA (the PROTECT IP Act, S 968) target foreign “rogue” websites dedicated to illegally offering copyrighted materials. SOPA’s description includes promoting “prosperity, creativity, entrepreneurship, and innovation by combating the theft of U.S. property, and for other purposes.” The idea behind SOPA and PIPA is to thwart the piracy of movies, music, books, artwork and other copyrighted materials online by making the host responsible rather than the user. Right now, if a 15-minute clip of Avatar got posted on YouTube, the site would remove the offending clip and any legal action would be brought against the person who posted it. Should SOPA pass in its current incarnation, YouTube itself would bear criminal charges, regardless of its knowledge of the offending post. Sonic.net CEO Dane Jasper sums up the collective argument of millions of internet users and hundreds of companies: “My concern is that this is the beginning of the road to an internet that could be censored.” As the head of Sonoma County’s largest ISP, Jasper has reason to be concerned. Passage of SOPA or PIPA would mean implementation at Sonic.net of a new filtering system, a new infrastructure and new costs. But moreover, Jasper is against the idea from a moral standpoint. “I am fundamentally opposed to

tampering with the underpinning of the internet,” he says, “and creating an enforcement tool that I believe would overreach, in a sense, to solve the problem of piracy.” Jasper continues, cognizant of the underlying problem: “DMCA [Digital Millennium Copyright Act] and others do function well. Piracy and counterfeiting is illegal, and we have the tools to counter those problems.” Peter Phillips, president of the Media Freedom Foundation and founder of Project Censored, says passage of the bills, despite their proponents’ claims otherwise, would equate to censorship. “We need to have zero interference with the free flow of information on the internet,” he says. Phillips envisions a scenario whereby the government could use the vague wording in the bill to shut down websites it deems threatening to homeland security—or worse, sites that it just plain doesn’t like.

Collateral Damage Aside from potential censorship, there are other possible unintended consequences of the two bills. Because private companies could sue service providers for unknowingly hosting copyrighted materials, companies like Facebook, Google, Wikipedia and other user-generated content sites would be forced to dramatically restructure and monitor content, possibly delaying posting times and removing the immediacy of the social experience, losing customers and therefore losing revenue. The bills’ goal is to combat foreign sites stealing American companies’ intellectual property, but American sites that don’t fall under defined domestic URLs can be targeted. Conversely, sites based outside of the United States with .com, .org, .us and other suffixes—like Pirate Bay, for instance—are defined as “domestic” in the bills and would not be targeted. Many argue that because of this alone, neither of these bills would

17

Ahead of the Curve Digital pirates have been around since the preteen days of the internet, back when they called themselves “Goonies.” Tim O’Reilly, a Sebastopol native who has been on the cutting edge of media and digital technology for decades, had a take on piracy 10 years ago that could be applied to today’s argument. From a post on his site, O’Reilly Radar, in 2002: “The simplest way to get customers to stop trading illicit digital copies of music and movies is to give those customers a legitimate alternative at a fair price.” In effect, O’Reilly argued against SOPA and PIPA even before they were conceived. “We see no need for stronger copyright laws, or strong Digital Rights Management software,” he wrote, “because existing law allows us to prosecute the few deliberate pirates.”

make any headway in combating online piracy. “They’re both totally horrible draconian attempts at controlling the internet,” says Schell Scivally, lead developer at Petaluma tech company the Synapse Group. “If I have a website that has users, I don’t want to be responsible for anything they post up there, because that’s not me, it’s the users.” As a programmer and site designer, Scivally says, “it would affect the way we have to structure our websites. It would mean a lot more work, actually.” In Silicon Valley, startup companies rarely have funds for a large legal team. An idea is developed and the details are sorted out later if it becomes popular and financially viable. According to a Booz and Co. study released in November, holding hosts rather than users accountable for content could reduce the pool of “angel investors” for startup companies by 81 percent. “If [a startup company] is a social technology, you’re pretty much screwed, unless you have a lot of money dedicated to customer moderating,” said Scivally. “It forces [social media sites] to become Big Brother.”

The Empire Strikes Back With so much protest, why would something like PIPA

initially enjoy the co-sponsorship of 40 out of 100 senators? Who supports it, anyway? The bill, introduced by Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., is primarily supported by the movie and music industries. The MPAA, Comcast, Viacom, News Corp., Sony Pictures, Sony Music, NFL, MLB, NBA, RIAA, CBS, ASCAP and a handful of other acronymhappy companies assert that these bills will protect their rights as copyright holders. In a Jan. 13 email, Sen. Barbara Boxer’s press secretary Andy Stone wrote, “Sen. Boxer supports and is a cosponsor of the PROTECT IP Act. She has a long record of working to protect intellectual property and fight piracy.” Sen. Feinstein, initially listed as a co-sponsor, said through her press secretary Brian Weiss that she supports postponing the bill to look more closely at its provisions. In the North Bay, Rep. Mike Thompson is against SOPA. “The internet is an amazing tool for communication, innovation and economic development,” he says via email. “The overly broad Stop Online Piracy Act would stifle that innovation, resulting in fewer new businesses, fewer new investments and fewer new jobs. While online piracy is something we must continually fight, SOPA is something we cannot afford.” Rep. Lynn Woolsey “doesn’t have a firm commitment

) 18

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

and lobbyists will determine that legislation is unnecessary, garnering several upvotes and raking in karma points. But on Capitol Hill, Mr. Smith does not always go to Washington. There are few true Hollywood endings in Congress, and plenty of rewrites. Grab the popcorn, because it’s likely that SOPA and PIPA will emerge again in that most dreaded of Hollywood clichés: the moneygrubbing sequel.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

18 SOPA ( 17

History of the World, Part I Sept. 20, 2010: Sen. Pat Leahy, D-Vt., introduces COICA (Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act). It was shot down in the Senate for being too vague. May 12, 2011: Leahy introduces PIPA (PROTECT IP Act). Tech blogs recall COICA and say this might even be worse, but little is made of it outside of blogs and tech magazines. Oct. 26: Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, introduces SOPA (the Stop Online Piracy Act) in the House of Representatives. Nov. 15: Google, Facebook and others take out a full page ad in the New York Times opposing SOPA and PIPA. Dec. 29: GoDaddy.com reverses its pro-SOPA stance after losing 29,000 customers in less than one week. Jan. 14, 2012: White House announces it will not support SOPA or PIPA as written. Jan. 16: Congress delays vote on SOPA until at least February due to mounting public pressure. Jan. 18: Wikipedia, Reddit and other popular sites go “dark” in protest of SOPA and PIPA. Google draws over 7 million signatures on a petition to stop the legislation. Jan. 18: Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., introduce OPEN (Online Protection and Enforcement of Digital Trade Act) as an alternative to PIPA and SOPA, respectively. Jan. 19: Megaupload, one of the largest file trading networks (and allegedly one of the largest sources of pirated intellectual property) is shut down by the U.S. Department of Justice. Jan. 20: Rep. Smith pulls SOPA from consideration until there is “wider agreement on the solution.” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., announces a postponement of voting on PIPA until a consensus of its provisions could be reached. Jan. 22: Sites similar to Megaupload—Upload.to, FileSonic— halt activity in fear of similar shutdown.

at this time,” her communications director Bart Acocella said on Jan. 12. Because SOPA keeps changing, “she needs to think it through a little more,” he said. Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, who proposed the bill in October, said in a statement responding to the Wikipedia blackout on Jan. 18, “The Stop Online Piracy Act cuts off the flow of revenue to these foreign illegal sites and makes it harder for online criminals to market and distribute illegal products to U.S. consumers. . . . [A]nd it provides innovators with a way to bring claims against foreign illegal sites that steal and sell their technology, products and intellectual property.” The Motion Picture Association of America released a statement Jan. 14, which read: “The American businesses that are victimized on a daily basis by global internet thieves are among the most innovative industries in this nation, and we welcome the administration’s support of these American businesses. Every day, American jobs are threatened by thieves from foreign-based rogue websites. This deplorable situation persists because U.S. law enforcement does not have the tools to fight back.”

Underdog Story Though they’re powerful, the MPAA and other groups supporting these acts are in the minority. Companies formerly in favor of the bills are withdrawing their support, and many in the online community feel the same as Jasper: that passage could lead to internet censorship. It appears the underdog is gaining traction. Companies publicly against SOPA and PIPA include Google, Yahoo, Twitter, Facebook, AOL, Tumblr, eBay, Reddit, Microsoft,

Rackspace, O’Reilly Media, the American Civil Liberties Union and a host of other internet companies, human rights groups and nonprofits dedicated to protecting free speech. Many of these companies collectively placed a full-page ad in the New York Times Nov. 15, stating, “We are concerned that these

So is this a win for the internet? A victory for the champions of free speech? Not quite. measures pose a serious risk to our industry’s continued track record of innovation and job creation, as well as to our nation’s cybersecurity.” Users of the internet at large are also against the bills. Once news broke that domain host GoDaddy supported SOPA, the company lost 29,000 domain registries in about a week, adding up to around $300,000 annually. GoDaddy has since changed its “official” stance on the issue, but did not win back many, if any, customers. Congress has also been bombarded with calls. Sen. Leahy released a statement Jan. 12, saying, “I and the bill’s cosponsors have continued to hear concerns. . . . This is in fact a highly technical issue, and I am prepared to recommend we give it more study before implementing it.”

