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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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‘The chicken-poop power plant is real; county leaders have already secured $55 million.’ COVER STORY P20 Pitman Family Farms: Humane Nature? T H E PAP E R P 9

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies A Bicycle Built for Two

Pedaling pregnant provides patience, plentitude BY SARAH HADLER

I

recently treated myself to a new bike. I figured turning 40 and being pregnant for the first time were reasons enough. It’s a lovely, gold, stepthrough Bridgestone, with the addition of a long stem, upright enough for me to bike around happily pregnant at seven months. I hope to ride to the very end, and who knows, maybe I’ll even ride to the hospital—it’s been done before. I feel the very best when I’m riding. Sure, I’m not as fast as I used to be, but I add on some extra minutes to get places, and off I go. I estimate that by the time this baby is born, I’ll have pedaled around 1,500 miles. I can’t think of a better way to spend my pregnancy while this child grows inside me. I think of all that good oxygen that he’s getting and the comfort he feels in the sweet pedaling motion. And for me, bicycling is symbolic of so many wonderful things that I love about being alive: good health, clean environment, strong community, simplicity and just plain fun—all things that I want my child to experience throughout his entire life. I truly believe that riding my bike every day makes me a better person, and I bet it will help me be a good mother as well. Spending time on my bike has given me patience, strength, self-awareness and love of the simple way of doing things. It is absolutely my favorite way to get around; it allows me to see my world up close and to get to know my neighbors. I often wonder at the world that I am bringing my child into, and when I’m on my bike, the world actually looks pretty good. People smile, wave and stop to talk, I use my very own power to get myself places and I am immersed in the changing seasons. Over these last few months, perched high on my new bicycle seat, I find myself reveling in the life unfolding around me and inside me. It is certainly a joy to be pedaling for two.

Sarah Hadler is a Safe Routes to School assistant in Sebastopol for the Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition. We welcome your Open Mic contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Behind the Red Curtain

I am writing in regards to David Templeton’s article about the closure of Sonoma County Repertory Theater (“Rep Repose,” Jan. 19). I served as the scenic director for SCRT for a number of years, having designed and/or fabricated the sets for over 35 productions for many directors, and I was closely involved with the executive director Jim dePriest, artistic director Diane Bailey as well as Scott Phillips and Jennifer King. As a matter of fact, my wife is Diane Bailey of Theatre Anew here in San Francisco, and she directed some of the most popular and profitable productions for the theatre from 1994 to 2002. I am currently involved with a local, small nonprofit arts organization, and after reading your article, I can draw several parallels. Clearly, all arts organizations are going through some fundamental shifts in how they are organized, as well as how they serve their communities, but one fact remains: the board of directors is solely responsible for seeing that the mission is carried out. Scott Phillips mentions that “no theater can survive on box office alone,” yet artistic director Diane Bailey consistently went before the board with corroborating information from the National Endowment for the Arts attesting to that fact, only to be dismissed and derided. In fact, upon her (and Jim dePriest’s) departure, the current management as well as previous board members publicly stated that both Jim and Diane had fiscally mismanaged the organization. It was a 78-seat theater—do the math: (performances) x (seats) = total maximum possible ticket revenue. For some reason, the board could not understand that. The board at SCRT and all boards of directors have one job: get the money. The board was also responsible for the

loss of their 160-seat Santa Rosa facility. Without an appropriate facility in which to present theater, educate new and young audiences, and grow our constituency, the math was against us. Their promises of a new theater space were a constant dangling carrot.

My wife was artistic director for 8 years, headed up the New Drama Works program, directed countless plays and also worked tirelessly on a salary of $14,400 per year! Jim wasn’t paid much more, and they accepted that pay in order for the theater to have more money to grow. It was Jim and Diane who raised the artistic and professional profile of that theater. Once Jim and Diane were essentially forced out, one board member came forward with enough money to pay new people much higher salaries, for a certain time frame. Once that money ran out, the theater was once again in a position to count on box office for its revenues and salaries—and Diane was responsible for allocating actors’ services as “in kind” donations for accounting purposes. The board of directors always expected the artists to donate 100 percent of their time and expertise, and were shocked (and even offended) that there would ever be an expectation of payment. SCRT was a very important part of my life and that of my family. We dedicated time, creativity, personal funds and energy to its growth and success. The members of the board of directors, yet again, have fallen down on their job, with consequences not only to themselves, but to the artists and administrators who work tirelessly to improve the quality of life and bring the arts to our communities.

MICHAEL MINGOIA San Francisco

Be Gone, Electro-Clash I first read the May 18 Green Zone column about electro-magnetic radiation in the paper and now online (“To Wit,” May 18). Thank you so much

THIS MODERN WORLD

for helping to get the word out. Smart meters, along with the huge increase in electro-pollution, are killing us and the planet. I pray we will adopt the precautionary principle here, too.

JOLIE ANDRITZAKIS

Santa Rosa

Hope Floats

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five

Thank you, Jeri, for sharing your story, and thank you to my beloved Bohemian for putting it out there so beautifully.

SAM BLUNT Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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“Every migrant coming to this country has their own story to tell,” says the narrator of Why We Come (Por Que Venimos), a new documentary about Latin American migrants living in San Rafael’s Canal district. The film dismantles the dehumanization of immigrants by examining why people make the choice to undertake a journey across the border into an oft-unfriendly U.S. Fernando Diaz, one of the filmmakers, says he’s informed by work with the Marin Immigrant Rights Coalition. “I want the MIRC to be a strong voice for a community that has remained voiceless for too long. That is why I embarked on this documentary project, to help make this possible,” says Diaz. Why We Come screens on Friday, May 27, at the Dance Palace. 503 B St., Point Reyes Station. 7pm. Donations accepted. 415.663.1075. www.whywecome.org.

IDENTITY POLITICS LIGHT Owner Mary Pitman jokes with production supervisor Jaime Caballero at one of Pitman Family Farms’ free-range facilities.

Giving a Cluck A PETA-approved method for chicken processing grabs shelf space at Whole Foods—and local producers flap their wings to keep up BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

M

ary Pitman fidgets when she enters the area of her Sanger, Calif., poultryprocessing plant where the chickens are killed. She prefers “processed” or even “put to

sleep”—anything other than a word relating to death. “I’ve never liked the way it’s been done,” says the owner and namesake of Pitman Family Farms, whose products include free-range chicken, turkey and duck. Her fidgeting is, in a way,

part of what has led the company to invest millions of dollars in a PETA-endorsed method for ending the birds’ lives. On the surface, it may seem strange that People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals—which believes the world’s population should refrain ) 10

Roberto Reyes, former police commissioner and current planning commissioner for the city of Richmond, speaks to the Sonoma County Commission on Human Rights this week about countywide ID cards. Proposed to protect undocumented workers not convicted of a crime from being taken to jail for not having a driver’s license, the system would provide a card to any county resident. Reyes says the card system can be implemented at no cost, and the public is welcome to attend the presentation on Tuesday, May 24, at the Permit and Resource Management Hearing Room. 2550 Ventura Ave., Santa Rosa. 5:30pm. 707.431.8451. —Leilani Clark

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Chickens ( 9 from harming animals in any way and eat only vegan diets—would advocate a method for the delivery of a living animal to a dinner plate. But, as PETA media specialist Ashley Gonzalez says, “we want to eliminate the worst suffering chickens are enduring right now. They’re going to be killed, and if we can do it in a less cruel way, companies should be doing it.” The process Pitman will begin using next month is the second of its kind in the United States, and the first west of the Mississippi. The Anglia Autoflow CAS (controlled atmosphere stunning) is as far a cry from current slaughter methods as one can get with the end result still being a dead bird. Currently, the most popular method involves hanging birds by their feet on hooks, which carries them by conveyor belt to an electrified water bath, then individually prodding each bird (by hand) with a high-voltage barbecue fork to ensure a lifeless entry to the packaging facility. Even then, according to PETA, some are still alive when their throats are slit. The CAS method involves no hanging, no bath, no prodding. Birds are loaded into a large crate (about 110 pounds in each) and taken by conveyor into a “gas tunnel,” where carbon dioxide gas replaces oxygen and causes death within 60 to 70 seconds. “It’s far more humane than what happens to birds now,” says Gonzalez. “With these new systems, it eliminates the chance for a chicken to be scalded to death.” Pitman Farms currently uses elements to make the process as humane as possible, including the use of red lights and a plate along the conveyor to rub the breasts of the birds, which puts them in a near-catatonic stupor before they are processed. But even that does not sit well with Mary, who does eat chicken but, like most of us, doesn’t like to think of certain steps in the process from farm to table. The birds are raised to aboverequired government standards

Nicolas Grizzle

10

DARK Carbon dioxide gassing sends

the birds to be processed.

for free-range chickens. Pitman applies the Five-Step Animal Welfare Rating by the Global Animal Partnership. One of Pitman’s farms in the Central Valley, a level three, gives the birds access to leave the spacious, temperature-regulated coop and “enrichments in housing,” which include branches of eucalyptus hung from the ceiling to just above the birds’ heads and hay bales to play on. Visitors wear a zip-up suit reminiscent of footed pajamas and hairnets, as well as plastic covering for shoes, to avoid any possible contamination. At the level-five farm, birds are brought up with the same care as are schoolchildren. Baby chicks are raised in small U-Haul-style trailers and placed in new ones in one-week intervals to make room for new chicks and to keep the older ones with birds their own age. After six weeks, they are housed in an open trailer in a fenced area with both shade and outdoor access. Trailers are moved every three days to ensure the birds don’t get used to living inside. The resulting bird looks like a normal chicken—an unusual sight in the poultry-processing business. Many chickens, ) 12

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including Petaluma Poultryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rocky Jr., lack enough feathers to safely go outside the coop before they are slaughtered. Birds at Pitmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s level-three farm are more sparsely covered than an average bird, but are still able to roam free. The level-ďŹ ve birds are in such high demand, says Geoff Green, Pitman Farms marketing specialist, that the company sometimes has to turn away orders. Despite the $6 per-pound price tag in stores, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough to keep up with demand, he said. Currently, about a thousand birds a week can be produced for sale using this method, but expansion plans are imminent. If Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision catches onâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the popularity of the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most humanely raised (and most expensive) products indicate itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possibleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the birds we eat will soon be treated more like humans than some house pets. If it remains a niche market, however, natural poultry producers may end up ďŹ ghting for market share. This may hit home hardest in Petaluma, an area once known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;chicken capital of the world,â&#x20AC;? still renowned for its agriculture and as the namesake of nationally sold products by natural-poultry pioneer Petaluma Poultry (which is now owned by food giant Coleman, soon to be sold to Perdue, the third largest poultry-processing company in the country). Furthermore, Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Free Range Chicken will soon be the primary option and one of just two brands available in California Whole Foods markets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re aligning with smaller-scale California producers as a way to secure and expand our supply,â&#x20AC;? explains Whole Foods Northern California meat coordinator Dan Neuerbrug, via email. The company is also offering birds from Field to Family, a Petaluma company, but appears to be noncommittal about Petalumaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most well-known chicken producer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking at new opportunities for unique items from Petaluma Poultry,â&#x20AC;? Neuerbrug writes. (Petaluma

Poultry was unable to answer questions about its processing method before press time.) Like Pitman Farms chickens, birds at Fulton Valley Farms are given outdoor access, fed a vegetarian diet and live in coops with enriched growing conditions. But the company isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t growing, having laid off over 120 employees last year when its processing plant on River Road in Santa Rosa closed last year after it became too expensive to truck the birds there from the Central Valley. Their birds are now raised and processed in the Central Valley, 40 miles north and south of Turlock, says a spokesperson for the company.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be killed, and if we can do it in a less cruel way, companies should be doing it.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Still, the long-term viability of Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chickens will rely upon consumer demand, which hinges on product quality. Slick marketing and warm, fuzzy feelings only go so far in the culinary world, where the bottom line boils down to taste. If raising an animal with compassion makes it taste better, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a safe bet that those in charge of the large factory farms will take another look at how things are done. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chefs out there want nothing but the best,â&#x20AC;? says Green, whose job is to convince chefs to spend a little more on his birds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But there are some who believe chicken is chicken and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not worth the price.â&#x20AC;?

Green Zone

Eli Pariser exposes what Google and Facebook are hiding BY JULIANE POIRIER

T

he world’s most illuminating “green” thinkers are unanimous on the subject of community, and that our survival as a species depends urgently upon cultivating unity among human beings. So it’s unsettling to learn that the internet is becoming, without our knowledge or consent, a wedge that divides and isolates us rather than a tool that brings us together as a betterfunctioning society.

