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|  Ɔ ĆŒ V OL. 33.35 SERVING SER VING SONOMA, SONOM A , NAPA N APA & MARIN MARIN C COUNTIES OUNTIES | JANUARY J ANU AR Y 11-17, 11 - 177, 2012 |É„É„É„ Ɔ É„É„ĆŒÉ„É„V 33 .35

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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers

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Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur, Michelle Feileacan, Stett Holbrook, James Knight, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Juliane Poirier, Alan Sculley, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Emily Witt

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of James Goodwin by Michelle Feileacan. Cover design by Kara Brown.


5 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

nb RIDING HIGH Uriah Green takes advantage of the setting sun with a backside wallie.

This photo was submitted by Jacques Law of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies The Dream Abides

Occupying Martin Luther King’s message of love BY MELISSA PATTERSON

T

he Occupy movement has become a powerful indicator of great change in our midst: the struggle to navigate the survival instincts of fear in a turbulent world versus the choice to love in the face of violence, poverty and death. As a naturopathic doctor, I often see how these core fears and subsequent contractions contribute to physical illness and even more fear.

In Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech, he reminds us that “again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.” Soul force is the knowledge that we are much more than our physical body. It is acting from our core in service to something greater than our fear. Soul force lends us the capacity and courage to meet our life’s challenges full-on, with openness and love. I have pondered what it must have been like to be an activist during the Civil Rights movement, to see my companions brutally beaten or killed, knowing full well that I might be next. And yet trusting in soul force carried a deeper purpose—to love the “enemy” and to open up to the fear, no matter what. Contraction and running to “safety” was not an option. That completely broke me open to the eternal truth that in practical, every-day actuality, love, that courageous choice to open, really does heal and prevail in all situations. Therefore, if we wish to shift the experience we are having with others or ourselves in a deep and significant way, we must be open, trusting and inquisitive, and must take nothing personally, even when experiencing tremendous fear. As we step into this larger version of ourselves, we awaken to the innate courage and compassion that resides in us all. May we honor Martin Luther King’s legacy by finding the courage to step fully into who we are, let go of the fear that binds us and surrender to the healing power of love. Melissa Patterson is a naturopathic doctor in private practice in Sebastopol. Find her at www.intuitive-nd.com. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Are We Robots or Humans?

Neuroscientist Michael Gazzaniga (“Brain Wars,” Jan. 4) conceives of human beings as chemically determined robots with no will of their own. Were scientists required to take one or two years of epistemology, they would distinguish between science and what they as scientists believe. Our knowledge of what we take for the material world is indirect and mediated (by the five senses). Within this manifestly partial, and therefore delusive, representation of what is real, neither the conscious mind nor the volitional self appears. Can we rightly infer that the volitional self does not exist? Or is it possible that the colorful representation all around us is not everything? Our knowledge of ourselves and of our own minds is direct and immediate. Those of us who possess souls, volition, goodness and love directly observe ourselves being, doing, sharing and giving. Those who would claim they are bags of chemicals—robots—should speak for themselves.

RICHARD FLACCO Santa Cruz

We Miss Yardbirds, Too Have you noticed how things change and we don’t notice them these days? 9-11 has precipitated so many national security measures that Americans can no longer move freely in our daily lives without being monitored and scrutinized. I have noticed our personal security and our right to the control of our personal image and identity eroding in the name of “security” or “corporate information.” The issue I want to bring to your attention is the video cameras and monitors in some of our national chain stores, especially home improvement

national retailer Home Depot on Mendocino Avenue in Santa Rosa. I find this store to be bristling on every aisle and checkout with these image-skimming devices. It wasn’t enough to have closed circuit cameras in little black pods suspended from the ceilings watching our movement and buying habits; now the technology is in your face.

I believe this tactic to be very Orwellian and an affront to my personal security of identity and image of self. Do we really have freedom (to choose) other than “paper or plastic” or “window or aisle seat”?

LEE E. TOLBERT Cloverdale

SMART: Cities Will Benefit What can nearly 100 years of past rail service teach 21st-century Sonoma and Marin? That people love the experience and convenience of trains. For 94 years, there was regular passenger rail service in the North Bay. At one time, Santa Rosa was served by over 40 passenger trains a day at its three passenger stations. The vast majority of intercity travel was by train. Indeed, as a girl I took the train from Santa Rosa to points south. Today, we face frustration on the congested 101 corridor. Fortunately, relief is at hand. The plan is both old and cutting edge: SMART trains will roll next to a pedestrian/bike pathway. Rail is transformative. The coming of the railroad changed the orientation of Santa Rosa. Before, Santa Rosa’s business community was along present Santa Rosa Avenue. With the railroad depot a half-mile from town, the town grew to the site, making Fourth Street the main thoroughfare. Businesses and industries located around the depot, which became the social center of town. Think of hotels, restaurants, a brewery and a tannery clustered near the depot. Imagine the excitement when Edison and Ford arrived at the Santa Rosa depot by railroad! SMART will bring that same transformative energy to


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our towns and will concentrate future growth into walkable communities. Once again, rail will be an economic driver, bringing jobs and connecting communities.

JANIS WATKINS Healdsburg

Ah, the Scent of Mayonnaise I’m all for homemade cleaning products (“Like Vinegar for Glass,” Jan. 4), but have you ever tried them? The problem with vinegar—which is a wonder cleaner, no doubt—is that your house ends up smelling like a jar of mayonnaise. I tried mixing it with lemon, but it still smells like vinegar. Blech.

HEATHER IRWIN Santa Rosa Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1

Phil Lesh takes over Seafood Peddler, plans venue, “Terrapin Station”

2

Press Democrat staff reportedly safe from the axe after Halifax sale, for now

3

2012 Coachella lineup announced; Refused and At the Drive-In fans freak out

4

Tim Tebow, Blue Ivy Carter and Rick Santorum walk into a bar . . .

5 Last week’s cover artist William Smith in group show at SVMA in Sonoma

7 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Rants

Fine Dining For Wild Birds


THE

Paper UNDERDOGS Andrew Nelson at the Trek Bicycle Store in Santa Rosa, one of only a few retailers that carry the Volagi frame,

says ‘the phone’s been ringing off the hook’ since the trial began.

Derailed

A small Cotati bike company goes up against cycling giant Specialized BY GABE MELINE

I

n a classic David vs. Goliath case that has the bicycling community abuzz, two owners of a small Cotati bike company are in a San Jose courtroom this week battling cycling giant Specialized.

At issue is a noncompete clause signed by Barley Forsman and Robert Choi when the two were

hired at Specialized in 2008. Though they left Specialized in 2010, the lawsuit alleges the partners’ new company, Volagi, represents a violation of that clause. In a pre-trial brief, Specialized claims Forsman and Choi “stole its trade secrets” and started a competing company while employed with Specialized. Demands include but are not limited to damages, restitution of wages, ownership of Volagi’s

Longbow Flex technology patent, royalties for Volagi sales and $1.5 million in attorney’s costs. The brief also threatens a motion at trial excluding much of Volagi’s defense, alleging that “defendants’ arguments will only enflame and enrage a jury against defendants and make their bad situation even worse.” Volagi’s own brief paints a sinister portrait of Specialized president and “notorious copycat”

Gabe Meline

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

Mike Sinyard, and includes a lengthy declaration from another former Specialized employee regarding Sinyard’s character and the company’s “rip off, duplicate and sue” strategy. It asserts that Forsman and Choi conceived Volagi on their own time and developed their frame only after leaving Specialized, using no confidential information from the company. Neither Forman nor Choi, it argues, worked in frame development at Specialized. Forsman and Choi are currently under gag order by Specialized, and the “big S,” as Specialized is known in the industry, declines to comment on any ongoing litigation. But the story has caught fire on sites like Bike Radar, VeloNews, Bike Rumor and CBS News, and according to many in the local cycling community, Specialized’s fight against the Sonoma County startup is only generating ill will. “It’s ridiculous what Specialized is trying to do,” says Jeremy Sycip of Santa Rosa–based Sycip Bikes. “This case has been going on for a long time, and initially, Specialized was going after them for other things.” Sycip, an expert frame builder who gave a deposition to Specialized’s lawyers, notes that Specialized originally went after Volagi for calling their frame “Venga”; Specialized had a frame in development at the time called a “Venge.” Volagi changed the name of their bike. Then, Sycip says, Specialized claimed Volagi’s frame looked like the Roubaix, a Specialized frame. Now, he notes, the case is based on the company’s noncompete clause. “It kept on changing, which to me is ridiculous. Obviously, they were just trying to go after them and trying to buy time, basically, to put these guys out of business.” Sycip himself was issued a cease-and-desist from Specialized in the late 1990s, when he decided to name one of his frames a Pavé. Specialized had a seat post called a Pavé, and to avoid a lawsuit, Sycip dropped the name. For years, Specialized has had a reputation for suing small bike companies, says Sean Walling, owner of Soulcraft Bikes in


9

MLK Day

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Petaluma. “You keep hearing the same stories over and over, and first you think, ‘How could they be doing this?’” Walling says. “And then you hear it from enough people, and you think, ‘Wow. They really are doing this.’” Citing oftentimes questionable copyright claims, the company has repeatedly used its legal muscle against custom bike companies, Walling says, and is notorious for forcing independent dealers from carrying competing brands. “Especially people on the industry side of things, they’ve known what’s been going on for a long time.” Support for the underdog has been strong. At the Trek Bicycle Store in Santa Rosa, which sells the Volagi, manager Andrew Nelson estimates that since the story broke, “We’ve had at least two go out every day in the last week. That’s pretty high-volume for something like this.” On Sunday, Trek had only one Volagi left in stock, priced at $3,595. Nelson credits Specialized with development in the road-bike industry, but notes that “definitely you have the backlash, not just from vendors, but from people who are riding bikes, who are making buying decisions.” Jim Keene, co-owner at Specialized concept store NorCal BikeSport in Santa Rosa, admits he’s heard negative sentiment from customers about Specialized’s legal history, but “not very much.” Volagi’s bike “looks very much like a Specialized bike,” he adds. “I can see rooting for the underdog and encouraging small companies to build bikes,” Keene says, “but in this particular case, to me, it’s clear-cut. I think Specialized has every reason to do what they’re doing.” Soulcraft’s Walling says that even if Specialized wins its case, the breach of goodwill in the bike community represents a net loss. “There are a lot of people who see the bike industry as somehow different from other industries that are more competitive,” says Walling. “It’s a family thing to them. Something like this sticks out for a lot of people.”

“Freedom and Dignity for All People” is the theme of this year’s MLK celebration at Santa Rosa High School. Black Panther founding member and civil rights activist Elbert “Big Man” Howard (pictured) gives the keynote speech, followed by African drumming by the Sena Kugbega Group and a performance by the Celebration Mass Choir. A special children’s program for ages four to eight will be offered in a separate room. Sunday, Jan. 15, at the Santa Rosa High School Auditorium. 1235 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 5:15–7:30pm. Free. 707.546.0744. Sonoma County Regional Parks will honor the “day on, not a day off” mandate with their annual Day of Service on Monday, Jan. 16. Volunteers are invited to help remove invasive plants that threaten the park’s oak woodlands. Tools, gloves, drinks and snacks will be provided. Those interested in volunteering should meet staff in the parking lot of Foothills Regional Park. 1351 Arata Lane, Windsor. 10am. 707.565.3356. The Volunteer Center of Sonoma County hosts a day of volunteer opportunities—arrive early to get the scoop—plus food, music and health services at the Community Baptist Church. 1620 Sonoma Ave., Santa Rosa. 9am–3pm. 707.573.3399, ext. 125. In Marin City, the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Coalition hosts its 13th annual celebration. This year’s theme is “Communities Empowered to Prosper”; the day includes a community service project and brunch with emerging leaders awards, featuring Assemblymember Jared Huffman. Monday, Jan. 16, at the Manzanita Recreation Center. 630 Drake Ave., Marin City. 9am–1pm. Volunteer opportunities abound in Marin with a community garden restoration project or marsh litter removal, hosted by the conservation corps. 9am–11am. For more information, contact 415.491.4366.—Leilani Clark

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The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.


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Green Zone

Sustaining joy and sanity through sound BY JULIANE POIRIER

L

et’s make 2012 the year of the joyful sound. And, no, you do not need to sing on key for this.

