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MENTOR THE MAGAZINE OF MENTONE GRAMMAR

ISSUE 02 2016

INSIDE:

05

TEACHING AND LEARNING UPDATE

12

INTERNATIONAL LEARNING JOURNEYS

22

SPECTACULAR STAGE EVENTS

31

NEWS FROM THE MENTONIANS


Mentor Published by Mentone Grammar

Contributors With thanks to: Simon Appel – Chair, Mal Cater – Principal, Matthew Borys, Peter Bratuskins, Rae Byrom, Libby Chislett, Gavin Cornish, Fiona Dallas, Maree Dinger, Pernilla Eklund Allan, Deb Frizza – Deputy Principal, Andrew Hayes, Erin Hunt, Joanne Kamp, Cameron Lancaster, Holly Loughran, P&F Committee, Janine Mayer, Natalie McLennan, Natalie Morgenstern, Katherine Nish, John Nolan, Melanie Ogle, Jarrod O’Neill – Deputy Principal, Andrew Oxland, Michelle Palfrey, Mark Pearman, Leah Percy, Catherine Poulton, John Twist, Jon Wever, TMA Editor – Greg Wilkinson – TMA Editor, Natalie Wilson, Ben Wolstencroft, Danny Yardis Editor Jen Blackburn Cover Alyssa and friends – Year 8 International Learning Journey – Nepal September 2016. (photo courtesy of Jo Kamp – Year 8 Coordinator)

The Mentor magazine is produced on paper that has been sourced in an environmentally-friendly, socially responsible and economically viable manner.

Mentone Grammar 63 Venice Street Mentone Victoria 3194 Australia Tel: +61 3 9584 4211 Fax: +61 3 9581 3290 enquiry@mentonegrammar.net ABN 87 616 069 977 CRICOS: 00323C Founded: 1923


CONTENTS 01 WELCOME TO MENTONE GRAMMAR 02

PRINCIPAL’S WELCOME

Once again the year is racing away and before we know it Christmas will be upon us.

03

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

04

RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN

At Mentone Grammar, we aim to educate, inspire and enable all members of our Community to contribute to reconciliation and break down stereotypes and discrimination.

05-07 TEACHING AND LEARNING At Mentone Grammar we look to continually improve both our student academic performance and their wellbeing.

16-17 FROGMORE SENIOR YEARS 10-12

28-29 CREATIVITY CENTRE BALL

As the Senior Campus within the School, there is, quite rightly, a significant focus towards the pursuit of academic endeavours and, specifically, the VCE.

In July, more than 400 members of the Mentone Grammar Community dressed up and headed into the spectacular Atlantic, Docklands to celebrate the new Creativity Centre.

18

WORLD CHALLENGE

Like Mentone Grammar, the World Challenge mission is to develop life skills such as resilience, empathy and leadership...

19 CADET LEADERSHIP 2016

THE MENTONIANS

The core values of the Australian Army Cadets are Courage, Initiative and Teamwork and they underpin the standards, skills and competencies, set to a national level, all ultimately delivered by our student Cadet Under Officers.

31

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

32

FUNCTIONS AND EVENTS

33

TMA ANNUAL DINNER

34

TONY DRINAN AWARD

20-21 WINTER SPORT

08-09 EBLANA ELC-YEAR 4

Overall, it has been a successful season for our winter season of sports.

Learning for Life. Teachers are talking less and listening more. They instruct less and allow time for discovery.

22 BLUES BROTHERS COMES TO GREENWAYS!

10-11 BAYVIEW MIDDLE YEARS 5-8 School programs in Bayview are designed to encompass a number of contemporary approaches to education.

12-13 YEAR 8 INTERNATIONAL LEARNING JOURNEYS We must go beyond textbooks, go out into the bypaths and un-trodden depths of the wilderness...

14-15 GREENWAYS YEAR 9 CAMPUS Learning Opportunities in Greenways. Our Mentone Grammar Teaching and Learning Framework underpins our learning culture.

30 MENTONE GRAMMAR FOUNDATION BUILDING FUND

For as long as anyone can remember, Jazz has always been a popular feature of the Mentone Grammar Performing Arts calendar.

23-25 LEGALLY BLONDE Three Spectacular Nights of Theatre!

26-27 SPRING CONCERT 2016 Farewell to our Senior Musicians. Jazz Ensemble, Froggers, opened the 2016 Spring Concert with its characteristic style and vigour, performing the theme from Hawaii 5-0...

This year the recipient is Professor Tim Brailsford (1981). Tim graduated from Mentone Grammar as a Prefect in 1981 and has subsequently enjoyed an outstanding academic career.

35

SIR ROBERT JACKSON

A Truly Great Australian

36

THE JOY OF VOLUNTEERING

37

PANTHER PRODUCTIONS

Our Performing Arts Graduates create a new space.

38

TMA NEWS

39

CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY


WELCOME TO MENTONE GRAMMAR MENTONE GRAMMAR IS A LEADING COEDUCATIONAL ELC – VCE SCHOOL IN BAYSIDE, MELBOURNE. OUR HIGHLY REGARDED COEDUCATIONAL MODEL OF SEPARATE GENDER CLASSES IN YEARS 5 – 9, INCLUDING A SEPARATE YEAR 9 CAMPUS, ARE JUST A FEW OF THE ADVANTAGES OF A MENTONE GRAMMAR EDUCATION. OUR SCHOOL PROVIDES THE VERY BEST IN PASTORAL CARE, A PURSUIT OF INDIVIDUAL SUCCESS AND A GREAT SCHOOL SPIRIT. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT OUR SCHOOL, WE INVITE YOU TO COME AND SEE US IN ACTION.

In Term 4 2016, we have 969 boys and 520 girls enrolled in the School, a total of 1489 local and international students. We are currently finalising our placements for 2017 and 2018, with limited places still available. We will commence the 2019 key intake year level placements in January 2017. It would be a pleasure to share with you just why Mentone Grammar has record enrolments, and for you to meet our happy, healthy, high achieving students. There is no better way to find out more than to come and see for yourself. We have upcoming School Tours commencing from February 2017. Please register online or contact me if you wish to arrange a private tour or wish to discuss enrolments and opportunities available to your sons and daughters at Mentone Grammar.

A note from the Registrar As a parent you are committed to providing your sons and daughters with the best possible education – and so are we. In my role as Registrar, I enjoy the conversations I have with prospective new families, in search of the right school for their children, as much as I love showing the School’s superb facilities and sharing Mentone Grammar stories.

A limited number of Academic, General Excellence and Music/Performing Arts Scholarships will be offered for Years 5, 7, 9 and 10 entries in 2018. Registrations for these scholarships are now open. Please find more information regarding Scholarships, including the registration process, on our website.

My aim is to provide a transparent and smooth enrolment process, from the initial contact to welcoming your family to the School. Our waiting lists continue to grow across all year levels and the best way to ensure a place for your children is to be registered with us.

PERNILLA EKLUND ALLAN – REGISTRAR

01 Pernilla Eklund Allan welcomes our new families to the School. 02 Demand for places in the Junior years has been at an all-time high in 2016.

01

GIRLS BOYS TOTAL

ELC

36

EBLANA

78 129 207

67

103

BAYVIEW 160 325 485 GREENWAYS 59 115 174 FROGMORE 187 333 520 Totals

520 969 1489

02 SCHOOL TOURS Our School Tour dates for 2017:

TOGETHERAPARTTOGETHER ELC-YEAR 4

YEAR 5-9

YEAR 10-12

Saturday 11 February, Tuesday 21 March, Monday 8 May, Saturday 5 August and Thursday 19 October. Please visit our website for our School Tour dates. To book, visit: www.mentonegrammar.net

Outstanding Coeducational Opportunities ELC-12

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01

FROM THE PRINCIPAL 01

Mal Cater Principal.

