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Bohemian

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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Contributing Writer Leilani Clark, ext. 106

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Queen Kate Polacci, ext. 200

Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur, Katrina Fried, Daedalus Howell, Traci Hukill, James Knight, Ari LeVaux, Kylie Mendonca, Juliane Poirier, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, David Sason, Chip Scheuer, Michael Shapiro, David Templeton, Clive Thompson, Tom Tomorrow

Interns Shelby Pope, Alma Shaw, Mira Stauffacher

Design Director Kara Brown

Production Manager Harry Allison

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Dolan

Advertising Designers Sean George, Mark Schaumann

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers John Smith, ext. 204 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Susan M. Sulc, ext. 206

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Ashley Lazowski, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover Photo by Sara Sanger. Model and Makeup: Rochell Foust. Design by Kara Brown.


Is it time for your next career? You can learn the leadership skills needed for successfully guiding an organization or community through needed change. Invest in your future with this dynamic graduate program. You can gain: I Powerful new tools to be a more effective manager, leader, or consultant I Cutting-edge approaches, theories, and tools to create and sustain winning organizations and thriving communities I A wider professional network, broadly applicable skills, and increased employment options.

nb BBQ BEAST A bench at Santa Rosa’s Finley Park scares off picnic-bound squirrels jockeying for hot dog buns.

This photo was submitted by Emily Huartes of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

Our two-year MA program emphasizes mentoring and hands-on learning through actual consulting projects and internships. Classes meet two nights a week and one Saturday a month. Costs are remarkably reasonable. We seek a broad spectrum of students including members of under-represented groups. Attend an Information Meeting:

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Fighting the Hike Why the west Sonoma County water hearing matters BY DAVID MATT

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ustomers living or working in Sweetwater Springs Water District’s service area (Guerneville, Monte Rio, Rio Nido, Villa Grande) might want to attend the public hearing on May 5. At a time when it has enjoyed budget surpluses for the past three years and has reserves in excess of $2.5 million, the district is planning to impose 3 percent rate increases every year for the next nine years. While hiking rates, it is also planning to lower the minimum retirement age for its 10 employees from 65 to 55, and just made a special $240,000 contribution to their retirement account. On average, those 10 employees are paid $135,852 in annual salaries and benefits. If a majority of the district’s 3,800 customers do not protest the planned rate increase in writing, on or before the hearing date, the rate hike will take effect. So if you can’t attend the meeting, be sure to download the protest form at the district’s website (www.sweetwatersprings.com), fill it out and mail it to the district before the May 5 meeting. This is harder to defeat than in a normal election where the majority of votes prevail; in this situation, the people who remain apathetic and don’t protest are counted as yes votes. A majority means that 1,901 written protests must be received by the time of the hearing, or we’ll all be subject to the rate hike. I asked the district how much seating will be available for customers attending the hearing on May 5. The reply speaks volumes about the district’s expectations: “Not including the board and staff, our conference room can accommodate an additional eight to 10 people. We have held rate increase hearings in May 2008, May 2009 and in earlier years (we did not increase rates in 2010). For those hearings, our board room has been sufficiently large.” Eight to 10 people—that’s .0026 percent of the district’s customer base. Let’s show them just how many tapped-out customers there are who want to protest the rate hike. Attend the hearing on Thursday, May 5, at 6:30pm in the district’s office located at 17081 Hwy. 116, Ste. B, Guerneville, California. Let them know enough is enough. Before retirement, David Matt served in the city attorney offices in San Jose and Santa Maria, Calif. He lives in Occidental. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

The Day the World Turned Day-Glo James Knight uses brilliant sarcasm in his modest proposal (“Smart Future,” April 20), hitting all the hot spots of complacency that exist in various North Bay communities; most vote for a better future but, as is so typical, spout NIMBY at the same time. I can’t remember the last time I read an article in a paper—anywhere— that made me sit up and say, “This social utopia is not only possible, but imperative if we are to sustain community!” Thank you for publishing this important article.

SHERI M. Rohnert Park

Let’s Submerge Come on, residents of Sonoma County! Let’s literally put our money where our mouths are! We protest Bank of America not paying their fair share of taxes (“Make ‘Em Pay,” April 20), so let’s take our money out of B of A and put it into our local banks instead! Put your money into Exchange Bank, Community First Credit Union or the Redwood Credit Union! They invest in our communities. So don’t just “use your words,” use your money and let’s tell them that we’re sick and tired of their greed and we don’t want to support them anymore! Let’s support the banks that support us—our residents, our homeowners, our schools, our businesses! If you can’t change your mortgage at the present time, at least move your checking and savings accounts. Let’s all do this in the month of May, sending a message that by taking our money back, we may make a difference!

TRICIA HOFFMANN Sebastopol

Oh Bondage Up Yours!

Like a lot of people, I rely on public computers. Recently, I was at the SRJC and some familiar emails came up as porn sites. I even rebooted the computer and they came back. Then a clerk came up and said one warning and then the cops. How did she know? It was a pretty public area, and no one came around my computer. Another time, I had flash drive info get sucked off, then returned as garbage. I talked to a friend, and he told me they can monitor my use of the computer. I think this needs to be looked into, as this is pretty disturbing. The porn issue has been pretty resolved since the 1970s, and is a very regulated industry. Is there not such thing as legitimate research, even in a taboo area? What if someone is using discretion? For me, porn is not that interesting, and really like a Warner Brothers cartoon. It ain’t real. This is not about a public letter, but a concern for the meaning of First Amendment rights.

MERLIN JONES via email

I Live Off You A recent article on Radars.com, “Problems and Faults with Police Radar and Police Speed Guns,” shows that police radars have been issuing tickets in error: “Some experts estimate that 1020 percent of all radar-backed speeding tickets are issued in error; and in the case of radar that is operated from a moving police vehicle, the number of bad tickets may be as high as 30 percent.” I recently was issued a citation in the area of Forestville School, where the officer claimed I was going 51 mph (in a 35 mph zone). I can assure you I was not going 51 mph. I haven’t decided yet whether to challenge the CHP on my ticket, as Paul Sarran did (“Challenging the CHP,” Feb. 2). In order for me to be doing the 51 mph the CHP claimed I was doing, my car


THIS MODERN WORLD

would have had to clear the top of the hill, Dukes of Hazzard–style, with me skidding to a stop in order to turn into the side road the officer was directing me to. In any event, could the enterprising reporters at the Bohemian investigate police radars further? Thank you.

GENE KOCH Occidental

I Am a Cliché

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1 Watch out for the angry

Obama/Hitler people in front of the Santa Rosa Post Office

2 Roger Ebert wins the New Yorker’s cartoon caption contest

3 Paper lanterns and bass

clarinets at the Feed Barn in Rincon Valley

This week’s Letters to the Editor are brought to you by Poly Styrene, singer of the seminal British punk band X-Ray Spex, who died of breast cancer in Sussex this week at the age of 53. Throw on Germ Free Adolescents in her honor, and turn it up loud.

4 “Only in San Francisco”:

THE ED.

started rewatching the Benji movies all over again

Hazel Dickens and Phoebe Snow, too

a possible circumcision ban on the November ballot?

5 For some reason, we’ve

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Rants

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Paper Keying in the Future Leaders Software affects everything we do. Why isn’t programming a required course? BY CLIVE THOMPSON

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they’re in the car is that they don’t want to be rude—they want to respond quickly so friends don’t think they’re being ignored. So what if the phone knew you were driving—and responded on its own?

It’s all too easy for older generations to write off those under 25 as disengaged and apathetic. Strike! Hella Youth Organizing for Power is proof positive that the assumption is just a myth. On April 30, the youth-led, youthfocused activist group leads the Youth Assembly, offering free food, free information, space to brainstorm demands and visions for a better world, discussion of issues like education cuts and college fee hikes, and movementbuilding inspiration. Great news for those who have acknowledged that the youth will indeed inherit the earth. The Youth Assembly takes place on Saturday, April 30, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Noon–3pm. Free. 707.528.3009.

Salt of the Earth

SECOND LANGUAGE Basic HTML and CSS skills should move out of the bedroom and into the classroom.

ow do you stop people from texting while driving? Last spring, Daniel Finnegan had an idea. He realized that one of the reasons people type messages while

Hella Motivated

Normally, Finnegan wouldn’t have been able to do anything with his insight. He was a creative-writing major at the University of San Francisco, not a programmer. But he’d enrolled in a class where students were learning to use Google’s App Inventor, a tool that

) 11

In celebration of International Workers Day, in support of immigration reform and against the ongoing collaboration between ICE and the sheriff’s department—for these reasons, the streets in Santa Rosa will fill with people. On May 1, stand in solidarity with the working people of the world as benefits, pensions and unions undergo a systematic dismantling by marching from Roseland to Juilliard Park for a community picnic, live music and entertainment. The Santa Rosa May Day March and Rally takes it to the streets on Sunday, May 1. Rally starts at the old Albertson’s parking lot, 665 Sebastopol Road, Santa Rosa. 1pm. 707.571.7559. —Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978

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Programming ( 9

Only a tiny chunk of people ever consider learning to write code, which means we’re not tapping the creativity of a big chunk of society. Finnegan’s story illustrates a powerful point: it’s time for computer programming to be democratized. Software, after all, affects almost everything we do. Pick any major problem—global warming, healthcare or, in Finnegan’s case, highway safety—and clever software is part of the solution. Yet only a tiny chunk of people ever consider learning to write code, which means we’re not tapping the creativity of a big chunk of society. Serious leaders already know this. “Every time I talk to generals in the military, they talk about how they can’t find enough young people who know

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makes it pretty easy to hack together simple applications for Android phones by fitting bits of code together like Lego bricks. Finnegan set to work, and within a month he’d created an app called No Text While Driving. When you get into your car, you hit a button on the app and it autoresponds to incoming texts with “I’m driving right now, I’ll contact you shortly.” I’ve used the app, and it’s terrific. By getting you off the hook socially, it makes your driving safer. It ought to be available—mandatory, even—on every phone.

how to program,” says Douglas Rushkoff, author of Program or Be Programmed, a new book that argues that everyday people should learn to code. What’s more, knowing programming changes your worldview. “You learn that every problem is made up of smaller problems,” says Kevin Lawver, a web designer whose 11-yearold son, Max, has spent the past few years designing programs using kid-friendly languages like Scratch. Frankly, companies like Facebook and Google would probably face a lot tougher scrutiny if their users understood how software works. Facebook users would know it’s not that hard to program finely grained controls over who sees what on Facebook (a service that is, as computer scientist Eben Moglen semijokingly puts it, just “some PHP doodads”). The current mystique around software allows companies to claim that the way they’re doing things is the only way possible, when it isn’t. But isn’t programming inherently hard? Sure. So are lots of things. Hell, cooking dinner involves lethal implements, a fire inside your house and ingredients (like raw chicken) that can poison you if they’re not correctly prepared. We teach kids how to do that safely; we can do the same with programming. It’d be great if programming became part of the curriculum, but that probably won’t happen, given how slowly schools change. The good news is that—much as the “maker” set is relearning how to build stuff—a grassroots movement is creating tools that let even liberal arts majors hack together a program. In recent years, we’ve seen the release of oodles of languages designed to make it easy for kids (or adults!) to write code, from Processing to Scratch to Google’s App Inventor. In fact, I just used App Inventor to make a program that lets my toddler and kindergartner call family members by touching their pictures. Got a problem you need to solve? When you can program it yourself, there’s always an app for that.

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ublishing is dead. Long live publishing. Or at least, selfpublishing, which, thanks to a plethora of services and a general de-stigmatization of the so-called vanity press could be entering something of a golden era. So where are the literary breakouts? The through-line from Gutenberg’s invention of movable type to the desktop publishing revolution of the mid-’80s to our present social-media megaphones, which permit instantaneous publishing of any thought to traverse from one’s temporal lobe to one’s fingertips, can be graphed with a zigzag darting between the authors and publishers and whoever thinks who is in charge at any moment. Turns out, the author has always been in charge. Moreover, the social acceptance of blogging and other forms of essentially self-published writing has fomented a sea change in the minds of authors who once fretted whether their work was legitimate or not if it hadn’t passed through the hands of a third party. Remarkably, until the 20th century, most literary works were authorpublished, an MO that seems to be returning thanks to a myriad of new publishing solutions that have emerged in the past decade.

Besides the ubiquity of print-ondemand services like CreateSpace and Xlibris that provide an à la carte menu of services to escort one’s work from a manuscript file to a printed paperback, the burgeoning eBook phenomenon is rapidly becoming where one is most likely to find the next Jonathan Franzen or Sarah Vowell. Electronic readers are approaching market ubiquity. At present writing, at a cafe, three of the four people reading on the patio are doing so on electronic devices—two Kindles and one iPad; the lone analog holdout is reading a yellowed, dog-eared paperback that looks as if it were rescued from a recycle bin. Apple’s online iBook store, Amazon’s Kindle Store and Barnes & Nobles’ Nook store are among the throng of new venues for the written word now available to authors. Pushing written content to readers online has been here since day one of the internet. But the ability of readers to push real dollars back up the pipe to the author, conveniently, safely and instantly is something else entirely. New companies are springing up to facilitate these transactions and deliver “creator-owned” content (as they say in the indie comics trade) into your digital devices. Among them is independent music stalwart CD Baby, which took its music marketing model (they aid directto-consumer music sales for bands via downloads and on-demand CD delivery) and retooled it for authors. Book Baby is among the latest ventures serving this emerging market, helping authors place their creations on iPads and alike for a nominal fee. It’s high time the would-be literati exhume their treatises and tracts, tell-alls and tomes from the virtual drawers of their laptops and begin the next renaissance in letters. The sound the next literary lion makes won’t be a roar so much as a click. Daedalus Howell publishes at FMRL.com.