As a singer, I have experienced many times over many years the power of music to touch people (myself included) at a deep level and transport them someplace within themselves—a place where they let go, relax and reconnect. I know the power of music from experience, though scientiďŹ c proof has lately been gathered up and packaged in Healing at the Speed of Sound, a book by Don Campbell and brain researcher Alex Doman, whose collaboration includes musical prescriptions for what may ail you. Ignoring for a moment the buzz about Doman and Campbell’s book, we should remember that musical prescriptions can be traced back about 2,500 years to the brilliant mathematician, philosopher and guitar-playing singer Pythagoras (OK, he

For more information, visit www.lovechoir.org and www.soundhealingcenter.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Joyful Noise

played a kithara, but it did evolve into what we know as the guitar). Pythagoras, according to reports, was able to soothe agitated states of mind when he performed, and so went about developing a theory of healing with certain musical sounds. At the time, he did not need to specify that these musical prescriptions were for live music and not something plugged into the ears. My radical prescription for health in 2012 is that we make joyful sounds ourselves, in the company of others, and concoct our own musical medicine. For those who like a folk-pop singalong, Jim Corbett’s Love Choir in Sebastopol meets weekly and has been encouraging community singing for over 15 years—and welcomes those who can’t carry a tune. For those who want to strike deeper chords (and fewer notes), the “universal sound� of Sanskrit and its translations can be experienced in chanting groups. Author Thomas Heston, in Chants for Health, claims that chanting “music with divine words� allows us to “assist in the healing process . . . aid our intellectual development, improve learning, calm the mind and bring us peace.� I can add, from experience with an impromptu chant group I attended in San Anselmo last month, that it is fun and inspiring as well. Making joyful sounds around the United States—including San Francisco—are chant groups known as “kirtan,� in which one or more strong singers “call� a sound and the chanters simply imitate. Participants don’t even need to learn the words. Singing doesn’t have to be conventional or difficult. It heals body and spirit, creates joy, builds connection and increases the odds for world survival. Singing in the shower is good, yes, but this year, go make a joyful noise with others.

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Dining Michael Amsler

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

12

FROM THE STREET Mateo Granados shows off a plate of seafood costeño at his new brick-and-mortar joint.

Mateo’s Mark Healdsburg’s journey to Yucatan finds gold at Mateo’s Cocina Latina BY STETT HOLBROOK

T

he opening of Mateo Granados’ Cocina Latina in Healdsburg was one of the most anticipated debuts of 2011. Granados is a fixture in Sonoma County with his catering and farmers market stands; he’s deliciously fused the food of his native Yucatan with seasonal ingredients sourced from local farms,

ranches and waters to create a cuisine that’s uniquely his. So when he opened the doors to his first brick-and-mortar restaurant in downtown Healdsburg in September, I was eager to try it. And also a little leery. Mexican food doesn’t often translate well into higher-end, sitdown places. I much prefer standing up and eating a tacotruck taco right off the griddle than paying more to have someone bring it to me. That was

part of the appeal of Granados’ modus operandi—inspired Mexican food served in humble settings. With his restaurant, Granados’ challenge was to appeal to fans who’ve come to love his food alfresco as well as those looking for a more refined, sit-down experience. I’m happy to report he threads the needle and delivers on both accounts. The restaurant itself is attractive, located a few blocks from the town square across from the H2H Hotel and Spoonbar

(Spoonbar “mixologist” Scott Beattie helped created the restaurant’s excellent cocktail menu) in a storefront that once housed a second-hand store. Granados created the kitchen and bar from scratch. Scrap metal from old barn doors left in the back was used to create the restaurant’s distinctive tables, and salvaged sheet metal formed the bar top. The walls of the long, narrow space are painted a warm, pale yellow and hung with lively art and collectibles from Mexico. There’s a large outdoor dining area adorned with an olive tree and grape vines; the glassedin kitchen is visible from the patio and adds an intimacy that devotees to Granados’ cooking have grown accustomed to from his mobile kitchens. Granados’ food is classic Yucatecan cuisine, interpreted with ingredients from local farms and purveyors—call it wine country Yucatan. Yucatan food is one of Mexico’s most distinctive, given its influence from Caribbean traders and its deep Mayan roots. It’s lighter and more brightly flavored than the northern style of Mexican food that’s more often represented in the Bay Area. Lime, habañero chiles, annatto seeds, cinnamon and olive oil serve in starring roles. The olive oil in Mateo’s tortillas, tamales and guacamole is both a nod to the North Bay, with its abundant olive groves, and to the Yucatan, where Lebanese traders brought the stuff to the southeastern Mexican state centuries ago. The menu namedrops various farms and ranches: Felton Acres, White Crane Springs Ranch, Preston of Dry Creek. On a recent night at Cocina Latina, I sat next to Granados’ pig farmer, who proudly pointed to my pork carne asada and said, “That’s my pork.” Pork is a good place to start at Cocina Latina. The aforementioned pork tacos ($8) are superb, deliciously caramelized on the outside and falling apart with succulent, porky richness. A dab from


has created a kind of flour tortilla cracker, long wedges of fried tortillas, dusted with sea salt and ground pumpkin seeds. They accompany Mateo’s excellent guacamole ($4) or sikil-pak ($6), a great purée of pumpkin seeds, epazote and poblano chiles, and slow-roasted and caramelized squash cooked down into another excellent dip ($6). I didn’t miss the standard tortilla chips at all. Granados always seems to be in motion, moving between the kitchen and dining room, chatting up customers in his friendly, voluble style and sometime delivering plates of food himself. It’s too bad the rest of the servers aren’t as smooth. Drink orders were missed and delivered to the wrong people. I asked for a recommendation from the bar’s ample list of mezcales, but my server said he didn’t know anything about them. After a silence, I suggested he ask someone who did know. He thought that was a good idea. And then there are the amusing moments, such as the busboy who used his cell phone as a flashlight to help identify a mystery ingredient. The best service I got was sitting at the bar. Speaking of the bar, cocktails go well beyond margaritas and invite exploration. Two of my favorites are the Paloma Hermosa ($9.50) and the Merida agridulce ($10.50). The first combines Tres Agaves blanco tequila with elderflower liqueur, lime and grapefruit juice and agave syrup. Spend a buck more for the Del Maguey Vida mezcal upgrade to add a delicious smoky note to the drink. The other concoction blends more Tres Agaves blanco with Carpano Antica Formula and Aperol. It’s served up, and makes for a classic cocktail. The wine and beer lists are solid, too. I’ll always have fondness for taco trucks and hole-in-the-wall taquerias, but Granados has created a one-of-a-kind brand of Mexican food that makes it a definite destination. There’s nothing quite like it. Mateo’s Cocina Latina, 214 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. 707.433.1520.

13 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

one of Granados’ excellent habañero salsas is the perfect accompaniment. The chef has made a name for himself with excellent banana-leaf-wrapped tamales, and the suckling pig tamales ($10) are my favorite. They’re made with olive oil instead of lard, but still pack a porcine punch. The entrée-sized dish is ladled with Mateo’s seemingly ubiquitous tomato-habañero sauce and baked rice—rice that becomes creamier and richer in the oven. Best of all is the cochinita pibil ($17), a wellknown Yucatecan dish of suckling pig marinated in annatto seeds and slow-roasted inside a banana leaf. The meat is juicy, intensely porky and wonderfully flavorful. It’s the best version of this dish I’ve ever had. As good as the pork may be, my favorite taco is the lamb taco ($8 each). The well-charred hunk of lamb raised by Preston of Dry Creek is peppered with a crust of Yucatecan spices, cloves, cinnamon, Mexican oregano, chiles and garlic. (Granados says his mother sends him the spices from Mexico.) And if you’re a fan of lamb, the lamb empanada is great, a lightly fried corn tortilla filled with tender chunks of lamb, sautéed chard and potatoes with some feta crumbled on top ($8). I ordered this dish twice. From the list of specials, I loved the seafood costeña ($25), which is black and rock cod “meatballs”—Marin County mussels and fat shell-on shrimp aswim in that tomato-habañero sauce cut with a pork-chorizo broth. Thick, toasted bread slathered with bright orangesaffron aioli tops it off—think Mexican bouillabaisse. The chicken in the pollo adobado ($19) is a bit dry, but the flavors of the peppery-sweet annatto seeds and great “sangre do toro” beans made up for it. The one dish that let me down was the pan de cazón ($18), a jumble of diced rock cod layered with puréed black beans, tortillas and tomato-habañero sauce. The fish flavors didn’t meld with the beans and sauce, and created a soupy mess on the plate. Instead of serving tortilla chips, an American invention, Granados

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

Dining

Dinner with the

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

Winemaker 2012 Series

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

SONOMA COUNTY Abyssinia Ethiopian/ Eritrean. $. Authentic and filling, and a welcome culinary addition. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 913 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.6455.

The Bay View Restaurant at The Inn at the Tides welcomes

Bear Republic Brewing Co Brewpub. $-$$. Award-winning ales and pub fare. Hearty portions and friendly service. Casual dining, outside patio. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.2337.

Megan Gunderson Assistant Winemaker Friday, January 20, 2012 MENU Fresh Dungeness Crab Salad fennel, orange, Belgian endive 2010 HALL Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8–5pm Now Open for Lunch on Saturdays 11am–3pm

Roasted Kurobuta Pork Filet caramelized red onions, chanterelle mushrooms, merlot rice cake 2007 HALL Napa Valley Merlot

Grilled Filet Mignon blackberry and chocolate sauces, parsnip purée, wilted baby spinach 2009 HALL Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon

Dried Fig Crème Brulée chocolate and walnut cioccolatini 2005 HALL Napa Valley Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc $

LES SALADES

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly,

Orchard Harvest Quinoa & Roasted Carrot Garden Nicoise Poached Chicken Salad Duck Confit

plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

89 per person, plus tax & gratuity

reservations: 800.541.7788 or 707.875.2751

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Graffiti Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Jazzed-up waterfront destination really is all that jazz. Big menu focuses on creative seafood dishes, also steak and lamb. Variety of indoor and outdoor seating; wide selection of appetizers– half vegetarian–can make the meal. Lunch and dinner daily. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Sonoma-Meritage Martini California-French. $$$. The menu, which changes daily, is well-rounded with plenty of options, thanks in no small part to the fresh seafood bar. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner, Wed-Mon; brunch, SatSun. 165 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.5556.

Sushi Tozai Japanese. $$.

800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

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Spare, clean ambiance and some of the freshest sushi you’ll ever eat. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 7531 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9886.

Syrah California-French. $$$. Sophisticated cuisine in restaurant or indoor courtyard. Seasonally changing menu and inventive desserts. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4002.

Toyo Japanese Grill Japanese. $$$. Well-crafted traditional Japanese with some modern extras like deep-fried mashed potato croquettes with mayo. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.8871.

Vineyards Inn Spanish.

Sat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Hatam Persian. $. Fresh and lushly seasoned regional fare. Lunch and dinner, TuesSun. 821 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8888.

$$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

Yao-Kiku Japanese.

Mountain Home Inn

$$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, WedSun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/

M A R I N COUNTY

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Open for dinner daily. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.

Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, Mon-

contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$.


N A P A COUNTY Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6540 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037. Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Fujiya Japanese. $$-$$$. Good, solid sushi. The Fujiya Deluxe combo is a standout. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat. 921 Factory Stores Dr, Napa. 707.257.0639.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409.

15

SMALL BITES

Martini Madness The martini succeeds because of its simplicity. Gin and vermouth, chilled and served in proper proportions. A twist of lemon, olive or pickled onion may be added, but that’s it. Like Simon and Garfunkel, or peanut butter and jelly, messing with the two essential ingredients leads to the degradation of a wondrously simple and simply delicious cocktail. But times have changed. I concede that I sound as conservative as Rick Santorum in my defense of martini morality. Some people—OK, OK, lots of people—make martinis with vodka. If you’re one such defiler of tradition, the 11th annual Martini Madness competition on Jan. 13 is the event for you. Hosted by Saddles Restaurant at MacArthur Place and sponsored by Skyy Vodka, Martini Madness features bartenders from Sonoma Valley restaurants and bars competing to create their best (vodka) martini blends along with live music and appetizers. The event coincides with the Sonoma Valley’s olive season, and participating restaurants and bars include Saddles Steakhouse, the Girl & the Fig, El Dorado Kitchen, Maya Restaurant, Estate, Sonoma Meritâge Martini Oyster Bar & Grill, Santé Restaurant at the Fairmont Sonoma Mission Inn, Mary’s Pizza Shack and Murphy’s Irish Pub. Tickets are $40–$45; an $85 dinner package includes entry plus a three-course dinner at Saddles. Find tickets and more info. at www.olivefestival.com. —Stett Holbrook

1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American.

$-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16

8ZLUO

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA COUNTY Adobe Road Winery Award-winning Cab, Pinot, Zin, Cab Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah. Their tasting room is located in Petaluma at the Racers Group Porsche race headquarters. 1995 S. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. 707.939.7967.

Alexander Valley Vineyards At family-run Alexander Valley Vineyards, the Wetzels serve as curators of local history, having restored Cyrus’ original adobe and schoolhouse. 8644 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Tasting room open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.433.7209.