A Bigger Boat The PROTECT IP Act, in various forms, has a losing track

record. In 2010, it was voted down as the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (also introduced by Leahy). The provisions in that bill were almost identical to PIPA, but it was so broad that it was shot down in the Senate, despite bipartisan sponsorship. The White House released a statement Jan. 13, saying, “While we believe that online piracy by foreign websites is a serious problem that requires a serious legislative response, we will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk or undermines the dynamic, innovative global internet.” The statement continues: “New legislation must be narrowly targeted only at sites beyond the reach of current U.S. law, cover activity clearly prohibited under existing U.S. laws, and be effectively tailored, with strong due process and focused on criminal activity.” So is this a win for the internet? A victory for the champions of free speech? Not quite. SOPA and PIPA are still out there, looming like sharks just offshore, awaiting their reintroduction to the congressional floor. By shutting down Megaupload, the federal government has already shown its ability to enact the crux of these measures without enacting additional legislation. But with massive lobbying money behind the bills, SOPA and PIPA could very likely emerge anew with proudly touted “revisions” and a new name. Already, two such bills, ACTA and OPEN, have been introduced. To completely blow the spectre of internet censorship brought on by SOPA and PIPA out of the water? That’ll require counterlegislation to tackle the problem in a different way. In other words, we’re gonna need a bigger boat.


19

Crush N A PA

Stow Show

Well, the Niners’ run was thrilling while it lasted, but after last Sunday’s playoff loss to the New York Giants, Bay Area sports fans are turning their attention back to baseball. You ever hear that San Francisco Giants third base coach Tim Flannery is a big Grateful Dead fan? And on top of that, a musician in his own right, with this band called the Lunatic Fringe? You may have seen him singing on the field with Phil Lesh and Bob Weir. This week, Flannery and his band play a benefit show for Brian Stow, the Giants fan who was beaten outside a Dodgers game last year, and Weir is an announced guest. There’s no telling who else will show up when Flannery and promised special guests play on Saturday, Jan. 28, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. Reception, 6pm; show, 8pm. $55–$100. 707.259.0123.

S A N TA R O S A

Hardcore Lives Holy Land, the debut EP by Santa Rosa band No Sir, traffics in the unglossy strain of hardcore reminiscent of smoky warehouses and dangerous clientele—in other words, the type of furious energy before massmarketers exploited the genre. (It’s safe to say that the No Sir song “The Kingston Beat” is not, as the title might hint, reggae.) With members of All Teeth, Not to Reason Why and others, No Sir play a record-release show this week that doubles as an art show, featuring visual work by Ross Farrar (Ceremony), Adam Vass (Da Doom Crew) and band members. The first 50 attendees get a silkscreened poster when No Sir play with Not to Reason Why, Code Orange Kids, Xerxes and Youths on Saturday, Jan. 28, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $8. 707.528.3009.

S A N TA R O S A

Chainsaw Massacre

In 1992, the Southern heavy metal band Jackyl released “The Lumberjack,” a song with a chainsaw solo. That’s really all you need to know about Jackyl. Sure, they had some other songs (ahem, “She Loves My Cock,” “My Moonshine Kicks Your Cocaine’s Ass,” “Just Like a Negro”). Sure, they’re starring in some not-popular reality show about the Sturgis bike rally. But when the subject of Jackyl comes up, all you have to do is say “Yeah, dude, they had that chainsaw song.” But if you truly want to be an authority on Jackyl? You could see them live and onstage, when singer Jesse James Dupree “plays” the chainsaw while performing “The Lumberjack,” on Thursday, Jan. 26, at the Last Day Saloon. 120 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. 8:30pm. $17–$20. 707.545.2343.

FA I R FA X

Still Fresh I.M.P.’s Back in the Days landed on the charts at a golden time for Bay Area rap—Tupac was just taking off, RBL Posse’s first record was out, Mac Dre was on the scene. But tragedy would ultimately befall the group. In 2001, I.M.P.’s gruff-voiced Cougnut was killed in a car accident in Daly City, and meanwhile, the group’s C-Fresh wound up in Lompoc State Prison. Now a free man, C-Fresh plays a 40th birthday party for hip-hop impresario Tony Butcha with guests Killa Tay, Tha Camp, Peoples and more. You know it’s a party when the flyer specifically mentions that anyone sneaking bottles of liquor into the bar will be kicked out; it gets poppin’ on Saturday, Jan. 28, at 19 Broadway Nightclub. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 10pm. 415.459.1091.

—Gabe Meline

ROACHY BALBOA The almighty Roach Gigz headlines Jan. 28 at the Phoenix theater. See Concerts, p25.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25-31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide


ArtsIdeas Jay Blakesberg

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

20

IN THE PLAYPEN Bob Weir oversees progress at the long-awaited ‘rebirthed’ Sweetwater, which opens this week.

Sweet Return

Mill Valley rocks again with the Sweetwater Music Hall BY LEILANI CLARK

B

efore it shuttered in 2007, the Sweetwater Saloon in Mill Valley held the air of a place where anything might happen. Case in point: the grungy little club north of the Golden Gate Bridge was one of Elvis Costello’s ďŹ rst dates on his inaugural U.S. tour in 1978. “He ew into San Francisco, checked in at the Howard Johnson’s

out by the highway, drove to the Sweetwater, had a beer and then went to Village Music,� says John Goddard, owner of legendary Mill Valley record store Village Music, which, like the Sweetwater, also closed in 2007. Indeed, in 2007 this very paper ran the headline “Mill Valley Goes to Hell.� But music lovers have cause to celebrate when a “rebirthed� Sweetwater Music Hall goes into soft opening on Jan. 27. Funded by multiple investors, including musical millionaires Bob Weir of

the Grateful Dead and Modulus Guitars owner Michael Klein, the new venue takes up residence this month in Mill Valley’s renovated 107-year-old Masonic Hall, most recently known as a music venue called the Woods. “A group of communityoriented investors decided that they wanted to keep the Sweetwater vibe alive,� says KR Holt, Sweetwater Music Hall’s general manager. “We’re now at the end of major renovations, and it’s looking absolutely gorgeous.�

The new venue contains numerous upgrades from its previous incarnation. The room boasts a high-end sound system, and streaming technology will allow for the broadcast of bands beyond the club’s 300-plus capacity. A cafe led by Gordon Drysdale, formerly of Pizza Antica and Cafe des Amis, will serve locally sourced organic food for dinner and happy hour, with plans to expand into full-service breakfast, lunch and patio dining in the spring. Holt, coming from a history as house manager at the Fillmore, Slim’s and the WarďŹ eld in San Francisco, says their goal is to maintain historical continuity between the new and the old. “We want to keep the roots Americana vibe going while branching out into up-and-coming artists,â€? she says. One beloved Sweetwater tradition, Open Mic Mondays, returns on Jan. 30, hosted by Austin de Lone. Bonnie Hayes, a Marin County musician who hit it big in the 1980s and went on to write songs for Bonnie Raitt (another Sweetwater drop-in regular) and others, hopes that the new owners maintain the original Sweetwater’s “adventurousâ€? booking spirit. An early walkthrough of the soon-to-open hall with Klein was reassuring, she says. “I know that this is his goal,â€? says Hayes. “But I don’t know if they’re going to be able to do it. Are they going to be able to be as adventurous booking-wise, and will they still have local musicians playing there?â€? “We had Ry Cooder, Carlos Santana, Albert Collins, John Lee Hooker and Robert Ward all onstage at the same time,â€? Goddard remembers of the original Sweetwater, adding that Jeanie Patterson, who ran the saloon during its most spirited years, was absolutely “fearlessâ€? in asking musicians to play her small stage. An anniversary party


Southern rockers the Outlaws kick off the Sweetwater Music Hall’s soft opening on Friday, Jan. 27. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $31.50. 415.388.3850.

21

Help Us Find Bitsy’s

Forever Home!

FUNCTIONAL ART

wo ie ni ti amo

konoronhkwa

s’agapo Bahibik

Je t’aime

Doostat d aram This sweet little kink-tail Tortie has had a tough time at our shelter. Came in as a kitten, sweet and loving, and then had 2 successive knee surgeries, YIKES! She’s fine now but no wonder she’s a bit grumpy at times (and other times a lap kitty)!! She thrived in a foster home but is struggling in our shelter. She needs a quiet, loving, and above all, PATIENT home.

Can you sympathize and give Bitsy a chance?