02-03 The new Creativity Centre will further enhance the vast Creative Arts offerings of the School.

04 Mentone Grammar is well-known for its innovative studies in Science and excellent Science facilities.

02

03 As our Year 12 students prepare to finish off their learning journey with us they will be confronted by a range of new careers during their lifetime – imagine, if you can, what the world will look like when our Kindergarten children graduate!

04 ONCE AGAIN THE YEAR IS RACING AWAY AND BEFORE WE KNOW IT CHRISTMAS WILL BE UPON US. AT THE TIME OF WRITING THIS ARTICLE THERE IS MUCH 2017 PLANNING BEING UNDERTAKEN ALONG WITH THE LONGER TERM PLANNING WHICH IS SO IMPORTANT TO THE ONGOING SUCCESS OF OUR SCHOOL.

02

Mentone Grammar MENTOR ISSUE 2 2016

At the University of Melbourne Vice Chancellor’s Dinner recently I could not help but reflect on the innovative environment in which education is at this time. The University is establishing a Science Gallery in the same style, as I understand it, as an art gallery and the first exhibits will be framed around the theme of ‘blood’. The University has over one million online students and fifty thousand students who attend its campuses. The architecture underpinning its evolution is highly innovative, engaging and designed around attracting students into the spaces. The University is developing a course in its Science Faculty around Data Science acknowledging that the recording, reporting, analysing and interpreting of ‘big’ data will be a future career path.

The key to being a great school is that young people are well prepared to lead a meaningful life beyond their journey here. I feel confident that our students are being well prepared – employers confirm this with us often. The other element which was highlighted at the Vice Chancellor’s Dinner was that universities, increasingly, want students to understand and be immersed in … CREATIVITY! The Dinner was another one of those reassuring moments one has as the leader of a school which clearly indicates that we are developing a school which will position our students for life beyond our campuses. I thank you for your ongoing support of our wonderful School.

MAL CATER – PRINCIPAL


02 FOUNDATION AWARDEES

BOARD OF DIRECTORS REPORT

01

Passion

Year

Ella Michell

Writing

4

Lucy Page

Animal Welfare

5

Olivia Parkes

Creative Arts

5

Matthew Scott

Writing

5

Hamish Berry

Sailing

6

Riley Spence

Athletics

6

Performing Arts

6

01

Simon Appel OAM – Chair of the Board of Directors.

Emilie Toby Hamish Neumann

Design

6

02

The Creativity Centre will be officially opened in 2017

Angus Marcombe

Cricket

6

Sam Murphy

Baseball

6

Taya Brooks

Dance

7

Charlie Dashwood

Dance

7

Benjamin Gerresheim

Tennis

7

Mitch Owens

Basketball/Football

7

Sammy Cartwright

Basketball

7

Olivia Goodman

Equestrian

7

Skye Carter

Athletics

8

Adam Halliday

Futsal

8

Phoebe Wearne

Swimming

9

Charlotte Pate

Gymnastics

9

Dominique Taylor

Netball

9

Karly Georgantis

Soccer

9

Grace Phillips

Sailing

9

Jordan Fox

Swimming

10

Imogen Schwartz

Fine Arts

10

Massey Parker

Cricket

10

William Carter

Athletics

10

Lucas Waters

Lifesaving

11

Corbin McCullough

Running

11

Tom Zallmann

Alpine ski racing

11

Callum Strack

Golf

11

Lachie Moorhouse

Cycling

11

Liam Grant

Creative Arts

12

Marc Shermon

Photography

12

Gabrielle Burton

Hospitality

12

Ben Thompson

Building & Construction

12

Renee Verginis

Performing Arts

12

Lucy Mangion

Performing Arts

12

Luc van Vliet

Music

12

03

Foundation Awardee Year 12 dancer Lucy Mangion has mentored many younger dancers in the Performing Arts throughout VCE.

02 03 MENTONE GRAMMAR CONTINUES TO PROVIDE A CARING AND PRODUCTIVE ENVIRONMENT FOR STUDENTS, STAFF AND FOR PARENTS AND CARERS. THE BOARD IS PLEASED TO REPORT THAT THESE ELEMENTS ARE SUPPORTED BY A STRONG FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF AN EVER GROWING SCHOOL.

Board retirement At the same time, there is a constant coming and going of both students and staff, and occasionally Directors. Mr Ian Larsen, a Director for 22 years, has advised his intention to retire from the Board at the end of 2016. Ian has provided outstanding service to the School as a Director, including as Treasurer for 20 years. The Board will miss Ian’s wise counsel and corporate wisdom and we wish Ian and his wife Mary the best of times for their future.

Staff retirements The Board has also been advised of a number of long-serving staff members who will be “moving on” at year’s end. Mentonians will fondly remember their times with Rob Patterson and Vic Evans, both having spent over 30 years at the School. We also recognise the wonderful contribution

made by Ms Diana Henderson over many years. Diana will retire from working in the Archives office having been Secretary to the previous Business Manager (Mr Cameron Blew), and Board Minute Secretary. The Board and Executive will formally recognise these fine contributors at year’s end.

Foundation Awardees Finally, we congratulate the Mentone Grammar School Foundation Award recipients for 2016. These students all demonstrate a dedication to activities which are not directly included in regular classroom work. Their standard of achievement is very high, and in some cases exceptional, and we acknowledge their fine work and presentations. SIMON APPEL OAM – CHAIR

03


MENTONE GRAMMAR’S RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN (RAP) 2016

Here in Australia we’re fortunate enough to have one of the richest and oldest continuing cultures in the world. This is something we should all be proud of and celebrate. Dr Tom Calma AO, Reconcilation Australia Co-Chair

AT MENTONE GRAMMAR, WE AIM TO EDUCATE, INSPIRE AND ENABLE ALL MEMBERS OF OUR COMMUNITY TO CONTRIBUTE TO RECONCILIATION AND BREAK DOWN STEREOTYPES AND DISCRIMINATION. IN MANY FORUMS, BUT ESPECIALLY THROUGH THE TEACHING OF OUR MENTONE GRAMMAR VALUES, PARTICULARLY THOSE OF RESPECT AND CARING, WE AIM TO ACHIEVE GREATER UNDERSTANDING OF OUR ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER POPULATION, CULTURE AND HISTORY IN THE HOPE THAT THIS WILL LEAD TO A MORE UNITED AND FAIRER COUNTRY FOR ALL AUSTRALIANS. Opportunities

The Mentone Grammar RAP has been developed in consultation with former Mentone Grammar Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, School Community members including students and staff, and the School Board. Our RAP comprises three sections: Relationships, Respect and Opportunities. We believe that the development of relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples both within and outside our School Community are vital in ensuring inclusiveness. We believe that respect and cultural awareness and recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are fundamental to reconciliation. We aim to create mutually beneficial opportunities to increase non-Indigenous understanding and knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with the opportunities to expand their knowledge, skills and experience.

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Mentone Grammar MENTOR ISSUE 2 2016

Relationships Mentone Grammar is located in an area that does not have a large Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander presence. This emphasises the importance of making connections with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the wider community, through connecting with Elders in our area.

Respect At Mentone Grammar, we recoginse the Bunurong People of the Kulin Nation as the traditional owners of the land on which our School stands, and acknowledge this at formal gatherings of the School Community. We will celebrate and teach about days of national significance including National Reconciliation Week and the Anniversary of the National Apology.

With the development of the Mentone Grammar RAP comes the opportunity to create mutually beneficial opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous people to expand knowledge, skills and experience. The Mentone Grammar RAP will be formally launched at the beginning of 2017 and we encourage all members of our School Community to become involved in ‘contributing to reconciliation and breaking down stereotypes and discrimination’. Our RAP publication is also available on the Mentone Grammar website and I invite all in our Community to read the full version of our Plan.