Benovia Winery Unfussy cellar tasting in barn-style winery, refined Chard and Pinot; but “ooh, have you had their Zinfandel?” 3339 Hartman Road, Santa Rosa. By appointment only, 10am–4pm daily. 707.526.4441. Benziger Winery A nontraditional, organic, biodynamically farmed winery. Don’t miss the daily 45-minute tram ride replete with a tour of the vineyard, wildlife sanctuaries and caves. 1883 London Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 888.490.2739. Dutcher Crossing Winery Barnlike room offers fireplace to warm the mitts on winter days; owner Debra Mathy leads monthly bike rides in better weather. Try the Maple Vineyard Zinfandel; ask the well-informed staff about the Penny Farthing bicycle. 8533 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily 11am– 5pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 866.431.2711.

Lynmar Winery Produces world-class Pinot and Chard in elegant rural setting. Look for fun food pairings. 3909 Frei Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.829.3374.

Sapphire Hill Sharing a property with such as Camilla Cellars and other boutique

wineries on a compound they simply call “Front Street 5,” production is mainly reds, with the exception of an estate Chardonnay. 51 Front St., Healdsburg. Open Thursday– Monday, 11am–4:30pm. 707.431.1888.

Timber Crest Farms Formerly of Lytton Springs Road, Peterson Winery has relocated to Timber Crest, where they pour on weekends right at the cellar door. Also on hand is Papapietro-Perry and the six Family Wineries of Dry Creek. Dashe Cellars crafts mainly powerful Zinfandels and other reds. At Kokomo Winery, it’s about the reds. Also look for Mietz Cellars, Lago di Merlo and Collier Falls. 4791 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Tasting rooms generally open daily from around 10:30am to 4:30pm. 707.433.0100. Peterson Winery is open weekends only. 707.431.7568.

NAPA COUNTY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Chateau Boswell Winery (WC) This small, boutique winery is open by appointment only, selling most its wine directly via post to club members. 3468 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.963.5472.

Del Dotto Vineyards (WC) Caves lined with Italian marble and ancient tiles, not to mention Venetian chandeliers and mosaic marble floors. They host candle-lit tastings, replete with cheese and chocolate, Friday–Sunday. Opera resonates until 4pm; rock rules after 4pm. 1055 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.963.2134.

Mumm Cuvée Napa Californian-style fizz factory,

all barn and no chateau, offers a robust account of how the bubbles get in the bottle. Sparkling winetastings offered on the patio, or take it to the next level in plush love seats on the Oak Terrace. Sparkling red is novel; DVX Brut among the best in the valley. Photography gallery includes Ansel Adams prints and other exhibits. 8445 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–5pm daily. Tasting $6–$20; Oak Terrace $30. 707.967.7700.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hall visitors can take in the tank room action. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Storybook Mountain Vineyards (WC) Jerry and Sigrid Seps and a few likeminded winemakers founded Zinfandel Advocates and Producers (ZAP), through which they continue to proselytize on behalf of “America’s heritage grape.” 3835 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.5310.

Velo Vino Napa Valley Cycling-themed bungalow is filled with enough gear to outfit a peloton, plus wine and espresso, too. Tastings include spiced nuts and dried cherries, but sample-sized Clif and Luna Bars are readily available for your impromptu energy bar and wine pairings. 709 Main St., St. Helena. Daily, 10am–6pm. $10–$25. 707.968.0625.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

Skewis Wines

I

t’s a new year, and there are new wines to check out. If you like crowds and you’ve got a sturdy palate, events like this weekend’s Winter Wineland offer an ideal opportunity to taste the maximum number of wines possible for one grand fee, an allweekend pass to the wineries of the Russian River and Alexander valleys.

The Wine Road organization bills the event as “Wine, Art, Education.” Designated drivers can enjoy all that, minus the wine— for a reduced fee. But if it’s education that you’re after, perhaps the best strategy is to seek out those small producers who don’t normally hold tasting room hours or are off the well-trodden path. Replacing Camellia Cellars, Skewis occupies the smallest of the tasting rooms in Healdsburg’s Old Roma Station and is operated by husband-and-wife team Hank and Maggie Skewis. Since 1979, Hank Skewis (pictured) learned winemaking on-the-job, working 13 years at Lambert Bridge Winery and a harvest in Burgundy before launching his own brand in 1994, the same year he took on the job of winemaker at Mill Creek Vineyards. From doing the lab work to climbing barrels stacked five tiers high with a pitcher of wine in his teeth, Skewis pretty much ran the show by himself there, with only one intern during harvest—with whose novice stumblings he showed an infinite patience—slowing his manic pace only when all the fermentations were done to put on a tape of Neil Young’s Harvest Moon while topping up barrels of new wine at the end of the evening. I know this because one year I was that intern. Since 2004, Skewis Wines have been on their own, selling to area restaurants and a small but dedicated wine club. Pinot Noir is their sole wine, all of it made in a distinct house style that puts a premium on lightness, brightness and the more subtle charms of the varietal. For instance, the 2009 Russian River Valley, Montgomery Vineyard Pinot Noir ($45) has aromas of orange peel, cherry-cranberry and rhubarb, with a bright and refreshing finish; the 2009 RRV Lingenfelder Vineyard Pinot Noir ($45) has barrel aromas of bacon fat over faintly tantalizing red fruit with hints of earth and dry hay, and an astringent, yet buoyant mid-palate finish that I would want to term “Burgundian”—if I wanted to break another New Year’s resolution. Skewis Wines, 57 Front St., Healdsburg. Saturday–Sunday, 11am– 4:30pm, and by appointment. $5 fee, refundable with purchase. 707.431.2160. Winter Wineland runs Jan. 14 and 15, 11am–4pm. Tickets, $45–$55, available at the wineries. $5 for designated drivers. www.wineroad.com.—James Knight


Triumph in the Sky Santa Rosa’s James Goodwin, former Tuskegee Airmen pilot, reconciles his feelings about the historic WWII flying squadron BY RACHEL DOVEY

WILD YONDER James Goodwin lives in a modest Santa Rosa apartment yet is widely considered a national hero.

H

e’s already soft-spoken, but 86-year-old pilot James Goodwin speaks in a near whisper when he recalls World War II.

“It’s sort of terrible talking about it,” he says, detailing the perils of a battle fought in mid-air. As a Tuskegee Airman, Goodwin was tasked with protecting American bombers from German fighters. But unlike white “escorts” from other squadrons, the military’s first group of black pilots was ordered to never leave its cargo and jet off in pursuit of a coveted enemy kill, a move that often protected the bombers but sometimes endangered both planes. “You’d pick up a bomber that had been wounded by anti-aircraft and try to shepherd it home,” he recalls. “But sometimes, because it had lost so much stability, it would lose control and wander back over the flak field. That was one of the most dangerous things for a fighter, because that field is deadly. You would see that, and it was horrible, these planes being knocked out of the air.” It’s clear that Goodwin, now a pacifist, doesn’t relish his violent memories. But the tall, thin veteran, who talks with his head bowed as though intently studying his own words, is not ashamed of his

participation in the war. His Santa Rosa apartment is piled with hand-written notes and newspaper clippings about the Airmen, and when he forgets a name or a date, he walks slowly to a bookshelf stacked with the writings of former comrades. The victories of Goodwin’s elite fighter group disproved centuries of stereotype and led to Truman’s 1948 order desegregating the military. Theirs is a triumphant narrative that has captured the imaginations of countless filmmakers, most recently George Lucas, whose Red Tails opens in theaters on Jan. 20. It’s earned the fighters deserved renown

and brought them, most recently, to President Obama’s 2008 inauguration, where they were honored as civil rights pioneers. But though the story of the Tuskegee Airmen is one of heroism, bravery and ultimate victory, it’s also the tale of a deeply conflicted War Department that needed—and sometimes exploited—its black pilots while fighting viciously to keep them from the very work they were trained to do. Much of it is set in the clear skies of Italy, but it’s really a story about the calculated brutality of 1940s America, particularly in that murky, humid place known as the South.

) 18

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Michelle Feileacan

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18 Airmen ( 17 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

triple it. That’s what it was like down there.” Like Goodwin, Williams was raised on the West Coast. “I was playing a role down in the South,” he recalls. “I played the role of a dumb ‘boy’ from California who said ‘Yes, sir’ and ‘No, sir’ just because I wanted to be a pilot so bad.” With other schools training black civilian pilots around the country, some Airmen questioned the military’s motives in sending them to the heart of the bigoted South, according to Goodwin. Their suspicious weren’t unfounded, says Jay Richardson, VP of Tuskegee Airmen Inc.’s Northern California chapter. “[Tuskegee] had an airfield, and the flying weather was good,” he says. “But the Army, not realizing that these men were highly educated Northerners, wanted to keep them in what they thought of as ‘their own culture,’ and keep them under control. You have to realize, it did not want to integrate them.”

P

THE 99TH James Goodwin in his Air Force days with the Tuskegee Airmen.

W

hen Goodwin arrived in Alabama, the shadow of Southern racism still covered Tuskegee University. Aside from being Jim Crow territory, it was also the site of the infamous “Tuskegee syphilis experiment,” in which the Public Health Department denied impoverished black sharecroppers treatment for their disease. The Airmen, many of whom came from highly educated “Northern” families, were

suddenly immersed in a culture of mundane, day-to-day prejudice. “My father made me promise not to leave the base, so I never went wandering around,” Goodwin, who grew up in Southern California, recalls. “We gave it pretty names, like Jim Crow, but it was actually domestic fascism,” he adds. “You couldn’t walk on the same side of the street.” Leslie Williams, a 92-yearold Airman now living in San Mateo, puts it in simpler terms: “Imagine the worst possible thing you can, and double it,

rior to WWII, the Air Force refused to admit black pilots. It based this exclusion on a war college report from 1925 titled “The Use of Negro Manpower in War,” which used social Darwinist logic to claim that blacks were physically, mentally and morally inferior to whites. It concluded that while they could succeed in menial labor positions, they would be unable to perform in highly technical roles, like flying. Funds to train black pilots were allocated in the late ’30s, but War Department leaders continued to be wary. At Tuskegee, rigid aviation and academic admissions standards were set and, once admitted to the program, Airmen were strictly segregated from their white counterparts. When the program’s first graduates were sent overseas, the department’s paranoia turned to sabotage, according to Goodwin. The 99th Pursuit Squadron was sent to North Africa in April of

1943. There the group of expert pilots was given a ground-attack role and then critiqued for not engaging in air-to-air combat. “The Army used that to argue that they weren’t aggressive enough,” says Goodwin, whose squadron joined the 99th in 1944. “They were literally called cowards, because they had no kills to their credit,” says Richardson. “But they weren’t given the opportunity to do what they were trained to do.” Ironically, many of the pilots who were kept from meeting their potential in North Africa would be forced to outperform white aviators later in the war. The late Gwynne Pierson, another Airman, flew 73 missions, according to his Mill Valley–based son Kerry Pierson. White pilots usually flew a maximum of 50 missions before returning to the States, but according to Pierson, the military believed that, due to what it deemed “flawed neural responses,” black pilots could withstand more stress. According to Richardson, it wasn’t uncommon for black pilots to fly more than a hundred missions before returning home. On one such mission, Pierson was flying low over the Adriatic Sea when he spotted a German destroyer, his son recalls. He was low on fuel and couldn’t navigate around the colossal ship, so he and his fellow pilots did the only thing they could. “They more or less closed their eyes and started shooting,” Pierson says. One shot hit the ship’s magazine. The destroyer exploded. Red Tails shows the planes speeding away from a backdrop of flames and smoke. “He was wearing a leather jacket, and he said his jacket was soaked,” Pierson says, recalling his father’s stress level afterward. “It was like he had dropped it in a bathtub and let it sit there for four hours.”

T

he 99th faced U.S. scrutiny until the end of 1943. That fall, the group’s famous


I

n his apartment, Goodwin sorts through newspaper clippings like he’s sifting memories, weighing them for fact and importance. He pauses to pull anecdotes and sidebars from each ink-smeared clip, but

his impressive history spirals over a central conflict. The celebrated veteran is now a Quaker. His mother belonged to the faith, which advocates nonviolence, and two of his brothers were conscientious objectors while he fought in World War II. “I think I need to write something about all this,” he says toward the end of our interview. “But part of the problem I’ve had is that I’ve never been able to square myself with it in a way. I will not apologize for my war experience, and yet I’ve moved on. I’ve come back to a very different place, and it isn’t easy. I mean, my God, I’m 86 years old. At least it isn’t pressing on me. I’ve been dealing with it for so long.” The younger Pierson says he’s seen many Airmen, including his father, engage in intense contemplation as they age. “They’re a justifiably proud and remarkably humble group of men, but I see them beginning to look at themselves differently. There’s a lot of bitterness, but I’m not saying they live their lives as bitter men . . . I don’t know how to describe it. My father used to tell me about how, in training, the bar was set so much higher for them. The littlest things were watched out for and they were imposed with extra duties and called names.” Despite his mixed feelings on war, the rigid segregation he saw in the South and the restrictions he faced in the army, Goodwin seems to have escaped bitterness. His quiet voice is filled with intense conviction when he speaks about his post-war work in the Peace Corps and with War on Poverty, and his belief that, despite everything he’s witnessed, reconciliation is a human possibility. “Peace isn’t the end, it’s the way,” he says. “It’s a way to live your life and deal with others. It has to be almost like getting a new DNA. We keep wondering why people go to war, like it’s this natural instinct that we can’t biologically shed, but I think we can. I really do.”

