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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Frack All Y’all

Small towns take on corporate bullies BY GLENN SCHERER

T

he town of Dryden, N.Y., has banned fracking, the controversial practice of shooting high-pressure toxic chemicals and water underground to release natural gas. The anti-fracking ordinance was immediately challenged by an irate gas-drilling corporation, Anschutz Exploration Corporation, which is taking the town of 13,000 to the State Supreme Court.

Across the country other towns frustrated by the failure of federal and state authorities to regulate fracking are acting to protect property rights, public health and local economies. Dozens of municipalities across the country have banned or curtailed fracking, while fracking companies have responded to this local revolt by threatening litigation intended to bankrupt and break the will of towns standing in their way. Communities are not relenting, because stakes are high. Fracked wells that leak pollute drinking water. Radioactive frack wastewater, stored in open pools, pollutes the air and groundwater, and overwhelms sewage treatment plants. Tank trucks that transport the millions of gallons of freshwater needed for fracking clog and ruin scenic country roads. Fracking industrialization hurts rural economies dependent on tourism. Unfortunately, defending communities from fracking is an uphill battle. Under the Bush administration, Congress exempted fracking from the Safe Drinking Water Act. Those in drilling communities are quickly morphing into an environmental movement in direct counterpoint to Congressional Republican efforts to shut down the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. As a result, towns often stand alone to protect citizens’ rights, ranging from corporate threats such as the Keystone XL pipeline in Atkinson, Neb.; mountaintop removal in Stephens, W.V.; the pollution of drinking water by agribusiness in Seville, Calif.; and the depletion of aquifers by bottled water companies in Newfield, Maine. Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has recognized corporations as super-citizens—backed by wealth and political influence— municipalities have no choice but to sound the battle cry and expend limited resources to prevent corporate bullying. This is their established right! Towns pass ordinances to keep dogs on leashes to prevent them from defecating in your front yard. It is no different—and more imperative—to require the leashing of aggressive corporations who pose a greater threat to private property, public health, local economies and our American way of life. Glenn Scherer is the senior editor of Blue Ridge Press. He lives in Vermont.

Money Talks

you turn down publicly financed campaigns at the national level.

The reason that the Occupy Wall Street movement is doomed to failure is actually hidden in your article about the Occupy Santa Rosa event (“Here to Stay,” Oct. 19). Leilani Clark interviewed local politician Susan Gorin who was quoted as saying, “[W]e want to see some serious fixes in our banking and economic systems.” Notice how Councilperson Gorin conveniently forgot to mention any serious fixes to our political system, which is the entity that controls our banking and economic systems. I haven’t yet met any Democrat or any Republican at any level of government who is a hardcore advocate for 100 percent publicly financed campaigns at all levels, which is the only real way to fix these problems. I actually wrote Lynn Woolsey a letter a few years back advising her that we need 100 percent publicly financed campaigns. She replied that she is for “campaign finance reform,” yet she has no problem taking money from lobbyists like the ones at Infineon Raceway.

The 99 %-ers need to realize one other basic thing about the economy and jobs, and that is that some of our economic problems are now happening as a result of overpopulation. We have allowed our population to rise to the point where the laws of supply and demand are starting to have a major effect on our economy, especially those at the lower end of the economic scale. Some people think that we can create an unlimited number of jobs for an unlimited number of people. As the population rises, so will the gap between the rich and the poor because of those same laws. But don’t worry, I am sure that our illustrious leaders will find all of us jobs working at the local unobtanium processing plants.

Unfortunately, next year most of the 99 %-ers are going to vote for the guy who now says he needs $1 billion to get reelected as president. In the last election, Obama took in about $700,000 in campaign donations, about half of that coming from corporations. The fact that he needs $1 billion this time means that he will be even more indebted to corporate America than he was in 2008. Truth diminishes as campaign contributions rise. Recently, independent Vermont representative Bernie Sanders created a list of America’s top 10 corporate tax cheaters. This list included Bank of America, Citigroup and Goldman Sachs, all of the corporations that the Occupy Wall Street movement is rallying against. I decided to do a little digging, and as it turns out, President Obama took almost three times as much money from this top 10 list of corporate tax cheaters as McCain did in the last election. That is what happens when

DUCLO HAYMAKER Santa Rosa

Rock the Vote Herman Cain may be a horse’s ass, but horseshit can help flowers grow. If a person fails, it is not always his or her fault, but if a giant movement fails, it might be because crying and moaning is not enough. If the Occupy movement was registering voters, the incumbents would have to take notice; registered voters put Obama in power. For all we wish he had done, he is still probably better for the country than John McCain and Sarah Palin. I have not seen one “Register and Vote” sign among all the Occupy news stories. I think that would guarantee safety of the occupiers, since there are laws that protect the right to organize voters.

DAVID WEINSTOCK Fairfax

Jive Joy RE: “Stolen Grief” by Angela Lam Turpin (“Stolen Jive,” Oct. 19)—wow! I think I said that to myself several times when I

Rants

read this story. And again, as I reread it. Can’t imagine I singly hold this response and hope that Ms. Turpin receives the accolades

MARTY ROBERTS

Via email

Dept. of Egads Last week’s news story (“Hospital Heartbeat,” Oct. 26) erroneously identified a Sutter Santa Rosa RN as Laura Hittenfeld. The correct spelling of her name is Laura Hinerfeld. In addition, the letter “Walkable Locale” was incorrectly attributed to Gerry Benway. The credit should be given to John Eder of Sebastopol. We regret the errors.

THE EDS. Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 2–8, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1

Occupy Oakland organizes first general strike in U.S. since 1946

2 ‘Make’ magazine

founder Dale Dougherty honored at White House

3 Berkeley professor and

famous climate-change denier Robert Muller changes tune

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4 U.N. Population Fund

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5 Dan Mozley, famed

CBS newsman and Marin resident, dies at age 90

Didn’t take $billions from taxpayers Puts people before profit

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THE

Paper OFF THE MENU? Pacific Northwest sockeye are the first victims of infectious salmon anemia on the West Coast.

Into the Wild

An aggressive—and deadly—farmed-fish virus could threaten California’s wild-salmon industry BY ERIC JOHNSON

M

argot Stiles, a marine scientist with the conservation group Oceana, calls the breaking news of a salmon-killing virus loose in the Pacific Northwest “horrifying.” Tobias Aguirre, director of the Santa Cruz– based FishWise, agrees that the virus—infectious salmon

anemia (ISA)—could have a “devastating” impact on fisheries in the region and beyond. They both believe the disease could spread to California, a view widely held by ocean ecologists. Scientists in British Columbia announced two weeks ago that the ISA virus had been discovered in sockeye salmon there. It’s the first time the mutant virus has

been found in the open ocean of the North American West Coast. Evidence suggests it spread from fish farms in the area. George Leonard, an aquaculture expert at the Ocean Conservancy’s Santa Cruz office, says it was inevitable that the virus would wind up in Canada, where open-net oceanic fish farming is prevalent. And, he says, it’s difficult to believe that it will not wind up here as well.

Photo courtesy NOAA

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“We’ve seen ISA spread all around the globe,” Leonard says. “It was just a matter of time before it arrived in British Columbia. And I don’t doubt that it will spread here—not because of any of the specifics of this particular disease, but because of the basic principles of ecology. A disease that occurs in a fish farm’s open net is going to be transferred into the outside world. This is not rocket science.” This disease, however, is particularly dangerous. Infectious salmon anemia had been found in ocean-going salmon for years, but it was not deadly in the wild. The virus morphed into a virulent strain in fish-farming pens in Norway. Stiles says poor aquaculture practices contributed to the virus’ mutation. “These were fish living in densely packed pens, being fed antibiotics—these were not healthy fish,” she says. Because there were no predators to pick off the diseased fish, the virus spread rapidly. When some salmon eggs from Norway were imported to Chile in 2007, the virus came with them and decimated the Chilean salmon-farming industry (though farmed coho did not die), which has not recovered. There are no wild salmon native to Chile, so the disease could not spread beyond the fish farms. But British Columbia is home to one of the most productive wild salmon fisheries in the world. The Western Fisheries Research Center, a branch of the U.S. Geological Survey, called the recent discovery a “disease emergency.” Richard Routledge, the Simon Fraser University sockeye researcher whose team found the virus, said the disease could have “a devastating impact” on farmed and wild salmon, as well as grizzly bears, killer whales and wolves, which feed on salmon. “No country has ever gotten rid of [ISA] once it arrives,” Routledge said. Margot Stiles points out that it’s entirely possible that Pacific Northwest sockeye, which have been known to travel as far south as the Mendocino County coast, might come in contact with the salmon that make their

9

Money Talks The brainchild of 27-yearold art-gallery owner Kristen Christian, Bank Transfer Day, set for Nov. 5, hopes to inspire people to move their money out of Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo and into local credit unions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the 99 percent removes our funds from the major banking institutions, we will send a clear message to the 1 percent that conscious consumers wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t support companies with unethical business practices,â&#x20AC;? Christian writes on the Bank Transfer Day Facebook page. Local credit unions are already seeing an upswing in customers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve deďŹ nitely seen an increase in new accounts,â&#x20AC;? says Robin McKenzie, senior vice president of Redwood Credit Union, adding that since Bank of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oct. 5 announcement of a $5 debit card fee, RCU has opened over 300 new accounts by former BofA members. David Williams, vice president of marketing at Community First Credit Union, welcomes the move toward locally grown financial institutions, though he does emphasize that there are â&#x20AC;&#x153;good banksâ&#x20AC;? out there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to recast [Bank Transfer Day] as a transfer out of giant Wall Street banks to local financial institutions, whether they are banks or credit unions,â&#x20AC;? says Williams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Locally, that would include Exchange Bank. There are good banks that do what we do.â&#x20AC;? The priority should be to keep locally earned dollars in local circulation, says Williams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the global banks, they are going for the best return on the dollar,â&#x20AC;? he adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That might be used to fund an oil derrick in Dubai, whereas the community banks and credit unions keep that money and reinvested right here.â&#x20AC;? For more information, visit www.moveyourmoneyproject.org. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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homes in the Monterey Bay. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their habitats do overlap, so there is a deďŹ nite possibility that eventually coho salmon will become infected,â&#x20AC;? she says, adding that British Columbia â&#x20AC;&#x153;is really not that far away from California.â&#x20AC;? FishWiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aguirre, whose international nonproďŹ t organization includes partners in the aquaculture industry, says the apparent outbreak of ISA is only the most recent problem with open-ocean operations in British Columbia. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Net-pen production of salmon in B.C. is highly controversial,â&#x20AC;? Aguirre says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are many peer-reviewed academic papers illustrating the impacts of farmed salmon on wild salmon, as well as impacts on the entire marine ecosystem.â&#x20AC;? The sockeye ďŹ shery in the area is already in near collapse, with many biologists and activists pointing to aquaculture as the culprit. Aguirre says that British Columbia â&#x20AC;&#x153;may be ahead of other regions in some of its efforts to limit risks to the natural ecosystem.â&#x20AC;? However, if it is shown that ISA is linked to the salmon farms, there will be intense pressure to put stricter regulations in place. Many advocates, including FishWise, have called on salmon producers to raise their ďŹ sh in fully enclosed pens. A law penned by California state senator Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto, strictly regulated aquaculture in this state in 2006, virtually banning the open-ocean farming of carnivorous ďŹ sh such as salmon. But George Leonard points out that statewide regulations are not sufficient protection for oceangoing species. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very difficult to put a fence in the ocean,â&#x20AC;? Leonard says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;California took precautions to protect the waters under its control, but it has very little impact on other states or, in this case, other countries.â&#x20AC;? In the wake of the apparent ISA outbreak, the U.S. Senate approved an amendment calling for an investigation and â&#x20AC;&#x153;a rapid federal responseâ&#x20AC;? to the threat.

Green Zone

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Sized Up

Children are getting more radiation per conversation BY JULIANE POIRIER

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y one decade of parenting has taught me that children are not miniature adults; rather, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re different in just about every way, because they are still developing and have not amassed a battery of defense strategies, either psychological or physiological. Adults are literally more hard-headed because weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had more time to grow a thick skull, whereas the brain case of a child is softer, thinner and more vulnerable to harm. Children wear bike and boarding helmets designed to protect a kidsized head; it would be dangerous, and dumb, to say that grownupsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; head protection gear is good enough for little people.