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THANK YOU BOHEMIAN READERS FOR VOTING ME BEST ATTORNEY IN MARIN! ²Divorce ²Mediation ²Collaborative Law ²Prenuptial Agreements ²Post-Dissolution Matters

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etaluma resident Rachel Kaplan wants to help us “live ecologically in the city.” Kaplan, 47, is co-author, with K. Ruby Blume, of Urban Homesteading: Heirloom Skills for Sustainable Living (Skyhorse Publishing; $16.95), a guidebook that on the surface is a manual about growing food, but at its core is a deeply uplifting guide to experiencing a more comforting, fun and abundant life, from self-care to spinach beds. “We eat really well, and we make a lot out of a little,” Kaplan explains. “This isn’t about scarcity or being a martyr; it’s about creating joy.” Kaplan and Blume suggest there is a lot more to their concept of homesteading than simply achieving a good crop of vegetables.

“This is a book about overcoming a culture of apathy, fear and cynicism,” Kaplan says. “We’re all taught that what we do doesn’t matter and that the problems we face are too big. But that’s not true. We can make a difference.” Homesteading doesn’t take a lot of space or even an owned property. Kaplan grows food in her rented yard and at a friend’s place across town; her chickens are kept at another friend’s place. A lot of bartering makes this system work, and friendships, as well as food, are abundant. The many side benefits of homesteading are included in this richly beautiful book. “My collaborator and I are artists,” says Kaplan, who practices somatic psychotherapy in west Petaluma. “So we wanted it to be beautiful, and to go beyond the other homesteading books out there. We didn’t want to kill trees to no avail.” I’d say Kaplan and Blume have exceeded their goals, creating not just a set of instructions, but rather a sensible and soul-nourishing guidebook for our times. “The things we do matter, and we can change our lives in big and small ways to make a difference,” Kaplan tells the Bohemian. “I work with Daily Acts, a nonprofit in Petaluma, and a lot of what I’m saying is supported by their mission. They are really great.” So is the book. I highly recommend Urban Homesteading. Kaplan will be at Petaluma Bounty Farm’s plant sale on Sunday, May 1 (55 Shasta Ave., Petaluma; 10am; 707.775.3663), followed by a signing at Copperfield’s Books (138 N. Main St., Sebastopol; 3pm; 707.707.823.2618). On Thursday, May 5, Kaplan and Blume appear at Baker Creek Seed Bank (199 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma; 7pm; 707.509.5171) and on Sunday, May 15, at Book Passage (51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera; 7pm; 415.927.0960). For more information, visit www.urban-homesteading.org.


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Dining PUDDING VS. PIE For those horrified of cutting butter into flour, the crust-free route is always an option.

Squash Squad It may seem crazy, but now’s the time to delight in the simple pleasure of pumpkin pudding BY ARI LEVAUX

P

umpkin pie is misunderstood in many ways. To name a few: it doesn’t need to be sweet, it isn’t only for the holidays, and, as far as I’m concerned, it doesn’t even have to exist. As much as I love pumpkin pie, I’ve been making pumpkin pudding more often, especially

now, after the holidays and at the end of squash season, when pragmatic shopping can provide good deals. I say this carefully, knowing full well that in some circles an argument against pie is an argument against America. But there’s no denying pumpkin pudding makes more sense, much of the time. The difference between pie and pudding is crust, the very

presence of which changes its contents from pudding to pie filling. If you can make a good crust, good for you; I hope somebody notices. But in my experience, crust is more liability than asset. The greatest crust won’t rescue a bad pie, but a failed crust can embarrass an otherwise respectable one. On more than one occasion, the thankless and messy task of crust

making has dissuaded me from making pie altogether. If I attempt to make a crust, it means flour and dough are going to coat the kitchen. And the pie will probably break apart as I try to serve it, which is less impressive than just serving pudding. Tapioca, chocolate and coconut milk may not be typical ingredients in pumpkin pie and pudding, but they’ve been working great for me. I start by cutting open a squash, using a spoon to scrape out the seeds, which I clean and bake separately. I bake the squash in large pieces on a baking pan at 350 degrees until it’s totally soft—about an hour—then let the squash cool and scoop out the soft flesh. Two cups of squash will make a good-sized tapioca pumpkin pie. Blend the squash with two eggs, a half-cup of coconut milk and sweetener to taste. If I plan on adding chocolate chips, I usually don’t sweeten the pie with anything else. If I’m not using chocolate, then maple syrup goes well with squash. Otherwise, I use sugar. Vanilla is worth adding, sparingly. So are traditional pumpkin pie spices: nutmeg and mace. Taste. Adjust. Repeat. And remember: if it tastes good in the mixing bowl, it will taste good when it comes out of the oven. For the tapioca, boil one cup of water per pie, and add three tablespoons of granulated tapioca to the water, stirring vigorously until it all breaks up. Kill the heat and wait about five minutes for it to cool. Stir the tapioca into the squash filling. If you’re using chocolate chips, stir them in last— half a cup or to taste. Add your pudding to an oiled dish, and bake at 300 for about an hour and a quarter per two inches of thickness. Whether or not you mess with crust, any of these variations on pumpkin pie will help you take advantage of the end of squash season. It doesn’t matter if you’re a locavore with a name for every squash in your root cellar or just somebody who likes pudding. Or pie. Whatever you call it, it’s worth a try.


Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Bistro Ralph Bistro. $$. Classic and classy–bistro food at its best. Wine bar. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 109 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.1380.

Cafe Zazzle Eclectic cafe. $-$$. Colorful, tasty food cooked Mexican-, Japanese-, Thai- and Italian-style. Lunch and dinner daily. 121 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.1700. Chloe’s French Cafe

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Stark’s Steakhouse Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever have. “Other than steak” menu changes seasonally. Happy hour Mon-Fri, 3 to 6. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

Yao-Kiku Japanese.

French. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Fri. 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

$$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868.

MARIN CO U N T Y

The Girl & the Fig

Buckeye Roadhouse

Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner daily. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Hang Ah Dim Sum Chinese-dim sum. $. Low prices and good variety make it pleasing. Buffet-style quality and greasiness can be a letdown. Lunch and dinner daily. 2130 Armory Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7873.

Kirin Chinese. $$. Specializing in Mandarin, Szechuan and Peking styles. Kirin’s pot stickers are the best in Sonoma County. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1957.

Madrona Manor Eclectic California cuisine. $$$$. Romantic fine dining in grand historic landmark mansion. Seasonal menu and superior wine list. Dinner daily. 1001 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.4321.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500.

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818. The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Mountain Home Inn

Angèle Restaurant & Bar French.

American. $$-$$$$. Great

$$$. Thoroughly

) 18

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Dining

summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.


Dining ( 17

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18

French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Buster’s Barbecue

Sat. May 21

Wine & Song Around the Plaza Wine & SongSun. May 22 New Orleans Jazz Brunch

Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

C.C. Blue Japanese.

The Perfect Pairing of the Bay Area’s Best Musicians and Sonoma Valley’s Finest Wines, all in a short stroll around Sonoma Plaza!

888-512-SHOW (7469), SonomaJazz.org Tickets inlcude 12 wine + tastings, 4 food tastings and live music all around the Plaza!

MUS IC: Wayne Wallace Latin Jazz Group, Rick Vandivier Quintet, Evan Francis Group, Times 4, Delta Wires, Santos Perdidos, Horace-Scope, Rue Manouche, Fog City Stompers, Mo’Fone, Du Gris, San Francisco Bourbon Kings W INE: Audelssa Estate Winery, Beltane Ranch, Benziger Family Winery, Gloria Ferrer Caves & Vineyards, Gofessel Vineyards, Haywood Estate, Little Vineyards Family Winery, Muscardini Cellars, Nicholson Ranch, Roche Winery, Roessler Cellars, Stone Edge Farm

$$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, MonSat. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$-$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dry-aged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.244.6328.

SMALL BITES

Craft Beer Country In a historically hopfriendly area and a place that many craft breweries call home, why have there been no brewery tours thus far in Sonoma County? This void motivated brothers Ron and James Holt, along with partner Robert Watkins, to start North Bay Brewery Tours. “Sometimes, I’ll talk to people who like beer who aren’t even aware of what we have in our own backyard,” says Ron Holt. “You talk to people outside the area and they’re like, ‘Oh, wine country,’ and I’m like, ‘No, craft beer country.’” The Holts and Watkins are homebrewers and beer enthusiasts themselves, and on April 30, their 15-seat bus embarks on the first official North Bay Brewery tour. For $85, participants get a guided trip that includes four stops: Lagunitas, Russian River, Third Street Aleworks and Bear Republic. A jaunt to homebrew shop Beverage People offers a chance to learn about homebrew techniques. Lunch is included—along with the chance to drink with impunity, since no designated driver is required. The tour has stirred up excitement in locals and tourists alike, according to Holt. “We hope to give people some additional beer education,” he says. “We’re all Sonoma County natives, and we know a lot about the region as well. It’s a fun environment, and you actually learn about beers.” For more information about North Bay Brewery Tours, see www.northbaybrewerytours. com or call 707.602.7397.—Leilani Clark

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$.

La Toque Restaurant

Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual

setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.


Wineries

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Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Camellia Cellars Like owner Chris Lewand, the wine is just so darned approachable and easy-going. Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon are most consistently strong. 57 Front St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–6pm. 888.404.9463.

Hauck Cellars Peach-tree state wine fans on a mission to be the “best Bordeaux house in Sonoma County” doing fine so far. Tin-roofed, 1948 Quonset hut off the plaza sports a long bar with plenty of elbow room. 223 Center St., Healdsburg. Friday–Tuesday, 11:30am–5pm; until 7pm, Friday–Saturday. $10 fee; one taste free. 707.473.9065. Lynmar Winery Produces world-class Pinot and Chard in elegant rural setting. Look for fun food pairings. 3909 Frei Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.829.3374. Ravenswood Winery The winery motto is “No wimpy wines,” and they make strong, much-praised Zinfandels. A great place to learn that wine is supposed to be fun. 18701 Gehricke Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.933.2332.

Sausal Winery Simple, rural, without corporate crosspromotions and pretense. Good Zinfandel and nice cats. 7370 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.433.5136.

Terroirs Artisan Wines Four wineries, one very busy winemaker, in a rennovated downtown Geyserville space that’s as dramatic and spacious as it is cozy by the fireplace. Sample limitedrelease wines that just might express that ineffable concept of earth, terrain and climate that we call “terroir,” all crafted by veteran winemakerconsultant Kerry Damskey, who ought to know. 21001 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville.

Open daily 11am–5:30pm. 707.857.4101.

Unti Vineyards Very friendly and casual with an emphasis on young Italianstyle wines. Yum. 4202 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment. 707.433.5590.

MA R I N CO U N T Y Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001. Tam Cellars Spacious wine bar quietly distributes the soul-salve of the ages and, like its soul mate the coffee shop, passes the laptop test. Cheese plates, wine flights and comfortable seating arrangements make a nice place to convene with the companion or flat screen of one’s choice. Wine shop features international, eclectic selection at fair prices. 1803 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Open Monday–Wednesday, 4–9pm; Thursday–Saturday, 4–10pm. 415.461.9463.

Windsor Vineyards Creaking wood floors, free tasting and gold medals at founder Rodney Strong’s original location. Grab a picnic wine and take the Blue & Gold ferry to Angel Island. 72 Main St., Tiburon. Sunday–Thursday, 10am–6pm; Friday–Saturday to 7pm. No fee. 415.435.3113.

N A PA CO U N T Y Black Stallion Winery Owned by a pair of Midwest liquor-distribution barons who hired a capable winemaker and envision it to be a retaildestination winery. The wines are quite good. 4089 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.253.1400.

Ceja Vineyards To Ceja Vineyards’ motto, “Vinum, Cantus, Amor,” and when there’s wine, song and love, there’s dance. Founded by one-time field workers, the Mexican-American-owned winery celebrates culture and wine at this sleek downtown lounge. Wine flights, light bites and one of the few full-bodied rosés “con huevos” in the county. On Saturdays, free salsa lessons and dance party spice up the night. Bailamos! 1248 First St., Napa. Sunday– Friday, noon–6pm, Saturday, noon–10pm; free salsa class starts at 7:30pm. Tasting fees vary. 707.226.6445.

Domaine Carneros Inspired by Taittinger’s Château de la Marquetterie of Champagne, this house of premium sparkling wine is a hard-to-miss landmark on the Carneros Highway. Enjoy a private Balcony Package for special occasions or taste sparkling and still wines paired with artisan cheese and caviar with the masses. Luxury bubbly Le Rêve offers a bouquet of hoary yeast and crème brûlée that just slips away like a dream. 1240 Duhig Road (at Highway 12/121), Napa. Wine flights $15; also available by the glass or bottle. Open 10am–5:45pm. 800.716.2788.