In his investigative book, The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You, social activist Eli Pariser demonstrates how algorithms used by Google and Facebook are editing what we see when we attempt to contact people or search for information on the internet. If you and I, for example, sit down at our respective computers at the same time on the same

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day and enter the same term in a Google search, our results will be different based on how the gatekeeping algorithms have summed up who we are and what is relevant to us. During a March TED talk given in Long Beach, Pariser showed screen shots of Google search results for two different men who simultaneously and separately entered the term “Egypt.” The algorithmic gatekeepers determined information priorities differently for each; one got headlines of Egyptian social unrest, and the other got vacation sites. (What’s up with these incredible hotel deals in Cairo?) Apparently, it doesn’t matter whether you’re searching for information or “friends.” Pariser says Facebook edited his contact with those whose political views differed from his; the conservatives were simply removed. Facebook’s social networking controls seem not only intrusive but horrifying when paired with a quote Pariser attributes to 27-yearold Mark Zuckerberg, creator and president of Facebook, defending the importance of personalized news feeds: “A squirrel dying in front of your house might be more relevant to your interest right now than people dying in Africa.” No, Zuckerberg. Not. Pariser notes that when programmed algorithms are acting as gatekeepers on the internet, they are not coded with responsibility, nor imbedded with values. Because these decisions are being made without our knowing and without our consent, we can’t know what or whom they are keeping us from seeing. “What is getting edited out?” asks Pariser, who suggests that if this control of the internet does not change, the tool intended to unite us—essential for species survival—will ultimately leave each of us “isolated in a web of one.”

13

Dining Alma Shaw

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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MADE BY HAND Marcelina Castaneda, busy as usual in the kitchen; the restaurant recently expanded to keep up with demand.

Filled to Perfection Pupusas Salvadoreñas one of the area’s best, cheapest and most delicious BY JESSICA DUR

P

upusas are to El Salvador what hot dogs are to America, what po-boys are to Louisiana and what burritos are to California. Simply put, they are the national plate of Central America’s smallest country, celebrated with

a national holiday—and they’ve been made for the last four years, delicious and cheap, at Pupusas Salvadoreñas in Santa Rosa. But beware: this is a place that turns customers into regulars. Named after the Pipil, an indigenous group native to El Salvador prior to the Spanish

conquest, pupusas, like most south-of-the-border staples, are made from corn. The thick handmade masa tortillas are filled with cheese, beans, pork, squash, spinach, loroco (a native edible vine flower), or some combination thereof, and then grilled to a golden perfection. Served with salsa and curtido, a spicy cabbage slaw with red chilies and carrots,

pupusas are healthier than burgers, more fun than burritos, and, at just two bucks a pop, incredibly easy on the wallet. Rosa and Antonio Cardona opened Pupusas Salvadoreñas in 2007, despite being “terrified that everything would go wrong.” On a recent evening, Rosa’s youngest daughter, Seida, agrees to translate, and it’s clear from the start that Seida knows the answers to many of the questions for her mother, whose light-filled eyes and easy smile defy her 60 years. Rosa spends every day at the restaurant, and even comes in on Sundays to wash dishes, much to Seida’s chagrin. “We all want her to rest,” she tells me. But rest is not part of Rosa’s pattern. Pupusas Salvadoreñas’ story begins in the 1980s, when Rosa ran a pupusa stand in San Salvador, cooking for hospital staff and patients. But due to the increasing violence and crime that swept the city, she and her husband fled north, followed over the next 10 years by most of their family. Seida was just three years old when her parents left El Salvador, where she continued to live with her aunt and cousins. She did not see her mother again until she moved to Santa Rosa as a teenager, a decade later. At that time, Rosa was working six days a week, cooking, cleaning and sewing for other people. On the weekends, she made pupusas in her kitchen for friends and family, “just for the heck of it.” These social pupusa gatherings grew in numbers and intensity for two years, until, Seida smiles, “it got a little out of hand. They were so popular that cars were blocking the street, and the neighbors were getting mad.” So delicious were Rosa’s pupusas that people began insisting she accept money for them. Eventually she thought, “Why not open a restaurant?” The pupusas, which are always made to order, are by far Pupusas Salvadoreñas most popular dish, though other Salvadorian specialties such as empanadas ($1.75), yucca ($7) and sweet corn atole ($2.50) fill the menu,

Pupusas Salvadoreñas, 1403 Maple Ave., Santa Rosa. Open daily, 9am–9pm. 707.544.3141.

15 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

alongside horchata made with morro seeds and peanuts instead of rice ($1.75). “I like only the freshest ingredients,” Rosa says. “I’m concerned about health, so the beans are cooked only in oil, never lard.” The devotion to quality shows in the restaurant’s varied and committed customer base. There are New Zealanders living in Novato who make the trek, and the Santa Rosa Police Department sometimes dines there for lunch. “It’s pretty cool when they come,” Seida says. But Rosa could never have predicted their enormous success. “If you work hard, you can have a good job,” she says about the United States, and hard work seems to come naturally for the Cardonas. After cooking at a nursing home from 4am to 3pm, Antonio spends his evenings cleaning the restaurant kitchen. Twenty-year-old Seida juggles SRJC classes with a full-time schedule at the restaurant. And during a major three-month renovation project that started in January, the family closed the restaurant for only one day to tear down a wall, doubling their floor space. “The whole family helped,” Seida tells me. “My dad and my uncles can do construction work, so they remodeled the bathrooms and expanded everything.” With fresh flowers in ribbontied vases, sprightly music in the background and sparkling clean blond-wood booths and tables, the spiffed-up restaurant invites postmeal lingering. Sporting maps and posters, the walls serve as introductory courses in El Salvador’s geography, currency and national treasures. Rosa seems so at home here, in fact, that when asked what she does with her time off, she lets out a chuckle. “I go to church,” she says, “but my life is pretty much here.” So does she miss El Salvador? Rosa’s gasp needs no translation. “Mucho,” she nods, looking right into my eyes. “Mucho. It’s very beautiful. When I am too old to work anymore, I want to go back home.”

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Bear Republic Brewing Co Brewpub. $-$$. Award-winning ales and pub fare. Hearty portions and friendly service. Casual dining, outside patio. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.2337.

Betty’s Fish & Chips Seafood. $-$$. Cheerful, bustling, totally informal eatery serving authentic Brit fare. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 4046 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0899.

Bluewater Bistro California cuisine. $$-$$$. Homey and rich seafood with warm service. Terrific specialoccasion spot. Dinner, ThursSat; lunch daily; breakfast, SatSun. 21301 Heron Dr, Bodega Bay. 707.875.3513.

Carmen’s Burger Bar American. $. Excellent and innovative burgers with a Mexican flair. Beef comes fresh daily from Pacific Market next door. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 1612 Terrace (in Town and Country center), Santa Rosa. 707.579.3663.

Carneros Bistro & Wine Bar Californian. $$$$. As fancy as foie graschestnut froth parfait for dinner, as simple as huevos rancheros for breakfast, and all superb. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 1325 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.931.2042.

Chloe’s French Cafe French. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Fri. 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

The Girl & the Fig Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner

daily. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

Hamburger Ranch & Pasta Farm American. $. Old-fashioned, informal mom’n’-pop roadhouse. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 31195 N Redwood Hwy, Cloverdale. 707.894.5616.

Red Rose Cafe Soul

fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Casa Mañana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Drake’s Beach Cafe

food/Southern. $. Fried chicken, ribs, collard greens and mac ’n’ cheese. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; breakfast and lunch, Sun. 1770 Piner Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9741

Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Sun; dinner, Fri-Sat. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Stark’s Steakhouse

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$.

Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever have. “Other than steak” menu changes seasonally. Happy hour Mon-Fri, 3 to 6. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Truc Linh Vietnamese. $. Your basic Vietnamse fare, prepared to perfection. Great for light meals. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat. 810 McClelland Dr, Windsor. 707.838.6746.

Willi’s Wine Bar Small plates/wine bar. $$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500.

N A PA CO U N T Y Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/

Mountain Home Inn

California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103.

Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536.

Buster’s Barbecue

Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$.

comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $.

Small Shed Flatbreads

Fantastic East-meets-West

Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed

Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $.

Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona Ave, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily.

SMALL BITES

Strawberries Wild It’s time to run wild through a strawberry patch, cheer on the coronation of the Strawberry Queen, share shortcake with the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence and dance to some berrylicious sax jams while pounding bucket loads of juicy fruit at the Fifth Annual Russian River Strawberry Fest. Radio KGGV-FM 95.1, aka “the Bridge,” celebrates summer’s red treasure by hosting the woodsy jubilee, which doubles as a fundraiser for the volunteer-run radio station. Celebrate the strawberry with contests, live music and a chocolate-dipping fountain on Saturday, May 28, at the Guerneville Community Church. 14520 Armstrong Woods Road, Guerneville. Free. 11am–5pm. 707.869.1131.

Fierocious In a recent interview with the LA Weekly, irascible recording engineer and indiemusician-turned-food-blogger Steve Albini was asked about TV cooking personalities, which launched Albini into a trademark rant against boob-tube chefs with “gimmick hairdos and catch phrases, hooting and highfiving, ‘bringing it,’ celebrating gluttonous sports-bar chow, dipshits abbreviating their ingredients and making childish, cutesy-poo ‘comfort food’ full of ‘yummy veggies’—shit like that.” In related news, Tex Wasabi’s, the downtown Santa Rosa eatery owned by Guy Fieri, reopened last week after a long closure for renovations. Craving sushi stuffed with, uh, barbecue and fries? This is the place to get it. And maybe one of those visor hats with the fake blonde hair sticking out of the top. Tex Wasabi’s, 515 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. 707.544.8399.—Leilani Clark

4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus

are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Wineries

17

SONOMA COUNTY Arista Winery Nothing big about the wine list, just style-driven9, focused wines. 7015 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Tasting room open daily, 11am–5pm. 707.473.0606. Armida The wines are original, and there are three mysterious geodesic domes on the property. Plus: bocce! 2201 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.433.2222.

Arnot-Roberts Some fresh pepper on that Syrah? Duo of chums craft spicy, savory lower-alcohol wines from cool climates in funky backstreet cellar. 6450 First St., Forestville. By appointment only. 707.820.1383.

D’Argenzio Winery Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

Hart’s Desire Wines Brash Zinfandel and sensuous Pinot Noir from the label with the come-hither eyes. Brick walls plastered with art, participatory painting, and a jukebox also entertain in this old warehouse shared with Christi Vineyards and J. Keverson Winery. 53 Front St. (Old Roma Station), Healdsburg. Thursday–Monday, 11am– 5pm. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.3097.

Thumbprint Cellars Vegan wines named Arousal, Threesome and Four Play; but it all started out innocently enough. Downtown lounge offers curvaceous bar, hookah-den-styled booth, and seasonal nosh. 102 Matheson St., Healdsburg. Open 11am to 6pm Sunday– Thursday, to 7pm Saturday. Tastings $5–$10; with food pairing, $10–$20. 707.433.2393.

Unti Vineyards Very

friendly and casual with an emphasis on young Italianstyle wines. Yum. 4202 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment. 707.433.5590.

NAPA COUNTY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Chateau Montelena The winery triumphed at the 1976 “Judgment of Paris” tasting where French judges, quelle horreur, found that they had awarded top honors to a California contender. 1429 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 9:30am–4pm. 707.942.5105. Clos Pegase Winery (WC) Practically an art museum. A 2,800-square-foot “cave theater” plays frequent host to parties and more. Tasting flight of four wines, red and white, $10. 1060 Dunaweal Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 800.366.8583.

Constant (WC) Boutique winery specializing in the kind of Cabernet that makes the Wine Spectator drool. 2121 Diamond Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.942.0707. Cuvaison Estate Wines (WC) Producing some 65 percent of its product as Chardonnay, Cuvaison has a 22,000-square-foot cave. 4550 Silverado Trail N., Napa. By appointment. 707.942.6266.

Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.257.2345. Nichelini Winery Take a joyride in the Napa backcountry and discover this rustic little winery that’s been in the family for generations.

See the only Roman wine press in the Western Hemisphere. 2950 Sage Canyon Road, St. Helena. Saturday and Sunday, 10am–5pm. No fee. 707.963.0717.

Olabisi & Trahan Wineries In the fancy heart of downtown Napa, a low-budget “cellar” where wines are shelved, with clever economy, in stacks of wood pallets; vibes are laid-back and real. Carneros Chardonnay and fruity but firm and focused Cab and Merlot from Suisin Valley, Napa’s much less popular stepsister to the east. 974 Franklin St., Napa. Open daily, noon–5:30pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.257.7477.

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

Taste at Oxbow Discover refreshing white varietals Albariño and Vermentino in stylish setting across from Oxbow Market, then move on to Pinot Noir from Carneros pioneer Mahoney Vineyards; Waterstone Wines, too. 708 First St., Napa. Sunday– Thursday, 11am–7pm; Friday– Saturday, 11am–9pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.265.9600. Vincent Arroyo Winery Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines. 2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.6995.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

!

!

Food | Wine | Live Music | Local Art

California Mediterranean Tapas / 20 Wines by the Glass Ask about our “Small Production” Wine List This restaurant is the perfect place for dinner after a relaxing day in wine country with its charming ambiance and delicious food. —Blue Suitcase Travel

235 Healdsburg Ave, #105, Healdsburg, CA 95448 Reservations: 707-431-1113 www.affrontihealdsburg.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment.