So when it comes to cell-phone safety standards, why is it that levels set for adults, based on skull

measurements modeled from a plexiglas mannequin of a large manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head, are supposed to ďŹ t kids as well? And for that matter, why are they supposed to work for adults who happen to be small? An international scientiďŹ c study titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Exposure Limits: The Underestimation of Absorbed Cell Phone Radiation, Especially in Children,â&#x20AC;? published Oct. 17, concludes that the standards, in fact, do not ďŹ t. Present cell-phone radiation standards, based on speciďŹ c absorption rates approved by the FCC, were determined by adult physiologyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;speciďŹ cally, male adult physiology. According to the new report, the absorption rates â&#x20AC;&#x153;for a 10-year old is up to 153 percent higherâ&#x20AC;? than for adults, owing to the fact that in a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head â&#x20AC;&#x153;absorption of the skullâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bone marrow can be 10 times greater than adults.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just the brain thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vulnerable. Cell-phone radiation heats up and damages other human tissues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pulsed digital radiation from cell phones,â&#x20AC;? reports the Journal of Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine, â&#x20AC;&#x153;induces an array of biological impacts ranging from blood-brain barrier leakage to brain, liver and eye damage in prenatally exposed offspring of rabbits and rats, to genotoxic effects on human cells.â&#x20AC;? This type of pulsed radiation mentioned in the study comes speciďŹ cally from the type of cell phones used in this country by AT&T and T-Mobile, referred to as GSM- and UMTS-type cell phones. But all cell phones emit radiation. Researchers conclude that allowable radiation levels should be based on metrics from MRI scans of real humans in a range of ages and sizes, including children, small adults and pregnant women. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take a scientist to see that radiation levels safe for a large man arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t safe for a child. So parents, get your kids wired headsets for cell phones. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re even cheaper than bike helmets. For more, visit www.electromagnetichealth. org.

CASEIN POINT Exemplary mac ’n’ cheese is a comfort-food staple at Stark’s Steakhouse in Santa Rosa.

Good ’n’ Gooey Mac and cheese retains gourmet status

B

e careful,” warns my waiter, sliding a large crouton dish into place on the table—a coating of richly browned cheese toasted into a steaming moonscape across the top, a slight hissing sound emanating from beneath the cheesy crust. “It’s still bubbling a little,” he cautions, “so proceed carefully.”

At Sebastopol’s K&L Bistro,

a large blackboard on the wall features a pertinent quote from the late Julia Child: “You don’t have to cook fancy or complicated masterpieces—just good food from fresh ingredients.” It’s the perfect motto to ponder as I wait for my macaroni and cheese to cool a bit. Macaroni and cheese is the reigning king of comfort foods. Among the oldest and simplest dishes ever devised, it has in the past decade established itself as a coveted culinary staple at even the most elegant eateries. Often referred to simply as mac

BY DAVID TEMPLETON ’n’ cheese (the British use the conjunction-free term “macaroni cheese,” and the Caribbeans have named it macaroni pie), the enduring entrée emerged several years ago as part of a recessionera rediscovery of classic homestyle recipes. Initially, it was dismissed—along with meatloaf sandwiches—as a mere fad. Mac ’n’ cheese, however, has hardly faded away. Today, there are countless cookbooks packed with imaginative variations on the theme of pasta and cheesy comestibles. Just across the bay

in Oakland, a little eatery named Homeroom recently opened with a menu based entirely on macaroni and cheese. Meanwhile, many of the best restaurants in the North Bay have continued to offer this quintessentially American dish, due largely to popular demand. The ever-inventive culinary king Mark Stark (Willi’s Wine Bar, Stark’s Steakhouse and others) offers rotating variations of mac ’n’ cheese at his restaurants, including the addictively unexpected Cambozola macaroni and cheese, rich and tangy and irresistible. Though hardly the first restaurant to serve truffled macaroni and cheese, Franco’s Ristorante in downtown Santa Rosa has earned fans since adding the dish to its menu. All proof that macaroni and cheese, with or without truffles, is here to stay. “We serve a lot of macaroni and cheese,” laughs Lucas Martin, the L at K&L Bistro (wife Karen completes the equation). “For 10 years, it’s been one of our big hits.” Martin is amused that a dish many have dismissed as too unsophisticated for culinarysavvy adults has continued to hold its own on a menu that includes things like grilled wild steelhead salmon served with potato purée, spinach, green onions and chili flakes. “I find it interesting,” he says, “that so many people order the macaroni and cheese for their kids, and then end up eating it themselves. People forget how decadent a dish it can be.” K&L’s recipe is nice and simple: begin with a basic flour-andbutter roux, then add a thick and creamy mix of heavy cream and milk in a one-to-three ratio. This is poured into a crouton of preboiled macaroni and plenty of Gruyère and Swiss cheese, and baked until the crust is irresistibly brown and crunchy. “We’ve got it dialed in by now,” says Martin. “Sometimes people go to extremes, adding all kinds of stuff to the macaroni and cheese. We keep it simple. There are certain things you don’t mess with.”

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 2–8, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Alma Shaw

Dining

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 2– 8 , 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12

Dining

MA R I N CO U N T Y

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $.

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Applewood Inn California cuisine. $$$. California wine country food inspired by European traditions. Dinner daily; midweek locals’ specials. 13555 Hwy 116, Guerneville. 707.869.9093. Arrigoni’s Delicatessen & Cafe Deli. $. A perennial favorite with the downtown lunch crowd. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 701 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1297.

Betty’s Fish & Chips Seafood. $-$$. Cheerful, bustling, totally informal eatery serving authentic Brit fare. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 4046 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0899.

Bovolo Italian/ Mediterranean. $-$$. Slow Food from Northern California-sourced ingredients. Fabulous made-in-house pork sandwiches, pizzas and salumi, Lunch and dinner daily. 106 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2962.

Karma Bistro Indian. $$. A variety of flavorful regional specialties. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 7530 Commerce Blvd, Cotati. 707.795.1729.

La Fondita Mexican. $. Hearty, filling, very tasty. No glop or goop here. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 816 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.0881.

La Gare French. $$$. Dine in an elegant atmosphere of Old World charm. Dinner, Wed-Sun 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4355.

La Hacienda Mexican. $$. A family-style Mexican eatery with a Michoacan touch. Lunch and dinner daily. 134 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.9365.

Mosaic California cuisine. $$-$$$. Chef Tai Olesky shines with local, sustainable ingredients cooked with innovation and thought. Terrific outside patio; warm and cozy inside for winter. Dinner,daily; brunch, Sun. 6675 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.7503 Ravenette Bistro. $$. Here’s that secret spot you look for all your life: great food, cheery service and a cozy ambiance. Menu changes weekly, with focus on tapas-style small plates. Dinner, Thurs-Sat; brunch, Sun. 117 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1770.

Stark’s Steakhouse Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever have. “Other than steak” menu changes seasonally. Happy hour Mon-Fri, 3 to 6. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

Starlight Wine Bar American bistro. $$. Tasty concoctions with a New Orleans flair. Menu is divided into pizzas, small plates, charcuterie and desserts. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 6761 Sebastopol Ave (in the Gravenstein station), Sebastopol. 707.823.1943.

Thai Pot Thai. $$. A local favorite for authentic Thai recipes with pad Thai, curries, exotic appetizers and entrées. Lunch and dinner daily. 2478 W Third St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.9296. 6961 Sebastopol Ave (across from West America Bank), Sebastopol. 707.829.8889.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525. Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900. Poggio Italian. $$-$$$. Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6540 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037. Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

SMALL BITES

Beak Season The 25th Annual Good Food Hour Recipe Contest is on, and finding the most delicious way to create a meal out of our fairfeathered fowl could earn one a spot in the upcoming John Ash cookbook, Culinary Birds. KSRO will broadcast live at G&G Market in Santa Rosa to judge the contest, and this year it’s all about chicken. According to host and chef John Ash, “Chicken is a true culinary star. It can be wrapped and rolled, seasoned and sauced, while never losing its identity.” Four finalists will hold a taste-off with Ash (shown) and co-host Steve Garner, along with a panel of celebrity judges. Entries will be awarded prizes such as $250 cash for the first place winner, gift certificates, cooking classes, wine and cookbooks—and one lucky winner will have his or her recipe featured in Culinary Birds. Deadline for entry is Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 5pm. Share your culinary genius by sending your original chicken recipe to KSRO Recipe Contest, PO Box 2158, Santa Rosa, CA, 95405. (Fax: 707.571.1097; email: steve@ksro.com.) Taste-off held on Saturday, Nov. 12, at G&G Market. 1211 West College Ave., Santa Rosa. 11am. 707.546.6877.—Anna Freeman

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

C.C. Blue Japanese. $$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place

for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

say more? Open for lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Fumé Bistro & Bar

Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656.

California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Go Fish Seafood/sushi. $$$$$. An über-trio of chefs all in one fantastic fresh fish house: Cindy Pawlcyn, Victor Scargle and Ken Tominaga. Need we

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Camellia Cellars Like owner Chris Lewand, the wine is just so darned approachable and easy-going. Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon are most consistently strong. 57 Front St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–6pm. 888.404.9463.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery Spacious, clean and bright, otherwise not much to recommend it–except a stellar lineup of finely crafted, fruit-forward wines. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Sebastopol. 10am–4:30pm daily. $10 tasting fee. 707.827.3600.

Graton Ridge Cellars Formerly an apple shed beloved by regular customers who drove up to get juice and apples, this tasting room is clean and contemporary, with a bit of vineyardy wine country art on the walls, and an apple dessert wine. The apples are not gone after all. 3561 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Sebastopol. Tasting room open Friday–Sunday, 10am–4:30pm. No fee. 707.823.3040.

Kenwood Vineyards Icon of 1970s wine boom remains more or less the same, a tidy but rambling barn with a modest L-shaped bar serving up ever-popular Sauvignon Blanc, Zinfandel and exclusive Jack London Vineyard wines. Prices also frozen in time: pick up a solid, Sonoma County wine without being left wearing nothing but a barrel. 9592 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. 10am–4:30pm daily; tasting fee, $5. 707.833.5891.

Martinelli Winery Only in the 1980s, after hiring a consultant, did Martinelli begin to make A-list wines, but it’s still a funky red-barn establishment at heart. Martinelli Winery, 3360 River Road, Windsor. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.525.0570.

Ridge Vineyards Lytton Springs (WC) Paul Draper is one of the top five winemakers nationwide. The wines are fabulous and tend to inspire devotion in drinkers. The tasting room is an environmentally conscious structure. 650 Lytton Springs Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.433.7721.

River Road Vineyards

Phifer Pavitt Wines Lots

Russian River Pinot for $18 at no-nonsense, solid producer. 5220 Ross Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only, Monday–Friday. 707.887.8130.

of cowgirl sass but just one wine: “Date Night” Cabernet Sauvignon. Hale bale seating. 4660 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4787.

Selby Winery Regularly

PlumpJack Winery

served at White House state dinners, Selby Chard has been through several administrations. 215 Center St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.431.1288.

Part of the huge empire in part helmed by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom. Syrah, Merlot and more. 620 Oakville Crossroad, Oakville. Open daily, 10am– 4pm. 707.945.1220.

Taft Street Winery

Smith-Madrone Riesling is Smith-Madrone’s main fame claim. Its Riesling has steadily gained fame while Napa Valley Riesling in general has become a rare antique. 4022 Spring Mountain Road, St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.2283.

Award-winning Sauvignon Blancs are a great deal. 2030 Barlow Lane, Sebastopol. Monday–Friday, 11am–4pm; Saturday–Sunday, 11am–4:30pm. 707.823.2049.

N A PA CO U N T Y Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.257.2345. Grgich Hills Mike Grgich’s Chardonnays famously beat the competition at the 1976 “Judgment of Paris” and the allestate winery is solar-powered and practices organic and biodynamic. 1829 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 9:30am–4:30pm. 707.963.2784.

Hess Collection Winery An intellectual outpost of art and wine housed in the century-old Christian Brother’s winery. Cab is the signature varietal. 4411 Redwood Road, Napa. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.255.1144.

Somerston Wine Co. Ambitious ranch and winery inclues utility-vehicle “buggy” rides by appointment. The cheese shop and grocery opens in April. All that and wine, too. 6488 Washington St., Yountville. Tasting room open noon-8pm Monday–Thursday; to 9pm, Friday–Saturday; to 10pm, summer. Tastings $15– $40. Ranch tours by appointment, $50. 707.944.8200.

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars (WC) Their three estate-grown Cabs are among the most highly regarded in the world. 5766 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2020.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

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Nichelini Winery Take a joyride in the Napa backcountry and discover this rustic little winery that’s been in the family for generations. See the only Roman wine press in the Western Hemisphere. 2950 Sage Canyon Road, St. Helena. Saturday and Sunday, 10am–5pm. No fee. 707.963.0717.

13

C omplete menu menu options: opt ions: Complete w w w.pea rsona ndco.com www.pearsonandco.com 2759 Fou 2759 Fourth rth S Street, t re et , S Santa a nta R Rosa os a 70 7.5 41 . 3 8 6 8 707.541.3868

Pu mpk in SSoup Pumpkin ou p SSweet weet Potato Potato and a nd Yukon Yu kon Potato P ot ato Gratin Gr a t i n Herbed H erb e d B Bread read SStuffing t u f f ing Roasted R oa s te d W Willie i l l ie B Bird i rd T Turkey u rk e y Cured C u red SSpiral-Cut pira l- Cut H Ham am Pan P an G Gravy r av y Cranberry C ra nberr y SSauce auc e w with it h F Fresh re s h C Citrus itr u s

Join us for a Holiday Party to Remember Custom Food & Beverage Packages Available for Groups from 25–200 Guests Food & Wine Receptions‡Dancing & Live Entertainment‡Holiday Parties We Offer Everything You Need to Create the Perfect Holiday Event

96 Old Courthouse Square Santa Rosa ~ 707.528.8565 www.christysonthesquare.com

The Blue Heron

Restaurant & Tavern 8 beers on tap! Spend the evening with us and enjoy our

LIVE MUSIC Great Food… Great People… Great Music! Open 7 days Dinner Nightly at 5pm Lunch Sat & Sun

www.blueheronrestaurant.com for Live Music & Event Info South Side of Hwy 116, Duncans Mills t707.865.2261

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 2–8, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Wineries

Gourmet Gourmet Thanksgiving T hanksgiving n Food Go F ood to G o

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 2– 8 , 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Winemaker Dinner Series

Ram’s Gate Winery

8ZLUO

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hirty minutes into my tour, Ram’s Gate is still a riddle. The where of it, I’d found. Perched upon a hill overlooking Infineon Raceway and the hay fields of the Carneros, it occupies the former spot of Roche Winery, whose juniper topiary sign served as a landmark, at least in memory. Under the outwardly modest, dusky peaks of the winery is a scene of rustic opulence: Fireplaces blaze away at mid-day, ceilings soar, and a bevy of staff welcome from every corner. The impression is that I’ve stumbled upon an executive retreat. No reservations required.