Taste at Oxbow Discover refreshing white varietals Albariño and Vermentino in stylish setting across from Oxbow Market, then move on to Pinot Noir from Carneros pioneer Mahoney Vineyards; Waterstone Wines, too. 708 First St., Napa. Sunday– Thursday, 11am–7pm; Friday– Saturday, 11am–9pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.265.9600. Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethen’s heyday was in the ’60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.255.7700.

Simply Vietnam Traditional Vietnamese Restaurant

Mon–Sat 10–9pm ~ Sun 11–8 966 North Dutton Ave. Santa Rosa 707.566.8910 www.simply-vietnam.com


8ZLUO

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Woodless Wonders

N

ot until California Chardonnay was kitted out with a robe of French oak did it conquer the world. But with success comes excess. The insurrection against smoky, buttery Chardonnay, at first only a whisper in the tasting rooms, has become so emboldened in recent years that the “unoaked” style is now boasted right on the label. This week, we found that the following stave-starved Chards were not only quite good, but the differences between them were all the more easy to spot, without the oak. Tasted unsighted, scored from 1 to 5. Balletto Vineyards 2008 Russian River Valley, Teresa’s Chardonnay ($18) Cool aromas of fresh cream, lime, honey and green apple set the mood for a medley of tropical, citrus and fresh apple flavors. With a finish tightly balanced between light, sweet flavor and excellent acidity, this was the clear favorite, an exemplar of the style. +++++ Foley 2009 Santa Rita Hills Chardonnay, ‘Steel’ ($30) Ditching the naysaying “unoaked” for a more robust tag, the Foley has crisp pear and citrus flavors, and a tangy, long-steeped chamomile tea finish. ++++ Kendall-Jackson 2009 Avant, California Chardonnay ($14) Having made a fortune popularizing the big, buttery style, K-J lately lobbies for the preservation of “Fresh, Crisp, Clean” Chardonnay. With hints of caramel apple, coconut cream pie and both butter and oak showing up in tasting notes, it’s a bit on the sweeter side than the rest, as if custom-built to wean their consumers off of the oak. ++++ Hendry Ranch 2009 Napa Valley Unoaked Chardonnay ($19) Here comes the pineapple. With tropical, pear cocktail and lychee aromas and flavors, this is a zippy and tart one-track wine—but it’s on the right track. ++++ Lincourt Santa Rita Hills Chardonnay, ‘Steel’ ($18) Distinctive green apple Jolly Rancher aromas, with sour apple and lime on the crisp palate. Nice, lingering finish. ++++ Windsor Oaks Vineyards 2009 Estate Unoaked Chardonnay ($29) Austere aroma, with jasmine and notes of Golden Delicious apple. Clean and bright, it’s got notable acidity. +++ Sebastiani 2009 Russian River Valley, Unoaked Chardonnay ($18) Floral, enticing aromas of dried apples and golden apricot, while flavors trend toward scrumpy or flat apple cider. +++ Toad Hollow 2009 Francine’s Selection, Unoaked Mendocino Chardonnay ($12) Not typical of the genre, this unoaked wine did go through malolactic fermentation. Some liked the floral, dried papaya aromas, with a zippy, dry finish that leaves nothing to complain about. Curiously, tasting some months back, this wine seemed to burst more with bright, ripe apple flavor, and in fact, inspired this week’s Swirl. +++—James Knight


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HISTORY AND BACKGROUND

The last will and testament of Exchange Bankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s co-founder and second president, Frank Doyle, stands tall above his many accomplishments. Doyle wanted the bank to be a locally owned and managed institution. So, rather than giving his stock to his heirs, his controlling interest (50.39% of the common stock) was put into a perpetual trust. The dividends are speciďŹ ed for distribution by the Trustees to the Frank P. Doyle and Polly Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Meara Doyle Scholarship Fund for assistance to â&#x20AC;&#x153;worthy young men and women attending Santa Rosa Junior College.â&#x20AC;?

sCommunity Bank: Strong community presence, support and involvement, including our NonproďŹ t Partnership Program sLocal Sonoma County Bank: Your money stays in Sonoma County, supporting local businesses and nonproďŹ ts with approximately 89% of our loans - highest of all Sonoma County banks sCustomer Service: Access to decision makers; 48 hour loan response and 72 hour doc turnaround; you always speak with a live person; same day call back or no greater than 24 hours; experienced and knowledgeable staff.

Our employees are committed to and actively are involved in the communities where we serve and live. This commitment is evidenced by the countless hours of volunteer time supporting good works and charitable organizations throughout Sonoma County, such as The Human 2ACE 5NITEDWAY !MERICAN#ANCER3OCIETY 2ELAYFOR,IFE 2EBUILDING4OGETHER AND!STHMA 7ALKFORTHE!MERICAN,UNG!SSOCIATION Exchange Bank also makes contributions and in-kind sponsorships in direct support of local needs such as homeless assistance, health care, food bank and numerous youth initiatives. WHY BANK WITH US?

s%XCHANGE"ANKISCOMMITTEDTOBEINGTHEPREMIER#OMMUNITY"ANKIN3ONOMA#OUNTY s7EARECOMMITTEDTOOURHERITAGEANDTHECOMMUNITYWESERVE s7ESTRIVETOCONSISTENTLYPERFORMATLEVELSTHATEXCEEDTHEEXPECTATIONSOFOURCUSTOMERS â&#x20AC;&#x153;Giving back to our communities has been a part of our rich legacy  DQGUHPDLQVDGHĂ&#x20AC;QLQJSDUWRI who we are today.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We offer a comprehensive set of products and services for your Personal and Business needs.â&#x20AC;?

SERVICE SPECIALTIES

We offer the kind of personal service that big banks gave up long ago as unproďŹ table. We call it competency with a smile. Our Members call it banking with family.

the difference to your savings account (we match rounded-up monies to 100% for ďŹ rst 90 days; 5% thereafter) s9OUTH3AVER WHICHEARNSARIDICULOUSLYHIGH!09 ONTHElRSTOFASAVING account for those under 20 years s&REECHECKINGTHATWITHOUTANYHOOPSORTRAPS ISACTUALLY&2%% s SURCHARGE FREE!4-SNATIONALLYMORETHAN"OF! s3MART!4-SLOCALLYTHATDONTREQUIRECUMBERSOMEANDWASTEFUL ENVELOPESTOMAKE deposits of cash or checks (and that we had years before those big banks that are currently advertising them) s&REEMOBILEBANKINGTHEONLYLOCALLYOWNEDINSTITUTIONTOOFFERBANKINGVIAANYSMARTPHONE

and free online banking with free online transfers to other ďŹ nancial institutions.

Branch staff is always at the ready to help, explain, and show. Our in-house Call Center is here â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not outsourced to Indiana or India â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and staffed by smart people who are empowered to help you immediately. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

We have whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called a Community Charter from the California Department of Financial Institutions. This means our primary mission is to promote (through education, actions and lending) the ďŹ nancial sustainability of Sonoma County. We can only take deposits from residents and students in our charter area; we can only make loans to residents and students in our charter area. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simple: local deposits can only be re-used locally to help create jobs, purchase homes and vehicles, and help fund vitally needed services where YOU live. WHY BANK WITH US?

We have all the products that 95% of Sonoma County households need ďŹ nancially: s&ULLRANGEOFlXED ANDADJUSTABLE RATELOANSFORHOMEPURCHASEORRElNANCE s,OW COSTVEHICLELOANSTHATYOUCANGETCONVENIENTLYDIRECTLYWHILEATANY3ONOMA#OUNTY car dealer. s3AVERS%DGEÂŽ, which rounds up every debit card purchase to the next dollar and transfers

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SONOMA FEDERAL HISTORY AND BACKGROUND

On June 7, 1961 Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital Federal Credit Union was welcomed to the credit union movement by the Credit Union National Association. This new beneďŹ t for the hospital employees was located in the basement of Santa Rosa Memorial and run completely by volunteer employees. On the credit unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst day of operation, there were 60 eager employees who waited in line to deposit $5 in their new membership account. In January 2005, we became Sonoma Federal Credit Union. Today, Sonoma Federal Credit Union is able to serve anyone who lives or works in Sonoma County. Our straight forward, relaxed business style and over ďŹ&#x201A;owing candy bowl makes the trip to the credit union a pleasure. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to be Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smallest credit union! SERVICE SPECIALTIES

One of our service specialties is obtaining the very best residential mortgage loans for our members. We can provide any mortgage loan available with some of the best rates, terms and fees. Sonoma Federal Credit Union also offers a wide variety of new and used auto loans. You can also borrow against the equity in your auto at our auto loan rates to pay for home improvements, payoff credit cards or take that dream vacation. In addition, our credit union has free checking, with unlimited CO-OP network ATM transactions, free point of sale, free online banking and free bill payment. This checking account is also very popular with Sonoma County sole proprietor businesses. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

In addition to providing banking services, Sonoma Federal Credit Union works as a true cooperative. We recommend our members to other members and in turn, our members recommend the credit union. The most rewarding beneďŹ t is that all of this wonderful work stays in Sonoma County because we are chartered to only serve anyone who lives or works in Sonoma County. This gives us the unique advantage of concentrating all of our efforts locally. We also participate in the Kids Wish Network, which provides sick children in Sonoma County with the trip of their dreams or meeting their favorite entertainer or athlete. Recently, our credit union, along with other Sonoma County businesses arranged for a Santa Rosa boy to go to Disneyworld with his family. WHY BANK WITH US?

If you are tired of long lines, sitting on the telephone with recorded message prompts, being sent from one person to the next to answer your ďŹ nancial questions and having to jump through hoops to obtain the best rates, then you have to try Sonoma Federal Credit Union. We serve people based on their needs, not our needs. Experience the differenceâ&#x20AC;Ś Local Banking at its Best!

Switching Made Easy STEP 1: CHOOSE YOUR NEW LOCAL BANK OR CREDIT UNION

Choosing between all of the great local banks and credit unions may be the hardest step in the switching process, as they all have great customer service and are strong supporters of the local economy. To help you decide, read the featured proďŹ les included in this Bank Local Guide, and visit golocal.coop/bank to ďŹ nd a list of all GoLocal member banks and credit unions in our local business directory. STEP 2: GATHER CURRENT ACCOUNT INFORMATION

Preparation is the key to making an easy transition. Find the last few months of statements from your existing account(s) or log-in online to identify all of the automatic deposits and withdrawals that will need to be updated. Also, gather all of the documentation for your mortgage and any other loans or investments you have with your existing bank. There is a good chance you can save some money by reďŹ nancing your outstanding debt at a lower rate locally. STEP 3: OPEN YOUR NEW ACCOUNT

The easiest way to open your new account is to go into your neighborhood branch of the bank or credit union you have chosen. Their friendly and knowledgeable staff can help you through the process. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to bring government identiďŹ cation, your social security number, and your checkbook or a couple hundred dollars cash for your initial deposit. STEP 4: TRANSITION YOUR AUTOMATIC TRANSACTIONS

If you have direct deposit set up with your employer, ask your new institution for a direct deposit authorization form to transfer the deposits to your new account. It may take a couple of pay cycles before the change occurs, so keep an eye on your accounts to conďŹ rm when it happens. To change automatic withdrawals, ask your new institution for several automatic withdrawal change or authorization forms. Use the list of automatic withdrawals you made and/or your recent account statements to make sure you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss any. STEP 5: CLOSE YOUR OLD ACCOUNT(S)

Leave your old account(s) open long enough to ensure outstanding checks have cleared and all of automatic transactions have been switched. Then, write a check to yourself from your old account(s) and deposit in your new account(s) to transfer the remaining funds. Finally, be sure to follow the correct procedure for closing your old account(s). If left open, you may be hit with account inactivity fees. STEP 6: CELEBRATE!

Congratulations, you made a difference! Throw a party to celebrate, invite all your family and friends, and encourage them to make the switch.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to be Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smallest credit union!â&#x20AC;? ´2XUVWUDLJKWIRUZDUGUHOD[HGEXVLQHVVVW\OHDQGRYHUĂ RZLQJ candy bowl makes the trip to the credit union a pleasure.â&#x20AC;?

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Chip Scheuer

Keepers of the Flame

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An outdoor survival class pays tribute to indigenous ways BY TRACI HUKILL

BASIC ELEMENTS Marin’s Jack Harrison starts a fire from twine and sticks.

W

e muster at 10 o’clock under the redwoods on a Saturday morning in February, 19 people shivering in our fleece and sweatshirts around a smoky fire. We are here to learn basic wilderness survival—how to keep ourselves alive in the

elements in case someday, somehow, things go terribly wrong: we’re jogging in the woods and fall into a ravine and lie there for six days until our neighbor finds us or our car breaks down on an isolated road and a storm hits or the Shit Finally Hits the Fan and we have to light out for the hills with nothing

but a Levi’s jacket and some Twix to escape the flaming apocalypse in the cities. The people who’ve paid $95 today to learn survival skills our ancestors used on a daily basis are a mix of the pessimistic, the playful and the paranoid. And we’re all pretty stoked about making a friction fire.