8ZLUO

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

18

Quixotic Quaffs

T

he “Final Grape Crush Report,” published by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, is a fine read—but lacks illustration. What does it mean that 446,136 tons of Cabernet Sauvignon were crushed in California in 2010, for example? That’s the equivalent weight of 190,400 Ford F-150 pickups. Standard cab. Fermented and pressed, the resulting product could easily be poured into a hundred Olympic-size swimming pools. No ullage. Getting a picture?

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If the entire crop of California’s vino rojo numero uno were condensed into a single barrel of Cabernet Sauvignon, tiny Tempranillo would only stand six or seven bottles strong. Although the Spanish first introduced wine grapes to California, their workhorse Mission grape was quickly eclipsed by French and German varietals—even scrappy no-names like Zinfandel. Now a group of vintners and growers is angling to bring back the grapes of Spain, plus Portugal. Bravely trooping past the wreckage of Sangiovese and the Cal-Ital dreams of the 1990s, the Tempranillo Advocates, Producers and Amigos Society may be doing more than just tilting against windmills. Spanish wines are hot right now (albeit, outside of the bubble of wine country), and TAPAS members grow the region’s finest varietals, including Tempranillo, the red grape of Rioja, whites Albariño and Verdelho, and Portugal’s traditional port wine grape Touriga Naçional. To offer a snapshot of Tempranillo, I put together a few disparate bottles, and found they shared more similarities than differences. Plucked from the shelves of Whole Foods, a Valdemar 2007 Rioja Tempranillo ($12.99) displays juicy, red berries locked in wet stone, with just a hint of oak vanillin to sweeten the tart, chunky, dry finish. From Bokisch Vineyards, among California’s leading TAPAS proponents, the 2008 Lodi Tempranillo ($21) is warmer, with a caramelized note, and indeterminately dark, spicy red fruit. From the cool Carneros, Mahoney Vineyards’ 2007 Tempranillo, Las Brisas Vineyard ($20), smells fresher, brighter, with similarly occult berries fused in wet stone. Taking lithe turns around the tongue, it lands on a decidedly dry note. Sanguine stuff, but I think I may prefer some of the exciting Iberian white varietals, like Mahoney’s 2009 Alberiño, Las Brisas Vineyard ($18). A cool, dusty aroma hints at fresh cut pear and pineapple, while the lean, tongue-tingling flavors of pineapple and grapefruit linger on, carried by an unexpected weight, something like unoaked Chardonnay. As for Vinho Verde? I’ll take a swimming pool. TAPAS grand tasting at Fort Mason Center, Herbst Pavilion, San Francisco. Sunday, June 5, from 2pm to 5pm. $60 at the door; $40 advance. For information, see www.tapasociety.org. Mahoney Vineyards wines can be sampled at Taste at Oxbow, 708 First St., Napa. Sunday–Thursday, noon–7pm; Friday–Saturday, noon–9pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.265.9600.—James Knight

19 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Voltage Violets How a public power agency in Sonoma County could revolutionize the grid BY DARWIN BOND-GRAHAM

FUELING UP Cordel Stillman is at the forefront in planning for a publicly owned alternative to PG&E.

I

magine that ďŹ ve years from now when a light switch is ďŹ&#x201A;ipped on in a Santa Rosa home, the electricity comes straight from solar panels mounted on the roof of a nearby school; and when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too cloudy to generate solar juice, turbines roar at the geothermal plants near Geyserville; and when demand for wattage is highest, a power plant near the airport that runs on methane extracted from chicken poop kicks in; and during the winterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s storms, wave-generated electricity streams across lines from Bodegaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all low-carbon, with not a watt of nuclear power in sight.

Unfortunately, Sonoma County residents currently get the biggest chunk of their electricity from enormous natural gas plants located far away, and another major source of PG&E-supplied energy is the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. Effectively, PG&E monopolizes Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy market. Even taking into consideration existing solar, wind and hydroelectric power, our current power supply is environmentally ruinous and almost entirely generated outside the county. Unless things drastically change, this regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already bloated carbon footprint will only grow. Now imagine not only an ecologically sensitive and economically robust alternative to business as usual, but add this kicker: all of it could be owned

and democratically controlled by Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residents and local investors, and built by local workers. On March 22, the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors may have set in motion just such a future by tasking the water agency to study the feasibility of developing a Community Choice Aggregation program. It marks the beginning of what could be a dramatically positive transformation of Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entire economy, but the path forward is highly complex and full of potential pitfalls. Local, clean energy is an obtainable goal thanks to a little-known piece of legislation, Assembly Bill 117, passed in 2002, which enables local governments to establish Community Choice Aggregation programs (CCA or

Alma Shaw

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

20

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community Choiceâ&#x20AC;?). â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like to call it Community Choice Energy,â&#x20AC;? says Woody Hastings of the Climate Protection Campaign, a local nonproďŹ t involved in shaping energy policy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s less jargony than â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aggregation,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and captures what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really about: locally developed clean energy.â&#x20AC;? By aggregating all the ratepayers in their jurisdictions, CCA programs let local governments purchase energy in bulk, more cheaply and from whomever they want, acting as a direct competitor to investorowned utilities like PG&E. Different from the long-sought and often rejected holy grail of fully municipalized energy, CCA electricity still ďŹ&#x201A;ows through an investor-owned utilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lines, and the utility still handles meter reading and billing. Nevertheless, CCAs put the most important decisionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;where to purchase energy from and where to reinvest ratepayer revenuesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in the hands of local elected officials instead of corporate boards of directors. The only precedent in California to what Sonoma County seeks exists in Marin County. And while dozens of other communities across the state have explored the possibility of creating their own CCA, and some have even taken steps to set one up, only San Francisco leads Sonoma County as of today. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the very beginning stages,â&#x20AC;? says Cordel Stillman, capital projects manager for the Sonoma County Water Agency. Stillmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team is heading the feasibility study partly because the water agency is a utility in its own right, with several megawatts of solar and hydropower already online. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The purpose is to see if CCA is ďŹ nancially viable. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strictly a numbers game. If it pencils out and we go with a CCA, then developing local sources will become a focus.â&#x20AC;?

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Parallel to Stillman’s feasibility study is another water agency– led effort to explore potential renewable energy resources from Petaluma to Cloverdale. Called Renewable Energy for Secure Communities, or RESCO, the mission of the state energy commission, in its own words, is “to advance the implementation of a locally owned, cost-effective renewable portfolio.” Already on the shelf is another blueprint for the development of local renewable energy, the Climate Action Plan, developed by the Climate Protection Campaign. Built into these studies, and the ethos of the officials and activists driving them, is the notion that renewable, low-carbon projects, located within the county, should be a core component from the very beginning. In this respect, Sonoma County’s reasons for pursuing a CCA are somewhat different from previous efforts. For example, in Ohio and Massachusetts, where two successful CCAs were founded in the early 2000s, green energy and localization were overshadowed by the primary drive to reduce ratepayer bills. Just a year old, the Marin Energy Authority is the first operational CCA in California. It took a gargantuan effort. “When we got close to launch, PG&E did an anti-marketing campaign,” recalls Jamie Tuckey, spokesperson for the Marin Energy Authority (MEA). “They

were sending out direct mailers to everyone in Marin. It was a fearbased campaign where they were spreading rumors that households would go into debt by $5,000 if they joined our agency, saying that the lights would go out, that we weren’t actually going to be supplying clean energy.” After PG&E failed to scuttle the MEA, the utility attempted to prevent other communities from following Marin’s lead by sponsoring Proposition 16, a ballot initiative that would have established virtually insurmountable obstacles to establishing CCAs. But all is not as green as it may seem in Marin. Since overcoming PG&E’s efforts to kill it, the MEA has been subjected to an altogether different kind of scrutiny that reveals just how difficult the task of localizing and greening the energy supply really is, even with the right policy in place. In a recent editorial in SolarTimes, Marin County resident and publisher Sandy LeonVest wrote: “While MEA took credit in its promotional material and in the local media for ‘breaking away’ from PG&E, it ended up signing a contract with an even bigger and more formidable corporation: Shell Energy North America, a subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell. And MEA customers, as it turned out, would still be reliant on PG&E to deliver their energy. . . . While it’s arguably true, at least on paper, that the energy mix

from MEA is clean, SolarTimes’ research shows that, at best, it is only marginally cleaner. And the authority has yet to implement plans for building any locally generated energy.” Like the MEA, San Francisco’s CCA, CleanPower SF, which is nearly operational, has also been in negotiations with Shell as a possible supplier. Yet Shell’s environmental and human rights abuses are infamous. Shell seems content to profit from Marin’s wealthy consumers who will pay premiums for “deep green” electricity, all the while continuing to drill for oil in the Gulf of Mexico and increasing use of the controversial method of “fracking” to release natural gas deposits by pumping toxic chemicals into the earth. The MEA’s Tuckey counters such criticisms by noting that while Shell supplies the energy, the electrons are still being generated from less carbonintensive sources. “We actually have the highest percentage of renewable energy resources reported to the Public Utilities Commission of any utility in the state.” Tuckey also notes that the MEA’s contract with Shell was always considered a first step for a small agency with big goals but a limited in-house capacity (MEA has a staff of five); the ultimate goal is still to develop local resources and suppliers. These seem distant targets at their current pace. The

MEA is expanding its energy supplies with an Atlanta-based corporation (hardly local) to develop methane-gas-fired energy from landfills. According to MEA documents, these two facilities will be located at landfills in Yuba and Solano counties, thus any harm to the environment—and any jobs created—would occur outside Marin. So too for the 40-megawatt solar farms MEA is currently negotiating to build. Charles Schultz, development director of Local Power, the Bay Area–based brain trust widely credited with creating CCA and other green and local policies, vented his frustration at a recent Marin Clean Energy board meeting, asking, “What happened to localization?” and suggesting that the MEA had lost sight of the original goals of locally sourced green electricity. Can Sonoma County do it differently? Certainly there is much in the MEA’s model to be emulated (as CleanPower SF has done), but if the goal of providing clean energy and green jobs through local resources is to be met, then Sonoma County’s CCA will have to be different. The RESCO study of county renewable resources is a major reason why Sonoma County might overcome some of the limits and contradictions Marin and San Francisco are running up against. Some local renewable energy projects are

) 22

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

SUN SOAK Although Marin Energy Authority buys power from Shell, Sonoma County is perfectly poised to use locally generated green energy .

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Voltage & Violets ( 21 already under development and would flourish with a CCA. For example, the chicken-poop power plant is real; county leaders have already secured $55 million in bonds to build the 1.4-megawatt facility near the airport. And the Sonoma County Water Agency is already extracting energy from biomass. Using wastewater at the Laguna Treatment Plant, staff grow algae which is then converted into methane. The methane powers a generator that provides electricity for vehicles and other uses, and the waste product is premium compost that goes on top of strawberry beds. Then there’s the geothermal resource of the geysers, which already produce 725 megawatts, with room to expand. Sonoma County is the Saudia Arabia of geothermal energy. Yet another reason for hope is the sheer momentum and cooperation among activists and officials keen on establishing CCAs that both provide clean energy and boost local economies. Marin Energy Authority’s staff has already been tapped by Sonoma County’s planners for their knowledge, as have many other key agencies, nonprofits and companies. It’s possible that a larger Sonoma County CCA, or perhaps a joint Sonoma-Marin effort, armed with the RESCO renewables study, a larger ratepayer base and a restrained PG&E could immediately make real on the promise of clean, local energy. And what about PG&E? Both MEA and CleanPower SF staffers report continuing problems. PG&E’s CEO recently told the Press Democrat that his company would not interfere in Sonoma County’s efforts to establish a CCA. A PG&E spokesperson contacted for this article offered vague statements to the effect that the company would still be vigilant to ensure its customers “receive accurate information so they can make informed decisions about where they get their power.” The Coalition of California Utility Employees, an industry-friendly union lobby that often serves as

a proxy for PG&E in its political battles, is pushing legislation in the State Senate that would severely hamper newly formed CCAs. This bill, SB 976 would prohibit consultants advising CCAs from bidding on CCA contracts, a stricture that would surely eliminate most of the qualified contractors in a field where experience is in short supply. Countering this is SB 790, sponsored by State Sen. Mark Leno. The bill reads: “California has a substantial governmental interest in ensuring that conduct by electrical corporations does not threaten the consideration, development and implementation of Community Choice Aggregation programs,” and it establishes a “code of conduct” and “enforcement procedures” to ensure utilities desist in interfering with Community Choice. “I think CCA is going to happen,” predicts Anne Hancock, executive director of the Climate Protection Campaign. But legislative battles, policy studies, public input, corporate flack—all of it will shape the final form. Hancock and other consumer and environmental advocates are therefore already deeply engaged in working with elected officials and the private sector and educating the public about CCAs’ potentials and pitfalls. Woody Hastings brims with optimism when he thinks about how a CCA could unfold in Sonoma County. “The most ambitious scenario would be if we could hit the ground running with a program that embraces the local build-out of renewables, integrated with the procurement of power on the open market.” This, he explains, would allow for a rapid transition away from large, centralized and nonlocal CO2emitting power plants through the development of many local, distributed, renewable energy projects. And because it would require a complete retooling of the county’s energy grid, it would drastically stimulate the economy. “This is the enormous green jobs program,” concludes Hastings.