The Bay View Restaurant at The Inn at the Tides welcomes

PETRONI VINEYARDS Lorenzo Petroni, Proprietor Friday, November 11, 2011 MENU Chilled Prawn Cocktail avocado, diced tomato, aurora sauce 2009 Sauvignon Blanc, Sonoma County

Tart Tatin of Ricotta roasted pepper, basil, balsamic glaze 2008 Chardonnay, Napa Valley

Orecciette Pasta rapini, spicy Italian sausage 2007 Rosso di Sonoma, Estate Grown, Sonoma Valley

Filet of Beef hazelnuts, red wine sauce, basil-mashed potatoes, julienne of vegetables 2005 Poggio alla Pietra, Brunello di Sonoma, Estate Grown, Sonoma Valley

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Profiteroles bitter chocolate custard filled, cabernet sauce 2006 Cabernet Sauvignon, Estate Grown, Sonoma Valley

Coffee Service $

99 per person, plus tax and gratuity

reservations: 707.875.2751 or email: reservations@innatthetides.com

800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

4100 Montgomery Drive Ste C Corner of Montgomery & Summerfield *Dine-in only. Offer cannot be combined with any other promotion. Exp. 11-30-11. Not valid on major holidays.

The how: A group of investors headed by Jeff O’Neill, who manufactures fountains of wine outside of Fresno, enlisted a winemaker, interior designer and architect, all with buzz-worthy names. The presentation is stunning, the possibilities are endless, and the view, sweeping. The why of it doesn’t click until I open the menu. Seven wine selections, sixteen food pairings. Eyeing the unpeopled demonstration kitchen, mistaking it for the production kitchen, I tentatively inquire, “So, can I order anything from this menu . . . now?” The small plate menu is comprehensive, outdoing local restaurants: oysters prepared three enticing ways ($10), a charcuterie board ($17); chanterelle and goat cheese tart, served with a detailed side salad ($12); Carneros lamb albondigas, five meatballs swimming in rich, flavorful mole ($12). There’s short-rib for the Cabernet and crispy cured pork belly, seared gulf shrimp or nicoise salad for the Chardonnay. Oh, and wine . . . One could spend a satisfactory afternoon with just a flute or two of the creamy, nonvintage Brut ($22), a sparkling with top-shelf airs. The 2009 Red Label Sonoma County Chardonnay ($30) is unabashedly fashioned in the big, buttery, and woody style; while the nominally sweet, racy 2010 California Moscato ($22) refreshes the palate. A gulp of black cherry over a haze of smoke, the 2009 Red Label Sonoma County Pinot Noir ($36), aims not for subtlety, but pure fun; while the 2009 Estate Pinot Noir, with potpourri and orange peel, has an unusual profile of furry tannins. With hints of leather over a singular, vanilla-black cherry aroma, the 2008 Syrah, Parmalee-Hill Vineyard ($52) is also a fruit-bomb pleasure. Ram’s Gate aims to be the place that wine country is often imagined to be, where friends linger over wine and food for hours, in the foreground of a magazine-cover view. If the vibe is more executive club than tasting room, consider that a positive development. For as little as six bucks for a glass of Moscato, you’re in. Ram’s Gate Winery, 28700 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Thursday–Monday 10am to 6pm; kitchen 11am to 5pm. 707.721.8700. —James Knight

15

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3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com Mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;F, 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm Now Open for Lunch on Saturdays 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3pm

LES SALADES Orchard Harvest Quinoa & Roasted Carrot Garden Nicoise Poached Chicken Salad Duck Confit

(Dine-in only. Valid with 2 beverage orders. Not valid on holidays. Cannot combine offers.) Exp. 11-30-11 30-11

thaipotrestaurant.com 707-575-9296 2478 W. Third St SSanta anta Rosa R

707-829-8889 In Downtown Sebastopol

Oa si s Sk incare a nd Spa

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All That Glitters T

he new American gold rush is on, though scarce is the prospector with a pan, shovel and pickaxe heading toward the virgin countryside to break dirt. Contemporary precious metal hunters are instead combing through dresser drawers, jewelry containers, boxes, buckets and other dusted receptacles stowed away in the neglected corners of their own households. And rising in conjunction with this new crop of domestic prospectors is a burgeoning

industry of “cash for gold” precious-metal buyers, who are popping up in commercial neighborhoods, shopping malls, hotels, outdoor entertainment venues—even supermarkets. Buyers say they’re helping the community by paying top dollar to consumers in need of cash. But some contend the business is tainted by dishonesty, while law enforcement says pervasive gold exchanges are spurring crime. While gold and silver buying is nothing new—pawn shops, jewelers and coin collectors have long dealt in items made of precious metals—recent years have witnessed a boom in gold

prices, and with it, an industry of merchants focusing strictly on acquiring the metals themselves, without consideration to craftsmanship. In contrast to jewelers and traditional pawn brokers, who tend to sell precious metal in the form of jewelry and other trinkets, cashfor-gold merchants typically pool their takings and resell them, in bulk, as scrap metal. “The bottom line is, what we buy is eventually being melted down,” says Steve Bernard, a buyer with the Exchange, a precious-metal shop that opened two months ago inside G&G Supermarket in Santa Rosa and Petaluma. “It can be a jewelry heirloom or broken pieces of metal—for us there’s no

distinguishing. It’s all metal.” Metals go to a refinery and then through multiple distributors after they leave a gold buyer, Bernard says, explaining that the metals commonly end up with manufacturers who use them in products such as decorative pieces, computer circuits, conductors for high-end audio/visual equipment and aeronautical parts. The Exchange, which has no storefront except for a wooden imitation prospector’s cart that rests incongruously near the beeping checkout stands at G&G, fielded a steady stream of customers on a recent weekday. Ed and Colleen Grant brought in sundry bits of jewelry and walked contentedly away with

Alma Shaw

Gold buyers have multiplied as prices soar, but who’s really profiting? BY JOE ROSEN

O

n another recent weekday, 25 people sat or milled around outside a conference room at the Hilton hotel in northern Santa Rosa, all waiting their turn for an appraisal by America’s Antique Roadshow, a precious-items purchasing company that conducts buys in hotels across the country. (This was one of two such shows occurring that same day in Santa Rosa alone; Secured Gold & Silver Buyers held a similar event at the Hyatt Vineyard Creek Hotel on Third Street). Kerry Vaassen, a buyer with America’s Antique Road Show, said her three-year-old troupe travels to hundreds of towns each year and averages about $250,000 in purchases at each stop. A waiting list inside indicated that between 9am and 1pm, over 170 hopeful sellers had signed up; some weary guests professed to have been waiting an hour and a half for their turn. Among the items brought were gold and silver jewelry sets, old silver dollars, watches, vintage kitchenware and war memorabilia. “I’m at an age where I realize I can’t keep all I have, and I’ve been selling the family jewels,” said

66-year-old Santa Rosa resident Marcia Singer, whose carry-in included silver goblets, a gold necklace and a two-dollar bill from 1870. Singer, a former nightclub entertainer and caregiver who was recently downsized, said she’d recently sold a diamond-studded gold ring for $2,600 to pay for dental work. “A lot of us these days are selling a lot of stuff, but it’s questionable how many of us are educated enough or have the time to do the research on what the actual value of that stuff is,” Singer said. “It’s wrenching when you have to learn to surrender things that hold value in your life. I cried when I sold my ring, but after it was done I felt a real sense of freedom. You let go and you let go.” Vaassen and an executive with Secured Gold & Silver Buyers both cited safety from criminals and low overhead as reasons for posting up in hotels instead of establishing permanent storefronts. Steven Segal, the owner of the Exchange, mentioned those same reasons for setting up inside a supermarket. “This is a community market where people are going to feel safe,” Segal said. For some, the possibility of danger is more keenly felt. Cash for Gold, a downtown Santa Rosa storefront, was robbed at gunpoint in September. One buyer interviewed for this story says he keeps a shotgun at his store for protection.

of pawn outfit must obtain certain information from sellers, including a driver’s license photocopy and fingerprint. Lazzarini says local police departments have seen a surge in stolen jewelry reports over the past couple years, which he attributes to skyrocketing gold prices. The most popular stolen items used to be stereo equipment, firearms and money, but now, he says, “Jewelry is the primary motive for burglary,” he says. “There are a lot of options out there to get rid of that stuff. Trying to keep tabs on all of it becomes very difficult. Before, we only licensed to bread-and-butter pawn shops; now we’ve got companies from all over the place. They might show up at a hotel, have a gold exchange in town and then they’re gone after a week—back to Wisconsin or something.” Another unique problem for law enforcement with cash-for-gold is the impossibility of tracking metals once they’re reduced to scrap, which leaves police with a short window to investigate the whereabouts of stolen items, Lazzarini says. Complicating the problem further are sellers who recognize this loophole and smash their stolen jewelry into unidentifiable pieces before ridding themselves of the scraps, he adds. Buyers interviewed in Santa Rosa and Petaluma profess to paying anywhere from 70–92 percent of gold’s “spot” (standard) value, which today is over $1,600 an ounce (it averaged $1,410 an ounce in 2010; $513 in 2005 and $273 in 2000). By comparison, pawn shops in San Rafael, Petaluma and Santa Rosa gave figures in the 25–60 percent range of standard prices. Gold buyers say they can pay more for precious metals because selling the accumulation as bulk scrap metal yields more money than just reselling individual trinkets. An experiment by the Bohemian yielded a range of offers on a gold ring embedded with a tiny opal

‘People are desperate, but they’re usually getting ripped off.’

S

gt. Michael Lazzarini, a detective with the Santa Rosa Police Department’s property crimes division, says two erstwhile gold-buying kiosks at the Santa Rosa Plaza have been targets of multiple after-hours burglaries. One of the kiosks closed when the owner moved his business; the other, according to Lazzarini, was shut down in August after a police investigation found that customers weren’t filling out the paperwork required of all California pawn outfits. To help prevent and track the resale of stolen items, any type

stone. (Purchased in 1999 for $200, the ring weighed about 2.95 grams, based on a conversion formula for the 1.9 “penny-weight” provided by the buyers.) Of the two cash-forgold shops that appraised the ring, one offered $75 and the other $39, while a jeweler offered $81 and a pawn shop $45. The jeweler said the ring would retail for about $400. Santa Rosa resident Kathe Close, one of 120 local gold enthusiasts belonging to a decades-old club called the Santa Rosa Gold Diggers, says she considers claims by gold buyers of paying 80–90 percent of spot prices “an outright lie.” Close says an appraisal she received two years ago on a gold necklace constituted less than half the gold buyer’s advertised percentage, adding that she’s heard similar stories from other Gold Diggers. In contrast to the homescrounging performed by modernday gold sellers, the Santa Rosa Gold Diggers practice old-fashioned prospecting—mining, digging and sifting in various patches of California gold country to extract the precious ore, Close says. The club’s most gung-ho prospectors camp out in gold country for weeks at a time and sometimes acquire up to $5,000 of gold inside a single month, Close says, adding that club members typically pool their findings and sell them to the same refineries utilized by cash-forgold merchants (refineries will only purchase metals at a certain quantity). Close says the Gold Diggers typically get about 80 percent of spot value, adding that percentages paid by refineries typically vary depending on the amount of gold sold. “A lot of these guys in our group are doubling what they made even four, five months ago,” Close explains. “These are guys who are really eager to share their techniques and help one another.” As for the new American gold diggers—the ones scouring drawers, attics and boxes, and rushing to the nearest pop-up buyer? “People are desperate, and whatever price they get they’re saying, ‘Well, that’s better than nothing,’“ Close says. “But they’re usually getting ripped off.”

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several hundred dollars. Ed said he’d previously sold four gold teeth that he found while cleaning the basement, 20 years after having them extracted. “In the ’80s, gold was cool, but I don’t wear this anymore,” said 47year-old contractor Kevin Cuellar, as he waited in line with a gold chain. “If I had more gold, I’d sell that, too.” The reasons customers give for selling run the gamut, but, unsurprisingly, most cite financial hardship. Sky-high gold prices certainly help, coupled with widespread news reports trumpeting the revival of valuable metals. And then there’s the divorce rate. “The most common thing we get, probably, is the defunct wedding ring,” Bernard says. “I just ended a nine-year thing myself, and I had a ring that said ‘Love Always’ from so-and-so, and I sold that. But times have changed, man. The last time I went through something like that, I just threw [my ring] in the bay.”