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commander Benjamin O. Davis Jr. returned to the States to advocate for his squadron when Air Force officials recommended it be sent home. Everything changed in January. On a notoriously balmy Mediterranean day, the Allies swarmed a 15-mile stretch of rocky beach near Anzio, Italy, and in the battle that followed, the Tuskegee Airmen shot down 12 German planes in two days. “These incredible statistics went back to the States about the Airmen,” Goodwin says. “That 1925 war report went out the window.” The 99th was legendary by the time Goodwin’s newly graduated squadron joined them in 1944. But though he was elated to be fighting alongside them, the 99th struggled with his group’s presence, he recalls. In May, the senior squadron was relocated from its mixed-race (though still strictly segregated) fighter group to the all-black 332 group, composed of four Tuskegeetrained squadrons. “They weren’t happy about being re-segregated,” he says, “but thank God they were, because they taught us how to do the work we needed to do. It’s kind of a mixed story, because these men had accomplished the goal of integration, and they didn’t want to join an all-black group but they didn’t hold on to those feelings. Finally, there was some mentorship, and no one had given them any mentorship in the beginning. That’s one of the reasons the Army could ding them and say they weren’t very good.” Without losing many bombers, the group destroyed and damaged upwards of 400 enemy aircraft, becoming known as the “red-tail angels.”

Begin your


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 1 1-17, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

CULTURE

Crush MISS INVENTION Bass clarinetist Beth Custer performs original music to the films of Alexander Hammid on Jan. 13 at 142 Throckmorton. See Clubs, p28.

The week’s events: a selective guide

N A PA

SEBASTOPOL

Reunion Mania

Gratitude

While millennial hardcore fans go crazy over the Refused and At the Drive-In reunions announced this week, a certain other type of music fan is palpitating at the reunion of Montreux. Launched in the mid-’80s with a live recording from the Swedish jazz festival of the same name, Montreux honed a smooth hybrid of jazz, folk and composition for Windham Hill Records. Playing together for the first time in 20 years at the behest of Napa Valley Opera House director Peter Williams, Darol Anger, Mike Marshall, Michael Manring and Barbara Higbie relive the glory on Sunday, Jan. 15, at the Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. 7pm. $25–$30. 707.226.7372.

SEBASTOPOL

We admit it: we listened to Jay-Z’s song “Glory,” about his new baby, on repeat in the office when it went online on Monday. And how could we not? It’s rare to hear a rap star express gratitude, amazement and elation, but then again, folk artists like Will Kimbrough, hell, they’ve been doing it for years. Take Kimbrough’s “Three Angels,” an ode to his wife and daughters, which is basically the same thing as “Glory” (without the crying baby samples) or “A Couple Hundred Miracles,” which obliges life’s many blessings. Taking a break from playing with Rodney Crowell and Emmylou Harris, Kimbrough shows he knows the important things in life on Saturday, Jan. 14, at Studio E. Address provided with tickets, Sebastopol. 8pm. $25. www.northbaylive.com.

Tech Gone Blue

SA N R A FA E L

When Evan Bartholomew was a teenager living in Santa Rosa in the early ’90s, he couldn’t have ever dreamed that one day he would tour around the globe performing his deep, transcendental electronic music. But under the name Bluetech, Bartholomew’s tonal bridge between the intellectual and the emotional now strikes a chord worldwide, from festival to festival. With name recognition, and having outgrown the need for ego fulfillment, Bartholomew is dedicating 100 percent of the proceeds from his seventh album Rainforest Reverberation to end deforestation in the Amazon. He appears in a homecoming show with the Polish Ambassador and DJ Delphi at Juke Joint on Thursday, Jan. 12, at Hopmonk Tavern. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 10pm. $20. 707.829.7300.

Blubba-da-doo All comedians have a certain trademark, be it Patton Oswalt (drinking), Robin Williams (prattling like an ADHD child with Tourette’s) or Dave Chapelle (only playing secret shows announced hours before that start at midnight and go until 5am). Personally, I’m a fan of Lewis Black’s trademark: when he relates a story of unfathomable stupidity, perhaps involving Republicans, he shakes his head sharply, letting his jowls wiggle across his mouth, creating a distinctive “blubba-da blubbada” sound. One never knows when the blubba-da blubba-da will strike, but when it does, it never fails to get a laugh— especially when combined with Black’s sharp wit. Blubba-da blubba-da the night away with Black on Friday, Jan. 13, at the Marin Center. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 8pm. $40–$75. 415.473.6800.

—Gabe Meline


ALL YOUR AGENT ARE BELONG TO US Twitter- and meme-based books are easy to harvest, causing a publishing frenzy.

I Can Has Bookz The business of turning Tumblr fads into tomes BY EMILY WITT

I

f publishers could collage a portrait of their ideal consumer of novelty gift books, it would probably look something like this: begin with a hapless urban twenty-something whose life is â&#x20AC;&#x153;out of controlâ&#x20AC;? (Fuck! Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in My 20s). She has an iPhone and sends a lot of text messages (Damn You, Autocorrect!). She continues to ďŹ nd the idea of the hipster amusing (Stuff Hipsters Hate; Look at This Fucking Hipster; Hipster

Hitler; Hipster Puppies). This imagined reader thinks her parents are darling, whimsical creatures (Dads Are the Original Hipsters; My Mom, Style Icon) worthy of affection on the basis of their ineptitude, outdated tastes and bluntness (When Parents Text; Crap at My Parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; House; Sh*t My Dad Says). Her sexual desire is infantilized (Hot Guys and Baby Animals; Bangable Dudes in History) but it might be because her male counterparts (Fuck Yeah Menswear;

Bike Snob; Total Frat Move) fail to inspire lust, perhaps since they favor lunch food to libidinous interactions (Scanwiches; Insanewiches). She has a knowing love for old-timey things like thank you notes (ThxThxThx) and used books (Forgotten Bookmarks). She cares about grammar enough to make fun of people who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t (The Book of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Unnecessaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Quotation Marks) and has a well-developed sense of irony (Awkward Family Photos; White Girl Problems; Rock Your Ugly Christmas Sweater) and sarcasm (Dear Blank Please Blank; Passive Aggressive Notes; Humble Brags). Most important, she shops at Urban OutďŹ tters.

Welcome to the world of the meme-oir. Once upon a time, back when blogging was about writing long, self-involved posts and sharing feelings and insights, bloggers were offered book deals to write novels or memoirs (ah, the good old days of 2005). Now thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a different formula for web-to-book success: start a Tumblr or Twitter feed with some combination of puppies, fear of protracted adolescence, horrific Americana, text messages from your friends or photos of your parents; add a dose of nostalgia, regret or chagrin; then promote it all over the internet and wait for the literary agents to find you. And they will find youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a whole crop of them, growing in number everyday. In 2004, Byrd Leavell was, in his own words, â&#x20AC;&#x153;this broke 24-yearold agentâ&#x20AC;? who tracked down and signed a Lothario blogger named Tucker Max. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Originally, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give Tucker Max away,â&#x20AC;? recalls Leavell in a recent phone call. When he ďŹ nally signed a book deal, Leavell says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it was a $7,000 advance.â&#x20AC;? Since then, Max has sold almost 2 million books, one of the most successful blog-tobook transformations ever. His bro/new media credentials thus established, Leavell took another risk in September 2009 when he signed a Maxim senior writer named Justin Halpern who had a Twitter feed called Shit My Dad Says. At that time, the first wave of Twitter-based books was just starting to come out. As for Halpern, he had started his feed a month before. He had 500,000 followers. With Halpernâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s input, the two decided on a strategy that compiled Halpernâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quotes from his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foul-mouthed observations into a series ) 22 of David Sedarisâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;like

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

ArtsIdeas

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Art PAID ADVERTISING SECTION

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Tumblr Books ( 21 essays. A long auction ensued. “I was really proud of the cover letter. I had a line that said, ‘This will be the book that all other Twitter books are defined by,’ or something like that,” says Leavell. It turned out he was right. Sh*t My Dad Says, the book, spent months on the bestseller lists and was even made into a short-lived sitcom starring William Shatner. However, the transformation from Twitter to humorous essays was not without some bumps. “At first, the covers they sent us, they were trying to do ‘Here’s my Twitter feed book,’ like bubble script on coffee cups,” Leavell says. He insisted that the project needed to be presented as a book that people could read, a strategy he’s carried over with other Twitter-based clients, such as the authors of another Twitter feed called White Girl Problems. On Jan. 17, Hyperion is releasing White Girl Problems as a novel, complete with the requisite chicklit stiletto heels on the cover. “You create a fictional protagonist,” says Leavell, expanding on his recipe for a successful transformation from Twitter to book. “I don’t think that anyone should print out a Tumblr or a Twitter feed and call it a book proposal, because those things aren’t books. They’re Tumblrs and they’re Twitter feeds,” says Kate McKean, an agent who represented the bloggers behind the New York Times bestselling lolcat book I Can Has Cheezburger? “I’ve always thought since the blog-tobook thing started that it has to be a book as well as a blog.” Some agents prefer to think of the concept and then mine the internet for content. Laurie Abkemeier, a literary agent with DeFiore and Company, decided a couple years ago that the world needed a book about ugly Christmas sweaters. She went on the internet until she found Brian Miller, Adam Paulson and Kevin Wool, three guys in Indiana who sold ugly Christmas sweaters from their website, UglyChristmasSweaterParty.com. “I literally looked at every

site related to ugly Christmas sweaters to see who would have the biggest platform for this book,” she remembers. She proposed they write a book about how to throw an ugly Christmas sweater party, released as the Ugly Christmas Sweater Party Book from Abrams. It has 152 pages of sweaters and party tips, including how to judge a contest. The adaptation game can be more difficult with Tumblrs or blogs that involve user-generated content. Monika Verma, the agent who transformed the website Damn You, Autocorrect! into a book, has also sold book versions of the websites Bangable Dudes in History, Things That Suck, Things Younger Than John McCain and Fuck Yeah Menswear. But how does one turn a chronology of images into a book? With Damn You, Autocorrect!, Verma had the blogger, Jillian Madison, add a list of the 10 most common autocorrect mistakes as well as original autocorrects never posted online. Like the internet memes themselves, these books are likely to serve future generations as not much more than a microcosmic documentation of a blip in time. What will Texts from Last Night be worth to us in 30 years? Yet Hollywood in particular has caught on to mining Twitter for writers, and even for the biggest agents, the competition has gotten fierce. “All the big Los Angeles agencies have whole divisions of online talent scouts,” Leavell says. He recently tried to sign up the author of Your Aunt Diane, a Twitter feed in the persona of a Santa Fe hippie feminist doula/jewelry designer with a mailbox shaped like a clitoris, whose Tweets say things like “Your Aunt Diane’s holistic hangover cure: persimmon juice, milk thistle, green tea, 45 minutes cunnilingus.” Leavell called, but even though the author had only 20,000 Twitter followers, he arrived too late. “It’s crazy it’s so tough now,” he laments.


Eric Chazankin

MULTIPLE PERSONALITIES

Utilizing only four actors in all roles, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;39 Stepsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is a fast-paced thrill.

Scared Silly

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;39 Stepsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; turns Hitchcock classic into campy fun BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

n 1935, Alfred Hitchcock directed a loose adaptation of John Buchanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1915 novel The 39 Steps, adding a sexy female spy and a skittish blonde love interest to Buchanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s otherwise sex-and-lovefree story. The ďŹ lm is now considered one of the great English ďŹ lms of all time, so one could make the case that the drastic changes Hitch put in place were, in the end, a pretty good idea.

The same could be said for the Tony awardâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;winning 2009 stage adaptation, which gives Hitchcock a dose of his own freely interpretive medicine by taking the beloved black-and-white ďŹ lm and turning it into the broadest of comedic farces, a naughtily inspired fusion of spy-thriller

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The 39 Stepsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday through Jan. 22 in the Studio at the Sixth Street Playhouse. 56 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; Sundays and Jan. 21 at 2pm. $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 707.523.4185.