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Crush S A N TA R O S A

Mi Corazon

In just a few years, banda crooner Espinoza Paz has risen from an undocumented farmworker toiling in fields outside Sacramento to a rising star on the Latin music scene. A winner of the 2010 BMI Latin Songwriter of the year, the cowboy-hatted heartthrob recently enjoyed a big hit with “Lo Intentamos,” a sexy song that opens with one whispered “Corazon.” When the horns kick in, it’s all over—hello melting heart, goodbye underwear. Let love in with Espinoza Paz on Monday, May 29, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. $80–$105. 8pm. 707.546.3600.

CORTE MADERA

Night Lore One of The New Yorker’s 20 best authors under 40, Chris Adrian writes novels that are alternately shimmering, gut-wrenching and grotesque. His latest work, The Great Night, re-envisions A Midsummer Night’s Dream as a tale of menace and gloom in modern-day San Francisco’s Buena Vista Park. In real life, Adrian moonlights as a fellow in pediatric hematology-ontology and is a graduate of Harvard Divinity School—which might explain his willingness to take on big, dark spiritual themes. Chris Adrian brings on the fairie lore on Friday, May 27, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. Free. 7pm. 415.927.0960.

N A PA

Trumped Up At the White House Correspondents’ Dinner last month, Seth Meyers roasted the shit out of Donald Trump. On television, fantastic cutaway camera shots caught the Donald iron-jawed, the “fox on his head” practically wiggling to get free. Hopefully, the fresh-faced Saturday Night Live head writer and host of “Weekend Update” will dust off some of his sardonic Trump jokes (and maybe the one about Larry King) when he brings his very funny standup act to Napa this week. Seth Meyers gets smart on Friday, May 27, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. $45–$55. 8pm. 707.259.0123.

SEBASTOPOL

Tentacle Arms Seeing the frenetic drummer Zach Hill play live is like taking a shot of adrenaline straight to the chest in the middle of a tornado. The guy is simply a beats machine, spewing records and collaborations with everyone from Marnie Stern to the Mars Volta’s Omar Rodríguez-López and his own spastic math-metal outfit Hella. Witness an unreal solo performance along with a million other bands (OK, just eight) including Not to Reason Why, the Iditarod, Thought Vomit and others on Friday, May 27, at the Sebastopol Community Center. 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. $12. 5:30pm. 707.823.1511

Leilani Clark

LIKE IT IS If we could type this in falsetto, we totally would: Aaron Neville sings May 29 at the Napa Valley Opera House. See Concerts, p29.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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ArtsIdeas ZAPATOS Color and gravity mark Danisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work; Steinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contain a cheerful palette with dark undertones.

Strange Gifts Livia Stein and Susan Danisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; yin-yang of artful unpredictability BY KYLIE MENDONCA

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ivia Stein arrived before the opening of her shared art exhibit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love and Pleasureâ&#x20AC;? at Art Works Downtown in San Rafael wearing a vintage gold-andgray striped dress, green tights and a row of clanking bracelets on each wrist. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the 2-D person,â&#x20AC;? she announced, gesturing to the colorfully layered paintings and prints on the wall.

Throughout the gallery stood found object sculptures made by Steinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friend and fellow artist Susan Danis, who arrived minutes later with her own clanking wrist ornaments and fuchsia ensemble. The colorful duoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current show, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love and Pleasure,â&#x20AC;? runs through June 17, and viewersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; only expectations should be for the unexpected. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do stuff thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of far out there,â&#x20AC;? Danis says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just absurd to think everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to like it.â&#x20AC;? Both Danis and Stein share a

penchant for eccentric fashion, bright colors and candid discourse, though their delivery is unique: Stein is the pragmatist; Danis, the fantasist. Steinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work is color, imageryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;brushstrokes ďŹ xed to canvas; Danisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sculptures seem to have their own gravity, as if they had spontaneously materialized with objects pulled from their resting place into piles and spheres. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Susan makes certain things look easy,â&#x20AC;? Stein says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so deceptive.â&#x20AC;? Stein motions toward a metal net full of ďŹ st-sized jewels that hangs

at the front of the gallery. Danis wove the net in which the jewels rest, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to overlook the craftsmanship, simply because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very precise. Many of her pieces incorporate woven structures, such as a pillow full of bones, coral, dentures and God knows what elseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and a giant human hairball (six monthsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; worth of ďŹ&#x201A;oor trimmings from Supercuts)â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ensconced in a wire sphere. Hung side by side, their works play like a conversation between old friends, each alternately playful then dark, witty and then ďŹ&#x201A;ippantly dismissive of convention. One gets the feeling from Steinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work that painted lines must continue off canvas and onto the wall of her studio, where sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still coloring outside the lines. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I decided a long time ago,â&#x20AC;? Stein says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no waiting for something called a museâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the muse never comes.â&#x20AC;? Despite their cheerful palette, Steinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings have dark undertones. A series on ďŹ&#x201A;ight, for example, features abstractions of military planes and helicopters, splatters of red pigment, and as such are vaguely hostile. Her own self-portrait depicts a frowning woman, which she attributes to staring in the mirror too long. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see the mixed messages in my work,â&#x20AC;? Stein says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see it, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t break their hearts and tell them.â&#x20AC;? Stein recently bought for Danis a taxidermied goat as a gift. A strange gift, yesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the type of gift she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know she wanted until she got it. The goat, it turns out, is a perfect metaphor for their show: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an unusual offering that inspires the viewer, when perhaps the viewer didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know she wanted to be inspired. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love and Pleasureâ&#x20AC;? runs through June 17 at Art Works Downtown. 1337 Fourth St., San Rafael. Reception, June 10, 5-8pm. 415.451.8119.

SWEET JOAN Amanda Moody wrote

and stars in this one-woman show.

Arc de Triomphe

Main Stage West blazes into existence BY DAVID TEMPLETON

F

or every door that closes, says the old adage, a new one opens. This weekend in Sebastopol, none other than Joan of Arc will be on hand to open the door. At the intersection of Main Street and Bodega Highway, the longtime home of the Sonoma County Repertory Theater, a new era begins this weekend for the little theater on the corner that closed in January when the Rep announced it was folding after 17 years. Reconceived now as the home of a consortium of local theater companies (“Rep Rising,” Feb. 23), Main Stage West has already hosted a small number of single-night events. This Friday’s opening of D’Arc, Woman on Fire, presented by the performance art troupe First Look Sonoma, marks

‘D’Arc, Woman on Fire,’ runs Thursday–Sunday, May 27 through June 5, at Main Stage West. Thursday–Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sunday. 104 N. Main St., Sebastopol. $15–$20. 707.823.0177.

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Stage

the first multi-night run of a fully produced show. “It’s a truly significant moment,” says Beth Craven, producing director of Main Stage West. “First Look Sonoma is one of our primary companies in residence at Main Stage West. This show is, I think, something completely different than most of the things we see in this area. It’s truly revolutionary theater, and I think it will really surprise and capture the imagination of everyone who sees it.” D’Arc, written and performed by singer-actress Amanda Moody, is a one-woman-show with live music telling the story of an agoraphobic woman whose daughter has disappeared while working overseas in a war-ravaged country. Through a combination of music, text, and physical performance, Joan of Arc appears to counsel the grieving woman through a transcendent series of visions. A significant element of the show is the original music by Jay Cloidt, fusing elements of Medieval chant and hymns, modern gospel and bold electronica. With live cello performed by Elaine Creston, the show is directed by Missy Weaver and produced by John Duykers. It’s the married team of Duykers and Weaver who formed First Look Sonoma, inspired by earlier “chamber opera” collaborations in San Francisco. Duykers is a renowned opera singer (he originated the role of Chairman Mao in John Adams’ Nixon in China), who now lives in Sonoma County. “John and Missy have always had a passion for original theatrical work,” says Craven, “and they’ve been trying to get something started in this county for some time. We thought they made a really good match for what we are trying to do at Main Stage West, and this show is an incredible way to introduce their work to a new audience.”

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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LOCAL BOY ‘Bathroom Drawer’ is one of 90 entires in the inaugural fest.

By the Tide

The Bodega Bay Film Festival BY MIRA STAUFFACHER

Watercolor and Mixed Media Paintings by Susan St. Thomas April 18-June 12

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inety short films. Twenty-five countries. A twoday international film extravaganza. And, yes, yet another film festival in the region. But this Memorial Day weekend’s inaugural Bodega Bay Film Fest, founded by filmmakers Kirk and Pamela Demorest, is dedicated to short films.

“We love short films,” says Kirk Demorest. “The excitement of short films is cool because there are so many different styles. There’s just no end to the amount of stories out there.” Thus, in order to be accepted into the festival, all films are between three and 15 minutes long, have no paid distribution and were made in 2008 or later. “We want to excite and promote this awareness of international film,” Demorest adds. “We are getting films from the entire world.” This festival is also notable in

that it includes audience voting. The viewers pick the best film in each category, be it comedy, horror or drama. The films are then judged by a panel of industry veterans, including Jack McGee, who most recently starred in The Fighter; actor Ed Begley Jr., who’s appeared in over 200 television and motion picture productions; and Share Stallings, producer of Death at a Funeral. Demorest is uncertain whether the judges will attend the event itself, but they will view the finalists’ films and cast their vote for Best in Show. “Their vote,” says Demorest, “can literally determine the career path of a filmmaker.” Demorest is also the founder of Sonoma Media Arts, an organization meant to connect and inspire filmmakers, directors and actors to create collaboratively. Two films from Sonoma Media Arts will be showcased in the festival, including one made by local Santa Rosa filmmaker Dan Schieberl. Based on a true story, Schieberl’s six-minute film titled Bathroom Drawer is a comedy that depicts sibling rivalry at its finest. In his household growing up, fights often broke out between he and his older brother. One such argument escalated when his brother ended up chasing him throughout the house, leaving Schieberl no choice but to lock himself in the bathroom, using a drawer as his safety. “I was stuck in the bathroom for hours,” says Schieberl, explaining the film. “My brother just sat outside reading. Eventually, my sister came in and rescued me.” Schieberl’s son Zachary plays his father in the film, which took about four months to complete. “I enjoyed it so much that I actually want to change careers,” Schieberl says. “I’m a general contractor right now, but I’m looking to become a full-time filmmaker. Right now, I’m working on a full-length feature film.” Festival films screen seaside near Bodega Head, giving attendees real-life, high-definition views right on the edge of the Pacific Ocean, on Saturday–Sunday, May 28–29, at UC Davis Bodega Marine Lab, 2099 Westside Road, Bodega Bay. Films run throughout the day. $20– $100. 707.875.2211.

Film capsules by Nicholas Berandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Cave of Forgotten Dreams (NR; 90 min.) This documentary from the great Werner Herzog takes viewers inside France’s Chauvet Cave, site of the oldest known human art, created over 30,000 years ago. At Petaluma’s Boulevard Cinemas. (NB)

The First Grader (PG; 120 min.) Justin Chadwick (The Other Boleyn Girl) directs the story of an 80-yearold Kenyan man determined to learn to read after the government institutes the nation’s first public school system—and the parents and school officials who don’t want resources wasted on him. Based on a true story. At Summerfield Cinemas and the Smith Rafael Center. (NB) Forks Over Knives (PG; 90 min.) An acclaimed documentary that examines the claim—and evidence—that our meat-based diet is responsible for most of our ailments. At Summerfield Cinemas. (NB)

The Hangover Part II (R; 102 min.) This time the boys are in Thailand to quietly celebrate the wedding of Stu (Ed Helms), but things of course go terribly, terribly wrong. There’s a funny monkey! Co-stars Zach Galifianakis and Bradley Cooper. (NB) Kung Fu Panda 2 (PG; 95 min.) Jack Black is back voicing Po, panda warrior, who must protect the Valley of Peace—and the art of kung fu itself—from a new danger. Also features the voices of Dustin Hoffman, Angelina Jolie, Seth Rogen and Jackie Chan. (NB)

Nostalgia for the Light (NR; 90 min.) In the Atacama Desert in Chile, astronomers study stars while relatives of Pinochet’s victims scour the ruins of a concentration camp the dictator established in the 1970s. Renowned Marin County author Isabel Allended presents the documentary Wednesday, May 25, at 7pm at the Smith Rafael Center. (NB)

13 Assassins (NR; 126 min.) From cult director Takashi Miike comes the remake of a ’60s martial arts classic about a band of samurai enlisted to

defeat a sadistic warlord. At the Smith Rafael Center. (NB)

ALSO PLAYING African Cats (G; 89 min.) From Disneynature films and narrated by Samuel L. Jackson, this documentary looks at life for lions and cheetahs on the African savannah. A portion of all proceeds benefits the African Wildlife Foundation. (NB)