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Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

BIG PERM Ultimate ’80s parody-maker Weird Al Yankovic plays hits like ‘Eat It’ and ‘Like a Surgeon’ on Nov. 7 at the Wells Fargo Center.

JUST THE FACTS Leonardo DiCaprio plays J. Edgar in Clint Eastwoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biopic of Hoover, screening Nov. 9 as part of the NVFF.

Hollywood &Vines Is Napa Valley about to become Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next Sundance? BY CHRISTINA JULIAN

A

ďŹ&#x201A;eet of Mercedes-Benzes crawl through downtown Napa. Later, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re motoring through the once sleepy streets of St. Helena, where restaurants boom well past midnight. Crowds jam the streets. Traffic is tight. Harvest is winding down, yet these towns clearly are not. Is this Napa Valley, or

some Hollywood ďŹ lm in the making? According to projections, such a bustling scene may be the future of the Napa Valley Film Festival (NVFF), running Nov. 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;13. In its inaugural year, the festival is poised to take over the region with nearly a hundred shorts, documentaries and feature ďŹ lms screening in venues from Napa to Calistoga over ďŹ ve days. Five thousand people are expected to attend, with enough winetasting,

VIP parties and chauffeured celebrities to do Hollywood proudâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but the question is, will the locals be equally enthused? If you ask Brenda and Marc Lhormer, the founders and directors of the festival, the answer is yes. The roots of the NVFF dig back to 2005, when the Lhormers were approached by a collective of Napa downtown development leaders to gauge interest in what would later become a ďŹ lm festival aimed at exploiting the projected

boom in downtown. In 2008, the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ lm Bottle Shock was released to audiences. Cut to 2009. The Lhormers had severed ties with the Sonoma Valley Film Festival, which theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d spent seven years refashioning, citing â&#x20AC;&#x153;vision divergence from the board.â&#x20AC;? They were primed for their next venture, which happened to coincide with the downtown resurgence. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to do our research and see if the community would embrace it,â&#x20AC;? says Brenda Lhormer. They polled vintners, chambers of commerce, the Napa Destination Council and general managers of a select group of hotels. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We asked them, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;If we did this, what time of year would be right and when would it be economically feasible?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; By 2010, we knew weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d struck upon something people really wanted,â&#x20AC;? says Lhormer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We started getting calls from Yountville, Calistoga and St. Helena, all wanting to be a part of it. There had never been an event that occurred at the same time in all the communities.â&#x20AC;? Though fueled by the positive response, the Lhormers werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sold. So they got to work on a launch event for November of 2010. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That and Sundance [where the NVFF hosted a 300-person party with chef Michael Chiarello] became our proof of concept. We wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have gone forward if we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have equal support in the ďŹ lm community and here.â&#x20AC;? Armed with two successful test drives, the Lhormers moved forward with plans to roll out a full-ďŹ&#x201A;edged event in 2011. The festival, just days away, appears to be buoyed by a bevy of supporters, from its 400 volunteers to participating local businesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We congratulate the NVFF on its inaugural year and celebrate the focused efforts they have made ) 20

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to integrate and collaborate with local businesses,â&#x20AC;? says Katherine Zimmer, vice president of marketing and communications for the Napa Chamber of Commerce. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This far-reaching festival beneďŹ ts our local economy and communities.â&#x20AC;? While many champion the cause, others donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially when it comes to the price. The pricing structure, modeled after the Telluride Film Festival, is based on different tiers of passes that range from $75 to $2,500, granting attendees varying degrees of access to parties, screenings, panels and other perks. Rush tickets for ďŹ lms will be sold for $10 after all passholders have entered, based on availability. Residents of Sonoma and Napa counties are being offered discounted rates for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Festival Passâ&#x20AC;? level at $195 (regularly $245) and the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Plus Passâ&#x20AC;? for $445 (full price $495). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our mission has always been to produce a festival that supports independent ďŹ lmmakers,â&#x20AC;? says Lhormer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A big reason for our nonproďŹ t status is to give our higher level passholders a tax write-off. Sure, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to support ourselves, but we want to give back.â&#x20AC;? This includes the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alliance with Roots of Peace, which will present its Global Citizen on Nov. 12. The program honors recipients of its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mines to Vinesâ&#x20AC;? program, which converts landmines into vineyards in wartorn regions around the world. Others question the need for yet another ďŹ lm festival when the Bay Area is already saturated, especially given the competition with festival heavyweights like Mill Valley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What distinguishes ours from those urban festivals is the community aspect,â&#x20AC;? Lhormer says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to create these intimate villages where you can drink wines, walk from venue to venue, see a culinary demo and watch a movie in an airplane hanger,â&#x20AC;? Lhormer shares. The festival channels Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;up all nightâ&#x20AC;? ways, with each city hosting its rendition of late-night lounges

and VIP afterparties. Some venues will stay open until 2am, a marked switch in cities like St. Helena that typically settle by 10pm when most restaurants close. Every town â&#x20AC;&#x153;villageâ&#x20AC;? will feature its own welcome center, screening venues and wine pavilion, each as diverse as the cities themselves. Venues range from Calistogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gliderport at Indian Springs to Napaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic Hatt Hall, set to transform into the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Loungeâ&#x20AC;? to screen edgier ďŹ lms like White Knight, with Tom Sizemore playing the grand dragon of the Klu Klux Klan. Napaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s welcome center will make use of the former Copia building. A sneak preview of Clint Eastwoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s J. Edgar screens as part of the Nov. 9 sneak preview night in Yountville, with the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening night gala on Nov. 10 at Robert Mondavi Winery. Opening night also features, among many others, a screening of Alexander Payneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Descendants, starring George Clooney, at the Napa Valley Opera House. Those hoping to rub some celebrity elbow will get the chance at the Avia Hotel, where the Buick Tweet House will cater to VIP technophiles and those hoping to catch a glimpse of Adrian Grenier, a conďŹ rmed guest. Other celebrities slated to attend the festival are Jeffrey Wright, Judy Greer, Dane Cook, Matthew Lilliard, Eliza Dushku, Rob Morrow, Scott Wolf, Freddy Rodriguez and Heather Morrisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;some of which will participate in Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Actors in Conversationâ&#x20AC;? panel at Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz Club in Napa. The festival ends on Nov. 13 with the closing-night feature Like Crazy, starring Felicity Jones and directed by Drake Doremus, followed by an awards ceremony at the Napa Valley Opera House. And in true Hollywood style, the festival ends with a multi-venue wrap party downtown at 1313 Main, Zins Valley and Morimoto. As in Hollywood, entry to the party is exclusive to passholders. The Napa Valley Film Festival runs Nov. 9-13. For full festival schedule, see www.napavalleyfilmfest.org.

Eric Chazankin

42-FACED Dan Saski takes on the

exhausting ‘Fully Committed’ once again, at the Sixth Street Playhouse.

Me, Me and Me Dan Saski juggles 42 roles in ‘Fully Committed’ BY DAVID TEMPLETON

T

he best part of doing Fully Committed again,” says actor Dan Saski, “is that I get to invent these characters all over again— and fix anything I didn’t like the last time.”

When Saski appears in Becky Mode’s popular one-man comedy this week in the Studio at the Sixth Street Playhouse (running Nov. 4–12), it will be the third time he has played the part—or should we say parts—in the last four years. In the play, Sam is an actor languishing between jobs, who makes ends meet working in the basement of a fancyschmancy New York restaurant.

‘Fully Committed’ runs Nov. 4–5 and 10–12 in the Studio at Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. All dates 8pm, with additional Saturday matinees at 2pm on Nov. 5 and 12. $20. 707.523.4185.

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Stage

He suffers through a constant barrage of phone calls, begging for reservations. As written by Mode, one solitary actor plays all 42 characters, morphing from the harried Sam into a parade of distinct people, all begging for a reservation. With this new production, directed by Dodds Delzell, Saski has enjoyed the process of revisiting every character and exploring each with fresh eyes. “Last time,” he allows, “I didn’t feel that some of the characters were all that fully realized. Now, four years later, I actually get to do something about that.” Fully Committed (the name is the restaurant’s euphemism for “totally booked up”) is an incredibly physical, incredibly fast-faced show. Often performed straight through without intermission, the Sixth Street production will actually feature one—something for which Saski is grateful. “It’s actually a lot of fun doing this show in one big rush,” Saski says. “It’s like running a race, a marathon. And it’s really satisfying to get to the end, and say, ‘Wow, I made it!’ But on the other hand, this is a pretty crazy, exhausting show. So now, I’m kind of looking forward to getting a break in the middle.” According to Saski, the toughest part of this show isn’t dashing back and forth across the stage. And it isn’t stepping crisply in and out of four dozen characters. “The toughest part of the show is keeping them all in order,” he confesses. “Every time the phone rings, I have to remember who it is, so that I can become that caller. If I remember who it is, then I know the lines. It’s a lot of mental discipline.” But the most important thing to remember, Saski has discovered, is very simple, and absolutely crucial. “I have to remember to take time to breathe,” he laughs. “In a show like this, breathing is very, very important.”

Film

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PICKING UP PIECES Elizabeth Olsen plays a cult survivor and Sarah Paulson,

the sister who tries to repair her broken life in ‘Martha Marcy May Marlene.’

Family Ties

‘Martha Marcy’ a grim look at cult’s damaging effect BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he ominous Martha Marcy May Marlene has a tongue-twister title, but it’s a title worth learning. Elizabeth Olsen, younger sister of the Olsen twins, plays a girl unstuck in time, completely hollowed out by a cult leader named Patrick (John Hawkes).

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After she escapes from the compound in upstate New York, Martha is traumatized by memories of what was done to her, and what she did to others. Martha’s estranged sister Lucy (Sarah Paulson) puts the penniless girl up in her lakeside vacation house. The vacation turns dismal: severely traumatized and yet unable to put her ordeal in words, Martha thwarts her sister’s attempts to connect. What happened to Martha is cloudy and half-remembered, though not all Gothic; much of it she spent as an underfed female drone subject to murderous threats. And probably not coincidentally, director Sean Durkin gives the cult leader a Manson air. Patrick looks startlingly like Charlie as the older jailbird, and he considers himself a folk musician, too, just as Manson did. Durkin seems to understand that what makes this character interesting isn’t his followers’ crimes, but the hold the leader has over his followers. The film’s turning point has Patrick making his family listen to a song he’s written about Martha, whom he’s renamed Marcy May. “You’re just a picture on the wall,” he sings. In one of the year’s key performances, Olsen gives us a memorable portrait of a girl split in pieces. What I liked best here was the note of arrogance that comes in cult living: who else can experience love and life as well as those within the width of the circle? The film shows us where the attraction lies: the cracks in normal society, the fissures large enough for a spider to crawl in . . . ‘Martha Marcy May Marlene’ opens Friday, Nov. 4, at Summerfield Cinemas. 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. www.summerfieldcinemas.com.

NEW MOVIES Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life (NR; 130 min.) Biopic on the great French pop singer follows his boyhood in occupied France to his death in 1991 at age 62. Based on the graphic novel by director Joann Sfar. (NB)

Martha Marcy May Marlene (R; 101 min.) A young woman escapes from a cult and tries to put her life back together. See review, adjacent page.

ALSO PLAYING The Big Year (PG; 100 min.) Under David Frankel’s laid-back direction, co-stars Steve Martin, Owen Wilson and Jack Black find some appealing comedic harmonies. The Big Year isn’t screamingly funny, but it’s scenic, and a number of wellknown actors turn up, as if they’d heard that Howard Franklin’s script was unusual—among them Anjelica Huston, Dianne Wiest and Brian Dennehy. There’s so much feeling in it—and so much snow—it seems certain this will join that small set of films that people will watch again and again on TV at the winter solstice. (RvB)

Dolphin Tale (PG; 113 min.) A young boy (Nathan Gamble) becomes friends with a dolphin that has become seriously injured by a crab trap. Morgan Freeman plays the doctor who creates a prosthetic tail for the creature. Based on a true story, the film also stars Harry Connick Jr. and Ashley Judd. (LC)

50/50 (R; 99 min.) Kyle (Seth Rogen) uses any and every means necessary—sex, drugs and profanity—in this heavy-hearted comedy to help his best friend Adam (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) cope with a recent cancer diagnosis. (LS)

Footloose (PG-13; 117 min.) Remake of the 1984 film that launched Kevin Bacon stars newcomer Kenny Wormald. Also with Andie MacDowell and Dennis Quaid. (NB)

The Ides of March (R; 101 min.) Ryan Gosling continues his rise to ultimate movie-star status in this

drama about an idealistic young campaign consultant who discovers that all is not what it seems on the campaign trail. George Clooney plays the presidential candidate at the center of a struggle for power. The power-house cast includes Paul Giamatti, Marisa Tomei, Jeffrey Wright and Philip Seymour Hoffman. (LC)

In Time (PG-13; 115 min.) Justin Timberlake and Amanda Seyfried co-star in sci-fi thriller about a future where old-age can be overcome by those wealthy enough to afford (literally) more time. Directed by Andrew Niccol (Gattaca, Lord of War). (NB)

Johnny English Reborn (PG13; 101 min.) British comedian Rowan Atkinson revives his hapless spy for a sequel to the 2003 Bond parody. Gillian Anderson’s in it! (NB) The Mighty Macs (G; 100 min.) This 2009 movie about the champion Immaculata College team of ’71–’72 isn’t a contender; it’s dull-witted, it squanders its cast, and the basketball games aren’t filmed with any excitement. And the film loads the sports pieties with religious ones (“Jesus loved to dance!”), though there are visible undertones suggesting that the exhortations of faith are just there to tickle the advance-ticket church crowd. (RvB) Moneyball (R; 105 min.) (PG13; 133 min.) Oakland A’s General Manager Billy Beane (Brad Pitt) builds a winning baseball team through a statistical system called sabermetrics. Co-stars Jonah Hill and Robin Wright. (LC)

Paranormal Activity 3 (R; 84 min.) A year after the second, Paramount releases the third installment of director and videogame programmer Oren Peli’s horror franchise. (NB)

Puss in Boots (PG; 90 min.) Puss in Boots (based on the Shrek character) goes wrong where prequels usually do, by changing the nature of the characters we love in the name of fleshing them out. Naturally, though, there are sweet lines (“Fear me if you dare,” Puss threatens) and some lovely sequences, such as the characters’ romp in the clouds outside the giant’s castle at the nether end of the beanstalk. But the plot is convoluted and doesn’t seem

about something, the way a fairy tale has to be—it doesn’t have any resonance. Features the voices of Anotonio Banderas (as Puss), Salma Hayek, Zach Galifianakis and Billy Bob Thornton. (RvB)

Real Steel (PG-13: 127 min.) Hugh Jackman plays a struggling ex-boxer in this action-drama set in a future where robot boxing has become a popular sport. His discovery of a discarded robot with champion potential offers a second chance at success and a renewed relationship with the young son he never knew he had inspires a reinvigorated sense of courage. Co-stars Evangeline Lilly (Lost) and Dakota Goyo. (LC)

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YEAR’S BEST.”