Not a Single Luxury Following Hodges, we trudge a short distance away to Exhibit A, a long, low pile of duff with an opening at one end. “This is not a high-tech shelter,” Hodges says without irony. “This is a shelter to keep you warm, dry and alive.” I try to picture wiggling into this natural fiber bivouac for a toasty night of shut-eye, but the picture doesn’t come easily. “All shelter is, is insulation,” Hodges continues. “Depending on the quality of the insulation we have, we need a lot of it.” Turns out when you’re using forest debris—the needles, sticks and leaves scattered all over the forest floor—it takes a layer four to six feet thick to achieve insulation comparable to that offered by a basic down sleeping bag. It’s as labor-intensive as it sounds. Hodges says his first debris hut took eight hours to build—“and I was still really cold,” he laughs. The three instructors demonstrate the principles behind building a debris hut, which starts with a skeleton of branches and lattice-style woven sticks to keep the structure from

collapsing into a pile of leaves. Our first assignment is to break into groups and build a hut of our own. We have half an hour. All we get is a length of twine to help secure the frame. When someone finds the end of a big hollowed-out redwood log, our group’s work is half done. Building off the existing log, we construct a respectable shelter in short order. Someone wonders aloud whether this is cheating. But when our time is up and we gather for a tour of each group’s site, with attention paid to insulation, rainfall and construction, we get the nod. “Looks sick!” Harrison exclaims. Group gloating commences until Hodges points out one minor issue: we’re in a dry gully. “If it starts raining, you’re pretty much in the creek,” he says. “So think about these things from a survival point,” McElroy tells the group. “If you know your car is three miles away but it’s freezing, how could you apply these principles?” One guy volunteers. “Stuff your clothes with debris?” “Right,” McElroy says. “Or if you’re in your car, what could you use to go walk for help? You could tear open the seat cushion and make yourself a coat out of that.” An anachronistic technique to be sure, from the standpoint of honoring ancient ways. But what could possibly be more human than opportunism, than creativity, than good old Yankee ingenuity?

together you’ll get fire, right?” McElroy asks. “But as a kid I tried that, and no fucking way.” Everyone laughs. “So we’re going to make what’s called a bow drill. It’s a universal technique for making a friction fire.” The bow drill consists of three pieces of wood and a piece of twine (note to self: buy some twine). A long, slightly curved limb makes a bow when twine is tied to either end. A second length of wood, 10 to 12 inches long and the circumference of a broom handle, is whittled to a sharp point and set on top of the third piece of wood, a block with a notch in it. As Harrison demonstrates with intimidating speed, the twine of the bow can be twisted around the “drill”; a strong back-andforth sawing motion spins the drill into the block of wood until—voilà!— an ember tumbles through the notch and onto a waiting leaf, where it’s carefully transferred to some dried moss or other tinder. It takes Harrison about 10 seconds to produce a flame. We applaud like we’re at the circus. We’re each given twine, pieces of wood and a knife for making our cylindrical drills. A whittler I am not, and after about 10 minutes I have a slightly oblong block of wood. The instructors, roving throughout the group, take pity on several of us. Harrison gets my drill into shape. McElroy helps me with the bowing, which is really hard, much harder than, say, typing on a laptop. But when I get an ember and blow it into a fire, it’s a great feeling. While people throughout the group are working on their bow drills, I get a chance to talk with Harrison about why he does this work. He talks about “nature-deficit disorder,” the term coined by writer Richard Louv to describe the alienation experienced by kids who never go outside, and mentions

We learn how to keep ourselves alive in case someday things go terribly wrong.

To Build a Fire After shelter, it’s on to water, sort of. Hodges informs us that learning how to find water in an emergency situation is easily a full-day class. Instead, we’ll be focusing on how to purify water, which brings us to the height of the day’s summer-camp-style awesomeness: making a fire from sticks. “As a little kid, you hear that if you rub two pieces of wood

“coyote teaching,” an immersive, experiential approach to outdoors education. “Our passion is teaching the knowledge that’s been lost from indigenous cultures who lived close to the earth,” he says. “We try to keep it intact as much as we can.”

Primitive as Can Be After fire, we learn how to make twine, in case we forget ours at home, using techniques still employed by tribes in the Amazon. We also learn how to make bowls (necessary for purifying the water) by using coals to burn out depressions in the wood. Finally, we get a brief rundown from McElroy on a few edible plants found throughout North America and the basics of making a Figure 4 trap, which basically consists of a heavy object leaning on a stick configuration that collapses when some unsuspecting critter takes the bait. “This can work on animals as big as deer,” McElroy assures us. “You’ll notice that we don’t spend that much time on food,” says Hodges, “because, really, in a survival situation, it’s not that important. I’ve never heard of anyone getting stuck in the woods and staying dry and getting water and dying of starvation.” Easy for you to say, I think, recounting the list of vitamins, fruits, leafy greens and highquality protein sources I consider necessary to propel myself from home to car to office and back. But after giving a modest pitch on Adventure Out’s upcoming snow camping and desert survival workshops, Hodges says something that puts it all in perspective. “You are the direct descendant of people who lived in earthen shelters, found water and knew how to find food,” he says by way of sending us off. It sounds true. And if they could do it, why can’t we? Adventure Out runs the Wilderness Skills and Survival Clinic on a regular schedule throughout the year at Camp Tamaracho in Fairfax. One-day course, $95. For more info, cue up www.adventureout.com.

27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AP R I L 27-MAY 3, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Cliff Hodges, the founder of Adventure Out and one of our instructors for the day, is striding around the site in a black T-shirt and jeans. Hodges, an MIT grad, starts the class by introducing his co-instructors: Tom McElroy, a former instructor at the New Jersey–based Tracker School who is now studying the human rights of indigenous people at the University of Connecticut; and Jack Harrison, a North Bay native who met Hodges in an indigenous-culture class at Arizona’s Prescott College. Hodges tells us this is a leave-no-trace class that takes its cues from techniques used by indigenous people today. We go around the circle briefly introducing ourselves, then Hodges explains that the four areas we’ll cover today—shelter, water, fire and food—are, in that order, the things a person needs in order to survive in the wild. We start with shelter.


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29

Crush S A N TA R O S A

HEALDSBURG

WHERE YOU LIVE

N A PA

Paper Thin

Free for All

Sprung Spring

Smooth Glass

Born in 1990, Santa Rosa native Ryan Schmale has been a prolific and acclaimed songwriter of the last five years. Yet strangely, his lo-fi classicism under the name That Ghost is discussed and cherished more on East Coast blogs than in his own hometown. That will change with Songs Out Here, his latest and best work yet, which sheds his pop leanings for a more antique aesthetic. See him play with Amir Coyle, Teenage Sweater and Laughters on Sunday, May 1, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $5. 707.528.3009.

Rounding out the Russian River Chamber Music season this weekend is the Galax Quartet, who present compositions set to the poetry of Pulitzer-winning poet Gary Snyder as sung by contralto Karen Clark. With music by the likes of downtown New York guitarist Fred Frith and Duke Ellington arranger Allaudin Mathieu, this isn’t your grandma’s classical concert—there’s even an afterparty with the artists at Spoonbar. Bring the family on Sunday, May 1, at Healdsburg Community Church. 1100 University Ave., Healdbsurg. 4pm. Free. 707.431.7622.

It’s time to scratch that winterlong itch to get outside—why not do it with cows, goats, chickens and bees? This week, Sonoma County Farm Trails presents Blossoms, Bees & Barnyard Babies, a farm tour including over two dozen farms, local food producers, ranches, seed suppliers and more, all throwing open their steel gates and giving behind-the-scenes tours to visitors. The per-vehicle pass covers “as many people as can safely fit,” so cram your friends in a VW Bug and milk some goats on Sunday, May 1, at various farms from Healdsburg to Petaluma. 11am– 5pm. $25. 707.837.8896.

Any live performance by Philip Glass is an event, and although one can count on certain pieces being played (the Metamorphoses, the Etudes, Mad Rush), the preeminent modern minimalist often throws curveballs. Last year at Carnegie Hall, that meant unlikely guests Iggy Pop and Regina Spektor; this year in Napa, it means something called The Napa Trilogy, a medley of previous works. Glass’ charming wit is drier than the Sahara, but his playing is watery as ever; see him in the intimate hall on Thursday, April 28, at the Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. 8pm. $35–$45. 707.226.7372.

Gabe Meline

GOTTA GIVE Distant Relatives celebrate their new album, ‘This Changes Everything,’ on Saturday, April 30, at Jasper O’Farrell’s in Sebastopol.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AP R I L 27-MAY 3, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide


ArtsIdeas Alma Shaw

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AP R I L 27-MAY 3, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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FINISHING TOUCHES Fred Lund contributes a portrait of Wes Chesbro in Becoming Independentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new show.

A New Hue

ArtWorks portrait show features local celebrities, unfettered approaches BY SHELBY POPE

I

n a warehouse buried deep in a southwest Santa Rosa business park, a group of 11 artists are scattered around a cavernous room working on their projects: beading, weaving and drawing. In one corner, decked out in powder-blue shutter shades and a Chuck E. Cheese baseball hat, William Eley paints his interpretation of a

Mitchell Heinze illustration, while across the table, Daniel Poma works on a self-portrait. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done a lot of collaborations, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my artistic soul mate,â&#x20AC;? instructor Beth Hibbard says as she pages through Pomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s portfolio, a series of colorful abstract impressionist paintings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fantastic artistâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I hoard his stuff at home because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m afraid someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to throw it away. He didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start doing art

until three years ago. He was shredding paper for 30 years.â&#x20AC;? Eley and Poma are both part of ArtWorks, an offshoot of Becoming Independent, the North Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest human-services organization dedicated to aiding people with developmental disabilities. The 10-year-old ArtWorks hosts exhibits at the Gallery of Sea and Heaven, a location triumphantly returned to this August after an 18-month closure for repairs. The latest, Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Perfect!,

features portraits of local celebrities, an eclectic mix that features Efren Carrillo, Jean Schulz, Lynn Woolsey, Brent Farris, Bernie Schwartz, Tom Ammiano, Michele Anna Jordan, Tom Waits and many others done by a collaboration of community and ArtWorks artists. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It started with artists painting together,â&#x20AC;? art production and gallery manager Barbara Harris says of the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inception. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had so many wonderful people in our area helping us, so we thought, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we include them?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? For community artists, working with the ArtWorks artists offers a refreshing, more intuitive approach to creating pieces, says Hibbard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re too aware of what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing, it will deaden the work,â&#x20AC;? says Hibbard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t experience that with most of the artists here. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a complete lack of inhibition; everythingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really bold, decided and authentic.â&#x20AC;? Hibbard lists several goals for the studio: increased national exposure, opening a dialogue with similar galleries and creating an online gallery of the works. Most important, however, is making sure the works are viewed the same as any other piece of art. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is this separation between the art that we do here and [art] happening outside of our studio,â&#x20AC;? Hibbard says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The artists] are being deďŹ ned by their disabilities, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty obvious to anyone who comes here and has a sensitivity to artwork that this work isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disabled. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our job as advocates to try and blur those lines.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Perfect!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; opens April 30 with a reception from 5pm to 7pm, and runs through June 18 at the Gallery of Sea and Heaven. Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 312 S. A St., Santa Rosa. Free. 707.578.9123.


HOSANNA Matlock Zumsteg as

Judas, Josh Sommers as Jesus and Norma Gomez as Mary Magdalene.

Crucify Him! A new kind of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Superstarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; revamped at SRJC BY DAVID TEMPLETON

O

ne would not suspect pop star Lady Gaga, street artist Banksy, transvestite comic Eddie Izzard and Jesus of Nazareth to have all that much in common. But according to John Shillington, director of Santa Rosa Junior Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s upcoming production of Jesus Christ Superstar, each icon has been inspirational in guiding the unique artistic direction of the theater departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big spring show. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted a Superstar that was edgy, raw and a little disturbing,â&#x20AC;? says Shillington of the beloved 1971 rock opera by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve borrowed from Lady Gagaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sense of fashion and Banksyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sense of visual style, and in the scene where Jesus appears before King Herodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where we conjure

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Jesus Christ Superstarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday, April 29â&#x20AC;&#x201C;30, and Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday, May 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, at the Burbank Auditorium. 8pm; 2pm matinees on April 30, May 1, 7 and 8. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$18. 707.527.4343.

31

Music by Andrew Lloyd Webber Lyrics by Tim Rice Recommended for age 14 and above

April 29, 30, May 4, 5, 6, 7 at 8 PM April 30, May 1, 7, 8 at 2 PM Burbank Auditorium, Santa Rosa Campus

THEATRE

SEASON

2010/2011

1501 Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa Tickets: $10-$18 Buy Tickets Online:

www.santarosa.edu/theatrearts Box Office: 707.527.4343 Hours: Wed, Thurs, Fri - Noon to 5 PM Tickets available one hour before each show in the Burbank Auditorium lobby JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR is presented through an exclusive arrangement with R & H Theatricals and Two Knights Rights Limited. www.rnhtheatricals.com

dhyana Center of Health Sciences â&#x20AC;&#x153;a place for all people to heal learn & growâ&#x20AC;?