542-0882

www.sonomahumane.org

miluji te

Just say... I Love You,

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in 1989 drew performances by the likes of Costello, Nick Lowe, Sammy Hagar, Bob Weir, the Fabulous Thunderbirds, Charles Brown and Jerry Garcia. Of course, times have changed. Patterson retired in 1998, and subsequent Sweetwater owners Thom and Becky Steere aren’t involved in the new venue. Also, increasingly restrictive booking contracts in the music industry may keep touring artists who play San Francisco from playing the Sweetwater due to its close proximity, a common restriction known as a “radius clause.â€? Because of Marin’s relative quiet since the Sweetwater closed, Hayes welcomes its return, and believes it heralds a resurgence for Marin’s music scene. “We’ve lost a sense of the true essence of what Marin style is,â€? says Hayes of the last ďŹ ve years. “To me, it’s just started feeling culturally bereft. It’s turned into the place where wealthy people can be comfortable, but there’s nothing really interesting going on. This makes me feel like there is a speciďŹ c Marin culture and history that’s being honored and supported by these musicians, and that’s great.â€? With the latest announcement that the Grateful Dead’s Phil Lesh will open a new restaurant and music venue in San Rafael at the old Seafood Peddler location, and with last year’s reopening of George’s Nightclub in downtown San Rafael, could this signal a renaissance for a once-strong scene? All signs point to yes. “That is the main goal: to bring music back to Mill Valley,â€? says Holt. “In recent years, since Sweetwater closed, it’s kind of waned. There are so many amazingly talented musicians in this county that don’t have a venue to do anything in. We wanted to make a venue to bring back the music.â€? Or as Weir said in a prepared statement, “Woo-hoo! Mill Valley ďŹ nally has its playpen back!â€?


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

PAID ADVERTISING SECTION

Gallery

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22

Stage

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here’s something exhilarating, perhaps a bit dangerous—but undeniably thrilling—about watching a mob of upset, outraged teenagers dancing their hearts out and singing obscenities. A similar energy certainly helped turn Hair into a theatrical symbol of ’60s-era indignation and hope, and something akin to that happens in Steven Slater and Duncan Sheik’s award-winning musical Spring Awakening.

Adapted from the scandalous 1892 German play by Frank Wedekind, condemned in its time for its frank depictions of teen sexuality, carnal curiosity and manic youthful anguish-and-ecstasy, the 2006 musical—which opened a twoweekend run last Friday at Spreckels Performing Arts Center— runs with the idea of using rock

music to represent the churning turmoil of young life and love. And damned if it doesn’t work. The original cast recording itself became a sensation, and the original Broadway staging, with its deliriously modern dance moves, blended surprisingly well with the tale of turn-of-the-century German kids trying to make sense of a world in which much of what they learn from fearful, moralistic adults is half-truth, distortion and lie. The story follows a group of students, right at the moment their bodies and minds straddle the awkward line between the naiveté of childhood and uncertain, unmapped adulthood. A kind of point-by-point refutation of abstinence-only sex education (remember, this was originally written over a hundred years ago), Spring Awakening boldly declares what can happen when young people are denied the information they need to grow up—spoon-fed instead with a diet of storks, fairy tales and vaguely nonspecific threats of damnation for giving in to their confusing, unrelenting urges. To get this kind of material right, you need a daring cast of young people, and director Scott van der Horst has built an astonishingly committed ensemble to tell this humor-strewn and often heartbreaking story. With inspired choreography by Michella Snider, the school-age heroes and heroines of Wedekind’s gleeful, angsty epic stomp, twitch, twist, twirl and rock out to the bottom of their souls, fairly exploding across the stage in tuneful musical numbers meant to illustrate the roiling mix of emotions they have no way of expressing. In Spring Awakening, there are some fine young voices on display, and though the acting is occasionally a little uneven, there is not one moment where the cast’s deep-down identification with the material is not evident. Remaining performances of ‘Spring Awakening’ run Jan. 27–29 at the Spreckels Center. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. Friday–Saturday at 8pm; Sunday, 2pm. $22. 707.588.3400.


DROPLET Glenn Close is the name, but Janet McTeer steals the show in ‘Albert Nobbs.’

Who’s That Girl

Glenn Close conceals money, identity in ‘Albert Nobbs’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

B

ased on a George Moore novella, Albert Nobbs has some plusses. It’s plausible. It’s a story of the kind of thing that used to happen all the time. It’s a well-staged and beautifully costumed recreation of Dublin for Ulysses-philes to daydream over. Brendan Gleeson plays a richly bearded, hard-drinking physician, well able to bear the heavy lifting of the most tragic lines. And Albert Nobbs has Glenn Close and also Janet McTeer. What Albert Nobbs doesn’t have is a director who can harmonize the various acting styles. Rodrigo Garcia (of the post-Crash tagteamer Nine Lives, which co-starred Close) helms with the same fits and starts of his connect-the-dots dramas. Glenn Close is the frozen-in-fear title character, a waiter at a pretentious hotel. She hides her sex in male clothes, and also conceals a trove of hard-earned money in the floorboards of her dingy room. Close’s portrait of a bound-in woman is the kind of sad the viewer can admire rather than feel. Maybe wearing a derby tempts an actor to try earnestly to emulate the wistful Chaplin. But as moviegoers, we’re trained to admire proactive indecent characters, so we keep wanting to see more of McTeer as Nobbs’ acquaintance, a laborer, also a male impersonator, who has managed to successfully live as a man. McTeer is a stage icon, but she previously hadn’t made a movie where she didn’t seem overpowering. Perhaps among the slackness of the direction, and among the occasional anachronism of the lines (“I don’t want to be that person”), there was room for McTeer to take charge on the set. Her cropped hair and remarkable sturdiness is a treat to watch for anyone who likes strong women. McTeer’s impulsiveness, and the spark of anger in her, transcends Albert Nobbs’ slight smell of mold. ‘Albert Nobbs’ opens Jan. 27 at Summerfield Cinemas in Santa Rosa.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Film

23


Film

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Albert Nobbs (R; 117 min.) Glenn Close stars in the adaptation of George Moore’s 1927 story about a woman living life disguised as a man. See review, p23. The Grey (R; 117 min.) A group of stranded

LIVE JAZZ AT 15 RESTAURANTS IN HEALDSBURG AND GEYSERVILLE

oil-rig workers face starvation and a pack of wolves after their plane crashes in the Alaskan wilderness. Stars as Liam Neeson. Produced by Ridley and Tony Scott. (GB)

The Main Course...

One for the Money (PG-13; 91 min.) Stars Katherine Heigl in the adaptation of Janet Evanovich’s 1994 novel about a young out-ofwork woman who turns to bounty hunting to pay the bills. (GB)

6 TO 9PM Each restaurant will feature signature dishes and live music. A portion of their proceeds go to the Healdsburg Jazz Festival’s Music Education Programs.

... and for Dessert 7:30 TO 10:30PM

AFTER PARTY AND DESSERT BAR AT COSTEAUX BAKERY AND CAFÉ

Swinging sounds from the SSU Faculty Jazz Ensemble. Tickets are only $10, including dessert bar!

For a full list of restaurants and musicians, and to buy your tickets:

ALSO PLAYING The Adventures of Tintin (PG; 107 min.) Directed by Steven Spielberg (produced by Peter Jackson) and presented in not always glorious CG. But RVB liked it. (GB)

HEALDSBURGJAZZFESTIVAL.ORG I N F O : 70 7- 4 3 3 - 4 6 3 3

The Artist (PG-13; 100 min.) French romance and homage to silent film, The Artist stars Jean Dujardin (OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies) as a

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silent-film star in love with an aspiring actress during the rise of the talkies. In black-andwhite with French subtitles. (GB)

Beauty and the Beast (G; 84 min.) The 1991 film that revived a foundering Disney is rereleased in 3-D. (GB)

11/27 / 2 7 – 2/2 2 / 2 CCheck heck wwith it h ttheater heat er ffor or SSunday unday sshows ho w s

Albert Al bert N Nobbs obbs R (11:00, (11: 00 , 11:30, : 30, 4:15) 4 :15 ) 7:00, 7: 0 0 , 99:30 : 30

A Dangerous Dangerous Method M ethod R (10:30, (10 : 30, 112:45, 2 : 4 5, 3:00, 3 : 00, 5:15) 5 :15 ) 77:30, : 30, 9:45 9 : 45 Saturday Sa t ur day Only: Onl y : (12:45, (12 : 4 5, 33:00, : 0 0, 55:15) :15 ) 77:30, : 30, 99:45 : 45

The T he IIron ron L Lady ady PPG13 G13 1

Carnage (R; 133 min.) Jodie Foster, Christoph Waltz and Kate Winslet star in Roman Polanski’s new film about a mediation session between the parents of a playground bully and his victim that goes violently awry. (GB)

Contraband (R; 110 min.) Familiar story about a retired criminal dragged back into the game stars Mark Wahlberg as an expert smuggler who agrees to do one last job to settle his brother-in-laws debts. Co-stars Kate Beckinsale. (GB)

(10:45, (10 : 4 5, 1:15, 1:15, 4:00) 4 : 00 ) 7:15, 7:15, 99:40 : 40

A Dangerous Method (R; 94 min.) David

The T he A Artist rtist PPG13 G13

Cronenberg directs the adaptation of John Kerr’s ’93 book about Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender), his mentor, Freud (Viggo Mortensen), and patient Sabina Spielrein (Keira Knightley), who became one of the first female psychoanalysts. (GB)

(10 :15, 112:30, 2 : 30, 2:45, 2 : 4 5, 5:00) 5 : 00 ) 7:15, 7:15, 99:30 : 30 (10:15,

Descendants D escendants R (1 0 : 30, 11:00, : 00 , 3:45) 3 : 4 5 ) 6:45, 6 : 4 5, 99:15 :15 (10:30, JJoin oin u us s ffor or a p presentation resent at ion o off JJoffrey: o f f r ey : M ave r i c k s o me ri c an D an c e o n Mavericks off A American Dance on Saturday S aturday 1/28 1/28 at at 10:30am! 10 : 3 0 am ! F Following o l l ow i n g tthe he film film tthere here w will ill b be e a LIVE LI V E s stream t re am o off a Q & A session se ssion w it h b allet m embers and and Q&A with ballet members ffilm ilm ccreators! re ator s ! JJoin oin u s ffor or a D ouble F eature of of us Double Feature R emembering Playland Playland at at the the Beach Beach & Remembering S utro’s : T he P alac e at at Lands L an ds E nd o n Sutro’s: The Palace End on S unday 1/29 1/29 at at 1 pm . Q &A w it h F ilm Sunday 1pm. Q&A with Film m ake er T om W yrsc h a f ter tthe he s h ow ! maker Tom Wyrsch after show!