The Rum Diary (R; 120 min.) A New York journalist sinks into the mire of alcohol and tangled love in San Juan in this adaptation of Hunter S. Thompson’s novel of the late 1950s. Stars Johnny Depp. (NB)

Take Shelter (R; 120 min.) A family man’s life unravels when he obsesses over building a backyard shelter after dreaming of an apocalyptic storm. (NB) The Thing (R; 102 min.) Billed as a prequel taking place three days prior to the events in John Carpenter’s 1982 remake, this Thing stars Mary Elizabeth Winstead (Death Proof) and a mostly Norwegian cast. Directed by Matthijs van Heijningen Jr. (NB) The Three Musketeers (PG-13; 110 min.) Resident Evil director Paul W. S. Anderson is the latest to update the classic Dumas tale. Stars Milla Jovovich, Orlando Bloom, Christoph Waltz and Mads Mikkelsen. (NB) The Way (PG-13; 115 min.) A California doctor (Martin Sheen) takes a journey that will change his life after he flies to France to collect the remains of his son (Emilio Estevez), killed while trekking the Pyrenees, and decides to finish his son’s pilgrimage. Written and written by Estevez. (NB)

Worst in Show (NR; 90 min.) Award-winning documentary about Petaluma’s famous Ugliest Dog contest screens at Boulevard Cinemas, Petaluma, Nov. 5, 8 and 10 at 7pm, and Nov. 6 at 4pm. Presented by co-directors Don Lewis and former PD writer John Beck. A portion of the proceeds benefit the Petaluma Animal Shelter. (NB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE

ELIZABETH OLSEN ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE ®

JOHN HAWKES

SANTA ROSA EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT Summerfield Cinemas

STARTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4

(707) 522-0330

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 2–8, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Film

Film capsules by Nicholas Berandt, Richard von Busack, Leilani Clark and Lacie Schwarz.

Music

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 2– 8 , 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Cafe Parisienne

Visionary Mahler

Glendeven String Quartet perform movements from quartets by Claude Debussy. Nov 6 at 4. $13-$25. Costeaux French Bakery, 417 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Piano virtuoso Monica Ohuchi performs the West Coast premiere of a composition by Kenji Bunch. Nov 6 and 8 at 3 and 7:30. $10-$70. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, 15.499.6800.

Dan Asia & Adam del Monte Composer Dan Asia and guitarist Adam del Monte join music faculty in a four-concert series. Nov 6-Nov 12. $38. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2353.

Mel Graves Scholarship Concert

FREE Pre-Party Raffle Giveaways! for Warren Miller's North Bay film release

Wed, Nov. 16 6:30–9pm at the Lagunitas Tap Room & Beer Sanctuary 21+ ONLY

NAPA COUNTY

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters Nov 4, Collaboration (jazz). Nov 5, Bee Rays (acoustic). 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Jeff Beck

Aubergine

Guitarist and three-time Grammy winner stops in Napa for two nights. Nov 1- 2 at 7. $90. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Wed at 7, open mic. Nov 4, Joanne Rand (folk). First Sun, Fresh (LGBT night). Tues at 7, ladies’ limelight open mic with Tawnie. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Marc Cohn

Jazz Saxophonist Kasey Knudsen debuts at this fundraiser for the SSU jazz studies program. Nov 3 at 7:30. $15 donation. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.3483.

Soul-smith to perform original material and re-imagined classics. Nov 4 at 8. $35-$40. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Santa Rosa Symphonic Chorus

Folk icon to perform from new album, “Balm in Gilead.” Nov 3 at 8. $35-$40. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Choir opens season with classics in “Cole Porter: Easy to Love.” Nov 6 at 3. $20. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4999, ext 9228.

Alondra de la Parra and Napa Valley Symphony will perform Elgar’s Introduction & Allegro for Strings and other compositions. Nov 6 at 3. $30-$80. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Rickie Lee Jones

Gaia’s Garden Nov 3, Hand Me Down (world). Nov 4, Spark and Whisper (Americana). Nov 5, Ruminators (alt folk rock). Every Tues, Jim Adams (jazz guitar). 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Sonoma Nov 4, Kunkle & Harris (folk). 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

SF Munich Trio

Enter to Win Big Prizes! 1 FREE raffle entry per person. UÊ£äÊ«>ˆÀÃʜvÊvˆ“Ê̈VŽiÌÃÊvœÀÊ œÛÊ£ÇÊvˆ“Ê«Ài“ˆiÀi Ê >ÌÊ7iÃÊ>À}œÊ i˜ÌiÀ UÊi>Ûi˜ÞÊÌÀˆ«ÊvœÀÊÓÊ܈̅ʏˆvÌÊ«>ÃÃià UÊœ*ÀœÊ Êi“iÌÊ ,"ÊUÊ<i>Ê"«ÌˆVÃÊ«œ>Àˆâi`Ê}œ}}iÃÊ܈̅Ê*UÊ7>ÀÀi˜ÊˆiÀÊ>««>Ài]ÊLi>˜ˆiÃ]Ê 6 -ÊUÊ>}՘ˆÌ>ÃÊÃÜ>} UÊ,iÃÌ>ÕÀ>˜ÌÉL>ÀÊ}ˆvÌÊV>À`ÃÊUÊ*ÕÃʓœÀiÊ܈˜ÌiÀÊÃÜ>}t

Pint specials all night long! Party with our ski babes and dudes! 1280 N. McDowell Blvd. Petaluma 707.769.4495 info: 707.527.1200

Brazilian classics old and new with band leader Marcos Silva. Nov 5 at 7:30. $15-$30. Palm Ballroom, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.389.5072.

String Fever

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Lauded trio of bassoon, cello and piano presented as part of the Redwood Arts Council series. Nov 8 at 5. $10-$25. Occidental Center for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.1124.

Weird Al Yankovic Singer of “Like a Surgeon” and “Fat” performs. Nov 7 at 7:30. $47.50-$57.50. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY The Mash Potangos Trio The trio performs its own arrangements of traditional, nuevo and contemporary tango for a unique instrumental combination. Nov 8 at 6. Free, suggested donation. Osteria Divino, 27 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Sol Do Brasil Bossa Nova, Samba and

STRING OUT Alondra de la Parra conducts the Napa Valley Symphony on Nov. 6 for an evening of Brahms, Elgar and Villa-Lobos. See Concerts, above.

Nov 4, Stephanie Ozer & Peter Barshay Duo. Nov 5, Dick Conte Trio with Steve Webber & Bill Moody. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

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Lagunitas Tap Room

Love as Laughter Cass McCombs lightens up on ‘Humor Risk’ Cass McCombs’ sixth album, Humor Risk, out on Tuesday, arrives close on the heels of the slowdancing-with-a-weary-heart feel of his last EP, Wit’s End, released in April. While Wit’s End put the Bay Area–based singer-songwriter’s high croon to good work on grayhilled folk songs dripping with yearning, Humor Risk is an attempt “at laughter instead of confusion,” McCombs says on his website. But make no mistake, this isn’t a party record. Though inflected with jubilant keyboard filigrees and vocal melodies that could sit comfortably next to Forever Changes–era Love, the album is rife with moments of soft resignation, as on “To Every Man His Chimera,” where McCombs wearily sings, “Everyone I know gossips endlessly / Everyone I know suffers just like me,” before falling into a quiet break. The album’s first single, “The Same Thing,” provides the record’s catchiest moments. Even as McCombs builds on a hazy ’60s melodic energy, his ancestry leans closer to Nick Drake and Fairport Convention than the Sonics. The “new folk” label is pretty much completely worn out at this point, but let’s call a spade a spade. This is folk music, folk for now, tooled with the thousands of tiny, deep pockets of love. —Leilani Clark

Hopmonk Tavern Thurs, Juke Joint with Bass Cadet, Ian Arun, John Stud.

Nov 4, Afromassive (funk). Nov 5, Dabrye, Ras G & others (hip hop). Mon, Monday Night

Nov 2, The Rivereens (folk). Nov 3, Jenny Kerr (alt country). Nov 4, Royal Deuces. Nov 5, the Courtney Janes (folk). Nov 6, Goodnight Texas (alt country). 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Every Wed at 7, North Bay Hootenanny’s Pick-Me-Up Revue. Nov 2 at 7:30, KRUSH presents the Blues Broads with Tracy Nelson and others. $15$18. Nov 5, Aqua Nett & Ancient Mariner (hair metal). Nov 6, the Mission Gold Jazz Band. Mon, karaoke. Nov 7, Filter and others (rock). 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

SANTA ROSA

WELLS FARGO CENTER FOR THE ARTS

THURSDAY, NOV. 17

7:30PM

SAN RAFAEL MARIN CENTER SATURDAY, NOV. 19 8:00PM TICKETING INF INFO: O:

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Mc T’s Bullpen Wed, open mic with Angelina. Thurs, karaoke with Country Dan. Fri, DJ Alexander. Nov 5, the Real Deihl. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Mystic Theatre Nov 5, Junior Brown. 2 3 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Papa’s Taverna Fri at 7, live music. Nov 4, the Artifacts. Sat at 7 and Sun at 4, Kefi (Greek). Sun at 1:30, Greek dance lessons; at 3:30, live music and bellydance show. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

Best Pizza?...No Contest! Best Cartoon?...Now tha th hat that’s another Story!

Phoenix Theater Wed at 6, jazz jam. Nov 5, Strung Out. Sun at 5, rock and blues jam. Mon at 7, young people’s AA. Tues at 7, acoustic Americana jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Nov 4, Tom & Maggie Ballard (Acoustic). 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Win One hundred dollars or One hundred Slices!

Transient Lounge Nov 4, 5 Band Rock Fest with the Mud, the Blood & the Beer and the Connies. 400 Todd Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.583.9080.

Trio Nov 5, George Heagerty & Never

) 26

Go to our web site for THE details!

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 2–8, 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Edutainment. Nov 7, the WBLK Dancehall Massive MNE Singers Series with Mikey General & Kulcha Knox. Tues, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

P

CRITIC’S CHOICE

26 NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 , 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Yo el Rey Roasting Locally Roasted Fair Trade Organic Coffee

Music ( 25 the Same. 16225 Main St, Guerneville. 707.604.7461.

MARIN COUNTY Wed at 8:20, salsa dancing with lessons. 815 W Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.460.0101.

Wed, Philip Claypool & friends. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.899.9600.

Fourth Street Tavern

SSaturday aturday November November 5, 5, 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

Nov 8, Wynonna (see concerts). 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Club 101

Thurs at 6:30, Bonnie Hayes. 510 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.2942.

OOSCAR SC AR AGUILAR AGUIL AR OOLEA LE A

Lincoln Theater

Thurs at 9, Texas Blues. Sat at 2, uke jam. Sun at 2, Irish music. Mon at 8, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Southern Pacific Smokehouse

Cucina

1217 Washington St, Downtown Calistoga www.yoelrey.com 707.942.1180

Sleeping Lady

Sat, Glamwave Happy Hour with Brandon B & A Jukebox. Sun, the Morones (classic punk). 711 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.4828.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Wed, standup comedy (see Comedy). Nov 4, the Fundamentals & Miss Terisa Griffin (Soul). Nov 5, Vinyl and guests Olive & the Dirty Martini. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Inn Marin Nov 4, Andoniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quartet (jazz). 250 Entrada Dr, Novato.

Mamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Royal Cafe Sat at 11, Frederick Nighthawk. Sun at 11, Carolyn Dahl. 387 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3261.

NAPA COUNTY Anaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cantina Fri-Sat, live music. 1205 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.4921.

Brannanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grill Fri-Sun, Herb Gibson. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Calistoga Inn Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, old-school DJ night. Sat DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Napa Glass Thurs at 7, Drummersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Delight with Art Cavagnaro. 2895 Solano Ave, Napa. 707.255.3544.

Napa Pizza Hut Thurs at 7, California Bluegrass Association jam. 3150 Jefferson St, Napa. 707.318.1913.

Oxbow Public Market Fri at 6:30, Rennea Couttenye and Marcelo Puig. Fri, Rennea Couttenye. Tues at 6, Locals Night. 610 First St, Napa.

Pacifico Restaurante Mexicano Fri at 5:30, live mariachi. Sun, acoustic guitar. 1237 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4400.

Compadres

Pica Pica Maize Kitchen

Thurs at 8, Douglas Houser or Brian Kline. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.253.1111.

First Fri monthly at 6, salsa dance party. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Hydro Grill

Rainbow Room

Fri-Sat, blues. Sun at 7, Swing Seven. 1403 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9777.

Fri-Sat at 10, DJ dancing. Sun, Salsa Sundays. 806 Fourth St, Napa. 707.252.4471.

Moylanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery Thurs at 8:30, jam session. 15 Rowland Way, Novato. 415.898.HOPS. H Honky on Tonk

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19 Broadway Club Mon at 9, open mic. Tues at 9, Uzilevsky Korty Duo with special guests. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Old Western Saloon Nov 5, Moonlight Rodeo. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Architecture in Helsinki Australian chamber-pop collective with more instruments than an elemantary school band. Nov 3 at the Fillmore.

Wild Flag

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Remarkably potent new band from Carrie and Janet from Sleater-Kinney. Nov 4-5 at the Great American Music Hall.

Nov 4, Blues Broads. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Thrice

Panama Hotel Restaurant Tues at 7, Swing Fever. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

SoCal stalwarts and Warped Tour veterans celebrate new record, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Major/Minor.â&#x20AC;? Nov 5 at the Regency Ballroom.

Dwele With openers Slum Village, the Detroit soul crooner explores the absence of J. Dilla. Nov 5 at the New Parish.

Papermill Creek Saloon

Mary J. Blige

Wed, Kevin McConnell, Dan Dickson & Phil Wood. 1 Castro, Forest Knolls. 415.488.9235.

The very definition of â&#x20AC;&#x153;soul survivorâ&#x20AC;? performs classic album â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Lifeâ&#x20AC;? in its entirety. Nov 11 at the Fox Theatre.

Sausalito Seahorse

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

Wed, Tengo Tango. Sun at 4, Salsa-lito. Tues, Noel Jewkes & friends (jazz jam). 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

TEAR-STAINED EYE Jay Farrar’s

sensitive Americana soothes an aching soul.

Tweedy Birds

Yes, you are trying to break my heart BY BABS NUGENT

G

uys who love Wilco tend to be terrible boyfriends. Granted, this is based on loose and subjective life experience, and would never hold up in federal court. It’s also a conclusion resulting from a whopping two-specimen study. But hey, I still stand by my conclusions. My YHF=SUX theory germinated after an ugly breakup with a flannel-wearing, baseballloving wannabe fiction writer who loved Wilco with a passion second only to Budweiser, and who I soon discovered (why was I surprised?) possessed the emotional capacity of a largemouth bass. I didn’t get much out of that relationship except a bad case of the cynical

27 THUR T HUR –NOV –NOV 3 W WEEKLY EEKLY E EVENT VENT JJUKE UKE JOINT J O I NT

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Jay Farrar plays Wednesday, Nov. 9, at the Mystic Theatre. 21 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 7:30pm. $19–$23. 707.765.2121.

DON’T FORGET…WE SERVE FOOD TOO!

707-765-2121 www.mcnears.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 2–8, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

bitters and a one-point plan for dating success: If dude gushes about how fucking fantastic Wilco are—especially after A Ghost Is Born, ugh—then get out when you still have a fully functioning nervous system. I’ve broken the rule only once, when I offered my heart on a platter to another flannel-wearing slacker prince. We watched the band’s 2002 documentary I Am Trying to Break Your Heart, and sure enough, my soon-to-be-ex handed a couple of Wilco albums over to me, which I took with a stupid, optimistic joy. (The truth is, I ended up listening to Being There more times than I should probably admit.) But lo and behold, my onepoint plan turned out to be spot on. Within a few months, that coldfish emotional capacity reared its persistent head again, and I found myself hearing “I’m not ready to be in a relationship” from yet another Tweedy fan. What I should have done all those years back is turned right instead of left at the Uncle Tupelo songwriter split, heading down the path of Jay Farrar. I’ve yet to meet an emotionally deciduous man who likes Farrar. From even the first note of his velvet-toned voice on Son Volt’s debut album Trace, he just seems more solid and slightly less manic depressive than Tweedy, a sweet country cousin to a grumpy city curmudgeon. I mean, the guy lives in St. Louis, Mo., for God’s sake. Isn’t everyone nice there? Farrar is a songwriter with enough sensitivity and emotional capacity to soothe the bruised-up heart of a girl who’s been through the relationship blender. One Fast Move or I’m Gone, the album he made with Ben Gibbard, is a swooningly soothing musical trip from beginning to end. So maybe there’s a new one-point plan here: If he likes Jay Farrar, don’t automatically assume he’s boring—and do assume that he might possibly have the emotional capacity of something without gills.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 2– 8 , 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Wed, Nov 2 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Nov 3 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther hosts a WEST COAST SWING PARTY

Fri, Nov 4 7:15–11pm

8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise Singles & Pairs Hoedown

Sat, Nov 5 5–11pm

Sun, Nov 6 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30–11:30am ZUMBA GOLD WITH TONING 5:30–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise Scottish Country Dancing

Mon, Nov 7 7–10pm

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Tues, Nov 8 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:40pm Jazzercise 7:30–9pm African and World Music Dance with SAMBA FREESTONE BATERIA

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

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Arts Events Galleries OPENINGS Nov 5 From 6 to 9pm. Buddha’s Palm Gallery. “Down the Rabbit Hole: Artistic Adventures by Ricky Watts.” TuesWed and Fri-Sat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4. 313 Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7256.

Nov 6 From 3 to 5pm. Gallery Route One. “Vaporization” with Betty Woolfolk, “The Wilds of Point Reyes,” Artists’ Book Show. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

818.97:.3351

SONOMA COUNTY Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Reservations Advised

DIN N E R & A SHOW

BESO NEGRO Original Gypsy Swing Nov 4 8:00pm / No Cover Sat Nov 5 THE SUN KINGS A Salute to The Beatles! Fri

8:30pm

Sun

CALAFIA Original Alternative Western Nov 6 4:00pm / No Cover Fri T L HE INDA I MPERIAL BAND 11 Nov Sat

with Special Guest David Freiberg! 8:30pm / No Cover

Nov 12

U NAUTHORIZED ROLLING STONES

Brazilian Waxing $40 8

$ Get Vajazzled for

Touchstone Therapies Your Brazilian Wax Specialist!

707.331.0631

8:30pm

Annnivverssary Week Ceeleeb rat ion

Wed

Nov 16 Thur

WILLIE K

Special Winter Luau 8:00pm

Nov 17

ANNIVERSARY SHOW

Celebrating 70 Years of Rancho 8:00pm

L IPBONE REDDING Nov 18 AND THE LIPBONE ORCHESTRA Fri

RON T HOMPSON

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Sat

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8:30pm

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THE JAMES MOSELEY BAND Nov 19 Hot Soul Music 8:30pm

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Women’s Health Specialists confidential compassionate nonjudgmental More Than Just Health Care...

707.537.1171 DŽƌŶŝŶŐŌĞƌWŝůů͕WƌĞŐŶĂŶĐLJdĞƐƟŶŐ͕ ďŽƌƟŽŶ^ĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ͕,ĞĂůƚŚĚǀŝĐĞ>ŝŶĞ ATION!3317 Chanate os a LOC Road , #2C, Santa R NEW www.cawhs.org

Aqus Cafe Through Nov 15 “Mentor Me Petaluma” participants show their work. art@aquscafe.com. 189 H St, Petaluma.

Arts Guild of Sonoma

Through Nov 28, “The Games Children Play.” $5-$8. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

visual art and altars for the Dia de los Muertos celebration. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

City Hall Council Chambers

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library

Through Dec 23, oil paintings by Mark Jacobson. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Dec 31, “Make Yourself at Home,” exhibit of unusual home and garden accessories. Wed-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123. Ending Nov 7, “Texture with Paper,” “Glimpses of Nature” and “Heavy Mettle.” 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery

Riverfront Art Gallery

Gallery One

Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Nov 30, “On and On: Sequel of Memories,” installation work by Kathleen Yorba. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600.

J Howell Fine Art

Buddha’s Palm Tattoo Gallery

Local Color Gallery

Calabi Gallery Through Nov, “Beyond Borders,” works by artists of the Central and South American diaspora. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Jan 29, 2012, “The Flipside of Schulz’s Art: More Than Peanuts,” original drawings by Charles Schulz. Through Dec 11, “Pop’d from the Panel,” parallel worlds of fine art and commercial art.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Nov 13, “Signs,” recent oil paintings by Cecilia Armenta Hallinan. Through Dec 24, “Rambin Modes,” an evolving window display by Monty Monty. Nov 3, Bill Horvitz and Robin Escher sing at 7. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799.

Through Nov 21, “Annual Collaborative Show” with various artists. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

Through November, “Our Backyard Bohemia: The People and Places of Sonoma County.” Tues-Wed and Fri-Sat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4. 313 Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7256.

Through Nov 28, “Pirates,” a kid-friendly exhibit featuring everyone’s favorite seafaring marauders. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Through Nov 12, a special show of the work of Rip Matteson (1920-2011). Sun-Mon, 11 to 4; Thurs-Sat, 11 to 6. 101-A Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2684. Through Nov 21, “Two Points of View,” paintings by Olga Storms and Cathy Coe. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2744.

Medlock-Ames Winery Through Nov 15, “In Honor of Melissa,” a photography series about honey bees by Amanda Lane. 13414 Chalk Hill Rd, Healdsburg. 707.431.8845.

Pelican Art Nov 8-Jan 7 “Small Works” with various artists. Open TuesThurs and Sat, 11 to 6; Fri, 11 to 8; Sun-Mon by appointment only. 143 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.773.3393.

Petaluma Arts Center Ending Nov 6, “Bridges of Light / Puentes de Luz,”

Ending Nov 6, “Two Photographic Views,” photography by Amber Reumann Engfer and Craig Melville; “Soft Focus,” photography by Rhen August Benson and Mayr McLean. Wed-Thurs and Sun, 11 to 7; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. Tues-Thurs and Sun, 10:30 to 6. Fri-Sat, 10:30 to 8. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART.

Rohnert Park Community Center Through Nov 18, fine arts by local artists of the Santa Rosa Art Guild. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 8 to 5. 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.584.7357.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts A two-dimensional and threedimensional show open to all media, including video and film. Jurors are Genevieve Barnhart and Julia Geist. Through Dec 3; Tues-Fri, 10 to 4, Sat 1 to 4. The Color of Magic. shows work by Art Heaven as painters celebrate 10 years of working together. Through Dec 3. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Feb 5, “Customized: The Art and History of the Bicycle,” with bicycle innovations, art bikes, regional history and more. Ending

Nov 4, Day of the Dead altars. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

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Through Jan 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonido Pirata,â&#x20AC;? curated exhibit dealing with the phenomenon of pirated music. Free-$8. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Towers Gallery

www.mateel.org

Nov 4-Dec 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nouveau Holiday,â&#x20AC;? with various artists. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

Info: 923.3368

/PWFNCFSÂ&#x; Â&#x2026;.BUFFM$PNNVOJUZ$FOUFS 3FEXBZ $" 'SJEBZÂ&#x2026;,JDL0GG&WFOU Dell Arte Presents Mary Jane The Musical /$30 adv/$32 door/7pm doors/8pm show 4BUVSEBZÂ&#x2026;.BJO&WFOU Diegoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Umbrella, Bayonics, Junior Toots, The Brown Edition, Sahra Indigo, To Life!, Ambush, Ngaio Bealum, Heather Donahue (Author of Growgirl) , The Fabulous Resinaires, Laxshmiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Daughters & more $20 suggested donation/11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1am/8pm show 4VOEBZÂ&#x2026;)FNQ'FTU'PSVN Featuring a panel of expert speakers organized by 707 Cannabis CollegesTopics will include: Humbolt County Medical Marijuana Ordinance; CA State Bill; Medical, Legal Dispensary Issues; Plus Media, Hemp & More!/FREE/1:30pm doors/2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm forum

University Library Art Gallery Mon-Fri, 8 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5. SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.4240.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Through Nov, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reflections in Yesterday,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Anne Herrero. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;CHAOTIC PERFECTIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Work by Ricky Watts opens at Buddhaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palm Gallery in Sebastopol Nov. 5. See Openings, previous page.