23

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Stage

intensity and Monty Pythonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;style outrageousness. Gleefully directed by Craig Miller, with a strong sense of visual invention and a clear knack for preposterous comic physicality, the play is essentially a show within a show as a quartet of actors rush and stumble, attempting to transport the movie onto the stage. When cues are missed or telephones ring on after theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been answered, the looks on the actorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; faces as they gamely try to salvage the moment are priceless. Featuring solid, satisfying performances from the agile, fearless cast, the joy of this production is witnessing how much hilarity good actors are able to milk from what must be fairly dry material on the page. In 1935 England, Richard Hannay (Adam Burkholder), a bored Londoner, is catapulted into a series of life-and-death adventures when he meets a mysteriously sexy secret agent, Annabella Schmidt (April Krautner, who plays all of the other women as well). After telling Hannay about a plot to destroy England, masterminded by an evil genius with a missing pinky ďŹ nger, Annabella ends up dead, a knife in her back. The bit where Hannay attempts to escape from under the femme fataleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dead body is an early highlight. Accused of her murder, Hannay escapes to Scotland to get to the bottom of the mystery, pursued by the police and various dangerous henchmen, encountering a parade of strange characters along the way (all of them played with magniďŹ cent elasticity by Larry Williams and Paul Huberty). Though the energy lags a bit in the second half, and some of the gags stretch a bit too long, The 39 Steps still packs more laughs into a single night than most shows capture in a month-long run. As a new year begins, this one is a winner.


We’re looking for you. The Bohemian newspaper is looking for a candidate to join our close-knit team of dedicated, self-motivated sales people in our downtown Santa Rosa office. The right person for the job is professional, friendly, outgoing, comfortable with both written and verbal communication, has a positive attitude and excellent customer service skills. You will be responsible for soliciting new business. Reliable transportation required. Must have digital media experience. A minimum of two years sales experience in print, radio and digital advertising is necessary. This high-energy, full-time position pays commission. The Bohemian newspaper offers full benefits. Please email Rosemary Olson at rolson@bohemian.com or fax resume to 707.527.1288. No phone calls please.

Film

ICY SILENCES Most of the tension in ‘Carnage’ takes place in just one apartment.

Bloodless ‘Carnage’ Roman Polanski’s newest film a game of Get the Guest BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

R

oman Polanski’s Carnage, based on the popular play God of Carnage by Yasmina Reza, is a tangy amusement about an after-school mediation session that goes bad. Aside from the prologue—one little boy bopping another boy with a tree branch—we never leave the flat of a well-off Brooklyn couple. Host Michael (John C. Reilly) is a gregarious, lumpy executive at a household hardware company. Meet his wife, Penelope (Jodie Foster), whose upcoming book about Darfur makes her particularly ready to forgive and forget playground violence. The father of the off-screen bullying boy is Alan, a snide lawyer (Christoph Waltz). If the ensuing game of Get the Guests reminds the viewer of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, certainly Alan’s wife, Annette (Kate Winslet), is the group’s Honey—a touch of brass to the gold hair, and more than a touch of nausea. Waltz, who reminds one of Jason Robards, knows how to inject a word with poison. Foster satirizes the kind of do-gooder she probably encounters a dozen times a day—many of them in the mirror. But the strange thing is that the more Carnage flaunts amusingly the idea that man is a wolf to man, the cozier it gets. Carnage’s witty attack on “nice” people is like Orwell’s description of Charles Dickens: a man beating the conservative elephant with a cane, and the beast feeling it as a delightful tickling. In this case, it’s the weepy liberal getting thwacked. But is Penelope such a phony? Those who are trying to rescue Africa aren’t opposed by some evil deity; it’s not some gory Kronos who put AK-47s into the hands of eight-year-olds. Something in Carnage’s argument bypasses the real story of post-colonial Africa. In laughing at all that, it’s as if you were complicit in making a man a beggar—then mocked him for his filth and the bloodiness of his life. ‘Carnage’ opens Jan. 13 at Summerfield Cinemas in Santa Rosa.

Guy Ferrandis

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24


Upcoming Events

Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Carnage (R; 133 min.) Jodie Foster, Christoph Waltz and Kate Winslet star in Roman Polanskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new film about a mediation session between the parents of a playground bully and his victim that goes violently awry. See review, adjacent page.

The Conquest (NR; 105 min.) Biopic about French president Nicolas Sarkozy plays as a series of flashbacks on May 6, 2007, the day he wins the election, and the day his wife leaves him for another man. (GB)

Contraband (R; 110 min.) Familiar story about a retired criminal dragged back into the game stars Mark Wahlberg as an expert smuggler who agrees to do one last job to settle his brother-in-laws debts. Co-stars Kate Beckinsale. (GB)

The Devil Inside (R; 87 min.) A young woman making a documentary about demonic possession suspects her mother may have been possessed when she killed three clergymen during an exorcism 20 years earlier. (GB)

Joyful Noise (PG-13; 118 min.) Dolly Parton and Queen Latifah co-star as a pair of opposites who join forces to save their small-town choir from budget cuts. (GB)

ALSO PLAYING The Adventures of Tintin (PG; 107 min.) Directed by Steven Spielberg (produced by Peter Jackson) and presented in not always glorious CG. But RVB liked it. (GB)

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G; 87 min.) Hawaiian shirts get digitized in this third installment of the Chipmunks franchise, when Alvin and co. find themselves on a desert island after too much partying on a cruise ship. Good subtitle. With Jason Lee and David Cross. (GB)

The Artist (PG-13; 100 min.) French romance and homage to silent film, The Artist stars Jean Dujardin (OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies) as a silent-film star in love with an aspiring actress during the rise of the talkies. In black-andwhite with French subtitles. (GB)

A Dangerous Method (R; 94 min.) David Cronenberg directs the adaptation of John Kerrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2122;93 book about Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender), his mentor, Freud (Viggo Mortensen), and patient Sabina Spielrein (Keira Knightley), who became one of the first female psychoanalysts. (GB)

The Darkest Hour (PG-13; 89 min.) A handful of people stuck in Moscow during an alien invasion must get to a nuclear sub with the secret to destroying the invaders. Produced by George Lucas. (GB)

The Descendants (R; 115 min.) Matt King (George Clooney) is forced to reconnect with his kids after his wife suffers a boating accident in Hawaii. With Jody Greer, Matthew Lillard and Beau Bridges. (GB) Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (R; 158 min.) David Fincher directs the Englishlanguage version of the hit 2009 Swedish film, based on the first in Stieg Larssonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Millennium series.â&#x20AC;? Co-stars Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara, as Lisbeth. (GB)

David Lindley Sunday, January 15, 7:30 pm â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Śone of the great slide players of all time.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jackson Browne

Hugo (PG; 127 min.) Hugo, a young boy sent

Saturday January 28, 8:00 pm Folk-Rock Legendâ&#x20AC;Ś â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Byrds

Government Secrets and the Publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Right to Know Reception, Film, and Discussion

Intimate Dinner and Discussion

Friday, January 27, 6:30 pm Sunday, January 29, 5:00 pm French Garden Restaurant Sebastopol Community and Bistro t Center Annex t

Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

in association with the French Garden Restaurant

Sebastopol

Also Coming Soon Blame Sallyo'FCtEric Bibb â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Feb. 17 Tim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Feb. 26

Shame (NC-17; 101 min.) The world of a young New Yorker with a sex addiction starts unraveling when his troubled younger sister moves in. At the Rafael Center. (GB)

Roger McGuinn

Daniel Ellsberg:

to live with his uncle who maintains the clocks at a railway station, searches for the missing part, the key to the heart, of the automaton his clockmaker father had found before his death. Directed by Martin Scorsese in an adaptation of Brian Selznickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret. (GB) (R; 132 min.) More capers and treachery in the fourth installment of the spy franchise Tom Cruise rebooted 15 years ago. Brad Bird (The Incredibles) directs, his first live-action. (GB)

An evening with

Community

Cultural Center

Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG-13; 128 min.) Guy Ritchie directs the sequel to his 2009 hit, with Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law reprising their roles. Holmesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; archenemy Moriartyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s here, played by the excellent Jared Harris. Also stars Rachel McAdams and Stephen Fry. (GB)

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R; 127 min.) Big-screen version based on John le CarrĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1974 novel stars Gary Oldman as George Smiley, British intelligence officer searching for a double agent in the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top levels. With Colin Firth too! (GB)

War Horse (PG-13; 146 min.) At the onset of World War I, a Devonshire boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s horse is sold to the cavalry for the war effort, and shipped to the front in France. Based on British author Michael Morpurgoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1982 novel and directed by a busy Steven Spielberg. Opens Christmas Day. (GB)

We Bought a Zoo (PG; 123 min.) The memoir of Benjamin Mee, father and widower who finds his life radically changing after he buys a country estateâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, with it, a zooâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is brought to the screen by director and screenwriter Cameron Crowe (Jerry Maguire, Almost Famous). Stars Matt Damon and Scarlett Johansson. (GB) Young Adult (R; 94 min.) The director and screenwriter of Juno team up again for Young Adult, starring Charlize Theron as a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book writer coming unraveled (GB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES

SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

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J oin u Join us s ffor or a p presentation resent at ion o off Joffrey: J o f f r ey : M ave r i c k s o me ri c an D an c e o n Mavericks off A American Dance on S aturday 1/28 1/28 at at 10:30am! 10 : 3 0 am ! Following F o l l ow i n g Saturday tthe he film film there there will will b eaL IVE s tream of of a be LIVE stream Q & A session session with with ballet ballet members members and and Q&A ffilm ilm ccreators! re ator s ! JJoin oin u s ffor or p er formances of of us performances M editerranea ffrom rom T e at ro a ll a S c ala iin n Mediterranea Teatro alla Scala Milan on Sunday 2/5 att 1 1pm and M ilan IItaly t aly o nS u n d ay 2 /5 a pm a nd T u e s d ay 2 /7 a : 3 0 pm . T i c ke t s a re o n Tuesday 2/7 att 6 6:30pm. Tickets are on s ale n ow a our box box o f fic e o sale now att our office orr a att w w w. movieticket s .com ! www.movietickets.com!

5 51 S 551 Summerfield ummer field Road Road Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 7 707-522-0719 07- 52 2- 07 719

DĹ˝Ć&#x152;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Ĺ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;WĹ?ĹŻĹŻÍ&#x2022;WĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ĺ?ĹśÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ?Ç&#x2021;dÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x;ĹśĹ?Í&#x2022; Ä?Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x;ŽŜ^Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ć?Í&#x2022;,Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ĹŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x161;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä?Ä&#x17E;>Ĺ?ĹśÄ&#x17E; ATION!3317 Chanate os a LOC Road , #2C, Santa R NEW www.cawhs.org

Ayurvedic

Indian Head Massage â&#x20AC;˘ improves mobility in neck

and shoulders â&#x20AC;˘ relief from tension headaches,

eyestrain, and sinusitis

Margery Smith 707.544.9642

25 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Film

Sebastopol Community Cultural Center


Music

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Will Kimbrough Guitar player and recent tour buddy of Emmylou Harris, Todd Snider and Rodney Crowell plays. Jan 14, 8pm. $25. Studio E, Sebastopol. Address provided with tickets.

La Bizzarria Musica Pacific presents classics from 17th century Italy. Jan 13, 7:30pm. $20. Petaluma Museum, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Philharmonia Healdsburg Raven Theater’s classical music orchestra performs “Music for the Young at Heart.” Jan 14, 8pm and Jan 15, 2pm. $10-$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Winterlude Musical ode to the Winter season to benefit Occidental Center for the Arts. Jan 14, 8pm. $20. Occidental Center for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

MARIN COUNTY

David Lindley

Eric Sardinas

Electro-acoustic performance will combine American folk, blues, and bluegrass traditions with elements from African, Arabic, Asian, Celtic, Malagasy, and Turkish sources. Jan 15, 7:30pm. $20-$23. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol.

Slide guitarist shows off licks from recent album “Sticks and Stones.” Jan 13, 9:30pm. $20-$25. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Nell Robinson & Jim Nunally Bluegrass duo present an evening of harmony-driven duets as part of Petaluma Church Concerts series. Jan 14, 8pm. $17-$19. First Church of Christ Scientist, 522 B St, Petaluma.

George Winston Pianist plays soothing melodies. Jan 14, 8pm. $15$32. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

NAPA COUNTY

whose compositions have been recorded by Carlos Santana, Dido and Richie Havens. Jan 14, 7pm. $35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Devo New wave icons in masks sing mega-hits. Jan 15, 8pm. $75. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Montreux Mike Marshall, Barbara Higbie, Darol Anger and Michael Manring reunite for first time in 20 years. Jan 15, 7pm. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Jan 13, Staggerwing. Jan 14, Dead Cat Hat. Jan 16, Aqus Community Drums. Sun, Sunday Jazz. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Jan 15, Gloomsday, SemiEvolved Simians, Sharky Coast. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Citizen Cope

Aubergine

Songwriter and producer

Jan 13, the Africa Project. Jan 14, BLEND DJ Night and Live Music Mash Up. Jan 15, Moonbeams. Tues, ladies’ limelight open mic. Wed, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Coffee Catz Mon, 6pm, open mic. Sat, 2pm, Bluegrass jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

A Bohemian approach to the web.