551 Summerfield 551 Summer field Road Road Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 7 707-522-0719 07- 52 2- 07 719

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (PG-13; 129 min.) A 10-year-old boy journeys across New York City in search of a lock box belonging to his father, who died in the 9-11 attacks. Based on the novel by Jonathan Safran Foer and starring Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock. (GB)

Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (R; 158 min.) David Fincher directs the English-

language version of the hit 2009 Swedish film, based on the first in Stieg Larsson’s “Millennium series.” Co-stars Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara, as Lisbeth. (GB)

Haywire (R; 93 min.) A freelance operative is doublecrossed after a mission rescuing a hostaged Chinese journalist in the latest from Steven Soderbergh. (GB) Hugo (PG; 127 min.) Hugo, a young boy sent to live with his uncle who maintains the clocks at a railway station, searches for the missing part, the key to the heart, of the automaton his clockmaker father had found before his death. Directed by Martin Scorsese in an adaptation of Brian Selznick’s novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret. (GB)

The Iron Lady (PG-13; 115 min.) Meryl Streep plays Margaret Thatcher in biopic costarring Jim Broadbent, Nick Dunning and Richard Grant. From the director of Mamma Mia! (GB) Joyful Noise (PG-13; 118 min.) Dolly Parton and Queen Latifah co-star as a pair of opposites who join forces to save their small-town choir from budget cuts. (GB)

Red Tails (PG-13; 125 min.) Producer George Lucas brings the story of the Tuskegee Airmen to the big screen. With Cuba Gooding Jr. and Terrence Howard. (GB) Shame (NC-17; 101 min.) The world of a young New Yorker with a sex addiction starts unraveling when his troubled younger sister moves in. At the Rafael Center. (GB) Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R; 127 min.) Big-screen version based on John le Carré’s 1974 novel stars Gary Oldman as George Smiley, British intelligence officer searching for a double agent in the organization’s top levels. With Colin Firth too! (GB) Underworld: Awakening (R; 88 min.) Kate Beckinsale returns for another paycheck in the fourth installment in the apparently unceasing war between vampires and werewolves. (GB) War Horse (PG-13; 146 min.) At the onset of World War I, a Devonshire boy’s horse is sold to the cavalry for the war effort, and shipped to the front in France. Based on British author Michael Morpurgo’s 1982 novel and directed by a busy Steven Spielberg. Opens Christmas Day. (GB)

We Bought a Zoo (PG; 123 min.) The memoir of Benjamin Mee, father and widower who finds his life radically changing after he buys a country estate—and, with it, a zoo—is brought to the screen by director and screenwriter Cameron Crowe (Jerry Maguire, Almost Famous). Stars Matt Damon and Scarlett Johansson. (GB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES

SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Bee Eaters

welcome new venue in Mill Valley with two-night stand. Jan 28-29, 9pm. $40. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley.

Brother-sister duo of Tristan Clarridge and Tashina Clarridge present fiddle/cello melodies as part of Petaluma Church Concerts series. Jan 28, 8pm. $20-$23. First Church of Christ Scientist, 522 B St, Petaluma.

Marin Symphony

Roger McGuinn

The Outlaws

Cofounder of the Byrds plays famous 12-string. Jan 28, 8pm. $32-$37. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Southern rockers play hits with new members in grand opening of new Sweetwater Music Hall. Jan 27, 7pm. $31.50. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley.

Melvin Seals & JGB with the Thugz Former Jerry Garcia band member throws down on keyboards and Hammond B-3. Jan 27, 8:30pm. $26. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Roach Gigz Oakland rapper and Rocky Balboa fanatic performs with Berner opening. Jan 28, 8pm. $25. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Jane Woodman SF nugaze artist performs following Woodman Colon and Meme-Catcher. Jan 27, 8pm. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

MARIN COUNTY

Special performance features 18-year-old cellist Nathan Chan. Jan 29, 3pm and Jan 31, 7:30pm. $29-$70. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

NAPA COUNTY Eric Johnson Guitarist performs with bassist Chris Maresh and drummer Wayne Salzmann. Jan 26, 8pm. $20-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Montrose Rock vet revisits heavy, melodic originals. Jan 27, 8pm. $28-$35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Rockapella Five guys, mics and a fullband sound. Jan 28-29, 8pm. $30-$40. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Steve Kimock

Tim Flannery & the Lunatic Fringe

Legendary guitarist helps

SF Giants coach Tim Flannery

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Jan 27, Acoustamatics. Jan 28, Calm and Chaos. Last Thursday of every month, Live improv with Slip-Goose Monkey (see Comedy). 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Jan 26, Sunday Gravy with Kelly the Singer. Jan 27, Phil Lawrence Quartet with David and Linda LaFlamme. Jan 29, 4x4xSong, featuring David Luning, Alan Watt, Jill Cohn and Bob Appleby. Tues, 7pm, ladies’ limelight open mic. Wed, 7pm, open mic. Last Sunday of every month, Irish Seisun with Riggy Rackin. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Blame Sally

Saturday January 28, 8:00 pm

Saturday, February 4, 8:00 pm

Former leader of the Byrds and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member.

Vivacious, infectious, rhythmic energy that produces a smile to the face‌

Roger McGuinn

Daniel Ellsberg: Government Secrets and the Public’s Right to Know Reception, Film, and Discussion

Sebastopol

Community

Also Coming Soon Eric Bibb o'FCtTim O’Brien – Feb. 26

Cultural Center

Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

Gaia’s Garden International Vegetarian Buffet

Wed Jan 25, 7–9 Jazz from Brazil & Norte America

Coffee Catz Mon, 6pm, open mic. Sat, 2pm, Bluegrass jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Intimate Dinner and Discussion

Friday, January 27, 6:30 pm Sunday, January 29, 5:00 pm Sebastopol Community French Garden Restaurant Center Annex t and Bistro t in association with the French Garden Restaurant

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Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. Jan 27, Rydah J Klyde, Alina Hansen, Benni Boom, Thick, Tori, Dexx, Dash, Texacali. 138 Calistoga Road, Santa Rosa. 707.537.0308.

Trio Pacifico Thurs Jan 26, 7:30–9:30 Sraight-Ahead Jazz

Hal Forman

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Historic

RIVER THEATRE An Evening with

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Fri Jan 27, 8–10 Celtic with a Kick!

Greenhouse Mon Jan 30, 8–10 50’s Cool Jazz

Neil Buckley Octet

First Church of Christ Scientist Jan 28, Bee Eaters (see Concerts). 522 B St, Petaluma.

Flamingo Lounge

Hopmonk. See Clubs, p26.

An evening with

Aubergine

Doc Holliday’s Saloon

BUST THIS A-Skillz plays Juke Joint Jan. 26 at

Upcoming Events

Arlene Francis Theater Jan 27, Jane Woodman, Woodman Colon and Memecatcher. Jan 28, No Sir, Code Orange Kids, Not to Reason Why, Youths, Xerxes. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

25

Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Jan 27, Fundamentals. Jan 28, Ascension. Tues, 8pm-12am, swing night with lessons. Wed, Thurs, 9pm-12am, karaoke. Fri, Sat, live music. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. ) 707.545.8530.

26

Tues Jan 31, 6:30–8:30 Solo Jazz Guitar

Jim Adams &INE"EERS7INESs$ 4 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

Mon–Sat 11:30am–9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

HotButt

eredRum

.net

Showtime 9pm, 2 full sets Tickets at generaladmissionentertainment.com $15 adv / $20 at the door

707-544-2491

Tickets available at the door 16135 Main Street, Guerneville

www.gaiasgardenonline.com

707.869.8022

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

and band present Irish folkrock to benefit Giants fan Bryan Stow. Concert held after silent auction and VIP reception. Jan 28, 6pm. $55$100. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.


Music ( 25

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

Friar Tuck’s

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Fri, DJ Mike. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.792.9847.