Gallery Bergelli Through Nov 30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fall Group Showâ&#x20AC;? featuring works by gallery artists. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Marin Arts Council Gallery Through Nov 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Asia Observed,â&#x20AC;? works addressing the cultural complexity of Asia. 906 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Marin Society of Artists Through Nov 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;84th Annual Membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Show,â&#x20AC;? a juried exhibit featuring works by MSA members. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

Museum of the American Indian Through Jan 15, 2012, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jewelry of California and the Southwest.â&#x20AC;? Tues-Fri, 10 to 3; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 2200 Novato Blvd, Novato. 415.897.4064.

Red Barn Gallery Through Jan 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grounded: A California Indian Life,â&#x20AC;? art by Miwok/Pomo artist Kathleen Rose Smith. Nov 11 at 2, discussions and presentations with artist, Gaye LeBaron and Young Smith. Dec 9 at 2, demonstration and tasting of California Indian native foods. 1 Bear Valley Rd, Pt Reyes Station. 415.464.5125.

NAPA COUNTY Artists of the Valley Ongoing, mixed-media work

of 57 artists in two Napa locations. An artist is always on-site. Daily, 10 to 6. 710 First St and 1398 First St, Napa. 707.265.9050.

Di Rosa Through Feb 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Looking at You Looking at Meâ&#x20AC;? featuring the photography, video and other media of Robert Wuilfe. Wed-Fri, 9:30 to 3. Sat, by appointment only. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Hess Collection Winery Ongoing, outstanding private collection featuring work by Andy Goldsworthy, Francis Bacon, Frank Stella and other modern masters. Daily, 10 to 5:15. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. 707.255.1144.

Lockwood. Daily, 10 to 5. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 707.968.2203.

St Supery Winery Ending Nov 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Contemporary Still Life Paintings,â&#x20AC;? works by Michael Beck and Michael Tompkins. 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.963.4507.

Comedy Andrew Norelli & Maggie Newcomb Las Vegas World Series of Comedy winner brings act to Tuesday night comedy series. Nov 8 at 7:30. $18. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Mumm Napa Cuvee

Michael Pritchard

Through Nov 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Signs of Life,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Robert Buelteman. Daily, 10 to 5. 8445 Silverado Trail, Rutherford. 707.967.7740.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s welcomes humanitarian, comedian and nationally acclaimed speaker Michael Pritchard. Nov 2 at 8. $12-$15. Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Napa Valley Museum Through Nov 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dia de Los Muertos,â&#x20AC;? works by local artists and high school students. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Robert Mondavi Winery Through Nov 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Water and Wood: Paintings and Sculptures Inspired by Nature,â&#x20AC;? paintings and sculpture by Carine Mascarelli and Crystal

NVOH Comedy Series Ongoing standup series. $18. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics ) and up-and-

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Jackson Browne

Nov 8rFlint Center, Cupertino

A Johnny Mathis Christmas

Dec 2rParamount Theatre, Oakland Dec 23rFlint Center, Cupertino

Bill Maher Live in Hawaii

December 31rWaikiki Shell Honolulu January 1rMaui Arts & Cultural Center, Kahului

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8, 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

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Arts Events

PA I D A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N

ART

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comers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

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Dance Contemporary Dance with SoCo Dance Theater Two evenings of new and revised works by local choreographers. Nov 4-5 at 8. $15-$20. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.861.0841.

Kings of Salsa Show brings energy and spirit of Cuba to life with a contemporary twist. Nov 4 at 8. $20-$45. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Events ROBERT BREYER PAINTINGS & PRINTS

Native American Heritage Month PETALUMAGALLERYONE.COM James Avati

Sept 25–Nov 12 Robert Bryer Talks About His Art Fri, Nov 4, 6:30–8pm

Linda Gonzalez

Thinking Red Returns Small Holiday Show: Nov 6–Dec 30 Artist Reception: Nov 12, 5–8 Since 1988

SEBASTOPOL GALLERY

150 N. Main St. Sebastopol, Ca 95472 707-829-7200 www.sebastopol-gallery.com

GALLERY o n e

209 Western Ave, Petaluma 707.778.8277

¡Puro Alma Apachicano! Emmanuel Catarino Montoya Calabi Exhibiting a diverse selection of unusual antique, modern & contemporary artworks.

Calabi Gallery 707.781.7070 | 144 Petaluma Blvd N calabigallery.com

Call Today to Advertise! 707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

Nov 2 at 7:30 storytelling with Robert Greygrass, Nov 7 at 7, lecture by John Trudell, Nov 16 at 7, screening of the award-winning film “Follow Me Home.” Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2382.

Ridge Trail Service Day: Annadel State Park No experience is necessary to help build boardwalk across wet sections of ridge trail. Nov 5 at 9. Free. REI Santa Rosa, Southside Shopping Center, 2715 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 415.561.2595.

Food & Drink Cupcake Ball 2011 Verity presents silent auction, no-host bar and cupcakes. Nov 5 at 6. $75 to $750. Flamingo Resort Hotel, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.7270.

French Garden Farm Market Enjoy produce from restaurant’s farm, along with freshly baked breads and pastries from their kitchen. Every Sun, 10 to 2. Free. French Garden Restaurant,

( 29 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Twilight Tour & Tapas Join winemaker Erich Bradley for a walk through the vineyard and winery, taste current releases and enjoy tapas prepared with local ingredients by Lizzy Brewer. Every Wed, 5:30 to 7:30. $35. Audelssa Winery, 13647 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen, Reservations. 707.933.8514.

Wine & Food Affair Sample autumn bounty of gourmet foods and premier wines. Nov 5-6, 11 to 4. $30$70. Wine Road, Association of 145 wineries and 50 lodgings, Alexander, Dry Creek, Russian River, Chalk Hill and Green Valleys in Northwest Sonoma County, 1.800.723.6336.

Friday Night Bites Interactive classes with tastes every Fri at 6. $75. Cavallo Point, 601 Murray Circle, Fort Baker, Sausalito. 888.651.2003.

Marin Artisan Cheese Tasting Tasting of award-winning cheeses from Cowgirl Creamery, Nicasio Cheese Co. and others. Nov 5 at 1. $5-$100. Fork, 198 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.663.1158.

Field Trips French Garden Farm Tour First Sat monthly, 10 to noon, join Dan Smith for practical tips on growing your own garden. Free. French Garden Farm, 11031 Cherry Ridge Rd, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Marin Moonshiners Hike Join monthly three-mile hike to experience sunset, moonrise, picnic and spectacular views. Pack your own picnic. Second Tues monthly at 7:30. $15. Pelican Inn, 10 Pacific Way, Muir Beach, RSVP. 415.331.0100.

Film America the Beautiful 2: The Thin Commandments Nonprofit Beyond Hunger

shows Darryl Robert’s documentary about the beauty industry, followed by reception and Q&A with the director. Nov 2 at 6:15. $25. Showcase Theatre, Marin Center, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Another Year Another rollicking good time in dire poverty and depression with director Mike Leigh. Nov 4 at 7. $4-$6. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

The Bolshoi Reopening Gala Watch footage of the Bolshoi theater’s reopening celebration. Nov 6 at 1:30, Nov 8 at 7. $12-$15. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Documentary Series Opening Nov 4, “Sholem Aleicheim: Laughing in the Darkness”; Nov 11, “Revenge of the Electric Car.” $7.25-$10. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

Fantomas Restored century-old French serial by Louis Feuillade screens. Nov 6 at 4. $5-$6. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Farmageddon Screening includes local food and drinks and a panel discussion after film. Nov 5 at 7. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Grange Documentary Film Festival Series of shorts from local documentarian Rich Panter. Nov 5, “When Rice Was King.” Dec 3, “Seared Souls.” All shows at 7; free popcorn included. $5 donation. Bodega Grange Hall, 1370 Bodega Ave, Bodega Bay. 707.875.3616.

HOME Screening of the first ever 100 percent aerial footage film, directed by Yann Arthus-Bertrand. Nov 7 at 7. Free, donations encouraged. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. www. transitionsonomavalley.org.

Italian Film Festival Selected modern films from the land of Antonioni, Fellini and Leone. Nov 5, “Hayfever.” Nov 12, “Santa Claus Gang.” Showtimes at 5:30 and 7:45. $14-$78. Showcase Theatre, Marin Center, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa.

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Upcoming Events

Seventy-two cantors journey to Poland to sing at the Jewish Culture Festival. Nov 2 at 7:15. $15. JCC Sonoma County, 1301 Farmers Ln, Ste C103, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

Peace Project Political Film Series: The Fourth World War

David Lindley January 15th 7:30 pm

Sebastopol and in association with the Mr. Music Foundation: First Friday (The songs of Motown) Dec. 2nd 7:00 pm

New Year’s Eve “Dance and Peace” Celebration

Community December 31st

Cultural Center

Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

raventheater.org

Kid-Friendly Karaoke Start building your fan base early! Sat, 5 to 8. Free. Barking Dog Roasters, 201 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.7446.

Messy Mucking About

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Nov. 19 8PM/NOV. 20 2PM raventheater.org

433-6335

Every Saturday, 9:30 to 11:30, toddlers and their parents are invited to a drop-in, free-form art studio to create with paint, ceramics, collage, construction, found objects and feathers. $15. Nimbus Arts, St Helena Marketplace, Ste 1-B, 3111 St Helena Hwy, St Helena. ) 707.965.5278.

Saturday, Nov. 12, 8PM Vote online now!

Mostl y Mozart!

Hang-out spot for Santa Rosa teens ages 12 to 20 offers art studio and class, open gym, tech lounge, cafe, recording studio and film club. Hours for high schoolers: Mon-Thurs, 3 to 9; Fri, 3 to 11; Sat and school holidays, noon to 11. For middle school kids: Mon-Fri, 3 to 7; Sat and school holidays, noon to 7. Film club meets Tues at 4. Membership, $5-$10 per year. Chops Teen Club, 509 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.284.2467.

raventheater.org

Chops Teen Club

433-6335

For Kids

raventheater.org

High-definition opera broadcasts from the Metropolitan Theatre in NYC. Nov 2, “Don Giovanni”; Nov 5, “Siegfried.” $16-$23. Jackson Theater, Sonoma Country Day

Join directors John Beck and Don R Lewis as well as several ugly dogs. Nov 5, 8 and 10 at 7; Nov 6 at 4. $10. Boulevard Cinemas, Petaluma Boulevard at C Street, Petaluma. 707.762.7469.

Also:

433-6335

The Met: Live in HD

Tiburon Film Society presents documentary about the Australian musician. Nov 8 at 6. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.381.4123.

Worst in Show

December 17th 8:00 pm

raventheater.org

Joe Camilleri

The Klezmatics

The Lark Theater presents acclaimed documentary film “The Welcome” to benefit Homeward Bound of Marin. Nov 8 at 7:30. $20. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.382.3363.

433-6335

In Cinnabar Theater’s Crimes of the Heart, pretty much everyone is damaged goods: Babe (Ivy Rose Miller), the youngest, just shot her rich husband; Meg (Dana Scott) is a reckless flirt with a fascination for pictures of skin diseases; and Lennie (Sarah McKereghan), the oldest, is convinced her “shrunken ovary,” whatever that is, has doomed her to a life of loneliness. Directed by Sheri Lee Miller, this lovingly funny comedy by Beth Henley clips along, as the sisters throw their tentative support to Babe, who has more to lose than anyone knows. By the end, a new day may actually be dawning for the Magraths, who finally find a glimmer of healing. In a hilariously redemptive moment, they even learn what may have possessed their mom to hang the cat. And like much of this wonderfully weird, warm play, it isn’t what anyone expects. Crimes of the Heart runs Friday–Sunday through Nov. 6 at the Cinnabar Theater. 3333 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. Friday–Saturday, 8pm; Sunday, 2pm. $15– $25. 707.763.8920. www.cinnabar.org. —David Templeton

Grammy Award winning

The Welcome

433-6335

The Magrath sisters are having a bad day. Then again, the three Southern siblings have never fully recovered from their mother’s suicide or figured out why she hung the cat alongside her.

November 6th 7:30 pm

raventheater.org

Cinnabar’s ‘Crimes’ is wonderfully weird

“Hills to Holler” (Bluegrass to Soul)

433-6335

Twisted Sisters

Laurie Lewis, Linda Tillery & Barbara Higbie

Narrated by Michael Franti and Suheir Hammad, film examines front-line conflicts in Mexico, Argentina and South Africa. Nov 3 at 7:30. Healdsburg Senior Center, 133 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1129.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 2–8, 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

at Sebastopol Community Cultural Center with Cumulus Presents

100 Voices: A Journey Home

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 , 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Grand Opening Boutique Store ~ November 12 New Location: 3209 Cleveland, Next to Trader Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Hospice Thrift Stores SUTTER CARE AT HOME

Voted Best Secondhand Store* Visit all our locations: Rohnert Park: 6350 Commerce Blvd, Next to Safeway Santa Rosa: 510 Lewis Road Sebastopol: 748 Gravenstein Hwy North *2009 Bohemian Readers Poll

for FREE pick-up or to donate call: 707.523.1775 to volunteer call: 707.535.5790

Find Your Catch of the Day!