Doc Holliday’s Saloon Jan 14, Johnny Hiland. Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 138 Calistoga Road, Santa Rosa. 707.537.0308.

First Church of Christ Scientist Jan 14, Nell Robinson and Jim Nunally. 522 B St, Petaluma.

The new Bohemian.com

Flamingo Lounge

IN TANDEM Gloomsday play Jan. 15 at the Arlene

Francis Center. See Clubs, this page.

Wed, Thurs, 9pm-12am, karaoke. Jan 13, Fusion. Jan 14, Reed Fromer Band. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.


CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wed, Brainstorm. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Heavyweight Jamminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Casa Rasta celebrates one-year anniversary If there is one thing the North Bay gets respect for, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a genuine appreciation of reggae music. Nearly every mainstream reggae musician from Jamaica to Germany has played here. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t surprising, then, that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a reggae dance party happening somewhere just about every night of the week. After cataloguing a series of slots in various Santa Rosa venues, bringing in heavyweight reggae stars like Michael Rose, Rootz Underground and Gentleman, Casa Rasta has found a permanent home to keep downtown jamminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; every Thursday night. Hosted by Society: Culture House and presented by local event promoter Rebel Lion Productions, Casa Rasta isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t only a hotspot for reggaeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it also serves as a tribute to the late Jessie Ray Southwell, a local surfer who died shortly after opening a reggae bar in Nicaragua. The club advocates year-round philanthropic causes, from Toys for Tots to tsunami victims. On Thursday, Jan. 12, lively up yourself with resident selectors DJ Konnex and DJ Sizzlak, along with Jah Warrior Shelterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rocker-T, dancehall vocalist Soulmedic, Luv Fyah and locals Ancient Mystic and Radioactive. Society: Culture House, 528 Seventh St., Santa Rosa. 9pm. $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$15. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jacquelynne OcaĂąa

Jan 11, Ameranouche. Jan 12, Sarah Petite. Jan 13, Jason Bodlovich. Jan 14, The Pine Needles. Jan 15, Danny Montana. Jan 18, Blue Merle. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Jan 13, Daniel Castro Band and SoulShine Blues Band. Jan 14, Tainted Love and DJ Rob Cervantes. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pick-Me-Up Revue. Thurs, Live Pro Jam. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Jan 11, 6:30pm, Phat Chance Trio. Jan 12, Maple Profant. Jan 13, Nathan Veshecco. Jan 14, Greg Hester and Friends. Jan 18, Willie Perez. Sun, Kit Mariahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open mic. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Jan 12, Tony Gagarin. Jan 13, Robin Rogers and Festival of Friends. Jan 14, The Ruminators. Jan 16, Greg

Hester. Tues, Jim Adams. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Tavern Jan 12, Juke Joint with Polish

International Vegetarian Buffet = F F ;Ă?D L J @ :Ă?8 I KĂ?: F D D L E @ K P Wed Jan 11, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 French, Italian and Classical

Da Fe Thurs Jan 12, 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30 Slide Guitar & Bottleneck Blues

Tony Gagarin Fri Jan 13, nsParty!

Robin Rogersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Festival of Friends Sat Jan 14, 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10 Folk and Funk

Thurs, 7pm, Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jan 14, Winterlude. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Olde Sonoma Public House Jan 12, Evan Levanti. 18615 Sonoma Hwy, Ste 110, Sonoma. 707.938.7587.

28

+ DJ DJ D DELHI ELHI ((GODDESS GODDESS A ALCHEMY) LC H E M Y ) $20/DOORS $ 20 / DOORS 1 10PM/21+ 0PM /21+

F FRI RI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JAN JAN 13 13

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S PARTY/COVER/POP PA RT Y/ COVER / POP

WONDERBREAD W ONDERBREAD 5 + SALLY SALLY HAGGARD HAGGARD $$20/DOORS 20 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

S SAT AT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JAN JAN 14 14

Mon Jan 16, 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Master Jazz Piano

DIEGOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S D IEGOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S U UMBRELLA MBRELLA

Greg Hester Tues Jan 17, 6:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:30 Solo Jazz Guitar

Jim Adams &INE"EERS7INESs$ 4 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

707-544-2491 www.gaiasgardenonline.com

GYPSY/PIRATE/POLKA G YPSY Y/ PIRATE/ POLK A

+ DG DGIIN IIN ((ACOUSTIC) ACOUSTIC )

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+ MON M ON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JAN JAN 16 16 W WEEKLY EEK KLY E EVENT VENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE PRESENTS PRESENTS REGGAE/DANCEHALL/HIP R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL / HIP HOP HOP

MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT EDUTAINMENT EDUT TAINMENT

DJJ JAH D JAH Y YZER ZER

$3 R $3 RED ED S STRIPES T R I PE S A ALL LL NIGHT N I G HT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11PM/DOORS 11PM / DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+ TUES TUES â&#x20AC;&#x201C;JAN â&#x20AC;&#x201C;JAN 17 17 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT BILL B ILL DECARLI DECARLI PRESENTS PR E S E N T S ANYTHING ANY THING GOES GO E S

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT

FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGESâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10PM AGESâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10PM THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C;JAN â&#x20AC;&#x201C;JAN 19 19 W WEEKLY EEKLY E EVENT VENT

JJUKE UKE JOINT J O I NT

BURLESQUE/CABARET/VARIETY BUR LESQUE/ CABARET/ VARIET Y

CABARET C ABARET DE DE C CALENTE ALENTE $10/DOORS $ 10 / DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

F FRIâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; RIâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; JAN JAN 20

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER 4(52s0-$//23s!$6$/3s WORLD/REGGAE

BACKYARD BOOGIE TOUR 2012

AMERICANA/ROOTS/ACOUSTIC A MER RIC ANA / ROOTS/ACOUSTIC

NAKED NA KED FICTION FICTION + ALISON ALISON HARRIS HARRIS

$$13 13 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

S SATâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; ATâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; JAN JAN 21 21

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

J BOOG

PLUS ELAN ATIAS & WHITE ELEPHANT 3!4s7PM DOORSs$25 s!,,!'%3 JAZZ/BENEFIT PHS MUSIC DEPT

MARCHFOURTH MARCHING BAND

&2)s0-$//23s!$6$/3s AMERICAN SURF ROCK

DICK DALE

JIMMY DALE ON DRUMS PLUS THE

PYRONAUTS

35.s0-$//23s!$6$/3s ACOUSTIC/FUNK/ROCK

Jan 14, 26 MPH, Death Valley High, Eight For Seven, the Loveless. Jan 15, The Crux, Point Reyes, Metacomet, Travis Hendrix, Blessed Monsters. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. ) 707.762.3565.

GHETTO G HET TO FFUNK/BOOGIE U N K / B O O GI E B BREAKS/GYPSY R E A K S / GY P S Y D DOODLE O O D LE

POLISH PO LISH AM AMBASSADOR BASSADOR BLUETECH B LUETECH

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

Northwood Restaurant

THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C;JAN â&#x20AC;&#x201C;JAN 12 12 W WEEKLY EEKLY E EVENT VENT JJUKE UKE JOINT J O I NT

Ruminators

Wed, open mic with Angelina. Thurs, 9pm, karaoke with Country Dan. Fri, DJ Alexander. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Phoenix Theater

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden

Mc Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bullpen

Wed, 7:30pm, trivia night. Jan 13, Hellhounds. Jan 14, Larry Carlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mostly Simply Bluegrass. Jan 15, Shards of Green. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

27

AN EVENING WITH

KELLER WILLIAMS

.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

7 WWWMCNEARSCOM

AFRO/WORLD/FUNK A FRO / WORLD / FUNK

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((MEMBERS M E MBE RS O OF FA AFROFUNK FROFUNK E EXPERIENCE) XPERIENCE )

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

SUNâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SUNâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; JJAN AN 2 22 2

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

BREW B R EW D DINNER INNER

WITH W ITH

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D DINNER INNER $$65/DOORS 65/ DOORS 66PM/21+ PM /21+

SUNâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SUNâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; JJAN AN 2 22 2

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

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FASHION F ASHION A F FUTURE UTURE $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Ambassador and Bluetech. Jan 13, Wonderbread 5. Jan 14, Diegoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Umbrella and Dgiin. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28

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Slot Car Raceway

J oin oour Join ur eemail mail llist ist events@pleasuresoftheheart.com e vents @ pleasuresof thehear t.com

415.482.9899 4 15.4 8 2. 9 8 9 9 11310 310 F Fourth our th S St. t. @ C C,, S San an R Rafael afael

Find us on facebook: www.facebook.com/oftheheart www.facebook.com/ofthe eheart

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Raven Theater

Tues, Swing Fever. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Jan 14-15, Philharmonia Healdsburg. 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Sebastopol Community Center Jan 15, David Lindley (see Concerts). 390 Morris St, Sebastopol.

Society: Culture House Wed, Gallery Wednesday, DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Home of the 2012 National Slot Car Championships

HOBBIES, MODELS, RACE SETS & MORE! s(UGESUPPLYOFCARSPARTSINSTOCK s3LOTCARPARTYSPECIALISTSÂ&#x2C6;TONSOF

FUNFOREVERYONE s-USEUMOFVINTAGESSLOTCARS MEMORABILIA

305 Southwest Blvd, Rohnert Park 707.795.4156 Visit our website for upcoming events:

scrhobbies.com

PERFORMED LIVE BY

Thurs Jan.19th $ $10

9pm

Jerry Knights Historic

RIVER THEAT TE ER 16135 Main St.

Guerneville, CA 707-869-802 22

Jan 11, Key Lime Pie. Jan 12, Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jam Sammich. Jan 13, 5 Minute O. Jan 14, the Other Stones and Manzanita Falls. Jan 15, Te Rivereens. Jan 17, Andre and friends. Jan 18, The Elvis Johnson Group. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Sausalito Seahorse Mon, local talent onstage. Tues, jazz jam. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Thurs, 9pm, Texas Blues. Sat, 2pm, juke jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

NAPA COUNTY Calistoga Inn Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, old-school DJ night. Sat, DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant Jan 13, Xstatic. Mon, Monday Night Football with Big John. 902 Main Street, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Hydro Grill Fri, Sat, blues. Sun, Swing Seven. 1403 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9777.

Napa Valley Opera House Jan 15, Montreux (see Concerts). 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jan 14, Franc Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ambrosio. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Jan 14, Will Kimbrough. Address provided with tickets. www.northbaylive.com.

Tradewinds

Tomales Town Hall

Studio E

Third Sunday of every month,

Uptown Theatre Jan 14, Citizen Cope (see Concerts). Jan 15, Devo (see Concerts). 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Jan 13, Beth Custer Ensemble. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Jan 13, Eric Sardinas. Jan 14, Mark Hummer & the Blues Survivors. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Jan 14, Winter Music Series with David Gans. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005. also - 311, Pepper, RHCP, and Morre...

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Jan 13, Jazz Jam with Michael Pinkim. Jan 14, Swoop Unit. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Tribute Show

7pm, Open mic. 27150 Hwy 1, Tomales.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Thurs, DJ Dave. Jan 13, Tim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil. Jan 14, Weekend at Bernies. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Woman W oman Owned d & Operated! Be s t Costume Best C os t u me Shop Shop Best B e s t Erotica Er o tica Shop Shop Marin M arin

C as t Y Cast Your ou r 22012 012 V Votes o tes ffor or Us! Us !

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Thurs, DJ Dray Lopez. Jan 13, Floyian Slip. Jan 14, Shotgun Harlot. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

'ZHH]LO=DSSD  3OD\V=DSSD  6DW)HE

Music ( 27

19 Broadway Club Jan 13, English Beat. Jan 14, Anthony B, Zamunda, Della Ranx. Jan 15, Lonestar Retrobates. Mon, open mic. Tues, Uzilevsky Korty Duo with special guests. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar Fri, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, Mal Sharpeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Roy Hargrove Quintet Adroit and inventive jazz trumpeter adds Latin, R&B and hard-swinging bop. Jan 12-15 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SF.

Silian Rail Loud, many-tentacled two-piece plays multiple instruments at once. Jan 13 at Hemlock Tavern.

Mavis Staples Gospel songstress belts earthy Civil Rights anthems for Martin Luther King Jr. day. Jan 15 at the Paramount Theater.

Vetiver Singer /songwriter Andy Cavic traffics in dreamy folk-rock on new album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tight Knit.â&#x20AC;? Jan 15 at the Independent.

Ty Segall Garage-rock belle du jour joins Shannon and the Clams in benefit for Jonathan Toubin. Jan 18 at Mezzanine.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.