Gaia’s Garden

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McNear’s Dining House

"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER &2)s0-$//23s$26s BLUES/FOLK/JAM

MELVIN SEALS & JGB PLUS THE THUGZ

3!4s0-$//23s!$6$/3s SUBLIME TRIBUTE BAND

40 OZ TO FREEDOM PLUS BOBBY JO VALENTINE 7%$s0-$//23ss FOLK/AMERICANA

THE WOOD BROTHERS PLUS SARAH AND CHRISTIAN DUGAS

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PLUS DJ JACQUES

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Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

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DIN N E R & A SHOW

Sun

Jan 29 Fri

Feb 3 Sat

Feb 4

THE RANCHO ALLSTARS

WITH GARY VOGENSEN Great Dance Band! 8:30pm

THE SHOTS

Irish, Old-Time, Country, Cajun 4:00pm / No Cover

AMY WIGTON

Soulful Original Acoustic Rock 8:00pm / No Cover

RON THOMPSON AND THE RESISTORS Blues and Rhythm & Blues 8:30pm

♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼

VALENTINE’S DAY WEEKEND AT

RANCHO NICASIO

♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼♼ Fri 10 STEFANIE KEYS

Feb Sat

Feb 11 Sun

Feb 12 Tue

Feb 14

Americana/Rock/Janis Joplin Tribute 8:30pm Our Sweetheart and “Blues Broad�

ANNIE SAMPSON

Rockin’ Blues 8:30pm

MIKE LIPSKIN & DINAH LEE

Special Valentine Songs 4:00pm / No Cover Bring your Sweetheart for a Romantic Evening with Fabulous Food & Drinks and featuring

T HE BAGUETTE QUARTETTE

A Special Valentine’s Menu 7:00pm

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Jan 25, Silent Comedy. Jan 26, Juke Joint with A Skillz. Jan 27, Petty Theft. Jan 29, Benefit for Breeland Family. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Jan 27, Dick Conte and Steve Webber Duo. Jan 28, Ken Cook Trio with Cliff Hugo and Alex Aspinall. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Wed, Brainstorm. Jan 28, Good Hip-Hop Three-Year Anniversary. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Last Day Saloon Jan 26, Jackyl, Darkside Shine and Shotgun Harlot. Jan 27, Pride and Joy, DJ Rob Cervantes. Jan 28, Abja and the Lions of Kush. Jan 29, American Head Charge, Simoom and Disconnect. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenanny’s Pick-Me-Up Revue. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343. Jan 25, Thick Soup. Jan 26, Benayro. Wed, 7:30pm, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

8:00pm / No Cover

Jan 28

Hopmonk Tavern

Murphy’s Irish Pub

JEB BRADY’S BAND Jan 27 R&B and Blues Fri

Sat

Jan 25, Trio Pacifico. Jan 26, Hal Forman. Jan 27, Greenhouse. Jan 30, Neil Buckley Octet. Tues, Jim Adams. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

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Jan 27, Melvin Seals & JGB with the Thugz. Jan 28, 40 oz to Freedom Sublime tribute with Bobby Jo Valentine. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano

Byrd Watching Roger McGuinn jinglejangles into Sebastopol While Bob Dylan, Pete Seeger and the Bible provided the Byrds with raw ingredients, Roger McGuinn kept busy giving the 1960s folk-rock pioneers their secret spice. Tumbling out of radio speakers during the Vietnam era, McGuinn’s shimmering 12-string Rickenbacker provided such a distinctive veneer for anthems like “Turn, Turn, Turn� and “Mr. Tambourine Man� that the guitar company offered a signature McGuinn 12-string model. McGuinn is one of the few guitarists alive adroit at a double-fingerpick, single-flatpick style, and his history intersects with Bobby Darin, Simon & Garfunkel, Gram Parsons and Tom Petty. Former Byrds band mate Chris Hillman has played Sebastopol several times, but be there for a rare concert by Roger McGuinn on Saturday, Jan. 28, at the Sebastopol Community Center. 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. 8pm. $32–$37. 707.823.1511.—Gabe Meline

Papa’s Taverna

Sun, 5pm, Rock and blues jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Mon, 6pm, Steve Swan’s Sinatra croonings. Wed, 6:30pm, Don Giovannis. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Fri, 7pm, live music. Sat, 7pm and Sun, 4pm, Kefi. Sun, 1:30 and 3:30pm, Greek dance lessons, live music and bellydance show. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

Northwood Restaurant

Phoenix Theater

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Jan 27, Devil in the Machine, Thoughts in Transit, Heap of Stone and Waxwyng. Jan 28, Roach Gigz (see Concerts). Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Fourth Thursday of every month, writers workshops.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge

Thurs, 7pm, Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

Olde Sonoma Public House Jan 26, Dark Lord Byron. Jan 29, Karaoke with Cat. 18615 Sonoma Hwy, Ste 110, Sonoma. 707.938.7587.

Redwood Cafe Jan 28, D’Bunchovus. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868. Jan 28, Real Diehl Band. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.


Russian River Brewing Co

Sebastopol Community Center Jan 28, Roger McGuinn (see Concerts). 390 Morris St, Sebastopol.

Society: Culture House Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Fourth Friday of every month, Kaleidoscope, live art and DJs. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Spancky’s Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Tradewinds Jan 27, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Jan 28, Hell Hounds. Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

MARIN COUNTY Dance Palace Jan 28, Brasil Guitar Duo. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpe’s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Wed, Larry’s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jan 27, The Outlaws. Jan 28-29, Steve Kimock. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley.

Jan 26, 8pm, Hanz Araki. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Calistoga Inn

Jan 25, Chris James and the Romeos. Jan 26, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Jan 27, Dani Paige Band, Dr Mojo. Jan 29, Jon Korty and Friends. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, old-school DJ night. Sat, DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Sausalito Seahorse

Jan 25, International Guitar Night. Jan 26, Eric Johnson. Jan 28-29, Rockapella. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Jan 25, Marcelo and Seth. Jan 26, Tito Gonzales. Jan 27, M Lamacchia and Bumpin Love Ensemble. Jan 28, Tikets. Jan 29, Orquesta Borinquen. Tues, jazz jam. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Thurs, 9pm, Texas Blues. Sat, 2pm, juke jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Jan 27, Benyaro. Mon, reggae.

27

Napa Valley Opera House

Silo’s Jan 27, Kevin Russell. Jan 28, Revolver. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Jan 27, Montrose. Jan 28, Tim Flannery and Lunatic Fringe with Special Guest Bob Weir. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

MARK ST MARY Saturday, Jan 28

Wed, Jan 25 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45 Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Jan 26 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45 Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Fri, Jan 27 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7–11pm DJ Steve Luther presents Motown, Disco & Rock ‘n Roll Sat, Jan 28 8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise 10:30am–1:30pm Scottish Challenge Dance 7–11pm DJ Steve Luther presents MARK ST MARY Sun, Jan 29 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30–11:30am Zumba Gold with Toning 5–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Jan 30 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45 Jazzercise 7–10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Jan 31 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:40pm Jazzercise 7:30–10pm African and World Music Dance

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

George’s Nightclub

Sat, 11am, Frederick Nighthawk. Sun, 11am, Carolyn Dahl. 387 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3261.

19 Broadway Club Jan 25, Gail ‘Mojo’ Muldrow and Rockin’ Blues Band and Eddie Neon Band. Jan 26, Diamond Jazz. Jan 27, Chuck Fender, I-Wayne. Jan 28, Leon Bristow and friends, and Tony Butcha 40th B-Bay Bash featuring Killa Tay Capone, C-Fresh of IMP and others. Jan 29, Brazilian Carnival with Samuka & the Wild Tribe Band. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Tues, 9pm, Uzilevsky Korty Duo with special guests. Fourth Thursday of every month, Jeremy Knudsen presents Fourth Thursday Hip-Hop Night. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

ROCK/EXP/JAM R OCK / EXP/ P/JAM

THE T HE S SILENT ILENT C COMEDY! OMEDY! + FOREST FOREST DAY DAY & VINTL VINTL VOWS VOWS $$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

+6 W THUR THUR –JAN –JAN 2 26 WEEKLY EEKLY E EVENT VENT JJUKE UKE JOINT J O I NT

GHETTO G HET TO FFUNK/BOOGIE U N K / B O O GI E B BREAKS/GYPSY R E A K S / GY P S Y D DOODLE O O D LE

A SKILLZ SKILLZ

+M MALARKEY ALARKEY & B BESET ESET

$$44 JJAMESON'S A M E SO N ' S & O ORGANIC R G AN I C G GUAYAKI UAYAKI CO COCKTAILS CKTAILS

$10/DOORS $ 10 / DOORS 10 10PM/21+ PM /21+

FRI– F RI– JAN JAN 27 27

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S BLUES/CLASSIC/ROCK B LUES/ CL ASSIC / ROCK

PETTY P ETTY T THEFT HEFT

+B BEER EER DRINKERS DRINKERS AND AND HELL HELL RAISERS RAISERS $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SAT S AT –JAN –JAN 28

HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R ESE NT S JJAM/FOLK/AMERICANA AM / FOLK /AMERIC ANA

GRATEFUL G RATEFUL DEAD DEAD D DANCE ANCE ((ERIK E RIK M MORSE O R SE 4 40TH 0T H B BIRTHDAY) IRTHDAY AY)

+T TONS ONS O OF FS SPECIAL PECIAL G GUESTS UESTS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

SUN– S UN– JJAN AN 2 29 9

FRIENDS F RIENDS AND AND FAMILY FAMILY PRESENT PR E S E N T BENEFIT/FUNDRAISER B ENEFIT/ FUNDRAISER

+ ANCIENT ANCIENT MYSTIK MYSTIK & 808 808 BAND BAND

Mon, open mic with KC Turner. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Mama’s Royal Cafe

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

NOR N OR CAL CAL BREELAND BREELAND B BENEFIT ENEF FIT

Finnegan’s Marin

Jan 27, Eric Martin with Elephant Listening Project. Jan 28, Danny Click and the Hell Yeahs. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

WED W ED – JAN JAN 25 25

San Francisco’s City Guide

Tom Tom Club Tina Weymouth and Chris Franz, one half of Talking Heads, soldier rhythmically onward. Jan 25 at Mezzanine.