DEB FRIZZA DEPUTY PRINCIPAL – STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION


TEACHING AND LEARNING UPDATE AT MENTONE GRAMMAR WE LOOK TO CONTINUALLY IMPROVE BOTH OUR STUDENT ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AND THEIR WELLBEING. THE SCHOOL HAS DEVELOPED AN EXPLICIT IMPROVEMENT AGENDA (EIA) FOLLOWING A REVIEW BY THE AUSTRALIAN COUNCIL OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH (ACER) AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF OUR OWN TEACHING AND LEARNING FRAMEWORK.

The two major arms of the EIA are: Visible Learning and Emotional Intelligence through the RULER program. Both of these arms are interrelated with the aims of improving both our student academic performance and their wellbeing. Our 2016-2020 Strategic Plan: It Takes a Village to Raise a Child, was developed with our EIA very much in mind with links to all of the strategic pillars identified in this Strategic Plan. There have been many improvements already put in place as part of our EIA which include: –– The use of learning intentions and success criteria so that our students know where their learning is headed and know how to demonstrate they understand the required learning. –– The use of formative assessment techniques to determine exactly where each student is at with their learning and determine next steps at an individual level. –– The introduction of a Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) stream within the School to allow each student and family to select the appropriate pathway and complete their learning journey at Mentone Grammar.

–– The roll out of the anchors of the RULER program. Each of these anchors is designed to build the capacity of our students to recognise, understand, label, express and regulate emotions more effectively. –– The appointment of a Head of Teaching Practice to oversee professional learning of teaching staff and ensure coaching is available for all teachers. –– A more rigorous teacher appraisal system, where each teacher is observed teaching, completes a self-assessment, works through student feedback and has a reflection provided by their Head of Faculty. –– The introduction of ‘triads’ where teachers observe each other teaching and provide feedback and suggestions for improvement. –– The development of a Student Data Management System that collects individual student learning data so that teachers can access and use it to improve their teaching approach to each student. It has already been an exciting journey, and we have seen improved academic performance. Using a major external measure as a guide, our VCE results have led

to the School moving from a ranking of over 100 in the State to now being in the top 50. We aim to continually improve these successes by building upon the structure that allows improved experiences for our students. In 2017, one of the next improvements will be a change to the structure of the school day. By doing this, we aim to improve academic results and increase the opportunities for collaboration between teachers to improve teaching practices. As part of the Visible Learning arm of our EIA, collaboration between teachers in particular, has been shown to improve student academic outcomes. The change will allow for an increase in teaching time for each subject. Each Year 12 subject, for example, will go from having 441 minutes per two week block to 493 minutes, which will bring us in line with similar schools and the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) recommendations.

05


WE LOOK FORWARD TO THIS DEVELOPMENT IN TEACHING AND LEARNING AND THE OPPORTUNITIES IT WILL BRING TO BOTH IMPROVE STUDENT OUTCOMES AND FURTHER DEVELOP COLLABORATION BETWEEN TEACHERS.

Changes to the day from Term 1 2017: –– The school day will begin at 8.30am and finish at 3.38pm. Greenways Study Sessions and the libraries will remain open after this time as is current practice. –– The school day will begin with a 10 minute roll call, followed by 6 lessons per day. –– Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday will be made up of 4 single 58 minute lessons and one double 87 minute lesson, and will include one of assembly, mentor period or an extended lunch. –– Monday and Friday will be made up of 6 single 58 minute lessons. –– Overall, there will be an increase of over two hours each week in time spent in lessons. –– Lunchtime will be 50 minutes in length, with one lunchtime each week in each Campus potentially a longer lunchtime. This will occur on sports training days. –– Teaching staff will no longer coach/ manage a sports team to enable them to focus on their teaching and the learning

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Mentone Grammar MENTOR ISSUE 2 2016

of their students and collaborating with their colleagues to continue to improve teaching. –– Technology will be introduced as a stand-alone subject for our Years 5 and 6 students. –– Within English, Mathematics, Humanities and Science, all subject areas will see an increase in teaching and learning time. –– From the beginning of the Winter Season in 2017, students within Frogmore will have the opportunity to apply to take part in one season of sport and one season of ‘creativity’ in the fields of drama, dance, music, visual arts, debating and public speaking to cater for a student’s particular interest and area of expertise. This will be available to Bayview and Greenways students from the beginning of 2018. We continue to use the research collected by Prof. John Hattie as part of Visible Learning to work on improving those areas that have been identified as making the greatest difference to student academic

and wellbeing improvement. Any decision or change is made with a great deal of thought, investigating the available research and looking at the specific culture and needs of Mentone Grammar, our Students and our Community. We look forward to this development in teaching and learning and the opportunities it will bring to both improve student outcomes and further develop collaboration between teachers.

DEB FRIZZA DEPUTY PRINCIPAL – STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION


ASSESSMENT CAPABLE VISIBLE LEARNERS... can be their own teacher can articulate their next learning steps

can talk about how they are learning and the strategies they are using to learn

can set mastery goals

actively seek feedback

can see errors as opportunities and are comfortable saying that they don’t know and/or need help

ask questions

understand the assessment tools; what their results mean and can self-assess

positively support their peer’s learning

know what to do when they don’t know what to do

can articulate what they are learning and why

can use self-regulation strategies

seek challenges; are resilient and aspire to challenges

display metacognitive skills and can talk about these: • systematic planning • memory • abstract thinking • critical thinking • problem solving

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EBLANA

ELC AND FOUNDATION –YEAR 4

01 LEARNING FOR LIFE. TEACHERS ARE TALKING LESS AND LISTENING MORE. THEY INSTRUCT LESS AND ALLOW TIME FOR DISCOVERY. THEY DIRECT LESS AND PROVIDE ALTERNATIVES. THEY GRADE LESS BUT PROVIDE INFORMATIVE FEEDBACK. WE SEE STUDENT-CENTRED LEARNING THAT SHIFTS THE FOCUS OF INSTRUCTION FROM THE TEACHER TO THE STUDENT; IT PUTS RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE LEARNING PATH IN THE HANDS OF STUDENTS.

02

03 Students focus on skills and processes that enable lifelong learning and independent problem-solving that emphasise the learner’s critical role in constructing meaning from new information and prior experience. How different schools are today. There is excitement in learning. It is meaningful, with boundless opportunities in the ways in which it is delivered. On many occasions I have said, and I am sure everyone has observed, that learning today goes well beyond the traditional classroom of the four walls through which students did not venture to the world of opportunities beyond. Today, more than ever, learning provides myriad experiences in the acquisition of knowledge. Under the banner of ‘cocurricular’ our students all engage in a broad offering of extended activities that strengthen classroom learning and provide social, emotional experiences that excite 08

Mentone Grammar MENTOR ISSUE 2 2016

and inspire curiosity and personal growth. Engagement in cocurricular activities is a means of educating the whole student, whilst providing an opportunity for the integration of academic, interest, and personal development. Cocurricular activities motivate students and can be moments of saviour for reluctant students as they provide flexible structures in new environments, outside of the traditional classroom routines of lessons, researching knowledge, completing bookwork, assignments, to complete set tasks. Eblana’s cocurricular philosophy is to ‘bring learning to life’ through participation in events and experiences sometimes within Eblana, at times in the ‘big school’, on a bus, on a train and even in the virtual world. ‘Cocurricular’ has no limits; it can be any experience that is connected to or ‘brings to reality’ our academic curriculum.