ARE THEY NOT MEN? Devo’s stance

on de-evolution was ahead of its time.

Riding the Whip The world catches up to Devo BY ALAN SCULLEY

I

n preparing their comeback album, Something for Everybody, Devo took the unusual step of inviting fans to pick its dozen tracks from 16 contenders. “We did it on purpose as an experiment,” Gerald Casale says in a phone interview. “We were always hermetically sealed, like little aliens that dropped down, dropped our load, took off and went home. We thought, ‘What is the thing that we haven’t tried?’ It’s like playing ball, involving the outside world on purpose, because at this point, 30 years down the line, everybody feels like they know what Devo is or has their own idea of what Devo is.” The idea that fans would ever understand Devo, who play Napa’s Uptown Theatre on Jan. 15, is rather ironic, given the group’s history. When Devo arrived in 1977 with Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo!, the band startled and

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Wed, Jan 11 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45 Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Jan 12 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45 Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Fri, Jan 13 7:30–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Hustle Lesson and Ballroom, Latin & Swing Dance hosted by California Ballroom

Sat, Jan 14 7–11pm

8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise Circle N’ Squares Hoedown

LEARNING CURVE Jan 20 Rock Fri

8:00pm

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8:30pm

Sun

Jan 22

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Featuring Wendy Fitz 4:00pm / No Cover

JEB BRADY’S BAND Jan 27 R&B and Blues Fri

8:00pm / No Cover

Jan 28 THE RANCHO ALLSTARS WITH GARY VOGENSEN Sat

Sun

Great Dance Band! 8:00pm

Jan 29 Devo appear on Sunday, Jan. 15, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $75. 707.259.0123.

FRI JAN 20

THE SHOTS

Irish, Old-Time, Country, Cajun 4:00pm / No Cover

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Sun, Jan 15 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30–11:30am Zumba Gold with Toning 5–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Jan 16 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45 Jazzercise 7–10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Jan 17 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:40pm Jazzercise 7:30–10pm African and World Music Dance

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

29 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

confused most of the world. Devo’s music was spastic, synthesizerbased, with quirky lyrics and song titles like “Gut Feeling / (Slap Your Mammy)” and “Jocko Homo.” They wore futuristic sci-fi-styled radiation uniforms. It was as if the very definition of rock and roll was under attack from Akron, Ohio. Casale remembers the initial reaction to Devo clearly. “We got people upset. We were like a lightning rod for hostilities back then,” Casale told a SXSW audience in 2009. “Rolling Stone, I remember they wrote us off, like, ‘They don’t even have a guitar on every single song. How can they be a rock band?’ or ‘They used a drum machine on one of their songs. How could you even do that?’ And they called us fascists. They called us clowns. Mark and I went, ‘Fascist clowns?’” A few years later, Devo didn’t seem so dangerous. The group’s third album, Freedom of Choice, became a mainstream hit, with the MTV staple “Whip It.” But while some saw comic relief and entertainment in Devo’s songs and videos (remember those red flower pot helmets), the group’s music and lyrics were never light-hearted in intent or message. “We had a very dark vision,” Casale says succinctly. “We definitely saw the world crumbling. There wasn’t much optimism.” Today, Casale says much of Devo’s bleak vision of de-evolution has become reality, which marks an appropriate return for the band. “I think things have devolved so far,” he says, “that Devo is relevant now in another way. “I’ve often said Devo is like the house band on the Titanic, playing familiar tunes that make us feel better as we all go down together.”


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30

Arts Events Galleries OPENINGS Jan 12 At 6pm. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, “Year of the Dragon 4710,” celebrating the Lunar New Year, featuring Cynthia Tom and Leland Wong, curated by Naomi Lasley and Season Leef. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Jan 13 At 5pm. Art Works Downtown, “Lightscape/ Darkscape,” artworks by Kala Art Institute students. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.451.8119. At 5pm. Journey Center Gallery, “Abstract Reflections” featuring art by Carolyn Beyah. 1601 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.2121. At 5pm. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, “Undiscovered,” five dynamic artists from Sonoma County. 551 Broadway, Sonoma . 707.939.SVMA.

SONOMA COUNTY ARThouse Gallery Through Feb 29, second exhibit of Ed Coletti Paintings. 13758 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.3513.

BackStreet Gallery Through Jan 21, “Strong Women of Vista,” an exhibit of artworks created by Cambodian women, survivors of the Pol Pot genocide. Uribe Studios, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. Sat, 11 to 5, and by appointment. 707.537.9507.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Jan 29, “The Flipside of Schulz’s Art: More Than Peanuts,” original drawings by Charles Schulz. $5-$8. Through Apr 2, “Hit the Road, Snoopy!” featuring the beagle’s most famous road trips. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Mar 1, Obie G Bowman’s pen, brush and ink works on display. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Finley Community Center Through Jan 31, Historical

birdhouses on display. Through Feb 2, “Honoring the Pomo Youth Dancers” with photographs by Christine Cobaugh. 2060 W College Avenue, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1. 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Jan 14-Mar 17, “Eye of the Beholder,” an exhibition of abstract art by Becoming Independent. Reception, Jan 14 at 5. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Graton Gallery Through Jan 16, “A Picture Is Worth 500 Words (or Less),” watercolors by Sally Baker paired with poetry and prose. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Feb 2, “Group Show,” with new works by Andre Cisernos-Galido, Jerry Cohen and others. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Institute of Noetic Sciences Through Jan 12, “Errant Horizons,” an exhibition of paintings by Catherine J Richardson sponsored by Lucid

Jan 14 At 3:30pm. Occidental Center for the Arts, “Along the Russian River and Water Quilt,” textiles exhibit. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

at Riverfront Art Gallery. See Openings, adjacent.

Art Foundation. 415.669.7585. 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma.

Journey Center Gallery Jan 13-31, “Abstract Reflections” featuring art by Carolyn Beyah. Reception, Jan 13 at 5. 1601 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 9 to 5; weekend hours by appointment. 707.578.2121.

Llewellyn Ongoing, bronze figurative nudes by Bruce Wolfe, paintings by William Cutler and William O’Keeffe, paintings and lithograph prints by Sandra Oseguera and bronze “Unedibles” by Valerie Brunmeier and Matt Hart. 6525-A First St, Forestville. 707.887.2373.

Local Color Gallery Through Feb 12, “Watercolor Festival,” Sally Cataldo, Mara Farnworth and Ned Luzmoor. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

At 5pm. Riverfront Art Gallery, “Living Life” paintings by Kathleen Deyo and “Color in Motion” photo-paintings by Jerrie Jerne. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART. At 5pm. Gallery of Sea & Heaven, “Eye of the Beholder,” an exhibition of abstract art by Becoming Independent. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

‘BROWN SUGAR’ Work by Jerrie Jerné (above) and Kathleen Deyo opens Jan. 11

Occidental Center for the Arts Jan 14-Mar 2, “Along the Russian River and Water Quilt,” Textiles exhibit featuring work by Pointless Sisters Art Quilt Group. Reception, Jan 14 at 3:30. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

RiskPress Gallery SCARLET LETTERS Author Paul Grushkin

discusses ‘Dead Letters: The Very Best Grateful Dead Fan Mail’ Jan. 11 at Book Passage. See Readings, p32.

Through Jan 28, “Corey Hitchcock’s Double Radiance,” a creative video tribute to

the remarkable, unseen, regenerative forces of the natural world. Special performances, Jan 15 at 7 and Jan 28 at 7. Artist talk, Jan 16 at 4. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Jan 11-Mar 4, “Living Life” paintings by Kathleen Deyo and “Color in Motion” photopaintings by Jerrie Jerne. Reception, Jan 14 at 5. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 1 1 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Rohnert Park Community Center Through Jan 27, Collective art exhibit by sisters Ann Marie Torrez and Lisa DeMartini. 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.584.7357.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Jan 12-Feb 4, “Year of the Dragon 4710,” celebrating the Lunar New Year, featuring Cynthia Tom and Leland Wong, curated by Naomi Lasley and Season Leef. Reception, Jan 12 at 6pm. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jan 22, “Singgalot,” Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition on history of Filipino immigrants in

America. Through Feb 5, “Customized: The Art and History of the Bicycle,” with bicycle innovations, art bikes, regional history and more. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Jan 14-Mar 18, “Undiscovered,” features five dynamic artists from Sonoma County. Reception, Jan 13 at 5. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Feb 23, paintings by Kathy Cia White. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Jan 13-Mar 2, “Lightscape/ Darkscape,” featuring artworks by Kala Art Institute students. Reception, Jan 13 at 5. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jan 31, “Winter Group Show,” featuring works by gallery artists Bryn Craig, Willam DeBilzan and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Marin MOCA Through Jan 15, “Agent of Change” featuring work of


31

CRITIC’S CHOICE

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

late Bay Area sculptor and activist Mary Tuthill Lindheim. 415.899.8200. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4.

Marin Society of Artists Through Jan 28, “Where in the World,” is an unjuried exhibit open to MSA members working in all media. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. MonThurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jan 31, “Members Show,” featuring sculpture, painting, photography and more. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Painters Place Through Jan 14, “Painters Place,” paintings by Christin Coy and Richard Lindenberg. 1139 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.461.0351.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Jan 14, “New Paintings,” featuring the work of Leslie Allen. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 11 to 6, Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, noon to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY Di Rosa Through Feb 11, “Looking at You Looking at Me,” featuring photography, video and other media selected from di Rosa collection by curator Robert Wuilfe. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sat, 9:30am to 3pm. 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Ongoing, “Momentum: Art that Moves (Us),” second annual interactive public art exhibition ARTwalk. Free.. 707.257.2117. First Street and Town Center, Napa.

Gordon Huether Jan 17, 6pm, evening of networking, food, wine and art. 1821 Monticello Rd, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Napa Valley Museum Through Jan 30, “Napa Valley: The People and the Landscapes,” featuring photographs of Vi Bottaro. An evening with Bottaro, Jan 20 at 5:30. Photography workshop with Bottaro, Jan 28 at 2. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Match Point

Billie Jean King speaks at Schulz Museum Not only did tennis legend Billie Jean King defeat Bobby Riggs in a 1973 “Battle of the Sexes” match, she also won 39 Grand Slam tennis titles and a record 20 titles at Wimbledon during her 1970s championship years. That’s what made her a hero to ’80s girls like me; we could always bring up King as a trump card when some stupid fourth grader tried to claim that boys were better than girls at sports. King is a hero of feminists and women the world over, not only for her sports prowess but also for her advocacy work for women and the LGBT community. In 2009, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom for that important work. Charles Schulz was also a great admirer of King. After the two became friends and occasional tennis partners, the Peanuts creator illustrated a multiday storyline about Title IX, the legislation that ensured equal access to federally funded sports programs and activities. The Schulz Museum’s latest exhibit, “Leveling the Playing Field,” commemorates the 40th anniversary of Title IX and celebrates the history of women in sports. Best of all, King herself will participate in a moderated conversation followed by an autograph signing on Sunday, Jan. 15, at the Schulz Museum. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 1pm. Free. 707.579.2301. —Leilani Clark

Comedy Lewis Black Stand-up comedian, actor

and author deals in anger and disillusionment. Jan 13, 8pm. $39.50-$75. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800. )

32


NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

32 Arts Events

( 31

Tuesday Evening Comedy

Cartoonist-inResidence

Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Second Sat monthly at 1, meet, watch and talk to professional cartoonists. Jan 14, Tessa Brunton. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Events Bay Area World Guitar Show Featuring instrument experts from around the globe, dealers, artists, collectors and foreign buyers. Jan 14, 10am-5pm and Jan 15, 10am-4pm. $15. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Harlem Globetrotters Basketball meets hi-jinks as the famous troupe shows off its rookies. Jan 11, 7pm. $28. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 800.564.SRJC.

Billie Jean King Meet and hear presentation from tennis legend. Jan 15, 1pm. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Tet Festival Sonoma Vietnamese

Community invites you to celebrate the lunar new year with food and drinks, cultural dances and a traditional long dress fashion show. Sun, Jan 15, noon. Free. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

National Theatre Live

Volunteer day

War Horse

Learn how to become an event helper or museum guide. Jan 15, 11am. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Free screening of Golden Globe-nominated film and complimentary tasting at Bello Family Vineyards’ new tasting room. Free tickets required; pick up at theater. Jan 14, 8pm. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3946.

Film

Live series of performances broadcast from the National Theatre, London. Jan 12 at 7:30 and Jan 14 at 1, “Collaborators.” $30. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Lectures Martin Luther King Celebration Featuring civil rights activist Elbert “Big Man” Howard. Jan 15, 5:15pm. Santa Rosa High School, 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Napa Valley Singles Convention Jeannine Kaiser, author of “30 Secrets to Finding Love in 2012” keynotes. Jan 13, 7:30pm. $10. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

State of the County The Day Diplomacy Died Screening of documentary on the 2003 jailing of independent journalists in Cuba. Jan 13, 7pm. $5. First United Methodist Church, 9 Ross Valley Dr, San Rafael.