Quarter Mile Combo Long-running rockabilly outfit hangs up the bandanas and plays final show. Jan 27 at Cafe du Nord.

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

TUES T UES –JAN –JAN 31 31

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Hip-hop collective rooted in hardcore and fronted by the imaginative P.O.S. Jan 30 at Amoeba SF; Jan 31 at Slim’s.

D DONATION ONATION $5/DOORS $5/ DOORS 5PM/ALL 5PM /ALL AGES AGES MON M ON – JAN JAN 30 30 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT THE THE WBLK W B LK D DANCEHALL AN C E H ALL M MASSIVE A SS I V E WEE REP REP THE THE WEST WEST TOUR TOUR PRESENTS PR E S E N T S W

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Jan 29, Benyaro. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

No Name Bar


Music

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28

LOOPED iPhone ďŹ les and projections are all part of Jane Woodman’s show.

It is September - before a rainfall A perfect time to be in love.

Cloud Gazing Jane Woodman takes delight in manipulating sound BY LEILANI CLARK

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hey’re ubiquitous, to say the least. You go to a show, ready to hear songs played live, hopefully in a way that adds striking new elements to recordings that you’ve been listening to at home for months. And then there it is, the laptop, glowing down from the stage and all loaded up with prerecorded tracks, narrowing the possibility of hearing something altogether spontaneous.

“Unless I’m listening to a DJ, I’m not sure how much I like it,� says San Francisco–based musician Jane Woodman, who brings her solo show to the Arlene Francis Center on Jan. 27. “I don’t really like seeing the Apple logo glowing onstage when I’m listening to music.� Not that Woodman is averse to using digital tools. Quite the

opposite, actually. During her own live performances, she uses an iPhone to run prerecorded tracks into a mixer. The tracks act as a supplement to an analog-heavy setup using pedals and guitars. “I’m all wired in,â€? says Woodman on the phone. It’s all part of recreating a cerebral and ethereal sound, captured on Woodman’s new EP, PoĂŠme Ăˆlectronique, that stimulates both aurally and visually; part shoe-gaze, part electro, the songs provide the perfect soundtrack for long car rides. So it’s no wonder Woodman has started making her own video art pieces that are projected on the wall behind her, or directly on her body, during live shows. “I’ve gone out with just a guitar before,â€? says Woodman. “I did that for many years, and it was really fun, but I want more out of my performance.â€? Woodman’s music career began as a guitarist and singer in Van Gogh’s Daughter, a grunge-era rock band that found minor fame with the song “Through the Eyes of Julie.â€? She’s also collaborated with experimental cellist Zoe Keating. Now Woodman is on to something entirely different. She makes what would technically be considered electronic music by building dramatic, reverbdrenched guitar and voice compositions, and creating layers of sound using loop stations, pedals and pads. Recently, Woodman began teaching herself how to do animation, employing an eerie barrage of images—cloud-mired bridges, a lone gray wolf, icy oceans—in a video for “Vapour.â€? The visuals add a brave new element to the live experience, she explains. “I ďŹ nd it more exciting to have video going and have things to do up there,â€? she says. “And I love the big sound.â€? Jane Woodman plays with Woodman ColĂľn and Meme-Catcher on Friday, Jan. 27, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $10. 707.528.3009.


29

Galleries OPENINGS

Beholder,� an exhibition of abstract art by Becoming Independent. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Jan 28

Hammerfriar Gallery

At 1pm. Quercia Gallery, “Time and Materials,� featuring works from the archives of DA Bishop. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Through Feb 2, “Group Show,� with new works by Andre Cisernos-Galido, Jerry Cohen and others. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Jan 29

Llewellyn

At 3pm. Gallery Route One, “Duration,� annual juried show featuring works by “Best of Show� Ellen Litwiller and others. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347. At 6:30 pm. Mumm Napa Cuvee, “Meet the Makers,� fine art photography reception to benefit Arts Council Napa Valley. $50. 8445 Silverado Trail, Rutherford. 707.967.7740.

Through Mar 17, bronze figurative nudes by Bruce Wolfe, paintings by William Cutler and William O’Keeffe, paintings and lithograph prints by Sandra Oseguera and bronze “Un-edibles� by Valerie Brunmeier and Matt Hart. 707.887.2373. 6525-A First St, Forestville.

Local Color Gallery Through Feb 12, “Watercolor Festival,� Sally Cataldo, Mara Farnworth and Ned Luzmoor. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

Miyares Gallery

SONOMA COUNTY ARThouse Gallery Through Feb 29, Second exhibit of Ed Coletti Paintings. 13758 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.3513.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Jan 29, “The Flipside of Schulz’s Art: More Than Peanuts,� original drawings by Charles Schulz. $5-$8. Through Apr 2, “Hit the Road, Snoopy!� featuring the beagle’s most famous road trips. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Finley Community Center Through Jan 31, Historical birdhouses on display. Through Feb 2, “Honoring the Pomo Youth Dancers� with photographs by Christine Cobaugh. 2060 W College Avenue, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1. 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Mar 17, “Eye of the

Through Feb 29, paintings by Claire B Cotts including layered, figurative and abstract works. Sonoma Academy, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 4. 707.545.1770.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Mar 2, “Along the Russian River and Water Quilt,� textiles exhibit featuring work by Pointless Sisters Art Quilt Group. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Mar 4, “Clay and Glass Exhibit,� featuring sculpture and functional works in clay and glass by members of Association of Clay and Glass Artists of California. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Jan 29, “Coming Home� exhibit welcomes vets home from Iraq with art, speakers’ series and vets services information table. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours

by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Quercia Gallery Through Feb 27, “Time and Materials,� featuring works from the archives of DA Bishop. Reception, Jan 28 at 1pm. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Breathe Easy Outdoors

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Quicksilver Mine Company Through Feb 26, “Bakers Dozen 2012,� featuring the work of 13 artists. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

RiskPress Gallery Through Jan 28, “Corey Hitchcock’s Double Radiance,� a creative video tribute to the remarkable, unseen, regenerative forces of the natural world. Special performances, Jan 28 at 7. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Mar 4, “Living Life� paintings by Kathleen Deyo and “Color in Motion� photopaintings by Jerrie Jerne. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Celebrate C eleb ebrat attee Smoke Sm Smok oke -Free -Freeee Sonoma S Soonoma ma Co County ount unt nt y /ZZ^cPZWQ]cbR]]`O`SOaO`Sa[]YST`SS / ZZ^ cPZWQ ]cbR]]` O `SO a O `S a[]YS T`SS e e e a]\ ][O  Q] c \b g ]`U 0  `S ObV S 3 O a g eeea]\][OQ]c\bg]`U0`SObVS3Oag 1]c\bg]TA]\][O=`RW\O\QS<]#'#! 1 ] c \ b g]T A ] \ ] [ O = `R W \ O \ Q S < ]  # ' # !

Dr. D r. Downing Downi ow n i ng ng has ha s been be e n pr ac t ici ng iin n tthe he B ay A r ea practicing Bay Area for for o over ver 40 4 0 years. yea r s. He He is is Free F ree IInitial nitia l i nter nat iona l ly known k now n for for internationally C Consultation onsu ltation his h i s innovative i n novat ive work work in in Holistic Hol i st ic Optometry, Optomet r y, the t he development off tthe Downing de ve lopment o he D ow n i ng Technique Tec h n ique of of Light L ig ht Therapy T her apy and a nd the t he Lumatron Lu mat ron Light L ig ht Stimulator. St i mu lator.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Feb 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Year of the Dragon 4710,â&#x20AC;? celebrating the Lunar New Year, featuring Cynthia Tom and Leland Wong, curated by Naomi Lasley and Season Leef. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Feb 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Customized: The Art and History of the Bicycle,â&#x20AC;? with bicycle innovations, art bikes, regional history and more. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

Optimize O ptimize Eye Eye & B Brain rain Performance Performance Holistic H olistic Eye Eye C Care are Brain Brain Care Care with witth L ight T herapy Light Therapy sStress s St r ess Free Fr e e Eye Eye Exams E xa ms sNat u r a l Vision sNatural V i sion IImprovement mprovement sIn-Office Tested s I n- Of f ic e T e ste d Prescriptions P r esc r ipt ion s

Through Mar 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Undiscovered,â&#x20AC;? features five dynamic artists from Sonoma County. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center

707.827.3664 707 70 7..8 827 27.366 366 4 SM

Through Feb 23, paintings by Kathy Cia White. 415 Steele Lane, )

30

sLight s Li g ht T Therapy h e rap y iimproves: mp r o ve s : sL B Brain r a i n Injuries I nju r ie s s Learning ear ni ng sM Memory e mor y sFa sD sSA ADHD Fatigue Depression SAD A DH D s t ig ue s e pr e s sion s D sIn sP Headaches H ead ac he s s Insomnia somn ia s PTSD T SD sV sC B Brain rain F Fog og s Vision i sion s Color olor Blindness Bl i n d n e s s

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GREEN G R EEN O OFFICE F F IC E E Ecofriendly, cof r ie ndly, n non-toxic, on-tox ic, h healing ea lin g eenvironment. nvironm n e nt.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Arts Events


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30

We’re looking for you. The Bohemian newspaper is looking for a candidate to join our close-knit team of dedicated, self-motivated sales people in our downtown Santa Rosa office. The right person for the job is professional, friendly, outgoing, comfortable with both written and verbal communication, has a positive attitude and excellent customer service skills. You will be responsible for soliciting new business. Reliable transportation required. Must have digital media experience. A minimum of two years sales experience in print, radio and digital advertising is necessary. This high-energy, full-time position pays commission. The Bohemian newspaper offers full benefits. Please email Rosemary Olson at rolson@bohemian.com or fax resume to 707.527.1288. No phone calls please.