By design, our programs seek to engage students in learning opportunities that support their cognitive, emotional, social, moral, cultural and aesthetic development. They provide excellent opportunities for the students to develop knowledge and achieve quality of learning in real life in a creative and excitingly engaging way. Through shared activities students can showcase like-minded interests and passions, develop confidence and friendships. It is those activities that our valedictorians seem to remember most fondly from their junior years. Cocurricular extension during the primary years is every bit as important as in the senior years of schooling. They provide a starting point for students to explore their passions, fascinations or dreams in areas such as music, through ensembles, choirs, orchestras and private instrumental lessons; performance through drama, dance, assemblies, public speaking, reading, presentations and parades; through sports, clubs, visual arts,


02

01

John Nolan, Head of Eblana

02 Book Week incursions and excursions in August are a highlight on the Eblana calendar.

03 The popular Instrumental Program introduces students to music and the stage in a fun and supportive environment.

04 Year 3 students discover the delights of Shoreham beach on their first sleepover at the School’s beachside camp.

05 Students enjoy sharing in Chapel services at St Augustine’s.

04

camps, incursions and excursions. These are not necessarily part of the base academic curriculum but are an essential part of life in Eblana. They provide occasions for students to participate, express their ideas and wants, and develop who they are. In Eblana, cocurricular events serve as a ‘celebration’ of all that we do in the classroom.

develop public speaking skills, organisation, cooperation, self-management and selfawareness when exposed to social leadership. Through service to others, students develop an appreciation and understanding of various community needs and circumstances and through the service of giving, gain enormously in personal growth.

Generally speaking, our cocurricular activities are an extension of the formal learning experiences in the classroom. They complement the teaching and learning programs and effectively impact student learning outcomes. They make things more real, more understood, more possible. Students learn how to perform academically, creatively and physically, mostly as part of a bigger team or group – a most important lifelong skill.

Students learn a lot through excursions. They become acquainted with new landscapes, communities, cultures, diversity and change. These include environmental excursions and programs, ‘I sea, I care’ Dolphin Research Institute Program, farm visits, historical adventures and the highlight being overnight stays at our Shoreham facility. What an adventure!

Our leadership and community service activities enhance our students’ skills, knowledge and confidence. Students

Incursions are similarly inspiring and are often incorporated into our student assemblies, musical events, art shows, debating, our DARE to Dream program, competitions, chess, sport, House meetings,

05 our Language program, social service, family days and International Harmony Day. These events offer age appropriate campus-based experiences, always fun, always memorable.

From the voice of a child: Teacher, come on outside! I’ll race you to the seesaw! No, you won’t fall off! I’ll show you how! Don’t be afraid teacher. Grab my hand and follow me. You can learn all over again! Albert Cullum

May we never stop experiencing, discovering, learning and achieving, wherever we are. JOHN NOLAN – HEAD OF EBLANA

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BAYVIEW

MIDDLE YEARS 5 – 8

01

02

03

SCHOOL PROGRAMS IN BAYVIEW ARE DESIGNED TO ENCOMPASS A NUMBER OF CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO EDUCATION WHICH HAVE BROUGHT TOGETHER AN UNDERSTANDING OF RESEARCH THAT FACILITATES THE BEST LEARNING AND UNDERSTANDING. There are many elements to consider when looking at how to maximise student academic performance. Areas worthy of discussion in relation to the learning program at Bayview designed to enhance student learning include the School’s approach to Visible Learning and the importance of teacher appraisal within the school. Mentone Grammar’s Teaching and Learning Department articulates a clear approach to learning within the School. At Bayview, we subscribe to the School’s belief that for optimal teaching and learning to take place, we need to consider where the learner is, where the learner is going and how the learner is to get there. Academic staff are expected plan their teaching in line with Professor John Hattie’s research to ensure that for every lesson, clear learning intentions and success criteria are understood by each child. The learning intention of a lesson, or series of lessons, tell students what they should know, understand and be able to do; the success criteria helps teachers and students decide whether the students have in fact achieved the learning intention.

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Mentone Grammar MENTOR ISSUE 2 2016

Using more effective techniques and activities that provide evidence of student learning is essential to good teaching. Formative assessment assists here. Mentone Grammar defines formative assessment as gathering and using information about student understanding to make decisions in the next steps in instruction. From this definition, there flows a simple process that our teachers follow when teaching their classes: 1. Teach a concept 2. Gather evidence to see whether students understand 3. Make an instructional decision about whether to move on, or to re-explain the concept. A number of formative assessment techniques, related to the work of Dr Dylan Wiliam, regarded as one of the world’s foremost authorities on formative assessment, have been employed by Bayview teachers. Using more effective techniques and activities provide teachers with powerful opportunities to help them modify, monitor and improve their classroom instruction, which empowers student

learning. Techniques involving students in all Bayview classes include: No hands up; allstudent response systems; electronic voting systems; finger voting; mini-whiteboards; traffic lights and exit passes. Mentone Grammar’s constructive Teacher Appraisal Program is firmly embedded at our Bayview Campus. Teachers have a profound impact on student achievement. The Gratton Institute, 2014, espouses: ‘High performance systems around the world know that improving the effectiveness of teaching is the way to lift school performance. They seek to improve the quality of teaching. They know that teaching improves when teachers learn from each other. So they ensure teachers are mentored and teach classes in front of skilled observers, who provide constructive feedback. They make time for teachers to undertake practical research in their schools on how to lift student learning….’


04

05 01

John Twist, Head of Bayview.

02 Bayview students hard at work completing the Australian Mathematics Competition.

03

Zac and Mia enjoyed meeting Cathy Freeman at a recent leadership summit.

04

Our separate gender classroom model in the Middle Years provides students with a customised teaching and learning environment and is highly regarded by our Middle School teaching specialists.

05 Bayview students are looking forward to their new Technologies learning spaces in the Creativity Centre in 2017.

06 Shoreham Camp provides unique learning

06

experiences for our Bayview classes.

The performance appraisal process for teachers and leaders at Mentone Grammar meets one of the School’s strategic objectives and enhances our explicit improvement agenda by reviewing, supporting and strengthening all teachers’ classroom practice in order to optimise all students’ learning outcomes. The objective is for all staff and all students to achieve their ‘Personal Best’ every lesson, every day. The expected outcomes of the process are: 1. to affirm and strengthen high quality professional teaching practice 2. to identify opportunities for improvement 3. to define priority individual goals for teacher focus, support, monitoring and accountability.

Effective feedback is key for teacher appraisal. By using multiple sources of data we are able to assist staff continuously on their development and improvement as teachers. These sources include: – Lesson observations – organised lesson observations for all teaching staff. Lessons are viewed by Executive or Management staff who provide prompt feedback to staff relating to performance. Opportunities for relevant professional learning or coaching stem from this process. – Learning Walks – a brief classroom visit by members of the Executive or Management teams to reflect on what students are learning, student interaction with subject content and student engagement. – Self-Assessment – gives teachers opportunities to determine their strengths

and weaknesses allowing them to reflect on what assistance they may need. – Development of professional goals. – Student Surveys – help staff set goals for continuous improvement assisting teachers with their professional growth and development. JOHN TWIST – HEAD OF BAYVIEW (RETIRED, TERM 4 2016) Acknowledgements About Learning Sciences – Dylan Wiliam Centre The Gratton Institute Report, 2014 Mentone Grammar School publications

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BAYVIEW

CULTURES, COMMUNITIES AND CIVILISATIONS YEAR 8 INTERNATIONAL LEARNING JOURNEYS

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“WE MUST GO BEYOND TEXTBOOKS, GO OUT INTO THE BYPATHS AND UN-TRODDEN DEPTHS OF THE WILDERNESS AND TRAVEL AND EXPLORE AND TELL THE WORLD THE GLORIES OF OUR JOURNEY.” – JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN

The above quote was used in the proposal for the Year 8 International Learning Journeys. Now in its third year, the benefit of the experience has life-changing consequences for our students, both educationally, as well as from a holistic, wellbeing perspective. This year, Year 8 students had the exciting opportunity to travel to Nepal, Cambodia, and China (Beijing and Southern China) and, for the first time, one group explored Vietnam. This real life experience surpasses the theory presented in textbooks, allowing the text to come to life and bring with it unique context. The individual growth of a student socially and emotionally through an integrated experience such as this is immeasurable. Students are engaged to a new and higher level with their learning making it meaningful, memorable and relevant. Academically, Bayview’s Cultures, Communities and Civilisations International Learning Journey (CCCIJL) enriches each of the specified Learning Areas – English, Humanities (both History and Geography), Mathematics and

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Science as well as Religious Education, Economics and Food Technology subjects.

amazing. (China Hill Tribes experience).’ Will S

The ultimate endeavour for education is to develop well-rounded, thoughtful citizens to lead by example who contribute positively to society. By journeying to the above destinations we, as a school, are certainly well and truly meeting these requirements.