The Beaver (PG-13; 91 min.) When a toy-company executive (Mel Gibson) falls into a serious depression, he finds the only way he can communicate to his family is through a beaver hand puppet. Really. Co-stars Jodie Foster, who also directed. (NB)

Bridesmaids (R; 125 min.) Hangover for the girls. Hilarious Kristen Wiig co-stars with Maya Rudolph in raunchy-ish chic flick about a Vegas bridal party that goes too far. Directed by Paul Feig of Freaks and Geeks fame and produced by Judd Apatow. (NB)

The Conspirator (PG-13; 122 min.) Robert Redford directs this tale of the aftermath of the Lincoln assassination with some heavyhanded references to post9-11 justice. (NB) The Double Hour (NR; 102 min.) A retired cop in Turin falls for a Slovenian maid, but their romance is endangered when her dark past is exposed on a trip to the country. In Italian with English subtitles. At the Smith Rafael Center. (NB) Everything Must Go (R; 100 min.) Will Ferrell drops into a serious role as an alcoholic who sells everything in an attempt to start over. Based on a story by Raymond Carver. At Summerfield Cinemas. (NB) Fast Five (PG-13; 113 min.) Vin Diesel and Paul Walker team up with Dwayne Johnson in the fifth installment of the Fast and Furious series. (NB) In a Better World (R; 113 min.) A Danish couple, on the verge of divorce, must confront their bullied son’s new defender, a violent boy angry over the loss of his mother to cancer. (NB)

Jumping the Broom (PG-13; 101

min.) A wedding in Martha’s Vineyard brings together two African-American families from different economic backgrounds in this comedy starring Angela Bassett. (NB)

The Little Traitor (NR; 88 min.) A young boy discovers the “enemy” isn’t always detestable in this story set in the British-occupied Israel of 1947. Based on the novel Panther in the Basement by Amos Oz. At Summerfield Cinemas. (NB)

KEVIN THOMAS, LOS ANGELES TIMES

“A “A

MUST-SEE MOVIE.” DAVID LEWIS, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

FILM THAT CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE.” ROGER EBERT, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES

Meek’s Cutoff (PG; 104 min.) Wagons heading west are led astray by a loony mountain-man guide in this view of the West from the perspective of pioneer women. (NB)

Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (PG-13; 137 min.) Number four in the franchise follows Johnny Depp’s Jack Sparrow on a quest for the Fountain of Youth. New perils on this journey include mermaids, zombies and the dread pirate Blackbeard. Also in 3-D. (NB)

Priest (R; 97 min.) I guess we lose the vampire wars in this horror adaptation about the remnants of humanity living in walled cities. Based on the Korean comic book. In 3-D. (NB) Rio (PG; 96 min.) Blu, a pet macaw, leaves his comfortable home in Moose Lake, Minn., to seek a mate. Animated, with the voices of Anne Hathaway and Jesse Eisenberg. (NB) Something Borrowed (PG-13; 103 min.) Kate Hudson, Ginnifer Goodwin and John Krasinski star in rom-com about friends sleeping with friends’ fiancees and whatnot. Based on the 2005 bestseller by Emily Giffin. (NB)

Thor (PG-13; 130 min.) The summer season kicks off early with fantasyadventure based on the Marvel comic. Directed by Kenneth Branagh and starring Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman and Anthony Hopkins as Thor’s pop, Odin. (NB) Water for Elephants (PG-13; 122 min.) A veterinarian (Robert Pattinson) is saved by the circus during the Great Depression, where he falls for the star of the horse show (Reese Witherspoon), wife of the sadistic animal trainer. (AD)

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Film

BATTLEFIELD WORTH Mikael Persbrandt plays Anton, a doctor in Darfur confronted with tough choices.

Morality Lessons ‘In a Better World’ could have been BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

V

iolence will never make the world a better place; sadly, though, it makes the world feel better. In In a Better World, a pair of young boys are in a trouble on a small Danish island. Christian (William Jøhnk Nielsen) has just lost his mother, though his rich but cold father (Ulrich Thomsen) still lives. Christian’s new friend from school is an undersized kid named Elias (Markus Rygaard) whose parents are separated. Elias is a magnet for bullies. When Christian gets some collateral bullying for being the new kid in school, he pulls a Rambo knife on his tormenter. A few thousand miles away, Elias’ father, Anton (Mikael Persbrandt), a doctor in Darfur, is asked to treat an injured warlord. That’s one moral choice, and the doctor soon faces another. During a short visit home, Anton is roughed up by a vicious mechanic, and he decides to use the incident as a moment to teach his kids nonviolence. This winner of this year’s best foreign film Oscar is generally wellacted, even if it plays like the kind of drama they’d screen if Ikea were a multiplex. It’s Persbrandt’s job to embody the tensile strength of pacifism—what it costs and what’s it’s worth. He does that well. And it’s refreshing to see director Susanne Bier’s faith in social melodrama and her insistence on the dark undertones in a film that sometimes looks like an unusually tense Audi commercial. Unfortunately, post-Dogme, just like Dogme, is the home for artificially symmetrical tragedy: tit always equals tat. For example, the one really unregenerate villain in the film is helpfully scar-faced, and he cackles over his misdeeds right at a key moment. That’s to make it easier for even the most qualm-ridden. But who is really that qualmridden? Quakers? Bier could have gotten rougher. She could have muddied the motives. The morality lesson here is dreadfully smooth. ‘In a Better World’ opens Friday, May 27, at Summerfield Cinemas. 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Avocet Traditional Western European dance and vocal music. May 27 at 7:30. $12. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Bryan Bowers Afternoon with celebrated storyteller and singersongwriter. May 29 at 4. $15. Occidental Center for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Espinoza Paz Icon excepcional de la música mexicana. May 29 at 8. $35$105. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Euro-Folk Italian folk music of Trio Garufa complemented by French folk of Un Deux Trois. May 28 at 8. $15. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Experience Hendrix

Mirabai Ceiba Celestial duo Markus Ceiber and Angelika Baumbach blend delicate sounds of harp, piano, guitar, and voice. May 29 at 7:30. $25$35. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Oysterpalooza Two stages of live music featuring Alison Harris, Way to Go Joes, Crazy Famous and many others, MC’ed by the Bohemian’s own spiritual guru Steve Jaxon. May 29 at noon. Free-$12. Rocker Oysterfeller’s, 14415 Hwy 1, Valley Ford. 707.876.1983.

Gillian Welch Singer-songwriter combines taps unique sounds of Appalachia in genuine Americana. May 31 at 8. SOLD-OUT. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Zion I Ghetto funk and Gypsy-doodle with guests Malarkey and Hook Boog. May 26 at 9:30. $20-$25. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

BBQ on the Lawn Grilled meat, cool bear and good-time music. May 29 at 4, Blues Broads. May 30 at 4, Lisa Haley & the Zydekats, D’Bunchovus. Then, every Sun at 4, Jun 12-Aug 28 $15-$25. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

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MARIN COUNTY

Bob Weir Grateful Dead frontman gives solo performance in benefit for Ring Mountain Day School. May 28, 7 to 11. $130-$135. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Eoin Harrington Singer-songwriter performs songs from his new album “Confess.” Five AM open. May 26 at 8. $20-$25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience Son of legendary Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham honors the band’s legacy. May 25 at 8. $50-$155. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Aaron Neville Distinctive pop tenor celebrates

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Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Billy Cox, Jonny Lang, Brad Whitford of Aerosmith and many others honor music of Jimi Hendrix. May 26 at 8. $45-$85. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Gyptian Reggae star joined by full band and top-ranking female vocalist Etana. Inner Riddim and DJ Jah Yzer open. May 28 at 9:30. $30. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe Soulful sax-man and friends a high-caliber funk machine. May 27-28 at 9. $30. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Landmark Concert Series Free live music and winery activities Sat, 1 to 4. May 28, Chi McClean (acoustic blues). Jun 11, Adam Traum (Americana). Landmark Vineyards, 101 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.0053.

RIDDIM MASTER Gyptian lights it up May 28 at the

Last Day Saloon. See Concerts, above.

Buy tickets at livenation.com. To charge by phone (800) 745-3000. Limit 6 tickets per person. All dates, acts and ticket prices are subject to change without notice. All tickets are subject to applicable service charges.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Music ( 29 recently released album, “I Know I’ve Been Changed.” May 29 at 7. $55-$75. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Boz Scaggs Grammy-award winning performer draws from a spectrum of American roots music. May 26 at 8. $65-$80. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0333.

Clubs SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters May 27, Rick Swanger (singersongwriter). May 28, Tubao (jazz). 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe May 25, bluegrass jam. May 27, Haute Flash Quartet. May 28 at 10:30am, Brandy Noveh; at 7, Bobby Joe Valentine (Americana). May 29 at 2, Blue Ambience (Gypsy jazz). 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine May 26, Stevie Coyle and Beso Negro. May 27, Dgiin, Heartbeats. May 28, Blusion for World Fusion. May 29, Sunday Gravy. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Brixx Jun 25, Jeff Eads. May 28, Marshall House Project. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

Chrome Lotus May 26, Casa Rasta. May 27, Leslie Perez, DJ Sykwidit. May 28, Shiny Toy Guns. 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. www.chromelotussr.com.

Flamingo Lounge May 27-28, Crossfire. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Gaia’s Garden May 25, Jim Adams (jazz guitar). May 26, Ron Durbin. May 31, Sonny Lowe and the Hi-Tones (R&B). 1 899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Highland Dell May 27, Misdemeanor. 21050 River Blvd, Monte Rio. 707.865.2300.

Hopmonk Tavern May 26, Juke Joint with Zion I (see Concerts). May 27-28, Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe

EIRE AIR Eoin Harrington plays May 26 at the Napa

Valley Opera House. See Concerts, adjacent.

(see Concerts). May 29, Black Market Blues. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Gappy Ranks. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

May 27, Estreno Musical. May 29, Gruber Family Band. 19080 Riverside Dr, Sonoma. 707.938.9910.

Hotel Healdsburg May 27, Dick Conte and Steve Webber Duo. May 28, Fred Randolph Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

May 26, Nate Lopez. May 27, Out the Blue. May 28, Perfect Crime. May 29 at 6:30, Cork Pullers. 464 First St, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Jasper O’Farrell’s

My Friend Joe

May 25, Brainstorm with iNi. May 27, Green Shade (reggae). 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

May 27, Conspiracy-A-Go-Go, Sharky Coast. May 28, Slightly Roasted (live DJs). 1810 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.829.3403.

Lagunitas Tap Room May 25, David Siegler. May 26, Emma Lee Project. May 27, Jinx Jones. May 28, Rivereens. May 29, WTJ. May 30, Ron Thompson & the Resistors. Jun 1, West County Professional Tea Sippers Oldtime String Band. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon May 25, Mr December, Misner & Smith, Orchid Killers (folk). May 27, West Coast Engine Room with Harvey “the Snake” Mandel, Bill Noteman & the Rockets, Scallywags (blues rock). May 28, Gyptian (see Concerts). May 29, Bill Kirchen (rockabilly). 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Little Switzerland May 26, Tri Tip Trio (Cajun).

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Mystic Theatre May 27, An Evening with Wonderbread 5. May 31, Gillian Welch (see Concerts). 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

North Light Books & Cafe May 26, MJ Brass Boppers. 550 E Cotati Ave, Cotati. 707.792.4300.

Olde Sonoma Public House May 26, Cork Pullers. May 28, Dark Lord Byron. 18615 Sonoma Hwy, Ste 110, Sonoma. 707.938.7587.

Phoenix Theater May 27, Shiny Toy Guns, DJ Carah Faye. May 28, Top Shelf, Mystic Roots, Bellyfull, Pion )

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31

...One Unforgettable Experience!

Five Stages Three Days Two Nights

MUSIC

ART

ECOLOGY

HEALTHY LIVING

In 1978, when a group of community activists banded together to present two days of music, food, and workshops that encompassed the emerging lifestyle options of the time, nobody could have imagined that their event would explode into one of the Bay Areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;most feted and longestrunning, three day/two night cultural events expecting 35,000 international visitors. Three decades after its foundingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;amid an environmental crisis of global proportions and a climate in which the arts are becoming increasingly commercializedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obvious that the Harmony Festival is as relevant as ever. The festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current abundance of performers, attractions, exhibits and presentations prove that Harmony is still at the forefront of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alternative lifestyle movement. The festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2011 programming is the culmination of more than three decades of progressive ideals, environmental and social activism, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;music with a message.â&#x20AC;? This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headline Performers include chart-topping, Grammy nominated, and platinum-selling artists such as Primus, The Flaming Lips and Michael Franti & Spearhead; hot emerging acts Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, Grace Potter & The Nocturnals, SOJA, Ghostland Observatory, A.Skillz, Rootz Underground; and established festival veterans like G. Love & Special Sauce and Railroad Earth.