Arts Events Orff Music & Creative Movement Develop vocal, rhythmic and dance skills using singing, folk dancing and other methods. Every Wed. Register online. Wischemann Hall, 460 Eddie Lane, Sebastopol.

Saddle Club Every Friday 5:30 to 7:30, children six and up are welcome for horse- and stable-related games and a casual dinner. $20. Sunrise Stables, 1098 Lodi Lane, St Helena. 707.333.1509.

Lectures Antarctica: Barometer of Climate Change Join Jason Flesher, lead guide for polar explorer Robert Swanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expedition company 2041, for a multimedia presentation of his adventures exploring the Antarctic Peninsula. Nov 2 at 7. Free. REI Corte Madera, 213 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.927.1938.

Media, Censorhip & New Media in the Arab Revolutions

Ayurvedic Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss Ralphieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quest for â&#x20AC;&#x153;the best Christmas present EVER!â&#x20AC;?

Indian Head Massage â&#x20AC;˘ improves mobility in neck

and shoulders â&#x20AC;˘ relief from tension headaches, eyestrain, and sinusitis

Adapted for the stage

Margery Smith 707.544.9642

Reinventing Radio with Ira Glass The NPR heavyweight and creator of â&#x20AC;&#x153;This American Lifeâ&#x20AC;? takes the stage in Santa Rosa to talk about his program and how itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s put together. Nov 6 at 7. $30-$45. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Stacy Carlson discusses her novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Among the Wonderful.â&#x20AC;? Nov 5 at 4. Gerald Nicosia. Gerald Nicosia talks about â&#x20AC;&#x153;One and Only: The Untold Story of On the Road.â&#x20AC;? Nov 5 at 7. William Gordon & Isabel Allende. Join William Gordon in conversation with Isabel Allende, as he presents his new mystery novel The Chinese Jars. Nov 6 at 7. Richard Grant. Richard Grant discusses â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crazy River: Exploration and Folly in East Africa.â&#x20AC;? Nov 8 at 7. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Depot Bookstore & Cafe Ross E. Goldstein. reads from his novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chain Reaction.â&#x20AC;? Nov 2 at 7. 87 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.2665.

Napa Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Sam Mogannam presents shopperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guide and cookbook rolled into one. Nov 6 at 1. 3900-A Bel Aire Plaza, Highway 29 and Trancas Street, Napa. 707.252.8002.

Petaluma Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Ally Condie shares latest installment in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Matchedâ&#x20AC;? series. Nov 3 at 3:30. Memoir workshop with Frances Lefkowitz. Workshop on revisiting, re-seeing, and reinterpreting stories youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always been told. Nov 6 at 2. $20. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

River Reader Fred Setterberg, Lunch Bucket Paradise. Fred Setterberg reads from his book about the midcentury California dream. Nov 3 at 7. 707.869.2240. 16355 Main St, Guerneville.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Readings

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Sharat G Lin speaks on technology and political mobilization. Nov 7 at 7. Free, suggested donation. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

( 31

WESTERN FARM CENTER 707.545.0721 21 West 7th St., Santa Rosa

Jasmin Darznik. Author discusses â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Good Daughter: A Memoir of My Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hidden Life.â&#x20AC;? Nov 2 at 7. Gilad Sharon. A look at the life, work of Ariel Sharon from the former Israeli leaderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son. Nov 3 at 7. Hillary Jordan. Hillary Jordan discusses her novel When She Woke. Nov 4 at 7. Laure Latham. Author talks about â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Hikes With Kids: San Francisco Bay Area.â&#x20AC;? Nov 5 at 1. Stacy Carlson.

Benefit reading for California State Parks Foundation. The WordTemple Poetry Series presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Redwoods Know: Poems from California State Parks.â&#x20AC;? All proceeds go to the California State Parks Foundation. Nov 5 at 7. khastings@wordtemple.com. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol.

SoCo Coffee Poetry SoCoCo. Join Ed Coletti and friends for evening of poetry on the first Sat of every month, 7 to 9. Free. 707.527.6434. 1015 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

Theater Bug A cocktail waitress and a Gulf War vet hide out in a seedy motel room and descend into paranoia and conspiracy. Through Nov 6; Thurs-Sat at 8, Sun at 5. $24$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Crimes of the Heart A troubled family escapes their past to seize the future. Through Nov 6; Fri-Sat at 8. Special matinee performance Nov 6 at 2. $15$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Fully Committed Actor Dan Saski juggles 40 characters in this 90-minute play. Nov 4Nov 12; Fri at 8, Sat at 2 and 8; Thurs Nov 10 at 8. $20. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Musicals Man A musical benefit for the Mountain Play Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 Production. Nov 5 at 6. $75-$125. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.383.1100.

Sherlockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Last Case Pegasus Theater Company presents dark comedy written by Charles Marowitz and directed by Diana Grogg. Through Nov 20; Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15-$20. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido. 707.583.2343.

Ten Little Indians Ten guests accused by mysterious voice of escaping justice are killed off one by one in Agatha Christieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most famous play. Through Nov 6. Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15-$23. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.6335.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

33 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 2-8, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 2-8 , 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

34

Classifieds Astrology BOHEMIAN

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

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ARIES (March 21–April 19) Here’s Malcolm Gladwell, writing in The Tipping Point: “We need to prepare ourselves for the possibility that sometimes big changes follow from small events, and that sometimes these changes can happen quickly. . . . Look at the world around you. It may seem an immovable, implacable place. It is not. With the slightest push—in just the right place—it can be tipped.” You are now within shouting distance of your own personal tipping point, Aries. Follow your gut wisdom as you decide where to give a firm little push. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Welcome to the autumnal garden of earthly delights, Taurus. It’s a brooding, fermenting paradise, full of the kind of dark beauty that wouldn’t be caught dead in a spring garden. There’s smoldering joy to be found amid this riotous flowering of moody colors, but you won’t appreciate it if you’re too intent on seeking bright serenity and pristine comfort. Be willing to dirty your hands and even your mind. Feel the moss on your back, the leaves in your hair and the mist on your bare legs. (P.S. If you like, you can take what I just said as an elaborate metaphor.)

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Here’s a vignette described by columnist Thomas Friedman: “Ludwig Wittgenstein once remarked that if you ask a man how much is 2 plus 2 and he tells you 5, that is a mistake. But if you ask a man how much is 2 plus 2 and he tells you 97, that is no longer a mistake. The man you are talking with is operating with a wholly different logic from your own.” I’d like to suggest, Gemini, that for you right now the whole world is like the man who swears 2 plus 2 is 97. At least temporarily, you are on a very different wavelength from your surroundings. In order to understand what’s coming toward you, you will have to do the equivalent of standing on your head, crossing your eyes, and opening your mind as wide as it’ll stretch. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

If you want to grow vanilla beans, you have to pollinate the plant’s flowers within 12 hours after they bloom. In nature, the only insect that can do the job is the melipona, a Mexican bee. Luckily, humans can also serve as pollinators, which they do on commercial vanilla farms. They use thin wood splinters or stems of grass to perform the delicate magic. I’m thinking that you resemble a vanilla bean right now, Cancerian. It is the season when you’re extra receptive to fertilization, but all the conditions have to be just right for the process to be successful. Here’s my advice: Figure out exactly what those conditions are, then call on all your resourcefulness to create them.

LEO (July 23–August 22) Even our most sophisticated drilling machines have barely made pinpricks in the earth’s surface. The deepest hole ever dug was 40,000 feet, which is just 0.2 percent of the planet’s 20-million-foot radius. I offer this up as a spur to your imagination, Leo. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to plumb further into the depths of anyplace or anything you’re intrigued by—whether that’s a subject you’ve always wondered about, a person you care for, the mysteries of life or the secrets of your own psyche. You could reach the equivalent of 5 million feet into the Earth’s innards. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

National Geographic speculates that most of the species on Earth are still unknown and unnamed (tinyurl.com/ UnknownLife). While 1.2 million life forms have been identified by science, there may be as many as 7.5 million that are not, or 86 percent of the total. I suspect that this breakdown is similar to the situation in your life, Virgo. You know about 14 percent of what you need to know, but there’s still a big frontier to explore. The coming months should be prime time for you to cover a lot of new ground—and now would be a perfect moment to set the stage for that grand experiment.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) I suspect that you will have a minor form of good luck going for you this week. It probably won’t be enough to score you a winning lottery ticket or earn you a chance to get the answer to your most fervent prayers. But it might bring you into close proximity with a financial opportunity, a pretty good helper or a resource that could subtly boost

your stability over the long haul. For best results, don’t invoke your mild blessings to assist in trivial matters like finding parking places or avoiding long lines at check-out lines. Use them for important stuff.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

“Try to be surprised by something every day,” advises Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi in his book Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention. That’s an inspirational idea for everyone all the time, but especially for you Scorpios right now. This is the week of all weeks when you have the best chance of tinkering with your rhythm so that it will thrive on delightful unpredictability. Are you brave enough to capitalize on the opportunity? I think you are. Concentrate your attention on cultivating changes that feel exciting and life-enhancing.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) “Dear Rob: I was born on Nov. 30, and am quite attached to having it as a birth date. But there’s a complication. While in Iraq in 2006, I was half-blown up by a bomb and had a near-death experience. When I returned from my excursion to the land of the dead, I felt I’d been born anew. Which is why I now also celebrate Sept. 24, the date of the bombing, as my second birthday. What do you think?”—Two-Way Tamara. Dear Two-Way: I believe we’d all benefit from having at least one dramatic rebirth in the course of our lives, though hopefully not in such a wrenching fashion as yours. In fact, a fresh rebirth every few years or so would be quite healthy. If it means adding additional astrological identities to our repertoire, so much the better. Thanks for bringing up the subject, as it’s an excellent time for Sagittarians everywhere to seek out an exhilarating renewal. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Social climbers are people who are focused on gaining higher status in whatever circle of people they regard as cool, even to the point of engaging in fawning or ingratiating behavior. Soul climbers, on the other hand, are those who foster the power of their imagination, keep deepening their connection with life’s intriguing enigmas and explore the intersection of self-interest and generosity toward others. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you could go far in either of those directions during the coming weeks, Capricorn—but not both. Which will you choose? AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) An Australian man named Daniel Fowler has more giraffe tattoos on his shoulders than any other human being on the planet. So says the Universal Record Database at Recordsetter.com. Meanwhile, Darryl Learie is now the only person to ever be able to insert three steak knives into an inflated balloon, and Billy Disney managed to inject a world-record 31 sexual innuendoes into a rap song about potatoes. What could or should be your claim to fame, Aquarius? This would an excellent time to try to establish your reputation as the best at your specific talent. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

“You have to know how far to go too far,” said poet and filmmaker Jean Cocteau. I reckon that’s good advice for you right now. You’re at a phase of your astrological cycle when you really can’t afford to keep playing by all the rules and staying inside the proper boundaries. For the sake of your physical and psychological and spiritual health, you need to wander out beyond the limits that you’ve been so faithfully respecting. And yet, on the other hand, it would be a mistake to claim you have a right to stop at nothing. Know how far to go too far.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Multi-Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â&#x192;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;DzÂ&#x192;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2030;Â&#x160;Â&#x2013;Çł th Saturday, Nov. 5 7:00-8:30pm (Suggested $15) -andEvolutionary Creativity & The New Cosmology: Tapping Into the Wisdom of Our Planet, Our Bodies and Our Cosmos th Sunday, Nov. 6 Sunday Service 10:30am & Workshop 1-4:00pm ($35 advance, $45 at door) Unity Church of Santa Rosa 4857 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa 707-542-7729 | www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Meeting the Mysticsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Martin Luther: Radical Mystic Explore what Luther teaches us about the invitation of surrender, in our Christcentered spiritual journey. Fri, Nov 11, 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm, Journey Center, 707.578.2121 www.journeycenter.org

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Jan Phillips is here Nov 5, 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:30pm, for a Multi-media Performance â&#x20AC;&#x153;Take Back the Lightâ&#x20AC;? and then on Nov 6 for the 10:30am service & a workshop 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evolutionary Creativity & the New Cosmology: Tapping into the Wisdom of Our Planet, our Bodies, and Our Cosmos. More details on www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Rocks and Clouds Zendo Zazenkai One Day Meditation Retreat, Sunday, Nov. 20, 6:00amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:00pm. Email us with any questions- daterra@sonic.net. Find us at www.rocksandclouds.org or call 707.824.5647

795 Farmers Lane #22 Schedule: 24/7 VM 707.523.9555 www.srf-santarosa.org

By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883

The Bohemian is printed at Northern Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading LEED-certiďŹ ed printing facility, using soy-based ink and the most advanced environmental practices in the industry. We continue to work, as a socially-conscious local company, to reduce energyconsumption, use recycled materials and promote recycling. Thank you for reading the Bohemian.

Sunday School & Service 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Non-traditional. Inter-denominational. A spiritually-minded community. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Self Realization Fellowship Santa Rosa Meditation Group

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Alternative Health&Well-Being

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Holistic approaches for Optimal Wellness. Carlisle Holland DO, 707.824.8764 www.holonomicinstitute.com

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Problems or Dyslexia? Improve academic performance. The Irlen Method reduces visual-perceptual difficulties. Ages 8 to adult. Info/appt. 707.538.1334 www.irlensantarosa.com

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