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the over-the-top, cross-dressing aspects of Eddie Izzard.â&#x20AC;? Another signiďŹ cant inďŹ&#x201A;uence on this Superstar, which Shillington and a large cast of players have been rehearsing for months, is the 2002 revival staged in London and New York by visionary director Gail Edwards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Andrew Lloyd Webber said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d waited 30 years for that production to come along,â&#x20AC;? Shillington notes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want just another â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;bellbottomed revivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of Jesus Christ Superstar. He loved that that production was so relevant to who todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s audiences are. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So,â&#x20AC;? he laughs, â&#x20AC;&#x153;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve stolen everything we can from that production.â&#x20AC;? Most notably, Shillington is letting the SRJC production be inďŹ&#x201A;uenced by Edwardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; emphasis on strongly delineated characters; a clear picture of the emotional triangle between Jesus, Judas and Mary Magdalene; and a strong sense of visceral theatricality. The latter appears most vividly in the way both productions approach the scourging of Jesus late in the show. In earlier versions, Jesusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; whipping was pantomimed as Pontius Pilate counts out each of the 39 lashes. In this version, the scene is staged as both symbolic and, in its use of stage blood, unforgettably literal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just have to ďŹ gure out how to get all that blood onstage,â&#x20AC;? says Shillington, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and then clean the stage up again right away.â&#x20AC;? Acknowledging that some faithful Christians still see Superstar as scandalous, Shillington suggests that great care has been taken to treat the play, and its description of Jesusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; last days on Earth, with respect. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know that this show has been described as controversial,â&#x20AC;? Shillington says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but I think a lot of Christians who come to our version will ďŹ nd it very inspiring. I know I do.â&#x20AC;?


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charles lloyd zakir hussain charlie haden geri allen fred hersch julian lage

Film

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NOBLER MĂŠlanie Thierry ďŹ ghts off four men in this period drama.

Bustiers for All

Visually stunning â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Princess of Montpensierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

S

washbuckling in widescreen, photographed as close to Technicolor as you can get today and with a percussive soundtrack by Philippe Sarde, Bertrand Tavernierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Princess of Montpensier recreates a visually grander era of moviemaking. The source is a tale by the 17th-century writer Madame de La Fayette (La Princesse de Clèves), and it simmers with cultural ferment and incipient feminism.

In 1562, a gorgeous princess named Marie (MĂŠlanie Thierry) is desired by a quartet of men. First is her cold, correct husband, the prince, whom she wedded through an arranged marriage. Second is her seemingly stoic tutor. Third is a dallying heir-apparent, and last is a sardonic, scar-faced duelist, the bloodthirsty Duc de Guise, the man Marie has always loved. Engrossing as it is, The Princess of Montpensier isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t completely about the pastâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the viciousness of the French religious wars and the ethnic cleansing they pioneered are still relevant. The good news and the bad: Tavernier is too historically aware for melodrama. The Princess of Montpensier is a visual treat, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a plausible, unoperatic epic. To counterbalance the nobility, Tavernier brings in peasant comic relief, showing a couple caught having a quickie in the kitchen and marveling at a boorish noble describing how he fattens lampreys for the table. Watching a successful historical ďŹ lm, we should be shocked, confused, discomďŹ ted: seeing the way the princess-to-be is stripped and displayed by her ladies-in-waiting, for example. Gloriously built, but not a commanding presence, Thierry doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try to break our hearts; rather, she impresses on us the intellectual sorrows of a young woman trapped. She embodies the sadness of an era when a well-born woman was the guardian of a husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s honorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;without having any of her own. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Princess of Montpensierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opens Friday, April 29, at the Smith Rafael Film Center in San Rafael.


Film capsules by Richard von Busack, Kennish Cosnahan, Alaric Darconville, and Ugo Lambui.

NEW MOVIES Atlas Shrugged, Pt. 1 (PG-13; 102 min.) In development for over 30 years, Ayn Rand’s controversial objectivist novel, the first part in a projected trilogy, finally makes it to the screen under the direction of Paul Johansson (John Q.), with financing from Forbes-profiled businessman John Aglialoro. Tea Party members, evidently, are very excited. (AD) Fast Five (PG-13; 113 min.) Vin Diesel and Paul Walker team up with Dwayne Johnson in the fifth installment of the Fast and Furious series. (UL)

Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG; 94 min.) Hansel and Gretel are missing, and it’s up to teen Red and the Sisters of the Hood to restore order, with the help of the Happily Ever After Agency. Animated with the voices of Bill Hader and Hayden Panettiere. (KC)

Medea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13; 106 min.) The latest from Tyler Perry finds Medea and the gang confronting sober issues when Medea’s neice is diagnosed with a serious illness. (AD)

Princess of Montpensier (NR; 139 min.) Director Bertrand Tavernier adapts Madame de La Fayette’s 17th-century romance La Princesse de Clèves set against the French Wars of Religion. At the Smith Rafael Center. See review, adjacent page.

ALSO PLAYING African Cats (G; 89 min.) From Disneynature films and narrated by Samuel L. Jackson, this documentary looks at life for lions and cheetahs on the African savannah. A portion of all proceeds benefits the African Wildlife Foundation. (AD)

raised by her ex-assassin father (Eric Bana) to kill. Dad’s idea of a debutante party is to contact the CIA, which has been seeking Hanna since birth with the intent of rubbing her out. Directed by Joe Wright (Atonement), this weirdly artsy mash of Jack London and Alias is meant as a pleasure machine, but it’s an oddly dour thrill ride that insists on repetitive training over the free-style adaptation it claims is the only key to survival. (RvB)

I Am (NR; 76 min.) Director Tom Shadyac (Ace Ventura, Bruce Almighty) documents “the meaning of life” after an accident leaves him reconsidering his life’s purpose. (AD) Jane Eyre (PG; 121 min.) Director Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre) plays up the darker aspects of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel in this adaptation co-produced by BBC Films and starring Mia Wasikowska (Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland) and Michael Fassbender (Inglourious Basterds). (KC)

L

L

E

R

Y

Winter / Spring

“where the river meets the sea” all classes Sat. & Sun. all materials provided please check web for availability

Potiche (R; 103 min.) When the wealthy boss of an umbrella factory finds his workers on strike, his sympathetic wife takes over and improves working conditions. With Catherine Deneuve and Gerard Depardieu. At Summerfield Cinemas and the Rafael. (KC)

Rio (PG; 96 min.) Blu, a pet macaw, leaves his comfortable home in Moose Lake, Minn., to seek a mate. Animated, with the voices of Anne Hathaway and Jesse Eisenberg. (UL) Scream 4 (R; 111 min.) Much of the gang’s all here in the first installment of a proposed second trilogy when director Wes Craven again teams up with Kevin Williams, writer of the first two Screams, and actors David Arquette, Courtney Cox and Neve Campbell. (UL)

Bill Cunningham New York (NR; 84 min.) Documentary about photographer Bill Cunningham, whose candid shots of New York’s fashion world became an institution in the New York Times. (AD)

Trust (R; 137 min.) A parent’s nightmare. Family bonds are tested when a teenage daughter becomes the victim of an internet predator. With Clive Owen and Catherine Keener. At the Rafael Center. (KC)

permafrost, Hanna (Saoirse Ronan), now 16, was

A

chucks the family business to pursue his dream of becoming a rock drummer. With the voices of Russell Brand, Elizabeth Perkins and Hank Azaria. (AD)

Soul Surfer (PG; 105 min.) Teenager conquers fears and limitations to return to surfing after losing an arm in a shark attack off Kauai. With Dennis Quaid and Helen Hunt. (UL)

Hanna (PG-13; 111 min.) Living in the

G

Hop (PG; 95 min.) Son of the Easter Bunny

Arthur (PG-13; 110 min.) Russell Brand plays a drunken Manhattan billionaire who covets the one thing money can’t buy, a girl from Queens (Greta Gerwig). Meanwhile, Arthur’s tyrant mother (Helen Mirren) is insists that he marry a vicious heiress (Jennifer Garner). The film suffers for being a vehicle for Brand, who wears the expensive clothes well, but there’s no comedic poetry in his motion. (RvB)

The Conspirator (PG-13; 122 min.) Robert Redford directs this tale of the aftermath of the Lincoln assassination with some heavyhanded references to post-9-11 justice. (KC)

ART

FROM LANDSCAPE TO MINDSCAPE

Through April 30th Exhibiting diverse selection of unusual antique, modern and contemporary artworks.

Calabi Gallery 707.781.7070 | 144 Petaluma Blvd N calabigallery.com

Source Code (PG-13; 94 min.) Jake Gyllenhaal stars as a soldier on an odd assignment: inhabiting the body of a dying terrorist to discover where his next target will hit. Directed by Duncan Jones (Moon) (AD).

Water for Elephants (PG-13; 122 min.) A veterinarian (Robert Pattinson) is saved by the circus during the Great Depression, where he falls for the star of the horse show (Reese Witherspoon), wife of the sadistic animal trainer. (AD)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

Watercolor and Mixed Media Paintings by Susan St. Thomas April 18-June 12, Reception May 7, 5-7pm

SEBASTOPOL GALLERY

150 N. Main St. Sebastopol, CA 707-829-7200 www.sebastopol-gallery.com

Call Today to Advertise! 707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

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Film

PA I D A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N


the last day saloon

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nightclub & restaurant DON’T FORGET…WE SERVE FOOD TOO!

McNear’s Dining House Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner BBQ • Pasta • Steak SAT 4/30 • 5:00PM DOORS • AGES 6–12 $5 AGES 12+ $10 ADV/$15 DOS • ALL AGES

PLASTIC IS DRASTIC PRESENTS: HILLSIDE FIRE’S RECORD RELEASE PARTY A NIGHT OF MUSIC, ART, ENTERTAINMENT & ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION SUN 5/1• 7:30PM DOORS • $21 • 16+ ROCK-N-ROLL

AN EVENING WITH

CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD FRI 5/6 • 8:00PM DOORS • $19 • 18+ SAT 5/7 • 7:30PM DOORS • $19 • 21+ WORLD

THE DEVIL MAKES THREE FRI WITH MISS

OPEN AT 4 PM WED. - sAT. & ANY DAY A SHOW IS SCHEDULED AVAILABLE FOR PRIVATE PARTIES, BANQUETS, FUNDRAISERS AND OUTSIDE PROMOTERS 707.545.5876

4/27

7:30 PM | $5 | FOLK

A North Bay Hootenanny Production

THE PLECTRUM DUO + J.D. LIMELIGHT + HOT CLUB BEELZEBUB

4/28

8:30 PM | $10 | ROCK

SFARZO ROCK SHOW THURSDAYS PRESENTS

BLIND ILLUSION + SKITZO + ROAD CREW + DEATH'S EMMINENCE

4/29

9:30 PM | $10 | DANCE ROCK

NOTORIOUS + DJ MATT MCKILLOP 8:30 PM | $12 | $10 IF YOU WEAR TIE-DYE | 60'S & 70'S ROCK

4/30

SFARZO LIVE IN CONCERT PRESENTS

A PIECE OF MY HEART + BLACK ZEPPELIN + HOTS

5/1

1:00 PM | $10 | DIXIELAND JAZZ

LONELY HEARTS SAT WITH THE BROTHERS COMATOSE

GOLD COAST JAZZ BAND

SUN 5/8 • 7:30PM DOORS • $21/$23 DOS • 21+ AFRO-BEAT/FOLK/REGGAE

5/5

SIERRA LEON’S REFUGEE ALL STARS PLUS FROBECK FRI 5/13 • 7:30PM DOORS • $16 • 21+ SINGER/SONGWRITER

CHUCK PROPHET

+ JAM SESSIONS BY T.R.A.D. J.A.S.S. 8:30 PM | $10 | ROCK

SFARZO ROCK SHOW THURSDAYS PRESENTS

HOODWINK + CARNY BRAT + SHOTGUN HARLOT

5/6

8:30 PM | $10 | LATIN ROCK

CHAVA CRUZ & TRAPEZIO + GRAVITY HILL

5/7

1 PM | $10 | ROCK | ALL AGES

SFARZO ALL AGES AFTERNOON SHOW

AND THE MISSION EXPRESS

THOUGHT VOMIT

PLUS EAST BAY GREASE

+ NUCLEAR TEMPEST + THE PYYROZOMBIES

SAT 5/14 • 8:00PM DOORS • $21 • 21+ 1980’S COVER BAND

5/13

TAINTED LOVE TUE 5/17 • 7:00PM DOORS • $21 • 21+ ROCK/REGGAE/SOUL/WORLD

VIEUX FARKA TOURE PLUS BHI BHIMAN

9:30 PM | $10/13 | COVERS

FRIDAY THE 13TH THRILLER PARTY

FOREVERLAND 14 Piece Tribute to Michael Jackson Zombie, MJ attire encouraged 7:30 PM | SOUTHERN ROCK $35-50 SEATING | $30 GEN.ADMIN. STANDING

SUN 5/15

DAVID ALLAN COE HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7 PM all shows are 21+ unless noted

No Children Under 10 Allowed For All Ages Shows

for reservations: 707.545.5876

23 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma

707.545.2343

707-765-2121

120 5th st. @ davis st. santa rosa, ca

www.mcnears.com

lastdaysaloon.com

Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Amatneek & Evans Bass-playing, story-telling Bill and banjo-Bill in a lively twoBill night of bluegrass. Apr 30 at 8. $15-$20. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.824.1858.

Chris Robinson Brotherhood

for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.1124.

Chamber Ensemble Chamber music students perform works by Beethoven, Mozart, Gershwin and others. Apr 29-30 at 7:30. $7. Lefort Recital Hall, College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9460.