SPIRITUALITY

Along with a 300 vendor global marketplace, featured 2011 Attractions include: Sustainable Living Roadshow, Eco Rally Action Sports Zone, Techno-Tribal Community Dance, The Steampunk Garage, All Weekend Camping, VIP Tickets, Discount Packages plus Kids under 6 FREE! This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headline Speakers include Mariel Hemingway and Bobby Williams, Mike Speakers: Farrell, Will Durst, Caroline Casey, Mahendra Mariel Hemingway & Bobby Williams Kumar Trivedi, The Yes Men and dozens more. And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss Mystic Beat Loungeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12th annual Harmony After Dark Techno-Tribal Dance, a bedazzling multimedia celebration featuring world class DJs, electronica and performance troupes including Gaudi, Quixotic, David Starfire Ensemble, Phutureprimitive, A.Skillz, and Emancipator. For a complete lineup and schedule, go to: www.harmonyfestival.com Whole Festival and individual Day and Night tickets are now available at all Northern California Whole Foods Markets as well as dozens of local outlets.

Experimental rock band PRIMUS headlines the 2011 Harmony Festival

$V DOZD\V +DUPRQ\ IHDWXUHV H[RWLF WZLVWV WKLV \HDU ZLWK DÂŹ special After Dark "Night of Bliss" performance by Krishna Das, ÂŹ -RVp1HWREDQGDQGÂŹ1DWDFKD$WODVDVZHOODVÂŹDÂŹ7ULEXWHWRWKH/LIH RI2ZVOH\%HDU6WDQOH\DQGÂŹWKH0XVLFDO6SLULWRI-HUU\*DUFLDÂŹ IHDWXULQJ 6WHYH .LPRFN -HVVH 0F5H\QROGV ÂŹ 0RRQDOLFH WKH 'DYLGÂŹ1HOVRQ%DQGDQGPHPEHUVRI5DLOURDG(DUWK

www.harmonyfestival.com

Visit www.harmonyfestival.com for full details, and be sure to check us out on Facebook and Twitter for the latest news about our 33rd year!

The weekend of June 10-12th, the Sonoma County Fairgrounds transform into an international showcase of music, culture, ideas, art, edutainment and â&#x20AC;&#x153;a party with a purpose.â&#x20AC;?

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Music ( 30 2 Zion. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Rio Nido Roadhouse May 28, Unauthorized Rolling Stones. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

River Rock Casino May 27, Mel Smith. May 28, Fusion. May 29, Alvon. 3250 Hwy 128, Geyserville. 707.857.2777.

The Rocks May 26, Crazy Famous, the Real Nasty. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Russian River Brewing Co May 28, Sorentinos. May 29 at 7, Team Mascot, Morningbell. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Tradewinds May 27, Sunday Gravy. May 28, Purple Haze. May 29, Bobby Voltage. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Wischemann Hall May 28 at 8, contra dance with Flat Earth Stringband. May 29 at 2, English country dance with StringFire. 460 Eddie Lane, Sebastopol. www.transformativedance.com.

Tones. May 28, Windshield Cowboys. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

May 29, Alzara and friends. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Smiley’s

May 25 at 7:30, MYP A Cappella Ensemble. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Peri’s Silver Dollar May 25, Royal Deuces. May 26, Dani Paige Band. May 27, Vinyl. May 28, Pulsators. May 29, Beso Negro. May 31, Andre and friends. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Presidio Yacht Club May 26, Ed Earley Band (blues). May 27, Marble Party Band. May 28, Olive & the Dirty Martinis. Fort Baker, Sausalito. 415.332.2319.

May 25, Midnight on the Water (Irish). May 26, songwriters showcase. May 27, Beso Negro. May 28, Virgil Shaw. Sun, open mic. May 29, This Old Earthquake. Mon, reggae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

The Smokehouse May 25, Philip Claypool & the Smokehouse Band. May 26, Bueno Brothers. May 27, Carlos Reyes and friends. May 28, Tim Hockenberry Group. May 31, Josh Cook (acoustic). 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.899.9600.

Rancho Nicasio May 27, Butch Hancock. May 28, Deanna Bogart and friends. May 29, BBQ on the lawn with Blues Broads (see Concerts). May 30, BBQ on the lawn with Lisa Haley & the Zydekats (see Concerts). Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sleeping Lady May 25, Sofi Rox. May 26, This Old Earthquake. May 27, Danny Click’s Texas blues night. May 28, Jenny Kerr.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s May 26, Brian Cline. May 27, High Water Blues. May 28, Voltones. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Silo’s Wed at 7, jam session. May 27, country music sing-along. May 28, Duran Duran Duran. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

MARIN COUNTY Dance Palace May 29 at 4, Albany Big Band. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

San Francisco’s City Guide

George’s Nightclub Wed, comedy (see Comedy). May 26, Firewheel. May 27, Az/Dz, Hot for Teacher (tribute bands). May 28, Elliot Randall & the Deadman, Vintage City, Kami Nixon. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Yeasayer Psych-rock Brooklyn outfit whose “Odd Blood” continues to dazzle. May 25-26 at the Fillmore.

Tony Bennett

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Master interpreter of song, still in fine voice at the age of 84. May 28 at Davies Symphony Hall.

May 25, Machiavelvets. Jun 1, Belle Monroe & Her Brewglass Boys. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Lykke Li Swedish singer of intrigue riding giant wave for her latest, “Wounded Rhymes.” May 30 at the Regency Ballroom.

19 Broadway Club May 25 at 6, James Forman Jazz Ensemble; at 9, Gail “Mojo” Muldrow and Rockin’ Blues Band. May 26 at 6, Diamond Jazz; at 9, Beats and Bars (hip-hop). May 27, Lonestar Retrobates. May 28, Jon Korty and friends. May 29, Samuka and Wild Tribe (Brazilian). 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Old Western Saloon May 27, Jinx Jones & the King

Sleigh Bells In-the-red power duo blows rafters and minds with openers Neon Indian. May 30-31 at the Independent.

Buffalo Springfield Neil Young takes his early band out for a nostalgic, highticket evening. Jun 1-2 at the Fox Theater.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

ZEITGEIST Denny Zeitlin’s twin

careers of psychiatry and jazz complement each other remarkably well.

Dr. Jazz

Denny Zeitlin, the man with two brains BY LEILANI CLARK

D

enny Zeitlin is one lucky fellow. Rather than choosing between his two loves, music and psychiatry, he has thriving dual careers. An acclaimed jazz pianist and composer as well as a successful psychiatrist, the Kentfield resident has taken the road less traveled without any regrets. “I’m very grateful for the shape of my life and for the opportunities I’ve had to continue to grow in both fields,” Zeitlin says by phone. On June 11, he performs at the Healdsburg Jazz Festival. A clinical professor of psychiatry at UCSF, Zeitlin has private practices in San Francisco and Marin County. In addition, he has more than 30 jazz recordings under his belt, performing throughout the years with the likes of Herbie Hancock and Tony

Denny Zeitlin performs on a bill including John Heard, George Cables, Ray Drummond, Craig Handy and others on Saturday, June 11, at the Raven Theater. 115 North St., Healdsburg. 7pm. $45 and $75. 800.838.3006.

33

charles lloyd zakir hussain charlie haden geri allen fred hersch julian lage

john santos madeline eastman bobby hutcherson john heard george cables and many more!

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

Williams, as well as Charlie Haden and Bobby Hutcherson, both of whom also appear in Healdsburg this year. He composed the outerworld theme music for 1978’s Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and his new live solo piano album, Labyrinth, will be released in late June. A compatriot of Bill Evans (who regularly performed Zeitlin’s gorgeous “Quiet Now”), Zeitlin is known for radically reinventing jazz standards. “The compositions are really launching pads for improvisation,” he says. “Improvisation is something we all can learn to do better. We’re improvising, really, in many ways much of the time through our lives, whether or not it’s on a stated artistic task.” For Zeitlin, creative improvisation extends into conversation, cooking and general everyday living. “We all have the challenge, if we want to accept it, of infusing our everyday life with more creativity and more spontaneity.” He says he got an early start in spontaneous composition. “My parents wisely protected me from prematurely beginning a study of music,” says Zeitlin. At six, he began a course of formal classical studies, but says that serious explorations of jazz, in the eighth grade, were like being shot from a cannon. “This had been the music I had been waiting for all my life,” he says. Nowadays, Zeitlin is often called to work with people who struggle to act on their own creative desires. He’s turned his insights gained through years of psychiatric practice into a lecture called “Unlocking the Creative Impulse” which addresses the psychological blocks that arise during the artistic process. “I can’t imagine retiring from either music or psychiatry. I wouldn’t know what to do with myself,” says Zeitlin. “I love being involved deeply in both fields, and it really is the combination that has helped keep it fresh for me over the years.”

ArtsEvents

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House Breakfast â&#x20AC;˘ Lunch â&#x20AC;˘ Dinner BBQ â&#x20AC;˘ Pasta â&#x20AC;˘ Steak THUR 5/26 â&#x20AC;˘ 6:00PM DOORS â&#x20AC;˘ $45 â&#x20AC;˘ 21+ 5 COURSE DINNER, SIX BEERS,TX & TIP INCL

BEER PAIRING DINNER WITH ANCHOR BREWERY FRI 5/27 â&#x20AC;˘ 8:30PM DOORS â&#x20AC;˘ $18 â&#x20AC;˘ 21+ COVER/DANCE/PARTY HITS

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MONTROSE LIVE IN CONCERT MICHAEL LEE FIRKINS FRI 6/17 â&#x20AC;˘ 7:30PM DOORS â&#x20AC;˘ $19 ADV/$23 DOS â&#x20AC;˘ 21+ WORLD/AFRO-BEAT/FOLK/REGGAE

AN EVENING WITH

THOMAS MAPFUMO

& BLACKS UNLIMITED

Galleries OPENINGS May 28 From 3 to 5pm. New Leaf Gallery, Zachary Coffinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockspinner 6.â&#x20AC;? Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. 707.933.1300. From 4 to 6pm. Quicksilver Mine Co., â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winter Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Jerrold Ballaine. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799. From 4 to 6pm. Aqus Cafe, work by Roberta Ahrens. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060. From 5 to 7pm. Marin MOCA, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artfully Reclaimed V,â&#x20AC;? fine art made from recycled and repurposed materials; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spectrum: Color as Expression and Form.â&#x20AC;? Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

May 29 From 3 to 6pm. Graton Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Explorations,â&#x20AC;? prints, etchings and paintings by Rik Olson; also, photography by Ann Gaughen and oil paintings by Lisa Skelly. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912..

TUE 6/21 â&#x20AC;˘ 6:30PM DOORS â&#x20AC;˘ $21 ADV/$23 DOS â&#x20AC;˘ 21+ SINGER/SONGWRITER

MARK BROUSSARD PLUS MATT HIRES &

CHIC GAMINE WED 8/3 â&#x20AC;˘ 7:00PM DOORS â&#x20AC;˘ $22 ADV/$25 DOS â&#x20AC;˘ 21+ ROOTS/REGGAE

THE MIGHTY DIAMONDS No Children Under 10 Allowed For All Ages Shows

23 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma

707-765-2121 www.mcnears.com

SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Through Jun 30, work by Roberta Ahrens. Reception, May 28, 4 to 6. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Ending May 30, membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; show with featured artist George Dawnay. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

Atelier One Ending May 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;100/100,â&#x20AC;? 100 pieces of art at $100 each, by Claude Smith. 2860 Bowen St, Graton.

BackStreet Gallery Ending May 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Experiments with Natural Forms: Recent Artwork by Fred Vedder.â&#x20AC;? Sat, 11 to 5, and by appointment. Uribe Studios, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.537.9507.

Charles M Schulz Museum May 28 at 11:30am, 1, 2 (see Kids). Through Jun 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Turn Another Page.â&#x20AC;? Through Jun 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Browns and the Van Pelts: Siblings in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Peanuts.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Through Jul 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Peanutsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Philosophies.â&#x20AC;? Jun 8-Oct 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Change of Scene: Schulz Sketches from Abroad.â&#x20AC;? $5-$8. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Jun 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Perfect,â&#x20AC;? a unique exhibition of portraits by Becoming Independent artists. Wed-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

Graton Gallery Through Jul 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Explorations,â&#x20AC;? prints, etchings and paintings by Rik Olson; also, photography by Ann Gaughen and oil paintings by Lisa Skelly. Reception, May 29, 3 to 6. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912.

Guayaki Mate Bar Through Jun 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk with Pride,â&#x20AC;? photo exhibition documents gay pride marches around the world. 6782 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.6644.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Jul 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Figments for a Warrior,â&#x20AC;? work by Catherine J Richardson. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 139 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Ending May 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Abstract Artist Showcase.â&#x20AC;? Daily, 11 to 6. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Journey Center Gallery Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Portals of Light,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Kathy Cia White. Mon-Fri, 9 to 5; weekend hours by appointment. 1601 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.2121.

Local Color Gallery Through Jun 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wavescapes,â&#x20AC;?

paintings by Pamela Wallace and graphite drawings by Linda Gamble. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2744.