‘Wow, what a trip. I enjoyed southern China so much and I’m so lucky to be able to have had this opportunity. Learning by being there has just been great. Doing all the different activities was just a great big memory that I will never forget. (China Hill Tribes experience).’ Tarli R

Upon return to school, students engage in putting together an ‘expo’ to showcase their experiences to their parents, peers and our School Community. Each group puts together a dynamic interactive display of different aspects of their journey so that the visitors to the expo can gain a sense of what the students experienced. ‘We are so lucky to have this opportunity to go overseas at our age. The people in Cambodia cannot even comprehend it.’ Jeremy D ‘The trip was a great learning experience on how people with not as much as what we have live. The mountains and scenery were

I loved being able to experience a different culture and I loved seeing all the amazing views. (China Hill Tribe experience).’ Drew ‘Vietnam was amazing. The experience is one that we will never forget. I loved the riding, hiking, riding in the boats and the whole educational experience. Our group had many laughs and great moments. The riding was massive; we rode close to 35 km.’ Trent ‘I used to take every thing for granted and now I feel lucky for what I have.’ (Nepal experience) Elyssia (featured front cover)


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01 Hiking the mountains of China. 02 Discovering the Great Wall of China. 03 Teaching English in Cambodia. 04 Bike riding in China.

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05 Trekking the terraces of China. 06 A history lesson at Angkor Wat, Cambodia.

07 Learning about subsistence farming in China.

08 Making new friends in Nepal.

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GREENWAYS YEAR 9 CAMPUS

learning and to develop greater global awareness, international understanding, and an appreciation of cultural diversity. Students were asked to consider the Focus Areas carefully when deciding their Personal Project. The aim of the Personal Project is not simply to display knowledge, but to apply it through Approaches to Learning and show an understanding of another Focus Area.

01 Learning Opportunities in Greenways Our Mentone Grammar Teaching and Learning Framework underpins our learning culture. One of our goals in Greenways is to provide each student with an abundance of opportunities available to succeed and thrive. The challenge with Year 9 is to continue to engage and extend students in a dynamic learning program that embraces personal development and supports growth. This development occurs at different times and, sometimes, as a result of different experiences and environments.

Greenways Personal Project This year all students have embarked on a journey of investigation and enquiry as part of the Greenways Personal Project. This is a project-based learning opportunity where students are encouraged to start with a big idea that leads to exploring an area of great passion. The main aims of this unit are to enable students to take responsibility for their own learning; to develop personal organisational skills and to learn time management skills. The project is run over three terms with checkpoints along the way that students need to meet. It allows students to work within a self-paced environment whilst being closely monitored by Personal Project mentors. The topic chosen by each student, at the beginning of the year, needed to be challenging, have enough scope to be sustainable long-term and to also align with a Focus Area. The Focus Areas are at the heart of the Personal Project. They help students to acquire the skills to promote

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Focus Areas:

Approaches to Learning This area is concerned with the development of effective study skills, of critical and independent thought, and the ability to solve problems and make decisions.

Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship involves learning about creativity, action, and thought both in and outside the classroom.

Health and Social Education Students have the opportunity to explore topics which contribute to a physically and mentally healthy life and that help them make informed decisions and take responsibility for their own wellbeing and for the people and world around them.

Community and Service Community and Service encourages students to become more responsible citizens through a greater understanding of the world around them and by actively participating in service projects.

Environments The environment aspect involves developing an understanding of the issues surrounding their place in the world and the responsibilities that people have in ensuring that our legacy is that of a clean and healthy planet. Each student is expected to undertake research and investigation beyond the classroom and create regular blogs on the Learning Management System. The final stage involves producing a product, submitting a written report based on the Personal

Project assessment criteria and finally, to present their learning as part of an oral and visual presentation. The students should be extremely proud of their results. It has been fantastic to see a wide array of topics and areas of interest within the year group. Some notable outcomes… Cooper Hamlin received a standing ovation for a song he wrote and recorded. Finnbar Reinehr presented his handmade electrical longboard which involved gaining an understanding of electrical circuits. Jakob Sloan created an electrical guitar where he sourced the specific wood, developed each component and wired the instrument. He articulated that this was one of the best learning experiences he had ever undertaken. Emma Scherger designed and made her own range of bathers. It was a real, hands-on learning experience that she shared with her ‘Nan’ (grandmother) who taught her to sew. Amelia Morris developed a successful concoction for face masks, packaged them and designed the labelling. Another memorable project, was Helena Papasimeon’s growing connection with the Yarrabah school which she shared in her own video presentation.

RULER in Greenways This semester, we have aimed to develop the emotional intelligence and awareness of our Year 9s. In line with the Mentone Grammar Strategic Plan, RULER is an evidence-based approach to social and emotional learning that helps school communities integrate the practice of emotional intelligence into daily life. Why do we care about social and emotional skills? Decades of research shows that emotional intelligence is essential to effective teaching and learning, sound decision making, physical and mental health, and success in school and beyond. Research also shows that when schools and families partner to support children’s emotional development, children not only feel better, but they do better.


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01 Natalie McLennan, Head of Greenways. 02 Flexible learning spaces are just one of the attractions of Greenways.

RULER teaches five key skills: Recognising emotions in self and others Understanding the causes and consequences of emotions Labelling emotions accurately Expressing emotions appropriately Regulating emotions effectively In Greenways, we commenced the RULER journey by creating one of the four anchor tools – the Charter. The Greenways Cohort Charter establishes agreed upon norms and guidelines, rather than rules, to help create a more contented, emotionally safe environment at school. Everyone in Year 9 has a voice and responsibility for developing the Charter and for upholding it. Our 2016 Greenways cohort agreed to the following guidelines. (pictured right) Innovative learning options connect with our Year 9s. Our Campus is all about developing our students’ fitness – their academic fitness, physical fitness, emotional fitness and spiritual fitness! NATALIE MCLENNAN – HEAD OF GREENWAYS 15


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FROGMORE

SENIOR YEARS 10–12

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AS THE SENIOR CAMPUS WITHIN THE SCHOOL, THERE IS, QUITE RIGHTLY, A SIGNIFICANT FOCUS TOWARDS THE PURSUIT OF ACADEMIC ENDEAVOURS AND, SPECIFICALLY, THE VCE. THROUGHOUT TERM 3 WE HAVE SEEN OUR YEAR 12 STUDENTS UNDERTAKE A SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF SAC ASSESSMENT TASKS, FINALISE CONTENT WITHIN THEIR UNIT 4 STUDIES AND COMMENCE THEIR PREPARATION FOR BOTH THE TERM 3 TRIAL EXAMINATIONS AND THEIR FINAL END OF YEAR VCE EXAMINATIONS. Many have taken advantage of the Senior Library being open for extended hours to meet with teachers and with Mentonian tutors to discuss specific content and to undertake private study. As our Year 12s come towards the end of their time with us it is appropriate to reflect upon their journey and, in particular, aspects of the ongoing evolution of education within the Frogmore Campus that have continued to move forward throughout these past three years. The arrival of our current Year 12 students into the Frogmore Campus coincided with a review and refocusing on our academic outcomes, with an emphasis on researchbased pedagogy and the collection and evaluation of meaningful data. The availability of meaningful research within education, that is research identifying strategies that ‘work best for raising student achievement’, to inform educational practices has been far more readily available in recent times. The School has been mindful of that research as we look to more effectively map the educational pathways for our students. In particular, the research of Prof. John Hattie regarding Visible Learning and the work 16