Food & Drink Blood Drive for Lunch Give a pint of blood to Blood Centers of the Pacific and get a free lunch courtesy of Moylan’s brewpub. Jan 14. Moylan’s Brewery, 15 Rowland Way, Novato. 415.898.HOPS.

Ceres Benefit Event to help Ceres Community Project will feature threecourse dinner served by teen chefs, music by The Poyntlyss Sisters and Miss Kitty & the Big Dogs and a silent auction. Jan 13, 5pm. $35. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol.

Olive Curing Seminar Renowned olive expert Don Landis offers curing techniques and recipes. Jan 15, 11am. Jacuzzi Family Vineyards, 24724 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.931.7575.

Martini Madness Napa’s top bartenders put their skills to the test to concoct the best martini. Fri, Jan 13, 5pm. $40-$85. Saddles, 29 E MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.933.3191.

Rajat Parr James Beard Foundation nominee reads from his book “Secrets of the Sommeliers” and guests enjoy light dinner. Jan 17, 6:30pm. $59. Fresh Starts Cooking School, 1399 North Hamilton Pkwy, Novato. 415.382.3363.

Winter Wineland

SHOOTIN’ HOOPS The Harlem Globetrotters strut their stuff Jan. 11 at the Santa Rosa Junior College. See Events, this page.

Over 140 wineries in Alexander, Dry Creek, and Russian River Valley Sonoma celebrate wine, art and education. Jan 14 and Jan 15, 11am-4pm. $35-$55. For complete list of locations, visit www.wineroad.com.

Breakfast forum and annual report delivered by Supervisor Shirlee Zane with analysis and forecast for the California economy presented by Dr. Jerry Nickelsburg. Jan 13, 7am. $55. Doubletree Hotel, 1 Double Tree Dr, Rohnert Park.

Keena Turner 49ers alum converses with Bruce Macgowan as part of ongoing A-List series. Wed, Jan 11. $12-$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Readings Bean Affair Jan 15, 2-4pm “Language Factory of the Mind,” with David Beckman Free. 1270 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.395.0177.

Book Passage Jan 11, 7pm “Dead Letters: The Very Best Grateful Dead Fan Mail” with Paul Grushkin. Jan 12, 7pm, “The Last Nude” with Ellis Avery. Jan 13, 7pm, “Women, Spirituality and Transformative Leadership” with Kathe Schaaf. Jan 14, 10am, “Unstuff Your Life! Get and Stay Organized for Good: New Year’s Resolution Edition,” class with Andrew Mellen. Jan 14, 10:30am, “Finding and Working with an Agent” class with Andy Ross. Jan 14, 1pm, “Coming Home to Who You Are: Discovering Your Natural Capacity for Love, Integrity, and Compassion” with David Richo. Jan 14, 1:30pm, “How to Write a Page Turner,” class with Kristen Tracy. Jan 14, 4pm, “At High Altitude and the Color of Desire” with David Watts. Jan 14, 7pm, “Wild Horses, Wild Dreams,” with Lindy Hough. Jan 15, 4pm, “The Tiger’s Wife” with Tea Obreht. Jan 16, noon, Literary Luncheon

with Elizabeth George. Jan 17, 6:30pm, “The Mindful Writer: Practices for Great Writing and a Great Life,” class with Albert DeSilver. Jan 17, 7pm, “American Dervish” with Ayad Akhtar. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jan 12, 3:30pm, “Eve,” with Anna Carey. Jan 14, 1pm, “The Underside of Joy,” with Sere Prince Halverson. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

River Reader Jan 12, 6pm, “Maman’s Homesick Pie: A Persian Heart in an American Kitchen” with Donia Bijan. Author reading and dinner, including signed copy of the book. $35. 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

Sebastopol Gallery Jan 12, 6:30pm, “Co-Creation: Fifty Years in the Making,” with Conrad Bishop and Elizabeth Fuller. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7200.

Theater The 39 Steps Hitchcock’s fast-paced Tony and Drama Desk awardwinning whodunit. $10-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Drowsy Chaperone The ultimate love letter to musical theater. Jan 13-Feb 5, 2 and 8pm. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Last Five Years One-act musical by Tony-award winning composer Jason Robert Brown. Jan 12-14, 8pm and Sun, Jan 15, 3pm. $12-$22. Novato Theater Company, 484 Ignacio Blvd, Novato.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


33 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 1-17, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Marvin’s Garden Herbal Cooperative

Oldest Operating Dispensary in Sonoma County!

Yo el Rey Roasting/ Art House

NO R E MEMBE! FE

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1217 Washington St, Downtown Calistoga www.yoelrey.com 707.942.1180 The Ehlers Collective (The Baker Sisters, Brown, CJM, Daithi, and Reyes) Dec 3 to Jan 28


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34

AFTER

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of January 11

ARIES (March 21-April 19) The Sanskrit word tapasya is translated as “heat,” but in the yogic tradition it means “essential energy.” It refers to the practice of managing your life force so that it can be directed to the highest possible purposes, thereby furthering your evolution as a spiritual being. Do you have any techniques for accomplishing that—either through yoga or any other techniques? This would be a good year to redouble your commitment to that work. In the coming months, the world will just keep increasing its output of trivial, energy-wasting temptations. You’ll need to be pretty fierce if you want to continue the work of transforming yourself into the Aries you were born to be: focused, direct, energetic and full of initiative.

TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

“Live out of your imagination, not your history,” says Stephen Covey, author of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. While that’s always true, it will be especially crucial for you to remember in 2012. This is the year you can transcend stale traditions, Taurus—a time when you can escape your outworn habits, reprogram your conditioned responses and dissolve old karma. You will be getting unparalleled opportunities to render the past irrelevant. And the key to unlocking all the magic will be your freewheeling yet highly disciplined imagination. Call on it often to show you the way toward the future.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Comedian Steven Wright says his nephew has HDADD, or high definition attention deficit disorder. “He can barely pay attention, but when he does it’s unbelievably clear.” I’m predicting something like that for you in the coming week, Gemini. You will encounter more things that are dull than are interesting, but those few that fascinate you will awaken an intense focus that allows you to see into the heart of reality. Model

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CANCER (June 21–July 22)

As I contemplate the most desirable fate you could create for yourself, I’m reminded of a lyric from one of my songs: “We are searching for the answers / so we can destroy them and dream up better questions.” Here’s what I’m implying by that, Cancerian: This is not the right time for you to push for comprehensive formulas and definitive solutions; rather, it’s a favorable moment to draw up the incisive inquiries that will frame your quest for comprehensive formulas and definitive solutions. That quest is due to begin in two weeks. For now, raise your curiosity levels, intensify your receptivity and make yourself highly magnetic to core truths.

for you to experiment around the house—refining your relationship with your roommates, moving the furniture around, and in general rearranging the domestic chemistry—but please avoid trying stuff as crazy as Handl’s.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

In 1878, Thomas Edison perfected the phonograph, a machine that could record sounds and play them back. There had been some primitive prototypes before, but his version was a major improvement. And what were the first sounds to be immortalized on Edison’s phonograph? The rush of the wind in the trees? A dramatic reading of the Song of Songs? The cries of a newborn infant? Nope. Edison recited the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb.” When you make your own breakthrough in communication sometime soon, Scorpio, I hope you deliver a more profound and succulent message.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) I suspect you may soon find yourself in a situation similar to the one that 19th-century American president Abraham Lincoln was in when he said the following: “If this is coffee, please bring me some tea. But if this is tea, please bring me some coffee.” In other words, Sagittarius, you may not be picky about what you want, but whatever it is, you’ll prefer it to be authentic, pure and distinctly itself. Adulterations and hodgepodges won’t satisfy you, and they won’t be useful. Hold out for the Real Thing.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Last summer, before the football season started, sportswriter Eric Branch wrote about a rookie running back that San Francisco 49er fans were becoming increasingly excited about. The newbie had made some big plays in exhibition games. Would he continue performing at a high level when the regular season began? Were the growing expectations justified? After a careful analysis, Branch concluded that the signs were promising, but not yet definitive: “It’s OK to go mildly berserk,” he informed the fans. That’s the same message I’m delivering to you right now, Capricorn. The early stages of your new possibility are encouraging. It’s OK to go mildly berserk, but it’s not yet time to go totally bonkers.

LEO (July 23–August 22) “A writer—and, I believe, generally all persons—must think that whatever happens to him or her is a resource,” said author Jorge Luis Borges. “All that happens to us—including our humiliations, our misfortunes, our embarrassments— all is given to us as raw material, as clay, so that we may shape our art.” I agree that this advice isn’t just for writers, but for everyone. And it so happens that you are now in an astrological phase when adopting such an approach would bring you abundant wisdom and provide maximum healing. So get started, Leo: wander through your memories, reinterpreting the difficult experiences as rich raw material that you can use to beautify your soul and intensify your lust for life.

AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) In summer, the pickleweed plant thrives in the saltwater marshes around San Francisco Bay. In many places, bright orange patches of the dodder plant intermingle with the pickleweed’s sprightly jade green, creating festive displays that suggest nature is having a party. But there’s a secret buried in this scene. The dodder’s webby filaments are actually parasites that suck nutrients from the pickleweed. In accordance with the astrological omens, Aquarius, I’ll ask you if a situation like that exists in your own life. Is there a pretty picture that hides an imbalance in the give-and-take of energy? It’s not necessarily a bad thing—after all, the pickleweed grows abundantly even with its freeloader hanging all over it—but it’s important to be conscious of what’s going on.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

PISCES (February 19–March 20)

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) A Swedish man named Richard Handl decided to conduct a scientific experiment in his kitchen. Would it be possible to split atoms using a homemade apparatus? He wanted to see if he could generate atomic reactions with the radioactive elements radium, americium and uranium. But before he got too far into the process, the police intervened and ended his risky fairy tale. I bring this to your attention, Libra, as an example of how not to proceed in the coming weeks. It will be a good time

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

“Poetry is the kind of thing you have to see from the corner of your eye,” said the poet William Stafford. “If you look straight at it, you can’t see it, but if you look a little to one side, it is there.” As I contemplate your life in the immediate future, Virgo, I’m convinced that his definition of poetry will be useful for you to apply to just about everything. In fact, I think it’s an apt description of all the important phenomena you’ll need to know about. Better start practicing your sideways vision.

“That in a person which cannot be domesticated is not his evil but his goodness,” said the writer Antonio Porchia. I invite you to keep that challenging thought close to your heart in the coming days, Pisces. In my astrological opinion, it is an excellent moment to tune in to your wildest goodness—to describe it to yourself, to cherish it as the great treasure it is, to foster it and celebrate it and express it like a spring river overflowing its banks.


35

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PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

SPIRITUAL

Connections

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Resources for your spiritual journey (contemplative prayer/meditation practices, workshops/retreats, spiritual direction, art gallery, reading room, bodywork). 1601 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org An Evening of Sacred Hebrew Chant and Music Join the sacred chant: a practice of spiritual communal worship, praising the Holy One. Thurs, Jan 26, 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm, Journey Center, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org. Centering Prayer Retreat Day Experience a variety of contemplative prayer practices. Beginners welcome. Sun, Feb 5, 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm, Journey Center, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org. The Wings and Arrows of Outrageous Fortune: Join Kathryn Grant (NC-IEA) for an intermediate Enneagram workshop. Sat, Jan 28, 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm, Journey Center, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org.

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707.528.2540 3401 Cleveland Ave #2 Santa Rosa

Great Massage By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883

Meditation Group of Self-Realization Fellowship

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Public welcome. No charge. 795 Farmers Lane #22 24/7 VM 707-523-9555

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Paramahansa Yogananda author of

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Mahakaruna Buddhist Meditation Center Offers ongoing classes for all levels of practice and interest. NEW CLASS! How To Become A Friend To The World A series of Commentaries & Meditations Exploring Love & Compassion from a Buddhist Perspective: Tues & Wed evenings, Dec 13 through Jan 28. 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:45pm. Eveyone is welcome. $10 donation requested per class. Prayers for World Peace: Sun 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:45am Everyone is welcome. 304 Petaluma Blvd, N, Petaluma 707.776.7720 www.meditateinnorcal.org.

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 1-17, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Movie Extras

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Napa Meditation class: Universal Love and Compassion. Mondays from 7:00 to 8:30pm at Jessel's Studio Gallery. We will explore Buddhism and the spiritual path, and what it means in our lives. The classes are $10 drop in; no commitment is needed, and they are open to both beginning and more experienced meditators. For information, call Mike Smith at 415.717.4943 or www.meditationinnorcal.org Jessel Gallery is at 1019 Atlas Peak Road, Napa, 707.257.2350. www.jesselgallery.com

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