Local Folkal Ongoing, co-op artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work. Tues-Sun, 10 to 5 117 North Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.8920.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jun 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Animal Dreams: Animals as Visual Metaphors.â&#x20AC;? Ongoing, sculpture, fountains and kinetic sculpture by over 50 artists including Zachary Coffinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockspinner 6.â&#x20AC;? Reception for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockspinner 6,â&#x20AC;? May 28, 3 to 5. Daily, 10 to 5. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. 707.933.1300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Ending May 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring Fever,â&#x20AC;? work by various artists. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental.

Pelican Art Through Jul 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Masters of Today,â&#x20AC;? artwork by Carole Gray-Weihman and Nobee Kanayama. Open Tues-Thurs and Sat, 11 to 6; Fri, 11 to 8; Sun-Mon by appointment only. 143 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.773.3393.

Petaluma Arts Center Jun 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arts Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lightâ&#x20AC;? (see Events). 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Jul 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond: Visions of Planetary Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? traveling Smithsonian exhibition of over 50 NASA photographs. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Quicksilver Mine Company May 27-Jul 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winter Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Jerrold Ballaine. Reception, May 28, 4 to 6. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jul 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Late Spring Showâ&#x20AC;? with work by various artists. Tues-Thurs and Sun, 10:30 to 6. Fri-Sat, 10:30 to 8.

Headlands Center for the Arts Through Jun 11, “Darkness and Light: Image and Object Cultivated in the Wild,” graduate fellowship exhibition. Sun-Fri, noon to 4. Bldg 944, Fort Barry, Sausalito. 415.331.2787.

ALL DOOR TIMES 9PM

Best Music Venue / Best Place for Singles to Meet

Marin Community Foundation

132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Eternity: A Love Story,” work by Richard Lang and Judith Selby Lang. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Through Jun 12, “Art at the Source Preview Exhibition,” with work of 153 participants. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Art Works Downtown

Sebastopol Gallery

Bolinas Museum

Through Jun 12, “Inner Journeys,” paintings by Susan St Thomas. Open daily, 11 to 6. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jun 5, ceramics by Jun Kaneko. Through Jun 26, “Zone of Focus,” a juried exhibition of photography by high school students. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Starstruck Boutique Through Jun 13, “Superstitious,” paintings by Ricky Watts. Daily, 11:30 to 8. 123 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.6199.

Tea Room Cafe Through Aug 1, “Broken Cups,” drawings by Mark Grieve. 316 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.765.0199.

University Art Gallery Ending May 28, “BFA Exhibition 2011.” Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; SatSun, noon to 4. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Through Jun 30, “From Here to

Through Jun 17, “Love + Pleasure,” work of Susan Danis and Livia Stein. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.451.8119. Through Jun 5, “Arthur Okamura: His Bolinas Life,” photographs by Troy Paiva plus painted prints and collages by Barbara Ravizza. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

Commonweal Gallery Through Jun 24, “Arthur Okamura: His Bolinas Life,” curated by Harriet Kossman. Mon-Fri, 10 to 4. 451 Mesa Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0970.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jun 15, “Daniel Tousignant: Recent Paintings.” 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Jun 26, “Finding My Way: Maps, Grids, Signs,” work by Will Thoms; also, “The Left Coast: California on the Edge,” work by Alex Fradkin and Tim Graveson. Through Jul 3, “Seventh Street Studios,” a group art exhibit. Wed-Mon,

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Ending May 31, “Black and White and Shades of Gray,” a group show juried by Richard Whittaker. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

NAPA COUNTY Di Rosa Through Jun 4, “Reconstructed World,” work by nine artists. Artist talk, May 26 at 7. Tours available Sat at 10, 11 and noon (reservation required) and Tues-Fri at 10, 11, 12 and 1 (reservation recommended). Gallery hours: Wed-Fri, 9:30 to 3. Sat, by appointment only. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Ending May 31, “ARTwalk,” an interactive public exhibition by 10 artists. First Street and Town Center, Napa.

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9:30 PM | $30 | REGGAE

REBEL LION PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

GYPTIAN + ETANA + INNER RIDDIM + DJ JAH YZER OF Jah Warrior Shelter HI-FI

Marin MOCA

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

8:30 PM | $13/15 | BLUES ROCK

WEST COAST ENGINE ROOM

Ongoing, “Treasures from the Vault,” local artifacts; also, “Ranching and Rockin’ at Olompali” features history of State Park; also, “Growing the Future: Farming Families of Marin.” Tues-Fri, plus second and third Sat monthly, 11 to 4. Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8538. May 28-Jul 10, “Artfully Reclaimed V,” fine art made from recycled and repurposed materials; also, “Spectrum: Color as Expression and Form.” Reception, May 28, 5 to 7. WedSun, 11 to 4, Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

7:30 PM | $5/8| FOLK ALL AGES

A North Bay Hootenanny Production

Marin History Museum

Donna Seager Gallery Through Jun 18, “Kay Bradner: On Water.” Tues-Wed and FriSat, 11 to 6; Thurs, 11 to 8:30. 851 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.4229.

OPEN AT 4 PM WED. - sAT. & ANY DAY A SHOW IS SCHEDULED

5/25

Through Jul 30, “Black Power, Flower Power,” black and white photographs of Black Panthers and Haight-Ashbury by Pirkle Jones and Ruth-Marion Baruch. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato.

‘BOOTSWEISER’ Stuart Wagner highlights a show of reclaimed material at Marin MOCA. See Openings, adjacent.

nightclub & restaurant

5/29

7:30 PM | $13/15 | ROCKIN BLUES

BILL KIRCHEN & too much fun Wed, May 25 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Dance Youth and Family 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, May 26 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circle ‘n Squares Square Dance Club 7:15–8:45pm New Dancer Class 8:45–10pm Plus Dancing Fri, May 27 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7pm DJ Steve Luther hosts MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK ‘N ROLL $10 Sat, May 28 8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise 10:30–11:15am Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 11:30am–1:30pm Scottish Challenge Dance with Gary Thomas Sun, May 29 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30–11:45am Zumba Fitness with Anna 5:30–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, May 30 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, May 31 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30 African & World Music Dance with Victoria Strowbridge featuring West African and Congolese Dance with live Drumming $13

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

6/2

9:30 PM | $20/25 | REGGAE

DON carlos w/Dub Vision feat. Jimmy D + DON CHA NOAH WITH DUBTOWN DREAD

6/4 9:00 PM | $15 | MOTOWN COVERS Celebrate The Last Day Saloon's 38th Year and 10th Anniversary in Santa Rosa with

PRIDE & JOY HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7 PM $1.50 pbr, $2 domestic beer, $3 import/draft beer, well drinks, wine, & appetizers all shows are 21+ unless noted for reservations: 707.545.5876

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35 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

the last day saloon

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Back Roads Productions Proudly Presents

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

36

The new, all-color North Bay Bohemian.

Hess Collection Winery Ongoing, outstanding private collection featuring work by Andy Goldsworthy, Francis Bacon, Frank Stella and other modern masters. Daily, 10 to 5:15. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. 707.255.1144.

Stubbs, G King. Jun 1, Will Durst and friends. $10. Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts, Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events

Napa Valley Museum Through Jul 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wanderlust: Journeys with Napa Valley Photographers,â&#x20AC;? featuring photos by seven artists; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Year in Flowers,â&#x20AC;? work by Joanne Youngberg and Nina Antze. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Elemental Dance

Preservation Napa Valley Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Memory Bank: A Discovery of Old Hands, Old Faces and the Way It Was,â&#x20AC;? photographic and film documentation of local old timers. 1400 First St, Napa.

Flowers, food, music by Lavay Smith & her Red Hot Skillet Lickers and others. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not to love? May 29, 11 to 6. Free. Downtown Larkspur, Magnolia Avenue between King and Ward streets, Larkspur. 415.924.3803.

St Supery Winery

Food Not Bombs

Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mountains,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Wayne Thiebaud. 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.963.4507.

Comedy Dana Carvey â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fest and Fiestaâ&#x20AC;? benefit for theater features comedic conversation between â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturday Night Liveâ&#x20AC;? legend and comedian Mark Pitta, plus festive Mexican dinner and drinks. May 29 at 6:30. $150. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturday Night Liveâ&#x20AC;? primetime player and master of political roastery. May 27 at 8. $45-$55. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Flower & Food Festival

Help prepare and serve free vegan meals every Sun afternoon; served at 5. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. 415.408.8094.

Producerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roundtable Annual meeting and potluck. May 26, 6 to 8. Free. Community Media Center, 1075 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, RSVP. 707.569.8785, ext 325.

Roller Derby Local Resurrection Roller Girls square off against Shasta Roller Derby. May 28 at 8:30. $5-$25. Cal Skate, 6100 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.0500.

Food & Drink

Slip-Goose Monkey

Friday Night Bites Interactive classes with tastes every Fri at 6. $75. Cavallo Point, 601 Murray Circle, Fort Baker, Sausalito. 888.651.2003.

Homemade Mozzarella Quick and easy cheesy. May 31, 7:30 to 8:30. $59. Relish Culinary Center, 14 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.9999.

Novato Farmers Market Join 50 farmers and food purveyors and 25 different artisans in celebrating Marin countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bounty. Every Tues, 4 to 8, through Sep. Downtown Novato, Grant Avenue, Novato. 707.472.6100, ext 104. Tues, 4 to 8. Novato Farmers Market, Grant and Sherman avenues, Novato.

Paella Party Chef Gerard shares his secrets. May 27 at 6. $96. Relish Culinary Center, 14 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.9999.

Pink Out Don your gaudiest pink attire for annual dry rose release party. May 28-29, 11 to 4:30. $15. Bella Vineyards, 9711 W Dry Creek Rd, Healdsburg, 866.57.BELLA.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Sat, 9 to 12. Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Wed and Sat, 8:30 to 12. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Sebastopol Farmers Market Through Nov; Sun, 10 to 1:30. Sebastopol Plaza, McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.522.9305.

Sonoma Farmers Market Fri, 9 to noon. Depot Park, First St W, Sonoma. Also, Through Sep; Tues, 5:30 to dusk. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. 707.538.7023.

Tasty Tuesdays Round-up of food trucks and home grown produce every Tues afternoon, 10 to 2. Rohnert Park Community Center, 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. www.facebook. com/TastyTuesday.

Highlight performers tackle improvised comedic theater games on the fly. Last Thurs monthly at 7. Free. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Beer Pairing Dinner

Standup Comedy

Firemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Barbecue

Wednesday Night Market

May 25, hypnotist comic Ron

No memorial day weekend is

Farmers market

Anchor Breweryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beers paired with delectable dishes. May 26 at 6. $45. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

) 39

BIR O THD

ARTY! ALL AY P

Seth Meyers

Constantine Darling leads conscious movement dance using earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alchemy followed by sound healing. Monthly, last Fri at 7. $15-$20. Meridian Sports Club, 1001 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.2490.

37

EBRATION! CEL

Ongoing, evolving exhibition of Gordon Huetherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine art. 1821 Monticello Rd, Napa. 707.255.5954.

complete without a BBQ. May 29, noon to 5. $10-$20. Muir Beach Picnic Grounds, Muir Woods Rd, Marin. www.muirbeachfire.com.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Gordon Huether

( 35

IN-STORE DAY

ArtsEvents

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

38

B e st P Best Place lac e for f or Singles Meet S i ng les to to M eet

SSILLY ILLY PPEOPLE EOPLE TAKE TAKE TO TO TTHE HE SSTREETS TREE TS TO TO BE BE SSILLY ILLY

H A PP Y H HAPPY HOUR OU R Mon–Thurs M on –Thu rs 5–7pm 5 –7pm U PS C A L E L UPSCALE LOUNGE OU N G E &L LIVE IVE E ENTERTAINMENT N T E RTA I N M E N T

Live Jazz every Thursday & Friday

JJUNE UNE 1 12 2•N NOON OON ttoo 6:0 00 0 the 96 Old Courthouse Squaree Santa Rosa ~ 707-528-8565 65 www.christysonthesquare.com w w w.ch rist ysont he squa re .com

116 1 16 FIFTH FIF TH STREET STREET • SSANTA ANTTA ROS ROSAA ((OLD OL D R RAILROAD AILROAD SSQUARE) QUARE)

TTHETOADPUB.COM H E TO A D P U B . C O M

ArtsEvents and street fair features live music and entertainment every Wed, 5 to 8, through Aug 31. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa. www. srdowntownmarket.com.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Andrea Young

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39

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Zazu Farmstand Sat, 11 to 2, through Sep. Zazu, 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

Field Trips

Wise Acre

Salt Point Walks Meet at Gerstlle Cove visitor center, walk the bluffs, explore coastal trails on two-hour hike. Free. May 29, Jun 12 and 26, Jul 10; 10 to noon. Salt Point State Park, Highway 1, Jenner. 707.847.3437.

Sunset Hike & Dine Meet at parking area across from inn for monthly two-hour hike on moderate to steep trails with midhike wine and cheese served overlooking Pacific Ocean. Optional dinner and socializing at inn follows. May 21 at 5. $15. Mountain Home Inn, 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley, RSVP. 415.331.0100.