BYGONE ERA ‘Remembering Playland By the Sea’ screens in a double feature with documentary on Sutro Baths at Summerfield Cinemas on Jan. 29. See Film, adjacent page.

Arts Events Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Towers Gallery Through Apr 1, “Seasons,” including works by Nancy Burres, Jim Van Deren and many others. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Through Mar 2, “Lightscape/ Darkscape,” featuring artworks by Kala Art Institute students. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bay Model Visitor Center Through Feb 11, “Iron Horse” commemorates 75th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge with photography exhibit of Edgar Angelone. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Mar 9, “H2O: Fragility and Strength,” featuring works by California Society of Printmakers, juried by Don Soker. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jan 31, “Winter Group Show,” featuring works by gallery artists Bryn Craig, Willam DeBilzan and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

( 29 Gallery Route One Jan 27-Feb 19, “Duration,” annual juried show featuring works by “Best of Show” Ellen Litwiller and others. Reception, Jan 29 at 3. Through Mar 4, “Photography: A Fine Art,” featuring the work of Tim Fleming, Alan Plisskin and Sister Adele Rowland. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin History Museum Jan 28-Sep 1, “The Golden Gate Bridge, An Icon That Changed the World,” historical exhibit. Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. Tues-Fri, plus second and third Sat monthly, 11 to 4. 415.454.8538.

Marin MOCA Through Feb 26, “Fresh,” featuring new work by resident artists. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4,. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Jan 28, “Where in the World,” is an unjuried exhibit open to MSA members working in all media. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. MonThurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jan 31 ,“Members

Show,” featuring sculpture, painting, photography and more. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

NAPA COUNTY Di Rosa Through Feb 11, “Looking at You Looking at Me,” featuring photography, video and other media selected from di Rosa collection by curator Robert Wuilfe. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sat, 9:30am to 3pm. 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Ongoing, “Momentum: Art that Moves (Us),” second annual interactive public art exhibition ARTwalk. Free.. 707.257.2117. First Street and Town Center, Napa.

Mumm Napa Cuvee Sun, Jan 29, 6:30pm, “Meet the Makers,” fine art photography reception and fundraiser to benefit Arts Council Napa Valley. $50. 8445 Silverado Trail, Rutherford. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.967.7740.

Napa Valley Museum Through Jan 30, “Napa Valley: The People and the Landscapes,” featuring photographs of Vi Bottaro. Photography workshop with Bottaro, Jan 28 at 2. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.


CRITIC’S CHOICE

Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Jan 28, 9am. Free. Sonoma Ecology Center, 20 E Spain St, Sonoma. 707.996.0712.

Songbird Open House

Film

Celebrating two-year anniversary. Sat, Jan 28. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8280 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.478.7274.

Year of the Dragon

Dance

Running Leak Daniel Ellsberg speaks in Sebastopol

Before Bradley Manning, there was Daniel Ellsberg. In 1971, Ellsberg, then a RAND employee, famously leaked classified documents to the New York Times. Known as the Pentagon Papers, they proved that the government prolonged the Vietnam War despite early knowledge that it would likely lose, and that the U.S. publicly underplayed the number of likely casualties. Ellsberg will appear twice in Sebastopol to screen and discuss the 2009 documentary The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers. The film follows the important activist while looking back at the Vietnam-era turmoil that sparked his momentous leak. Directed by Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith, it’s garnered awards from the International Documentary Film Festival in Amsterdam and the Mill Valley Film Festival, and earned an Oscar nod in the category of Best Documentary Feature. The Kensington, Calif., resident is now a vocal opponent of nuclear warfare, and was accepted into the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation as a Fellow. On his website, he writes: “Public education and political mobilization against the destruction of nearuniversal legal norms governing nuclear weapons has never been more urgent.” Daniel Ellsberg speaks on Friday, Jan. 27, at the Sebastopol Community Center (390 Morris St., Sebastopol; 6:30pm. $20; 707.823.1511) and with a four-course dinner on Sunday, Jan. 29, at the French Garden Bistro (8050 Bodega Ave., Sebastopol; 5pm; $50; 707.824.2030).—Rachel Dovey

Yountville Community Hall Through Mar 12, “Mustard and More”

juried exhibit sponsored by Napa Valley Photographic Society. 6516 Washington St, Yountville.

Hot Dance for a Cold Night Batacha offers salsa lesson and rhythms to get you dancing. Sat, Jan 28, 7:30pm. $15. Occidnetal Center for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Events Calistoga Art Walk follow the signs and view art with strolling tour of shops and galleries. First Wed-Thurs of every month, 5-7pm. Free. Downtown Calistoga, Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.225.1003.

Help Tillerman welcome the Year of the Dragon and Chinese New Year with annual lion dance celebration. Sun, Jan 29, 1pm. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Field Trips Fryer Creek Native Plant Restoration Help with native plant restoration and habitat improvement project along Fryer Creek. Event held at Fryer Creek at the Second Street entrance, between Bettencourt and West MacArthur. Sat,

for “The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers,” featuring wine, appetizers and Daniel Ellsberg himself. Fri, Jan 27, 6:30pm. $20. Sebastopol Community Center Annex, 350 Morris St, Sebastopol.

Home Aerial footage film on the evolution of Earth, with discussion to follow. Mon, Jan 30, 7pm. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Food & Drink

Live Theater Broadcasts

Civic Center Farmers Market

Classic ballet and opera broadcast live from around the globe. Jan 28 at 10:30am, “Joffrey: Mavericks of American Dance.” Ongoing. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

Playland by the Beach Documentary on bygone San Francisco amusement park screens in double feature with ‘Sutro’s: The Palace at Land’s End.’ Jan 29, 1pm. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

The Most Dangerous Man in America Reception and film screening

Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Cochon 555 Local-to-national culinary contest featuring five pigs, five chefs, five winemakers and one Prince or Princess of porc. Sun, Jan 29, 5pm. $125. Culinary Institute of America, 2555 Main St, St Helena. ) 707.967.2320.

Food Not Bombs Help prepare and serve free vegan meals every Sun afternoon; served at 5. Sun. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.701.3620.

Poet Laureate Reception Reception honors Bill Vartnaw, Sonoma County’s seventh poet laureate, with light refreshments and readings. Sun, Jan 29, 3pm. Central Library, Third and E streets, Santa Rosa. 707.545.0831.

Pretty in Pink Wine, food, music and silent auction to benefit local cancer patient Tamara Green and her family. Fri, Jan 27, 5:30pm. Free. Paradise Ridge Winery, 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.9463.

Ring in the Dragon Chinese New Year celebration featuring winetasting, dim sum, music, red envelopes and fortune cookies. Sat, Jan 28, 11am-9pm. Free. Downtown Wine, 132 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.473.0337.

Sebastopol Community Awards Annual celebration sponsored

‘#14’ Work by Ellen Litwiller opens at Gallery Route One’s ‘Duration’ with a reception on Jan. 29. See Openings, p29.

32

31 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Tuesday Evening Comedy

by the Sebastopol Area Chamber of Commerce. Thu., Jan 26, 6pm. Community Church, 1000 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.823.2484.


32

Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Feast of the Olive Dinner

Joy of Public Speaking Workshop

Featuring food, olive oil, wine and the talents of eighteen local chefs. Sat, Jan 28, 6pm. $150. Ramekins Culinary School, 50 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.933.0450.

Informal workshop reviews tools and tips to become comfortable, confident public speaker led by Elaine B, Holtz. Wed, Jan 25, 6pm. $10. Share Exchange, 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.393.1431.

Friday Night Bites Interactive classes with tastes every Fri at 6. $75. Fri. Cavallo Point, 601 Murray Circle, Fort Baker, Sausalito. 888.651.2003.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Sat, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

For Kids Afterschool Cooking Series The Culinary Dude Scott Davis leads kids on a culinary trip around the world, making various dishes from scratch. Wed, Feb 1, 4:30pm. $50$180. Relish Culinary Center, 14 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.9999.

Wild Cat Adventure Presentation features five wild cats from around the globe. Sun, Jan 29, 3pm. $5-$10. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol.

Lectures Daniel Ellsberg Dinner and discussion with man behind film “The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers.” Sun, Jan 29, 6:30pm. $50. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Harvesting Life Wisdom: Empowering Seniors Three-session workshop allows older adults to connect with others and gain empowering tools. Wed, Jan 25, 10:30am and Wed, Feb 1, 10:30am. JFCS Sonoma County, 1360 N Dutton Ave, Ste C, Santa Rosa. 707.571.8131.