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of Prof. Dylan Wiliam regarding Formative Assessment have been implemented. The introduction of this research from our Teaching and Learning team, led by Mr Tim Macdonald, to our staff through an array of professional development initiatives has better equipped staff to meet the needs and demands of 21st Century learning. Further, the access to quality professional learning opportunities and the development of our staff to implement the core aspects of Visible Learning, which will continue throughout the next few years, has been key in providing quality teaching and learning opportunities for our students. In looking to further enhance staff professional learning, the School has appointed Mrs Christine Altidis as our inaugural Head of Teaching Practice. Amongst other responsibilities, Mrs Altidis will oversee the ongoing development of staff professional learning plans based upon data and feedback provided regarding the professional practice of staff. Mrs Altidis will be based in our new Professional Development Centre due for completion in 2017. In implementing these aspects of Visible Learning and Formative Assessment the

School has seen a significant increase in the volume of data available and the Frogmore Campus is no exception, particularly given the increasingly competitive nature of tertiary entry and, therefore, the emphasis being placed on ATAR scores and academic proficiency by the world around us. To assist with informed teaching practice, Frogmore staff have access to various summative data through our Learning Management System or via our Student Performance System. Staff also collect their own data regarding student progress through the use of formative assessment techniques, including through software programs such as Kahootz and Socrative. Our staff review data and regularly engage with students regarding their performance; data is now an inherent part of any professional conversation within the Frogmore Campus. We are also fortunate to have access to the work of Mr Wayne Reed, our Student Performance Manager, who regularly reviews and collates data regarding student performance and utilises that data to inform staff, students and indeed parents. The ready availability of technology and data that enables staff to actively measure student performance, develop strategies to support


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06 understanding and then impact student learning in a timely manner is certainly having a positive impact in Frogmore. This year was the first in which Year 12 students undertook Study Lessons, those periods in which they do not have a scheduled VCE class, at the same time. While the logistics of ensuring 171 Year 12 students are simultaneously and appropriately engaged in meaningful study might appear challenging, there were significant benefits, among which was the development of a cohesive study culture amongst our Year 12 students. While our Year 12 students have been busily engaged in their final year, it has been extremely pleasing to see them maintain their involvement in myriad cocurricular opportunities too. While their academic studies are rightly a priority, our students understand that their ATAR score is just one facet of who they are and that seeking

out opportunities and being involved in our extended program can also often provide memorable experiences. These opportunities help our students to develop themselves as young people and, as such, are an invaluable part of their Mentone Grammar experience. In addition to providing them with an often welcome distraction and increasingly important ‘down-time’ from their studies, their ongoing involvement, coupled with their enthusiasm and leadership also provides an invaluable example for other students and greatly assists in developing the connections and sense of community we enjoy in the Frogmore Campus. Most recently some of our Year 12 students, in their roles as Cadet Under Officers, provided great leadership and guidance for our Year 9 Cadets at the annual Field Exercise at Puckapunyal. Though cold and wet, and in obviously testing conditions, our senior

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Cameron Lancaster, Head of Frogmore.

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Duke of Edinburgh Gold Level Awardees Sarah Cimino, Frazer Kemp and Lucinda McIntyre are congratulated by their Mentor, Ms Natalka Kolstraby.

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Students sit for a National Mathematics Competition.

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After hours tutoring provided by high-achieving former students has been very well received by Frogmore students.

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Extended Library hours during the holiday breaks has provided a great lead in to final VCE exams.

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Our Year 12 leaders enjoying their last Cross Country House event.

students ensured spirits were kept high and activities remained enjoyable throughout the week. Three of these leaders have also recently achieved their Duke of Edinburgh Gold Level after rigorously completing the award during their VCE studies. This is just one example, yet there have been many throughout the year, of involvement, enjoyment and enthusiastic leadership, whether on various sporting fields, at music performances, our production of Legally Blonde or just around the Campus, the role modelling our Year 12s have provided across all areas for our Years 10 and 11 students is excellent and I commend them ahead of their final challenge – the VCE exams. CAMERON LANCASTER – HEAD OF FROGMORE

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COMMUNITY SERVICE WORLD CHALLENGE 2016

LIKE MENTONE GRAMMAR, THE WORLD CHALLENGE MISSION IS TO DEVELOP LIFE SKILLS SUCH AS RESILIENCE, EMPATHY AND LEADERSHIP AND OUR YEAR 10S TOOK WHAT THEY KNEW FROM THEIR GREENWAYS LEARNING JOURNEYS AND HEADED OFF TO VIETNAM AND LAOS, EXPLORING, LEARNING AND LEADING.

Over 12 months, 23 students raised funds and cooked a lot of sausages so that families of a small village in northern Laos could, for the first time, access fresh water. The children of the village also returned to their school amazed to find new play equipment, fully funded by our Year 10 Mentone Grammar students. The smiles of the children made the deprivation, inevitable illness and sleeping rough, all worthwhile. Nothing comes easy in a small Laos village. Food and water collection is tedious and the weather is harsh but the peaceful, loving nature of the people is infectious. The students embraced the challenges of their project and worked hard digging trenches, carrying pipes and living like locals to achieve these life-changing improvements. The trade-off for all the hard work was the extraordinary opportunity to share in the dayto-day lives of Laotian families. They shared their food, traditional skills such as basket weaving and broom making and ultimately 18

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blessed each and every student with good fortune in a beautiful thanksgiving ceremony. Our Year 10s left wearing traditional cotton wristbands that, if worn for three days, would bring love, prosperity and good fortune. By contrast, over the border, the students navigated their way around the chaotic streets of Hanoi, staying in the Old Quarter, and discovered Vietnam’s Communist culture, history of war and colourful street food. An overnight train to the mountainous beauty of the Sapa hill tribes was a unique experience and a tough four-day hike through the harsh, subsistence farmland was unforgettable. Slippery hill climbs and an energetic entourage of locals added to the memories. Our Year 10 travellers returned to School knowing that they had made an immense difference, having learnt many valuable life lessons and had an unforgettable time connecting with all around them. WORLD CHALLENGE TEAMS 2016


CADET

LEADERSHIP 2016

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01 Senior leaders enjoying their time at Puckapunyal Military Base in September.

02 Cadet marksman Frazer Kemp is congratulated by his Mentor, Major Jon Wever OC, Mentone Grammar Army Cadet Unit.

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Future leaders – Years 10 and 11s take charge of Headquarters.

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Wes Flavell receives the Ken Smith Perpetual trophy from former Mentonian, Flying Officer Tristan Atkins (2001).

Annual Camp was certainly a test of resilience and fostered greater personal responsibility as torrid weather conditions set in and added to the challenges of the bush camp.

The core values of the Australian Army Cadets are Courage, Initiative and Teamwork and they underpin the standards, skills and competencies, set to a national level, all ultimately delivered by our student Cadet Under Officers (CUOs). For our senior students, it is an impressive undertaking to parallel senior studies with that of being a volunteer Cadet. This year 72 Frogmore students were promoted to leadership positions and took on this challenge and led our 175 Year 9 recruits through training days to equip them all with the required field craft, navigational and practical skills in readiness for September’s Annual Camp at Puckapunyal. Annual Camp was certainly a test of resilience and fostered greater personal

04 responsibility as torrid weather conditions set in and added to the challenges of the bush camp. Pleasingly our recruits and leaders were impressive throughout. Each platoon worked together and demonstrated great endeavour; sleeping under hutchies, cooking rations on trangias and keeping sodden camp fires alight. All platoons completed challenging navigational courses, learnt first aid and bush survival along with the history and traditions of Army life. The camaraderie and shared stories around camp were testament to the success of the week.