Los Pinguos Vivacious, infectious Latin rhythms. Apr 29 at 8. $20-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Galax Quartet

Orchestra’s “Straight to the Heart” explores Behzad Ranjbaran’s “Mithra,” along with pieces by Dvorak, Brahms and others. May 1 and 3 at 7:30. $29-$70. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.7000.

Hikari Benefit Musicians Free Peoples, Majitope, Kyma, Thugz, Morgan Hervin and others help raise money for Japan relief. Apr 30 at 8. $20. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Mali Meets Jazz Khalil Shaheed and Mansa Musa perform Afro-jazz. Apr 30 at 7 and 9. $25. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg, www.healdsburgjazzfestival.org.

One Horse Town Outlaw country band reunite, joined by Shelby Cobra, to help raise money in Karen Wesolowski’s fight against pancreatic cancer. Apr 30 at 9:30. Donations appreciated. Toad in the Hole Pub, 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.TOAD.

Plastic Is Drastic Hillside Fire stars in all-ages extravaganza and CD release party featuring Gabby La La, Arann Harris, Three-Legged Sister plus art, family fun and more. Apr 30 at 6. $6-$15. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

SF Guitar Quartet Redwood Arts Council present vibrant repertoire of classical, Spanish, jazz and world music. Apr 30 at 8. $10-$25. Occidental Center

Clubs SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters

MARIN COUNTY

Black Crowes lead singer returns after last month’s surprise jam with Bob Weir. May 1 at 9. $21. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121. Poetry of Gary Snyder blended with music by four composers. May 1 at 4. Free. Healdsburg Community Church, 1100 University Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.7622.

100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Marin Symphony

Thunder Road Blue Star Music Camp fundraiser celebrates music of Bruce Springsteen. Apr 30 at 8. $35-$38. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Apr 29, Pyrotones (jazz). Apr 30, Laurie B Ballard Trio (acoustic jazz). 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Affronti Apr 30, Jive Samba. May 1, Andrew Emer (jazz). 235 Healdsburg Ave, Ste 105, Healdsburg. 707.433.2788.

Aqus Cafe Apr 27, bluegrass jam. Apr 29, Blue Acoustics. Apr 30, Rebecca Roundman (cello). 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Theater May 1, Amir Coyle, Teenage Sweater, Laughters, That Ghost. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Apr 28, the Real Nasty, Jugtown Pirates, Whiskey Pills Fiasco. Apr 29, Fishtank Ensemble, Dirtfloor Band. Apr 30, Jay Blue. Tues at 7, ladies’ limelight open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Bluewater Bistro Apr 28, Emily Tessmer (acoustic rock). Links at Bodega Harbour Golf Course, 21301 Heron Dr, Bodega Bay. 707.875.3519.

Brixx

NAPA COUNTY Crowell & McMurtry Singer-songwriters and guitarists Rodney Crowell and James McMurtry collaborate on a double dose of Americana at its finest. May 1 at 8. $27-$37. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Philip Glass Minimalist composer busts out “Napa Trilogy: Night on the Balcony, Metamorphosis,” among other solo piano works. Apr 28 at 8. $35-$45. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Ozomatli Decidedly urban blend of world music. Frobeck open. Apr 29 at 8. $35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

SF Scottish Fiddlers Contemporary and traditional tunes in Old World style. May 1 at 3. $22.50. Lincoln Theater,

Apr 30, Jinx Jones & the Kingtones. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

Chrome Lotus Apr 29, DJ E Rock, DJ Sykwidit (hip-hop). Apr 30, Spring Fling with DJ Jimmy Stewart Jr and DJ Sykwidit (hip-hop). 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. www.chromelotussr.com.

Flamingo Lounge Apr 29-30, Too Smooth. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Restaurant Apr 29, Blue and Lonesome. Apr 30, Un Deux Trois. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden Apr 27, Jim Adams (jazz guitar). Apr 29, Green House (Celtic). Every Tues, blues with Sonny Lowe. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Highland Dell Apr 29, Hookah Stew. 21050


CRITIC’S CHOICE

Hotel Healdsburg

Apr 27, Brainstorm with Mr. Rogers. Apr 28, Subb Kulture Sound with London Fog Project. Apr 29, Western Medicine (reggae). 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Apr 27, California Honeydrops. Apr 28, Ian Scherer and Angeline Saris. Apr 29, Snap Jackson & Knock on Wood Players. Apr 30, Shark Alley Hobos. May 1, JayDub and Dino. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon

New trio recharges Cat McLean’s sound Cat McLean has covered a lot of ground. Since 1997, the Sonoma-based singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist has sold more than 150,000 copies of her four self-released discs and has shared the stage with Joe Walsh, Bob Weir, Heart and Peter Frampton. In 2001, she scored a Top 20 hit in the U.K. with “Camouflage,” co-written with producer Narada Michael Walden. She’s been featured twice in Guitar Player magazine, and her song “Ho” is in a new film. But McLean is just getting started. After years of hiring different musicians for every gig and recording session, she’s settled with a steady power trio. The band bonding (with bassist John Shields and drummer Ryan Comiskey) is “like being born again, like having my first teenaged band experience,” she says enthusiastically. “I’m excited about playing again. It feels like I’ve gone full circle.” The trio format also opens up McLean’s songs, which range from Americana-style melodic rock to funky alt-metal to modal industrial grooves. “This is a tight, interactive trio,” Cat boasts. The new Cat McLean Trio plays Tour de Cure, a fundraising bike-a-thon sponsored by the American Diabetes Association, on Sunday, May 1, from noon to 4pm. The tour begins and ends at the Veterans Home of California, 100 California Drive, Yountville. Noon–5pm. 888.342.2383.—Karl Byrn

River Blvd, Monte Rio. 707.865.2300.

Hopmonk Tavern Apr 28, Juke Joint with Slayers Club and Malarkey. Apr 29, Stone Foxes, Felson (rock).

Apr 30, Hikari Benefit (see Concerts). Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with DJs Jacques and Guacamole (reggae). Tues, open mic. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Apr 27, Plectrum Duo, JD Limelight, Hot Club Beelzebub. Apr 28, Blind Illusion, Skitzo, Death’s Emminence, Road Crew (rock). Apr 29, Notorious, DJ Matt McKillop. Apr 30, A Piece of My Heart, Black Zeppelin, HOTS (70s). May 1 at 1, Gold Coast Jazz Band, TRAD JASS (Dixieland jazz). 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

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Jasper O’Farrell’s

Cool Cat

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Apr 29, Bennett Roth Newell Duo. Apr 30, Chris Amberger Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Wed, Apr 27 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Dance Youth and Family 7–10-pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Apr 28 7:15–10pm 7:15–8:45pm 8:45–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise Circle ‘n Squares Square Dance Club New Dancer class Plus Dancing

Fri, Apr 29 7pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther hosts A NIGHTCLUB TWO-STEP PARTY $10

Sat, Apr 30 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10:25–11:15am Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 11:30am–1:30pm Vintage Dance with Gary Thomas 8pm North Bay Country Dance Society/Contra Dance Sun, May 1 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30–11:45am Zumba Fitness with Anna 5:00–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, May 2 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise Scottish Country Dancing

Tues, May 3 7:30

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise African & World Music Dance

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Main Street Station Apr 27, Phat Chance Quartet. Apr 28, Greg Hester and friends (bebop piano). Apr 29, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. Apr 30, Jess Petty. May 3, Out of the Blue (swing). 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen Apr 30, the Get Down. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Apr 28, Jay Dub and Dino. Apr 29, Vitamin Girl. Apr 30, Brian Ruff. May 1 at 3:30, Celtic jam; at 6:30, Savannah Blue. 464 First St, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Reservations Advised

DIN N ER AN D

A

S HOW

NEW RISING SONS cho Apr 29 FEATURING BOUDEEKA Ran Fri

Debut!

60s Rock ‘n’ Roll 8:30pm

JOHNNY ALLAIR’S

Sat

Apr 30

Documentary Celebration! Rock ‘n’ Roll Dance Party 8:30pm

BESO NEGRO

Sun

May 1

Original Gypsy Swing 5:00pm / No Cover

TOMMY CASTRO BAND SHANA MORRISON May 7 Sultry Singer/Songwriter Fri

May 6

8:30pm

My Friend Joe

Sat

Apr 30, Pristine. 1810 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.829.3403.

Mother’s Day Brunch Buffet

8:30pm

Mystic Theatre

Fri

Apr 30, Hillside Fire (record release). 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Sat

Phoenix Theater Apr 29, Iration, Top Shelf, Thrive. Apr 30, We Own the Night, Native Shores, Dawn Is Our Enemy, Nuclear Tempest, Cure for Kindness, Manzanita Falls. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Apr 30, SoulShine

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SUNDAY, MAY 8 • 10AM–3PM STAGGERWING Rancho

May 13 May 14 Fri

May 20 Fri

May 27 Sat

May 28

Americana/Folk Rock 8:00pm / No Cover

Debut!

ROY ROGERSAND THE DELTA RHYTHM KINGS

Slide Guitar Genius 8:30pm

THE SUN KINGS

A Salute to the Beatles 8:30pm

FROM THE FLATLANDERS BUTCH HANCOCK

8:30pm

Rancho Debut!

DEANNA BOGART & FRIENDS

Amazing Singer,Keyboardist,Songwriter,Saxaphonist 8:30pm

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

ALL DOOR TIMES 9PM

Best Music Venue / Best Place for Singles to Meet


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Music ( 35

142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Blues Band, Dgiin. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

River Rock Casino Apr 27, Groove Team. Apr 29, Soul Survivors. Apr 30, Pulse. 3250 Hwy 128, Geyserville. 707.857.2777.

Russian River Brewing Co Apr 28 at noon, Patrick Sweaney. Apr 30, Brothers Horse. May 1, P-Butta Quartet. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Toad in the Hole Pub Apr 30, One Horse Town (see Concerts). 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds Apr 27, Dgiin. Thurs, DJ Dave. Apr 29, Simply Amazing. Apr 30, Purple Haze. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

MARIN COUNTY Finnegan’s Marin Apr 28, Dennis Haneda. Apr 30, Revolver. Mon, open mic with KC Turner. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

George’s Nightclub Wed, standup comedy (see Comedy). Apr 29, Fundamentals, David More Band. Apr 30, Wall Street. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Apr 27, Royal Deuces. Apr 28, Pepperland. Apr 29, Jamie Clark Band. Apr 30, Bitch Franklin. May 1, blues jam. May 4, Whiskey Pills Fiasco. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Presidio Yacht Club Apr 28, Jonny Darlin Band (oldies). Apr 29, Used Blues. Apr 30, Final Four Band. Fort Baker, Sausalito. 415.332.2319.

Rancho Nicasio Apr 29, New Rising Sons, Boudeeka (rock). Apr 30, Johnny Allair. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Apr 27, Tingo Tango. Apr 28, Regina Pontillo & Her Fantastic Swing-Time Band. Apr 29, Olive & the Dirty Martinis. Apr 30, Doc Kraft & His Wild Band. Sun at 4, Salsa-lito. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Servino Ristorante Apr 28, Brian Gold Swing Fever. Apr 29, Hands on Fire, James Henry. Apr 30, Macy Blackman (New Orleans vocal). 9 Main St, Tiburon. 415.435.2676.

Sleeping Lady Apr 28, Darren Nelson and friends. Apr 29, Tom Finch

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Apr 27, Savannah Blue. May 4, Sang Matiz (Latin). 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

19 Broadway Club Apr 27, Gail “Mojo” Muldrow (blues). Apr 28 at 6, Diamond Jazz; at 10, fourth Thurs hiphop night. Apr 29, Moonalice. Apr 30, Mi Gaan (reggae). May 1 at 2, Cathey Cotton and Elliott’s Evil Plan; at 6, 19 Broadway Goodtime Band; at 9, Phil Hardgrave & the Continentals. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Old Western Saloon Apr 29, Buddy Owen Band. Apr 30, Brewnel. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

142 Throckmorton Theatre Apr 27, Fath Chamber Players. Apr 29, Los Pinguos (see Concerts). Apr 30, Thunder Road (see Concerts).

Group. Apr 30, uke jam. Mon at 8, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Apr 27, Midnight on the Water. Apr 28, singer-songwriters. Apr 29, Duke & the Boys (blues). Apr 30, Hang Jones. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

NAPA COUNTY Calistoga Inn Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, old-school DJ night. Sat DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Downtown Joe’s Apr 28, Steak and Cline. Apr 29, Xtatic. Apr 30, High Water Blues. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Silo’s Wed at 7, jam session. Apr 29, Stung (Sting tribute). Apr 30, Renegade (rock). 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria Apr 28, Davies Dukes (blues). Apr 29, Jon Popenoe (blues). Apr 30, Terrence Brewer Trio (jazz guitar). Sun and Tues, James and Ted (jazz). 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Thee Oh Sees Sweaty, unbridled rock toned down for a promised “mellow set.” Apr 28 at Cafe du Nord.

Accept German heavy metalers still best known for 1983 hit “Balls to the Wall.” Apr 28 at the Regency Ballroom.

Mike Watt San Pedro represent with the van-driving, bass-playing, spiel-spouting great. Apr 29 at Bottom of the Hill.