Wildcare Adventures Family hikes in both English and Spanish. Carpool at 9:15am, hikes begin on location at 10am. May 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring Wildlife.â&#x20AC;? Free. Canal Alliance, 91 Larkspur St, San Rafael. 415.453.1000.

Film Aida Opera performed at Teatro del Maggio Musicale Fiorentino. May 28 at 7. $20. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

As You Like It Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s romantic comedy performed at Globe Theatre in London. May 26 at 7; May 29 at 1. $15-$18. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Bodega Bay Short Film Festival Two days of horror,

) 40

Occidentalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chester Aaron writes again Soldier, X-ray technician, garlic farmer, authorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in his 88 years on Earth, the multifaceted Chester Aaron has nearly done it all and lived to write the tale. The author of 26 books, Aaronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest novel, About Them (El Leon Literary Arts), revisits the â&#x20AC;&#x153;largely vanishedâ&#x20AC;? world of his very ďŹ rst book, About Us, an autobiographical exploration of a 1930s Pennsylvania coal-mining village. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My stories are about 50 percent fact and 50 percent ďŹ ction,â&#x20AC;? says Aaron, by phone from his home in Occidental. He was inspired to write a sequel to About Us, he says, after a visit to his hometown revealed an unexcavated side to the original narrative involving the love between a Jewish boy and an African-American girl. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I doubt I will write anymore about that place or those people,â&#x20AC;? Aaron says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Writing brought them back in body and soul. I miss them now more than I did when I started.â&#x20AC;? As one of the soldiers that helped liberate Dachau (â&#x20AC;&#x153;We could smell it when we were approaching it, and the Germans had not yet leftâ&#x20AC;?), Aaron began writing down his thoughts after the war and hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stoppedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; his latest endeavor is a movie script. As an assistant writer at MGM in the 1950s, Aaron gained familiarity with the movie-making process, but times have changed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a totally different world now,â&#x20AC;? he says. Chester Aaron reads from About Them on Thursday, May 26, at Viva. 7160 Keating Ave., Sebastopol. 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8pm. $20 includes light dinner and wine. 707.824.9913.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark

Outdoor Dining 7 Days A Week Reservations Advised

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

DIN N E R & A SHOW F ROM THE F LATLANDERS May 27 BUTCH HANCOCK Ranchut!o Deb Fri

Troubadour/Renaissance Man 8:30pm

Sat

May 28

DEANNA BOGART & FRIENDS

Amazing Singer,Keyboardist,Songwriter,Saxaphonist 8:30pm

##################

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

BBQs on the Lawn 4:00pm

HE BLUES BROADS FEATURING May 29 TTRACY NELSON, DOROTHY MORRISON, ANNIE Sun

SAMPSON, ANGELA STREHLI, & DEANNA BOGART

Mon

May 30

LISA HALEY & THE ZYDEKATS Cajun Zydeco Grammy Nominees Rancho PLUS Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;BUNCHOVUS Debut!

##################

JUNE BBQs on the Lawn 4:00pm Sun

May 12

RIDERS IN THE SKY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Favorite Cowboysâ&#x20AC;?

Sun

Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day with May 19 PABLO CRUISE Sun

May 26

BIG SANDY & HIS FLY-RITE BOYS

with special guests

RED MEAT

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

40

ArtsEvents drama, comedy, romance and more in beautiful coastal setting. May 28-29. $20$100. Bodega Marine Laboratory, Bodega Bay. www.bodegabayfilmfest.org.

Coppelia Live presentation of ballet beamed from Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow kicks off series. May 29 at 8am. $12-$18. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

Por Que Venimos â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why We Come,â&#x20AC;? about Latin American immigrants living in San Rafael Canal district. May 27 at 7; potluck at 5:30. Donations appreciated. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

For Kids Aladdin Roustabout Theater present Disneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s version of classic Arabian tale. May 27 at 7:30; May 28 at 12:30, 3:30 and 7:30; May 29 at 3:30. $16-$26. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Cirque en Deroute French-American acrobatic clown trio. May 28 at 4. $6$10. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Especially for You Music series for kids, Sat mornings at 11. May 21, Andy Z (music and movement). May 28, Gustafer Yellowgold. $5-$12. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3942.

Musical Petting Zoo Musician Todd Crowley brings his famous collection of 100 instruments from around the world to touch and play. May 28, 3 to 5. Free-$10. Occidental Center for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Story Theatre Improvised storytelling with Victoria Goring. May 28 at 11:30am, 1 and 2. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

( 39

Readings Bay Area Discovery Museum May 28 at 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harvesting Colorâ&#x20AC;? with Rebecca Burgess. Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

Book Passage May 25 at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Summer Reading Recommendationsâ&#x20AC;? with Sue Plus Sue Equals Two, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beamish Boy: A Memoir of Recovery and Awakeningâ&#x20AC;? with Albert DeSilver. May 26 at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;First Contact: Scientific Breakthroughs in the Hunt for Life Beyond Earthâ&#x20AC;? with Marc Kaufman. May 27 at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Halfway to Each Otherâ&#x20AC;? with Susan Pohlman, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Great Nightâ&#x20AC;? with Chris Adrian. May 31 at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Best of It: New and Selected Poemsâ&#x20AC;? with Kay Ryan. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Guerneville Library May 28 at 11am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Russian River (Then & Now)â&#x20AC;? with John Schubert and Valerie Munthe. 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Readersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Books May 28 at 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Too Late for the Festival: An American Salary-Woman in Japanâ&#x20AC;? with Rhiannon Paine. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.939.1779.

River Reader May 27 at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Too Late for the Festival, An American Salary-Woman in Japanâ&#x20AC;? with Susan Ryan. 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

Viva May 26 at 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;About Themâ&#x20AC;? with Chester Aaron. 7160 Keating Ave, Sebastopol, 866.360.6662.

Theater Aladdin Roustabout Theater present Disneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s version of classic Arabian tale. May 27 at 7:30; May 28 at 12:30, 3:30 and 7:30; May 29 at 3:30. $16-$26. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Arc: Woman on Fire Play depicts a present-day intercession by Joan of Arc in life of Joanne, a contemporary mother. May 27-Jun 5; Thurs-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15-

$20. Main Stage West, 104 North Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Hairspray Beloved John Waters musical about a teenage dancer who rallies against racial segregation in 1962. May 29Jun 19; Sat-Sun at 2. $30-$40. Sidney B Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre, Mt. Tam, Mill Valley. 415.383.1100.

Picasso at the Lapin Agile Steve Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comedy about a fictional meeting between Pablo Picasso and Albert Einstein at a Paris bar in 1904. May 26-Jun 19; Thurs-Sat at 8, Sun at 3. $15-$19. Novato Theater Company, 484 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.883.4498.

Shirley Valentine Disillusioned housewife finds adventure, hope and love. May 27-Jun 12; Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15-$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

A Small Town Goes to War Sentimental journey through the music of 1940s, and poetry inspired by an era. May 28 at 8; May 29 at 2. $15. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.6335.

Stalag 17 Humorous and suspenseful play depicts day to day survival of 13 US airmen held captive during World War II. Through Jun 12; Thurs at 7:30, Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $8-$21. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Unmasked Sophia Marzocchiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s onewoman show combines dance, mask work and improvisation. May 27-28 at 8, May 29 at 7. $15-$17. Bolinas Community Center, 14 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.272.7992.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it by email to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Please DO NOT SEND e-mail attachments. The BOHEMIAN is not responsible for photos. Events costing more than $35 may be withheld. Deadline is 2 weeks prior to desired publication date.

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MASSAGE FOR MEN

Healing & Bodywork

RELAX! Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 11 yrs experience. 707-542-6856

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Women, Men, & Couples

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Psychics

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707.578.3088

Foot Massage $19.99/45 min 2460 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa

Sunday School & Service 10:30am. Non-traditional. Inter-denominational. A spiritually-minded community. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy 707-542-7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Offers ongoing introductory and advanced classes. Weds at noon, Tues & Weds evenings 7:30-8:45pm. Prayers for World Peace - Sun - 10:30 - 11:45am Everyone welcome. 304 Petaluma Blvd., North - Petaluma www.meditationinnorcal.org 707-766-7720 info@meditateinpetaluma.org

Are You Seeking More Meaningful Relationships? A spiritual practice for couples and individuals that reveals unconditional loving as our true nature. After 15 years in Berkeley, Gateway Institute is now in Healdsburg. Heather Parrish, Ph.D. MFC36455. 707-473-9553.

Movement Meditation Workshop With Prema Dasara

Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707-542-9898

Spiral Mandala dance representing the 21 Noble Qualities of Tara, Buddha of wisdom and compassion, The Great Mother. All levels welcome. Earle Baum Ctr., 4539 Occidental Rd., Sebastopol. Introduction - Fri., 6/3 7:30-9:30 pm - $21. Sat. 6/4 & Sun. 6/5: 10 am-6 pm. Full Workshop...$225. 707-823-7710. www.TaraLotusCircle.org

Massage & Relaxation

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Mahakaruna Buddhist Meditation Center

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SPIRITUAL CONNECTIONS

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PAIN/STRESS RELIEF Professional male massage therapist; strong, deep healing bodywork. 1 hr / $50, 1 1/2 hr $65. 707-536-1516 www.CompleteBodyBalance.

Want your entire body squeezed, kneaded, massaged & stretched by skillful male CMT? Call/text 707-824-8700, or visit www.SantaRosaMassageforMen.com for pix & scheduling.

SUNDAY PRAYERS FOR WORLD PEACE Santa Rosa: 9:30-10:45 a.m., Compassion Buddhist Meditation Center, 436 Larkfield Center information: www.meditateinsantarosa.org; 477-2264. Petaluma: 10:30-11:45 am., Mahakaruna Buddhist Meditation Center, 304 Petaluma Blvd. North information: meditateinpetaluma.org;766-7720 FREE SESSIONS. EVERYONE WELCOME.

Ayurvedic

Indian Head Massage • relief from tension headaches, eyestrain, and sinusitis • improves mobility in neck and shoulders • balances energy

Margery Smith 707.544.9642

Share your organization’s inspiration with over 123,000 Bohemian Readers monthly!

Phone: 707.527.1200 email: sales@bohemian.com

43

TO DOWNLOAD YOUR AWARDS GO TO WWW.BOHEMIAN.COM

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MAY 25-31, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

F O T BES RS . . . E N WIN

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1901 CLEVELAND AVE SUITE B SANTA ROSA 707.576.0818 www.srtp.net

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Quality beads, sterling silver clasps, etc. Custome necklaces, earrings and bracelets for you or that someone special. Jewlery repair available also, no soldering. 707.696.9812, tiffany_beadsandpieces@yahoo.com Now doing jewelry parties

Professional photographer & videographer. Weddings, parties, special events. Call award winning David Ludwig Local: (707) 527-6004 Toll Free: (800) 942-8433 www.creativelightproductions.com

Every Fri, 3 to 6, all ages welcome to join LandPaths for garden care. Bayer Farm, 1550 West Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.524.9318.

Santa Rosa Plumbing Water Conservation Experts. Friendly, Honest Service. Licensed, Bonded and Insured. License #871026

tankless water heaters, high efficiency toilets recirculation, general plumbing needs. Call 707.528.8228

Hairstylist Teri Kinney Has Moved to Blazing Hair Design! 1420 4th street. Call me for 50% off all services for new clients! (707)544.1422

Are You Seeking More Meaningful Relationship?

Advertise on the Back Page Call 707.527.1200 today and be seen more than in any other section of the Bohemian!

A spiritual practice for couples and individuals that reveals unconditional loving as our true nature. After 15 years in Berkeley, Gateway Institute is now in Healdsburg. Heather Parrish, Ph.D. MFC36455. 707-473-9553.

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BUY, SELL, TRADE 707-546-4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

IN TROUBLE WITH â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE LAWâ&#x20AC;?? Festivals and Clubs: Too Much Fun? Over the Line? Couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Walk the Line? Push Back. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Roll Over! Get A Deal You Can Live With. Attorney Arthur George 707-798-7835

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A & A Kitchens Need commercial kitchen space? Our spot will accomodate all your culinary needs. Stop lookinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and start cookinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;! Call us in St Helena, CA at 707.968.9474,

Does Your Business Need a Scan â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Are Things Getting Stale? Euro Business Solutions Can Help You Discover & Succeed! Call Freddie Baggerman for a FREE Consultation: 707.483.5135

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Bankruptcy & Debt Relief Attorney Evan Livingstone (707) 206-6570. 740 4th St #215, Santa Rosa

Confidential Program. (707) 576 1919

Donate Your Auto 800.380.5257

Photography by Paul Burke

We do all DMV. Free pick up- running or not (restrictions apply). Live operators- 7 days! Help the Polly Klaas Foundation provide safety information and assist families in bringing kids home safely.

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BUSINESS CARDS â&#x20AC;˘ BROCHURES POSTERS â&#x20AC;˘ T-SHIRTS â&#x20AC;˘ CD COVERS FLYERS â&#x20AC;˘ PHOTOGRAPHIC RESTORATION

general marketing materials Mark Schaumann 707.795.0924

schaumann1@earthlink.net


1121_BO