Awards

donated a perpetual trophy to the Mentone Grammar Army Cadet Unit to acknowledge exceptional student leadership, interpersonal and management skills in the context of a busy senior study program. This year, CUO and Head Prefect, Wes Flavell was recognised for his fine leadership. Year 12 CUO Frazer Kemp was awarded the MCC Cup in the Melbourne Schools’ Army Cadets Battalion competition for being the best individual marksperson in Victoria. Congratulations to these students for all upholding the values of both the AAC and Mentone Grammar.

The late Mr Ken Smith AO, who was instrumental in the establishment of a number of Army Cadet Units across Victoria, 19


WINTER SPORT

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Led by Lisa Turner, our senior Aerobics girls enjoyed their time on the Gold Coast.

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Oliver Florent (right) looks to a bright AFL career. Pictured with First XVIII Captain Henry Edwards and Head of Frogmore, Cameron Lancaster.

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Our successful senior boys’ relay team finish their season with a win.

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Elite swimming coach Tim Mulvihill joins our sports coaching team.

OVERALL, IT HAS BEEN A SUCCESSFUL SEASON FOR OUR WINTER FIXTURE OF SPORTS. ALTHOUGH WE DID NOT ADD TO OUR SIX SUMMER PREMIERSHIPS, MOST SPORTS IMPROVED ON THEIR AGSV PLACINGS, THANKS TO A MOMENTUM OF SUCCESS THAT CARRIED OVER FROM THE SUMMER SEASON, ALONG WITH A SEASON OF PASSIONATE COACHING FROM ALL CONCERNED.

Most notably, our First XVIII Football team posted its most successful result in the School’s history. At the time of writing, the team is eagerly waiting to see which AFL club teammate, Oliver Florent, will be drafted to. Congratulations to Oliver on an excellent winter season, following a successful summer season as part of our Premiership Tennis team. Once again a number of our Aerobics teams made it through to Nationals in Queensland and, as always, were great representatives for their sport. Individually, we had a number of girls and boys named as AGSV Representatives, all of whom excelled in their chosen sport. They are:

AGSV Boys Representative Team Kai Owens – Basketball Corbin McCullough – Cross Country Thomas Siedle – Hockey Lewis Cotsopoulos (GK) – Soccer George Smethurst – Soccer 20

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Nanthawat Magee – Soccer Max Williams – Football Matthew Grigoriou – Football Edward Newman – Football Oliver Florent (Co VC) – Football Emergencies: Bailey Clarkson – Basketball Lachlan Moorhouse – Cross Country Jack Laidlaw – Football Riley Sawyer – Hockey

AGSV Girls Representative Team Brooke McCullough – Cross Country Hannah Schmidt – Cross Country Grace Bunting – Cross Country Jessica Ewart-McTigue – Cross Country Maddison Capsalis – Netball Courtney Munn (Co VC) – Basketball Bianca Malby-Luke (GK) – Soccer Charlotte Fryer – Soccer Stephanie Giccominato – Soccer Alex Boys – Soccer Sam Fifer – Soccer

Athletics 2016 AGSV Athletics Carnival In September, the Mentone Grammar Athletics team competed in the AGSV Athletics Meet at the Lakeside Stadium at Albert Park. It was a fantastic carnival which saw both the Boys’ and Girls’ teams compete alongside each other. The day saw the culmination of many training sessions come together for this one event. It is always a tough season due to the many commitments that the students have at this time of the year. The teams performed with great distinction on the day and there were many personal bests across a range of events. The Girls’ team finished an excellent fourth and the Boys’ team finished fifth. With several injuries in the lead up and on the day – both teams should be very proud of their achievements. This is an excellent finish as both teams scored more team points than ever before.


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Girls and boys Individual top 3 finishes on the day: Girls Open 400m Natalie Clucas – 2nd Girls U17 100m – Anna Laidlaw – 2nd 200m – Anna Laidlaw – 3rd 400m – Anna Laidlaw – 2nd Discus – Jamie-Lee Munn – 1st 4 x 100m – Anna Laidlaw, Rebecca Hayes, Mia McCulloch, Alison Ahern – 3rd Girls U16 800m – Lucy Burgess – 1st Long Jump – Lucy Burgess – 2nd 100m – Natalie Clucas – 1st 200m – Natalie Clucas – 1st 400m – Lucy Burgess – 2nd 1500m – Jessica Ewart-McTigue – 2nd Discus – Stephanie Kelly – 2nd Shot Put – Alex Siedle – 3rd 90m Hurdles – Lauren Fagan – 3rd High Jump – Lauren Fagan – 3rd 4 x 100m – Rachel Watson, Stephanie Kelly, Lauren Fagan, Natalie Clucas – 1st Girls U15 Triple Jump – Bronte Reark – 3rd Shot Put – Dominique Taylor – 2nd 1500m – Brooke McCullough – 2nd High Jump – Ella Mairs – 2nd 80m Hurdles – Skye Carter – 1st Long Jump – Lauren Malby-Luke – 3rd 4 x 100m – Skye Carter, Lauren Malby-Luke, Bronte Reark, Meg Bresnehan – 3rd Girls U14 Long Jump – Cassie Newman – 2nd Girls U13 Triple Jump – Cassie Newman – 3rd Long Jump – Olivia Hargreaves – 2nd 100m – Summer Leonard – 3rd 200m – Summer Leonard – 2nd 400m – Riley Spence – 2nd Discus – Lily Clucas – 3rd

Shot Put – Summer Leonard – 1st 80m Hurdles – Olivia Hargreaves – 2nd 800m – Cassie Newman – 2nd High Jump – Bethany Bratuskins – 2nd 4 x 100m – Summer Leonard, Cassie Newman, Riley Spence, Olivia Hargreaves – 2nd Boys Open 100m – Dhruv Rodrigues Chico – 1st 200m – Dhruv Rodrigues Chico – 1st High Jump – Barclay Miller – 3rd 1500m – Corbin McCullough – 2nd 3000m – Corbin McCullough – 1st 4 x 100m – Dhruv Rodrigues Chico, Harrison Edwards, George Smethurst, Jesse Reed – 1st 4 x 400m – Jesse Reed, Luke D’Allessandro, Tom Siedle, Dhruv Rodrigues Chico – 2nd Boys U17 Hurdles – Aidan Taylor – 2nd Shot Put – Ben Awad – 2nd Boys U16 1500m – Geordie Hore – 2nd 1500m – Trenton Johnson – 2nd High Jump – Conor Murray – 3rd 800m – Geordie Hore – 3rd Shot Put – Damien Papadopoulos – 2nd Triple Jump – Aaron Moore – 2nd Boys U15 Discus – Jeremy Campbell – 3rd Long Jump – Chris Perkins – 2nd Boys U14 High Jump – Ethan Martin – 1st Hurdles – Ethan Martin – 1st 800m – Will Garbelotto – 2nd 1500m – Will Garbelotto – 3rd 1500m – Alec McComb – 3rd 100m – Ethan Prabaharan – 3rd 200m – Ethan Prabaharan – 3rd

In the School’s continual vision of ‘raising the sporting bar’, Mentone Grammar is pleased to announce the latest addition to the Bayside Aquatics leadership team, Tim Mulvihill, a highly credentialed, high performance coach who brings 18 years of aquatic leadership and coaching experience to the Centre. Recruited from the USA, Australian born Tim is our new Senior Squad Coach. He is responsible for all aspects of the swim squad programming and coaching which includes his role as Head Coach of the highly competitive Bayside Swimming Club. Having completed one term in his new role, Tim likes what he sees. ‘Right from our learn-to-swim, through to our schools program and squads, there is a renewed sense of excitement and optimism about what we can do here at Bayside Aquatics. Our programming and coaching is focused on excellence and doing your best’ says Tim. We look forward to seeing this success, not only on the dais but in increased participation in all of our swimming and the joy that comes from participation, improvement and achievement. He joins our experienced staff, Wendy Davidson and Eric Du and their team. All enquiries can be made via: 9581 3288