Ghostface Killah While other Wu-Tang alumni descend into caricatures, Ghostface remains an exception. Apr 29 at Mezzanine.

Mark McGuire Member of Emeralds and pioneering hero in underground noise circles. May 3 at Hemlock Tavern.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to our email letter at www.sfstation.com.


FREE AND EASY Down the road

Dierks Bentley goes, not feelin’ so bad.

Country Harmony Dierks Bentley comes to town

BY GABE MELINE

A

re there any musical genres anymore? After the postmillennial hybrid craze of rap-metal, punk-folk, Jewish blues, hip-hop country and indie-disco—plus DJ mashups of everything—it’s hard to make a case for distinction. No longer are there rigid lines in musical styles, and it’s the same story behind the scenes in the industry as well. Case in point: the Harmony Festival is presenting a country concert next month. This fact might seem strange to the outside observer. The Harmony Festival is still deflecting longtime stereotype as “that hippie festival,” much in the same way that country music is still shedding its image as a bunch of ignorant rednecks whining about beer and trucks. But in the last five

Dierks Bentley plays with Kellie Pickler, Joe Nichols, Pete Stringfellow and McKenna Faith on Saturday, June 4, at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds. 1350 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. 2pm. $45–$55. 707.528.3247.

Roast Beef au Jus

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PM PM

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Local Spring Vegetables grilled and roasted Nicasio’s Cow Track Ranch Red Merlot Lettuce Salad Farm Fresh Scrambled Eggs ~ Buttermilk Pancakes Fresh Seasonal Fruits and Strawberries with crème fraiche Homemade Muffins, Scones, Croissants and Breads Chocolate Decadence, Cheesecake, and Brownies

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AP R I L 27-MAY 3, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

years, the Harmony Festival has booked the Roots, Brian Wilson, Lauryn Hill and Bad Brains; while country has gone from the sound of the blue-collar working class to your basic well-polished pop music. On June 4, those two worlds come together when country star Dierks Bentley plays Santa Rosa presented by “HFI Presents”—i.e., the Harmony Festival. I called up Harmony Festival CEO Howard Sapper to ask about it. “Our belief,” he told me, “is that country music has a very dedicated and strong demographic in the North Bay that we feel is underserved.” Yes, “underserved” is one way to put it. “Vastly ignored” might be another. After the close of Konocti Harbor Resort in Lake County in 2009, where huge stars like Tim McGraw and Taylor Swift routinely appeared, and with country shows seemingly curtailed at larger area venues, country fans have had to either drive out of town or rely on the jukebox at the local bar for their fix. When a big star does come to town, it’s the event of the year. Witness Miranda Lambert’s show at last year’s Sonoma County Fair, with barely an empty seat in the rodeo grandstand. The country stigma that the consciously themed Harmony Festival has to navigate is that of red-state conservatism, Tea Party politics and forced gender roles. They’ve picked a worthy debut with Dierks Bentley, instead of, say, Toby Keith, and Sapper even aligns the Harmony Festival with some of country’s standbys. “We feel that country music speaks to the values of America, which we feel we do,” he says. “It speaks to the value of family, which we really stand for in many ways, and it speaks to good music that has a message that serves the people who listen to it. “Over the next 12 to 18 months,” he adds, “the North Bay will have a realization about how broad and wide the Harmony Festival’s presentations are going to be.”


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AP R I L 27-MAY 3, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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ArtsEvents Galleries OPENINGS Apr 29 From 5 to 7pm. City Hall Council Chambers, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tara Matheny-Schuster: New Works.â&#x20AC;? 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Ronnie Kaiser and Harriet Burge. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery Through May 22, abstract paintings by Soo Noga, plus works by guest artists Lorraine Cook, Linda Koffman and Ron Smoot. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912.

Matanzas Creek Winery

From 5 to 7pm. Matanzas Creek Winery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARTaste Series,â&#x20AC;? work of several artists. 6097 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.6464.

Through Jun 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARTaste Series,â&#x20AC;? work of several artists. Reception, Apr 29, 5 to 7. Daily, 10 to 4:30. 6097 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.6464.

Apr 30

Through May 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oyster Farm,â&#x20AC;? photographs of the Drakes Bay Oyster Company by Evvy Eisen; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Field Days: At Work and at Play,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Paige Green and text by Jonah Raskin. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

From 5 to 7pm. Gallery of Sea & Heaven, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Perfect,â&#x20AC;? portraits by Becoming Independent artists. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123. From 6 to 8pm. di Rosa, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reconstructed World,â&#x20AC;? work by nine artists. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

SONOMA COUNTY Charles M Schulz Museum Through Jun 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Turn Another Page.â&#x20AC;? Through Jun 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Browns and the Van Pelts: Siblings in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Peanuts.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Through Jul 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Peanutsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Philosophies.â&#x20AC;? $5-$8. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Jun 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tara Matheny-Schuster: New Works.â&#x20AC;? Reception, Apr 29, 5 to 7. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Apr 30-Jun 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Perfect,â&#x20AC;? a unique exhibition of portraits by Becoming Independent artists. Reception, Apr 30, 5 to 7. Wed-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through May 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Afternoon Tea?â&#x20AC;? Work by Kathleen Lack,

Petaluma Arts Center

Quicksilver Mine Company Through May 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Adam Wolpert: New Paintings.â&#x20AC;? Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through May 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enchanting Venice: Winter Memories,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Stephanie Hamilton-Oravetz; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Came First?,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Jerrie JernĂŠ and paintings by Christine Kierstead. Tues-Thurs and Sun, 10:30 to 6. Fri-Sat, 10:30 to 8. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jun 5, ceramics by Jun Kaneko. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through May 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eco Chic: Towards Sustainable Swedish Fashion,â&#x20AC;? an exhibition by the Swedish Institute; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Daniel McCormick: Iterations of Ecological Art and Design,â&#x20AC;? sculptures from riparian materials. Free-$8. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Tea Room Cafe Ending May 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Portraits:

Commissioned and Personalâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Travels with Rollei: Seeing into It.â&#x20AC;? 316 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.765.0199.

St Supery Winery Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mountains,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Wayne Thiebaud. 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.963.4507.

Comedy Dinosaurs of Improv

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Apr 29-Jun 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love + Pleasure,â&#x20AC;? work of Susan Danis and Livia Stein. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.451.8119.

Bolinas Museum Through Jun 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arthur Okamura: His Bolinas Life,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Troy Paiva and painted prints and collages by Barbara Ravizza. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

Commonweal Gallery Through Jun 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arthur Okamura: His Bolinas Life,â&#x20AC;? curated by Harriet Kossman. Mon-Fri, 10 to 4. 451 Mesa Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0970.

Gallery Route One Through May 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life Is Tricky,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media paintings by Vickisa; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Far from Home,â&#x20AC;? prints by Shane Weare. WedMon, 11 to 5. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA Through May 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Altered Book Show,â&#x20AC;? work by over 100 artists. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4, Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts Ending Apr 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Continuing Conversation,â&#x20AC;? artwork by Cayen Robertson and Tom Robertson. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

Improvised mayhem and hilarity. Apr 28 at 8. $18-$22. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Free Pizza Comedy Apr 28, Bradley Lum honors Asian Heritage Month with zingers and pizza. SSU Pub, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2382.

Di Rosa Apr 30-Jun 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reconstructed World,â&#x20AC;? work by nine artists. Reception, Apr 30, 6 to 8. Wed-Fri, 9:30 to 3. Sat, by appointment only. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

April 30. See Events, below.

Left Coast Live Sketch comedy by American Dream Players. Apr 29-May 15; Fri-Sat at 7:30; special matinee, May 15 at 2. $15. Graton Community Club, 8996 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.538.7543.

Slip-Goose Monkey Improvised comedic theater games on the fly. Last Thurs monthly at 7. Free. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Standup Comedy Apr 27, Huck Flynn, Dave Deluca and friends. May 4, Luenell, Marvin Deloatch Jr. $10. Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Dance All About Tango Members of Marin and Sonoma Argentine tango community in lively performance. Arrive an hour early for class and stay late for social Milonga dance. Apr 30 at 7. $10-$30. Bay West Ballroom Dancesport Academy, 1133 E Francisco Blvd, Ste D, San Rafael. 800.838.3006.

Na Lei Hulu

NAPA COUNTY

BY JOVE Find the clues in Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Puzzle Hunt

Culturally authentic hula updated for 21st century. Apr 30 at 8. $25-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Events

Downtown Napa

Angel Gala

Through May 2011, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARTwalk,â&#x20AC;? an interactive public exhibition by 10 artists. First Street and Town Center, Napa.

Napa Valley Museum fundraiser celebrates â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yountville Sunâ&#x20AC;? editor Sharon Stensaas with reception and

silent auction in Yountville Town Square, Apr 30 at 5pm, followed by 7pm gourmet dinner and live auction, $45. V Marketplace, 6525 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Food Not Bombs

Birding & Nature Festival

Ghana Fundraiser

Join expert birders and naturalists on walks, boat tours and more. Apr 29-May 1. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station, Register. 415.663.9312.

Cedars & Sweets Celebration of moms with sweet treats, wine, prizes, plus jewelry and textiles for sale. Apr 28, 7 to 9. $25. Marin MOCA, Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

Face to Face Fiesta Dinner dance fundraiser for local schools with live music by Pocket Change. Apr 30 at 5:30. $50-$60. Dickson Ranch, 182 San Geronimo Valley Rd, Woodacre. 415.488.0123.

Fibershed Celebration for first farmbased cotton and wool mill with fashion show, stories, food, drinks and more. May 1; dinner at 5, reception at 7. $25-$75. Tobyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feed Barn, 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.259.5849.

Fishermans Festival Avast ye picaroons and landlubbers! Celebrate bounty of the sea with music, activities, food, drink and more. Apr 30-May 1, 10 to 5. Free-$10. Westside Park, Westshore Road, Bodega Bay. 707.875.3866.

Help prepare and serve free vegan meals every Sun afternoon; served at 5. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. 415.408.8094. Keynote speaker Gemma Bulos of Global Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Water Initiative joined by musicians Anna Maria Flechero and Afia Walking Three in gala benefit. Apr 30, noon to 5. $50-$100. French Garden Restaurant, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.604.7044.

Mill Valley Garden Tour Mill Valley Outdoor Art Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual tour, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gardens, Art and Architecture XVII,â&#x20AC;? a tour of five homes and yards. Apr 28, 9:30 to 4. $35-$45. Downtown Mill Valley, Throckmorton Avenue, Mill Valley. 415.455.4695.

Pollinator Party Demonstration hive, landscaping presentation, Slow Food Sonoma feast, plant sale and more. Apr 30, 9 to 3. Free. Sonoma Garden Park, 19990 Seventh St E, Sonoma. 707.996.0712, ext 110.

Puzzle Hunt Find hidden custom-made puzzles in team-based treasure hunt. Apr 30. $10-$15. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa. 707.670.DASH.

Summer Plant Sale Purchase organic heirloom and rare varieties, and tour the property. Apr 30May 1, 9 to 5. Free. Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, 15290 Coleman Valley Rd,


Occidental. 707.874.1557, ext 201.

Workers in Solidarity

Youth Assembly Youth organization for revolution and free food. Apr 30, noon to 3. Free. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Soul: The Power of Stories to Heal” with Sher Christian. 390 Coddingtown Mall, Santa Rosa.

of novel. May 1 at 4. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Readers’ Books

‘Hairspray’ Sing-Along

Apr 28 at 7:30, “The Good Among the Great” with Donald Van de Mark. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.939.1779.

Jesus and Judas duke it out with spectacular ‘70s rockopera intensity. Apr 29-May 8. $10-$18. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4343.

Interactive John Waters experience helps benefit Mountain Play Association. Apr 27 at 7. $20-$40. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. www.mountainplay.org.

Monday Night Movies

Food & Drink Pizza Party Learn to make gourmet woodfired pizza, focaccia and calzone with Mary Karlin. Apr 30, 11 to 2. $89. Relish Culinary Center, 14 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.9999.

Sprouting Health & Energy Discover beauty of sprouts and take home your own equipment to continue on path to better health. Apr 23 and 30, 9 to 11am. $70. Ceres Community Project, 330 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.5833, ext 3.

Field Trips

May 2, “Angle of Inspiration.” Free. Mill Valley Library, 375 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.389.4292, ext 116.

Spring Cinema Apr 27, “Double Indemnity.” May 4, “You, the Living.” $5. Carole Ellis Auditorium, SRJC Petaluma Campus, Petaluma. www.petalumafilmfest.org.

Troubled Water Ex-con begins to rearrange scattered pieces of his life. Norwegian with English subtitles. Apr 29 at 7. $6. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Readings Book Passage

Film

Apr 27 at 7, “The Dressmaker of Khair Khana” with Gayle Tzemach Lemmon. Apr 28 at 7, San Geronimo Valley School poetry reading. Apr 29 at 7, “Making It: Radical Home Ec for a Post-Consumer World” with Kelly Coyne and Eric Knutzen. Apr 30 at 4, “Understanding Myself: A Kid’s Guide to Intense Emotions and Strong Feelings” with Mary Lamia; at 7, “Democracy Is Not a Spectator Sport” with Arthur Blaustein. May 1 at 2, “The Heart of the Revolution” with Noah Levine; at 4, “World Without Fish” with Mark Kurlansky; at 7, “A Double Life: Discovering Motherhood” with Lisa Catherine Harper. May 2 at 7, “Quiet Corners of Rome and Paris, Paris” with David Downie. May 3 at 10am, “Jam and Honey” with Melita Morales (for kids); at 7, “Driving with Plato” with Robert Rowland Smith. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

American Graffiti

Coddingtown Whole Foods

Screening of locally filmed

Apr 27 at 4, “Food for the

Dairy Farm Tours Family farm with focus on environmental preservation offers series of tours. Apr 30 at 1. Free-$10. McClelland’s Dairy, 6475 Bodega Ave, Petaluma.