( 31

Readings Book Passage Jan 25, 7pm, “Passing Love,” with Jacqueline Luckett. Jan 26, 7pm, “The Gilder,” with Kathryn Kay. Jan 27, 7pm, “The Retribution,” with Val McDermid. Jan 28, 4pm, “Debt: The First 5,000 Years,” with David Graeber. Jan 28, 7pm, Poetry reading with CB Follet, Laura Horn, Susan Terris and Yvonne Postelle. Jan 29, 4pm, Poetry reading with Karen Benke, Karla Clark, Ed Coletti, CB Follett, Janet Jennings, Melanie Maier, Beverly Momoi, Daniel Polikoff, Susan Terris and Abby Wasserman. Jan 29, 7pm, “Naked in the Nursing Home,” with Harold Lustig. Jan 30, 7pm, “Lost Kingdom,” with Julia Flynn Siler. Jan 31, 7pm, “Roger Williams and the Creation of the American Soul,” with John Barry. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jan 26, 3pm, “Shine and Oopsy Daisy: A Flower Power Book,” with Lauren Myracle. Jan 28, 2pm, “Healthy Choices, Healthy Children,” with Lori Brizee. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jan 29, 4pm, “The Underside of Joy,” with Seré Prince Halverson. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Jan 27-Feb 19. $15-$30. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Civil Disobedience: The Musical Walking Elephant Theatre Company presents original documentary theater and film project portrayed by actors ages eight to 18. Jan 27-28, 8pm and Sun, Jan 29, 3pm. $10-$15. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

The Date Whisperer Meet Caylia Chaiken, a woman on a mission to pave the way to romance for the dating challenged. Sat, Jan 28, 8pm. $25. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

The Drowsy Chaperone The ultimate love letter to musical theater. Through Feb 5, 2 and 8pm. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Real Life Stories Bay Area Playback Theatre presents improv based on audience members’ life stories. Jan 28, 7:30pm. $10-$12. Open Secret, 923 C St, San Rafael. 415.457.4191.

She Stoops to Conquer Ross Valley Players present comedy of manners by Oliver Goldsmith. Through Feb 19, 2, 7:30 and 8pm. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Spring Awakening Multiple Tony-award winner about coming of age. Through Jan 28, 2 and 8pm. $22. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Sylvia Classic story about man, wife and dog by Pegasus Theater Company. Through Feb 12, 2 and 8pm. $15-$30. Rio Nido Roadhouse, 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

River Reader Jan 26, 7pm “Night Duty,” with Dave Seter. 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

Theater Chicago Popular musical set in Prohibition-era Chicago.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


33 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25-31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Yo el Rey Roasting/ Art House “Barn Storm No. 2” Saturday, Dec 3

7pm-10pm Brand New Oil paintings, Tiny Shinies, Sculpture and Installation 1217 Washington St, Downtown Calistoga www.yoelrey.com 707.942.1180 The Ehlers Collective (The Baker Sisters, Brown, CJM, Daithi, and Reyes) Dec 3 to Jan 28


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25-31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

34

Tired of the Drive?

Come to Thrive!

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of January 25

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ARIES (March 21–April 19) The coming week is likely to be abnormally free of worries and frustrations. I’m afraid that means you’re not going to have as much right to complain as you usually do. Can you handle that? Or will you feel bereft when faced with the prospect of having so little to grumble about? Just in case, I’ve compiled a list of fake annoyances for you to draw on. 1. “My iPhone wont light my cigarette.” 2. “The next tissue in my tissue box doesn’t magically poke out when I take one.” 3. “I want some ice cream, but I overstuffed myself at dinner.” 4. “I ran out of bottled water, and now I have to drink from the tap.” 5. “My cat’s Facebook profile gets more friend requests than me.” 6. “When people tell me I should feel grateful for all I have instead of complaining all the time, I feel guilty.” TAURUS (April 20–May 20) The state of

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GEMINI (May 21–June 20)

In Bill Moyers’ DVD The Language of Life, poet Naomi Shihab Nye is shown giving advice to aspiring young poets. She urges them to keep an open mind about where their creative urges might take them. Sometimes when you start a poem, she says, you think you want to go to church, but where you end up is at the dog races. I’ll make that same point to you, Gemini. As you tune in to the looming call to adventure, don’t be too sure you know what destination it has in mind for you. You might be inclined to assume it’ll lead you toward a local bar for drinks when in fact it’s nudging you in the direction of a wild frontier for a divine brouhaha.

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California was named after a storybook land described in a 16th-century Spanish novel. The mythical paradise was ruled by Queen Calafia. Gold was so plentiful that the people who lived there made weapons out of it and even adorned their animals with it. Did the real California turn out to be anything like that fictional realm? Well, 300 years after it got its name, the California Gold Rush attracted 300,000 visitors who mined a fortune in the precious metal. Your assignment, Taurus: Think of the myths you believed in when you were young and the fantasies that have played at the edges of your imagination for years. Have any of them come true, even a little? I suspect that one may do just that in the coming weeks and months.

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Renowned comicbook writer Grant Morrison claims he performed a magic ritual in which he conjured the spirit of John Lennon, who appeared and bestowed on him the gift of a new song. I’ve heard Morrison sing the tune, and it does sound rather Lennonesque. The coming week would be a good time for you to go in quest of a comparable boon, Cancerian: a useful and beautiful blessing bequeathed to you by the departed spirit of someone you love or admire.

LEO (July 23–August 22) “There are works which wait, and which one does not understand for a long time,” said Oscar Wilde. “The reason is that they bring answers to questions which have not yet been raised; for the question often arrives a terribly long time after the answer.” I predict that sometime soon, Leo, you will prove that wisdom true. You will finally learn the brilliant question whose crucial answer you got years ago. When it arrives, you will comprehend a mystery that has been churning in the semi-darkness all this time. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

Shedding is healthy—not just for cats and dogs and other animals, but also for us humans. Did you know that you shed thousands of particles of dead skin every hour? And just as our bodies need to shed, so do our psyches. I bring this up, Virgo, because you are in an unusually favorable phase to do a whole lot of psychic shedding. What should you shed exactly? How about some of these: old ideas that don’t serve you any more, habits that undermine your ability to pursue your dreams, compulsions that are at odds with your noble intentions, resentment against people who did you wrong a long time ago, and anything else you carry with you that keeps you from being fully alive and radiant. To paraphrase Thomas Jefferson, the price of freedom and aliveness is eternal shedding.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) According to research published in the journal Psychological Science, many people are virtually allergic to creative ideas. When asked to consider a novel proposal,

they’re quite likely to reject it in favor of an approach that’s well-known to them. (More info here: tinyurl. com/3oor4nq.) This could be a problem for you in the coming weeks, Libra, since one of your strengths will be your ability to come up with innovations. So it won’t be enough for you to offer your brilliant notions and original departures from the way things have always been done; you will also have to be persuasive and diplomatic. Think you can handle that dual assignment?

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

“A single sunbeam is enough to drive away shadows,” said St. Francis of Assisi. I’m afraid that’s an overly optimistic assessment. In many circumstances, just one ray of light may not be sufficient to dispel encroaching haze and murk. Luckily for you, though, there will be quite an assortment of sunbeams appearing in your sphere during the coming weeks. Here’s the complication: they won’t all be showing up at once, and they’ll be arriving in disparate locations. So your task will be to gather them all up and unite them so they can add to each other’s strength. If you do that successfully, you’ll have more than enough illumination to chase away any darkness that might be creeping around.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Poet Elizabeth Alexander says that in order to create a novel, a writer needs a lot of uninterrupted time alone. Poems, on the other hand, can be snared in the midst of the jumbled rhythms of everyday chaos—between hurried appointments or while riding the subway or at the kitchen table waiting for the coffee to brew. Alexander says that inspiration can sprout like grass poking up out of the sidewalk cracks. Whether or not you’re a writer, Sagittarius, I see your coming weeks as being more akin to snagging poems than cooking up a novel.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “A true poet does not bother to be poetical,” said the poet Jean Cocteau. “Nor does a nursery gardener perfume his roses.” I think that’s wise counsel for you in the coming weeks, Capricorn. It’s important that you do what you do best without any embellishment, pretentiousness or self-consciousness. Don’t you dare try too hard or think too much or twist yourself like a contortionist to meet impossible-to-satisfy expectations. Trust the thrust of your simple urges. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Collectors prefer wild orchids, says William Langley, writing in the U.K.’s Telegraph. Orchids grown in nurseries, which comprise 99.5 percent of the total, are tarnished with “the stigma of perfection.” Their colors are generic and their petal patterns are boringly regular. Far more appealing are the exotic varieties untouched by human intervention, with their “downy, smooth petals and moistened lips pouting in the direction of tautly curved shafts and heavily veined pouches.” Whatever your sphere or specialty is, Aquarius, I suggest you model yourself after the wild orchid collectors in the coming days. Shun the stigma of perfection. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

While doing a film a few years ago, actress Sandra Bullock stumbled upon a stunning secret: rubbing hemorrhoid cream on her face helped shrink her wrinkles and improve her complexion. I predict that at least one and possibly more comparable discoveries will soon grace your life. You will find unexpected uses for things that were supposedly not meant to be used in those ways. Here’s a corollary, courtesy of scientist Albert Szent-Györgyi, that describes a related talent you’ll have at your disposal: “Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought.”

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.


35

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 25-31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Family Services


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