Farm Trails Visit farms throughout Sonoma County for “Blossoms, Bees and Barnyard Babies” tour. May 1, 11 to 5. $25. 707.837.8896.

Vintage Rose Tour View several roses and cemetery flora, some planted over 100 years ago. Apr 30, 10 to 11am. Free. Santa Rosa Rural Cemetery, Franklin Ave at Monroe Street gate, Santa Rosa. 707.573.0103.

River Reader Apr 29 at 7, “Russian River (Then and Now)” publication party with local authors. 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

Toby’s Feed Barn May 1 at 5, “Harvesting Color: How to Find Plants and Make Natural Dyes” with Rebecca Burgess. 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1223.

Theater Black Comedy When young man tries to impress his wealthy, future father-in-law by “borrowing” fancy furnishings, wackiness ensues. Apr 29-May 15; Fri-Sat at 8; matinees May 8 and 15 at 2; special pay-what-you-will preview, Apr 28 at 8. $10$15. Studio Theatre, College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9555.

Cabaret Saucy musical celebrates life, art and escapism amidst turmoil of 1929 Berlin. Through May 15; Thurs-Sat at 8; SatSun at 2. $22-$39. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Comedy Tonight Collection of six hilarious one-act plays. Apr 29-May 15; Fri-Sat at 8; matinee, May 15 at 2. $20-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Cosmic Cabaret Live science, multimedia, musical theater and onewoman show under the stars. Apr 30 at 8. $5-$10. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall 2001, 1502 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4266.

Dogs! It’s the Musical! Silver Moon Theatre presents a coming-of-age canine drama. Through May 15; Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 3. $20. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626, ext 1.

The Islanders Word for Word presents fun and dramatic interpretation

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Jesus Christ Superstar

Little Shop of Horrors Sci-fi spoof a bloody, fun campy musical. Ending May 1; Thurs-Sat at 8, Sun at 3. $15$25. Novato Theater Company, 484 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.883.4498.

Over the River & Through the Woods Italian-American grandparents aim to sabotage grandson’s out-of-town job opportunity. Through May 22; Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2; pay-what-you-can night every Friday beginning Apr 29. $20. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido. 707.583.2343.

Play Festival Original production showcases 10-minute plays crafted by Redwood Writers members. Apr 29-30 at 7; special matinee, Apr 30 at 2. $20. private theater, directions given upon reservation, Cotati, Reservations required. 707.664.1524.

Reefer Madness: The Musical Narrow Way Stage Company parodies 1938 cult classic film on dangers of marijuana. Ending May 1; Thurs-Sat at 8, Sun at 5. $20. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.58.3400.

Tiffany Box: A Love Remembered Uplifting true story celebrates bond between mother and daughter, where roles are often reversed. May 1 at 1:30. $75. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it by e-mail to calendar@bohemian.com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Please DO NOT SEND email attachments. The BOHEMIAN is not responsible for photos. Events costing more than $35 may be withheld. Deadline is 2 weeks prior to desired publication date.

What the . . . ? ‘Reconstructed World’ tweaks the mundane Cities made of Jello. Tiny peepholes into an urban landscape. A reconstructed, Frankenstein Fiat. “Reconstructed World,” di Rosa’s new exhibit opening this week, asks a necessary question in our information-overloaded times: Just how strange and eye-catching does something have to be for us to slow down and really examine it? “We’re always going so fast,” says di Rosa’s Ann Trinca of the show’s concept. “[We’re] Facebooking and tweeting, without really looking around at our surroundings and what they really mean.” The show features pieces in a variety of media, each demanding lengthy contemplation. Every piece in the show uses something familiar and tweaks it slightly, with individual conclusions to be drawn by the viewer, Trinca says, explaining that “[the artists] are using everyday surroundings to recontextualize and rebuild them.” Pieces include Tracey Snelling’s installations that center around seedy motels, rooms lit only by the light of the TV and other iconic American imagery; Liz Hickok’s city reconstructions made from Jello, mimicking the literally shaky nature of the Bay Area landscape; and the artist team Leonardogillesfleur’s double front-ended Fiat (above), which aims to make a point about the struggle between individual and collaborative work. “Reconstructed World” opens with a reception on Saturday, April 30, at di Rosa. 5200 Carneros Hwy., Napa. 6–8pm. Show runs until June 4. 707.226.5991.—Shelby Pope

39 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AP R I L 27-MAY 3, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Gather in parking lot for International Workers Day rally and march to Juilliard Park. May 1 at 1. Dollar Tree, 665 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

nostalgic classic benefits Marin Charitable. Apr 28 at 7:30. $15$50. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AP R I L 27-MAY 3, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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April 29 - May 1, 2011 at The Concourse 8th & Brannan Streets, San Francisco, CA. You will have an opportunity to experience what goes on behind the scenes, meet and network w/ fascinating people & have fun! In exchange for your time, professionalism and energy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll receive a 3-Day gen. admission pass to attend the Expo, which incl. Exhibits, Panels, Free Lectures & free workshops! Please call Winnie @ 415-751-6443 or

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The Journey Center: A Place for Transformation Growing Together Workshop Assess strengths and growth areas in your relationship; work on communication and conflict-resolution skills. Fri, March 11 (7-9p) & Sat, March 12 (10a-4p). Register by March 4. Journey Center, 707-578-2121, www.journeycenter.org.

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Astrology

43

FREE WILL

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AP R I L 27-MAY 3, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of April 27

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) To convey my vision of how best to proceed in the coming week, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll offer the following metaphorical scenario. Imagine that you are not a professional chef, but you do have a modicum of cooking skills. Your task is to create a hearty, tasty soup from scratch without the beneďŹ t of a recipe. You will need a variety of ingredients, but on the other hand you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to just throw in a welter of mismatched ingredients without regard for how they will all work together. To some degree, you will have to use a trial-and-error approach, sampling the concoction as it brews. You will also want to keep an open mind about the possibility of adding new ingredients in the latter stages of the process. One more thing: the ďŹ nal product must not just appeal to you. You should keep in mind what others would like, too. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

Many artists want â&#x20AC;&#x153;to aim for the biggest, most obvious target, and hit it smack in the bullâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eye,â&#x20AC;? says Brian Eno, a Taurus genius renowned for his innovative music. He prefers a different approach. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather â&#x20AC;&#x153;shoot his arrowâ&#x20AC;? wherever his creative spirit feels called to shoot it, then paint the target around the place where it lands. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why his compositions donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t resemble anyone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or ďŹ t into any traditional genreâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brian Enoâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;like music. Can I talk you into trying a similar strategy in the coming weeks and months, Taurus? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to see you create a niche for yourself thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tailored to your speciďŹ c talents and needs.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) When World War I ended in 1918, the victorious nations demanded crushing ďŹ nancial reparations from the loser, Germany. It took 92 years, but the remaining $94 million of the debt was ďŹ nally paid last October. I hope this story serves as an inspiration to you, Gemini. If entities as notoriously inďŹ&#x201A;exible as governments can resolve their moldering karma, so can you. In the next few weeks, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to see you ďŹ nally clean up any messes left over from your old personal conďŹ&#x201A;icts. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22) I know how secretive you Cancerians can be because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m one of your tribe. Sometimes the secrecy is a bit neurotic, but more often it serves the purpose of sheltering your vulnerable areas. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m also aware of how important it is for you to be self-protective. No one is better than you at guarding your goodies, ensuring your safety and taking care of your well-being. I would never shame you for expressing these talents, and I would never ask you to downplay them. Having said that, though, I want to make sure that in the coming weeks they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t interfere with you getting the blessings you deserve. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crucial that you allow yourself to be loved to the hilt. You simply must let people in far enough so they can do that. LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) With a fortune of $27 billion, business tycoon Larry Ellison is the sixth richest person in the world. His monumental sense of self-importance is legendary. One of his colleagues says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The difference between God and Larry is that God does not believe he is Larry.â&#x20AC;? Ellison seems to be what astrologers call an unevolved Leoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an immature soul whose ego is a greedy, monstrous thing. Evolved Leos, on the other hand, are very different. Are you one? If so, you do a lot of hard work on your ego. You make sure that in addition to it being strong, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beautiful and elegant. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just forceful; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s warm and generous. It gets things done, but in ways that bless those who come in contact with it. For you evolved Leos, this is Celebrate Your Ego Week. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) Seventy-ďŹ ve percent of all adults confess they would like to have sex in the woods at least once in their lives, and yet only 16 percent say they have actually enjoyed that thrill. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re one of the 59 percent who would like to but havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to make it happen. Your capacity for pleasure in wild places will be at a peak, as will your courage for exotic adventures. In fact, I suggest that between now and May 21 you consider carrying out three fantasies that have been marinating in your imagination for many moons. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22)

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time

for the Big Squeeze. All the contradictions in your life are coming up for review. You will be asked to deal more forthrightly with enigmas youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been avoiding, and you will be invited to try, try again to unravel riddles youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been unable to solve. Does all that sound a bit daunting? It could be. But the end result should be evocative, highly educational and maybe even exhilarating. The scintillating play of opposites may caress you with such intensity that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll experience what we could refer to as a metaphysical orgasm.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

In the coming weeks, I would love to see you get excited about many different people, places, animals and experiences. And I hope you will shower them with your smartest, most interesting blessings. Do you think you can handle that big an outpouring of wellcrafted passion? Are you up for the possibility that you might blow your cover, lose your dignity and show how much you care? In my opinion, the answer is yes. You are deďŹ nitely ready to go further than ever before in plumbing the depths of your adoration for the privilege of being alive.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poet James Schuyler: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time again. Tear up the violets and plant something more difďŹ cult to grow.â&#x20AC;? In my opinion, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost the right advice for you these days. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d prefer it if you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually rip out the violets to make room for the harder-togrow blooms. Would it be possible to ďŹ nd a new planting area that will allow you to keep what you already have in the original planting area? One way or another, I think you really should give yourself a challenging new assignment.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dear Dr. Brezsny: For ďŹ ve years my wife and I have been married but still have made no children. We have consulted uncountable physicians with no satisfying result. Please predict a happy outcome for our troubles. When will the stars align with her womb and my manhood? She: born Dec. 31, 1983, in Chakdaha, India. Me: born Jan. 7, 1984. in Mathabhanga, India.â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Desperate for Babies. Dear Desperate: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m happy to report that you Capricorns have entered a highly fertile period. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already going strong, and will culminate between May 16 and May 23. I suggest you jump on this sexy opportunity. You couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask for a better time to germinate, burgeon and multiply. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Welcome home, beautiful!â&#x20AC;? I hope you hear those words or at least experience those feelings very soon. In my astrological opinion, you need to intensify your sense of belonging to a special place or community. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to grow deeper roots or build a stronger foundation or surround yourself with more nurturingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or all of the above. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not all. As you bask and thrive in your enhanced support system, you also deserve to feel better appreciated for the wonderful qualities youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working so hard to develop in yourself. Ask and you shall receive.

<=@B6 0/G G=5/

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Whatever you have been trying to say, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to say it stronger and clearer. You can no longer afford to hope people will read your mind or guess what you mean. Your communications must be impeccable and irresistible. A similar principle holds true for the connections and alliances youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been working to ripen. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to raise your intensity levelâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to do everything you can to activate their full potentials. Starting today, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be crazy to tolerate shaky commitments, either from yourself or others. Be sharp and focused and unswerving, Piscesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;keen and candid and to the point.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

Bikram Yoga San Rafael

1 3ECOND 3T 3UITE  3AN 2AFAEL s 9/'! s SANRAFAELYOGACOM We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change because we see the lightâ&#x20AC;Ś we change because we feel the heat. So what are you waiting for? 2011 is your time to change your body, change your life! The Bikram beginning practice is suitable for beginners and advanced yogis appealing to both men and women of all fitness levels.

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Santa Rosa Treatment Program

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IN TROUBLE WITH â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE LAWâ&#x20AC;?? Drinking? Drugs? Domestic Problems? Get Help. Fight Back. Successful in Sonoma County Courts: Credit for Rehab. Cases Dismissed. Attorney Arthur George 707-793-7835

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Santa Rosa Flea Market

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to help you help yourself

Every second and/or fourth Sun, 8 to 2. Apr 24. Free. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa, mojosales@hotmail.com.

â&#x20AC;˘ Heroin/Opiate (Vicodin, Oxycontin) detox and maintenance utilizing methadone

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Food Not Bombs Help prepare and serve free vegan meals every Sun afternoon; served at 5. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa, 415.408.8094.

Bayer Farm Tending Every Fri, 3 to 6, all ages welcome to join LandPaths for garden care. Bayer Farm, 1550 West Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.524.9318.

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