Boys U13 800m – Jordan Michell – 3rd Long Jump – Mitch Owens – 2nd High Jump – Mitch Owens – 3rd ANDREW HAYES – DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 21


BLUES BROTHERS COMES TO GREENWAYS! FOR AS LONG AS ANYONE CAN REMEMBER, JAZZ HAS ALWAYS BEEN A POPULAR FEATURE OF THE MENTONE GRAMMAR PERFORMING ARTS CALENDAR. FOR THE LAST SIX YEARS OUR JAZZ MUSICIANS HAVE CREATED THEIR OWN NIGHT, SOLELY DEVOTED TO JAZZ AND ITS ICONS. Following our Jazz musicians’ successful trip to Generations in Jazz in Mt Gambier, the Greenways Campus was transformed into a glittering cabaret complete with festoon lights, white table cloths and flickering candles. Over 100 guests enjoyed the sounds, a Blues Brothers vibe and dance floor and were entertained by a full big band, Froggers, and myriad singers including the Cat’s Meow jazz ensemble, all dressed in authentic 70s Blues Brothers style complete with suits, fedoras and sunglasses. The music was energetic and bluesy; the mocktail bar busy and colourful and the dance floor full and boisterous. We can’t wait until the next one. NATALIE MORGENSTERN – MUSIC TEACHER

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LEGALLY BLONDE

THREE SPECTACULAR NIGHTS OF THEATRE! MENTONE GRAMMAR’S 2016 PRODUCTION AIMED TO SHOW THAT LIFE IS INDEED MORE COMPLEX THAN A SERIES OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL STEREOTYPES, THROUGH THE PROCESS OF THEATRE MAKING. In the words of James Corden: “Theatre is a place where every race, creed, sexuality and gender is equal, is embraced and is loved.”

musical number, over the entire two hours, maintaining dialogue even when in the wings for quick changes.

This year, 37 of the School’s most senior Performing Arts students and two furry professionals took to the stage for the dizzyingly energetic production of Legally Blonde. Together, with a truly amazing production team, the cast and crew collaborated for seven months to bring the hit show to life on stage.

The characters of Legally Blonde are presented archetypally; pink and fun, or dull and driven. We asked our audiences to dispose of judgements based on stale and old-fashioned perceptions of how things ‘should be’ and instead to embrace diversity, uniqueness and aspiration against all odds.

The talented student cast worked tirelessly with a dedicated group of choreographers, directors, musical directors, designers and vocal coaches to get ‘whipped into shape’ for roles that required skipping and singing simultaneously, dancing and leaping in heels, cheerleading, dog training, sales assisting, golf buggy driving, violin playing, back-flipping, American accent nailing and some very serious wig wearing. Some students played up to six different characters, seamlessly altering accents and costumes from scene to scene while others, notably the challenging role of Elle Woods, required Year 11 student Anna Mallows-Zejak to be on stage for almost every

This, our brilliant students achieved both on and off the stage. As the Director of this year’s production, I could not be more proud of the bubbly, enthusiastic and committed cast of gifted and supportive students who always encouraged, motivated, congratulated, and reassured each other throughout the production process. There are many challenges that come with producing a high calibre show and the enormous success of the show is credit to the passion and work ethic of all involved. Congratulations Blondies! HOLLY LOUGHRAN – DIRECTOR

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SPRING CONCERT 2016

FAREWELL TO OUR SENIOR MUSICIANS JAZZ ENSEMBLE, FROGGERS, OPENED THE 2016 SPRING CONCERT WITH ITS CHARACTERISTIC STYLE AND VIGOUR, PERFORMING THE THEME FROM HAWAII 5-0 AND THE NEW SWING STYLED ZUIT SUIT RIOT. THIS LEADING ENSEMBLE COMPRISES A GROUP OF HIGHLY COMMITTED AND EXPERIENCED PERFORMERS FROM ACROSS THREE CAMPUSES.

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The Senior Vocal Ensemble followed with an a cappella, arrangement of the unofficial national anthem of Australia, You’re the Voice. The Ensemble performed this unconventional, though beautiful, version with skill and assurance, featuring all aspects of the choir. On piano, Iris Liu performed The Hunting Song by Felix Mendelssohn, the German composer of the early European Romantic period. The Hunting Song features highly effective picturesque musical images, replete with tumbling notes reminiscent of galloping horses and bucolic hunting horn calls which Iris recreated beautifully. Bridgette Kelsey’s arresting performance of Music for a While by Henry Purcell, cast a spell across the audience. Her supernal voice, resonated throughout the space creating an exquisite atmosphere. The ever popular Supersax, a saxophone quartet that explores various genres of music from classical through to jazz, presented an early taste of Christmas cheer with The Nutcracker Suite by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, a composer of the Late European Romantic period. Earlier this year, the Orlando Orchestra provided the musical accompaniment for our first opera production Orlando by George

Handel. The Orchestra again performed a suite of instrumental pieces from the production, comprising the Overture, Gigue, Sinfonia for the Heavenly Potion and the Act 3 Sinfonia. The Frogmore Trio, formed in 2011, performed the Third Movement of Bach’s Trio Sonata BWV 1038. Eliza Harvey, Robert McIntyre and Iris Liu, all Year 12 students, will leave a legacy of fine trio performances and three chairs of excellence to be filled. Eliza Harvey is a distinguished leader and a dedicated musician. Following the trio performance she rested her violin and stepped forward to sing An Chloe by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. In relation to voice matters, tone may indeed be everything. Strong in the higher register and dark in the lower, Eliza gave a beautiful and commanding performance of Mozart’s famous Aria. The Senior Brass Ensemble performed War by the Hypnotic Brass Ensemble which the audience recognised from the recent film, The Hunger Games. The Cat’s Meow, a group of dedicated singers from Years 9 to 12, also veterans of the Mt Gambier Generations in Jazz Festival, performed an a Cappella version of the heart wrenching Gospel standard Wayfaring Stranger arranged by Melbourne musician, Tracey Miller. Callum Matthew and Shinji Hibino performed the second work by Bach in the program. The Double Violin Concerto movement 1 is a popular concert item and features both soloists in equal measure. The Flute

Ensemble performed Faded by Alan Walker and Louise Solomonides performed Perhaps Perhaps Perhaps by Osvald Farres with certainty, and a beautiful sound. Vibe, the senior string ensemble, performed Adagio, an emotive and reflective work used in notable films such as Gallipoli in 1981. Solo performances at the Spring Concert are usually programed for Year 12 and VCE music students. Robert McIntyre, on flute, played the exotic Bali Moods by Anne Boyd followed by Luc van Vliet on saxophone with Café 1930 by Astor Piazzolla. With an easy segue, the Chamber Wind Ensemble assembled on stage. Comprised of senior orchestra members, the group performed the charming Minuet 1 and 2 by Seixas. As expected, Kamikaze Crash Helmets blitzed the stage with a performance of the Beatles classic, Come Together. Whilst the song featured blistering guitar solos and a tidy arrangement, Ben Landgraf, Sean Butler and Ben Lofthouse demonstrated how a fine rock rhythm section can unite in performance, while Nick Sheppard successfully navigated the absurdist lyrical content with style and energy. The final item of the Spring Concert was provided by the Senior Orchestra. The performance of the joyous Valse No.2 from Tchaikovsky’s ballet Swan Lake, was a happy farewell to the Bayview Gymnasium (Keith Jones Gymnasium) as the venue for Senior concerts in anticipation of the new and fabulous Creativity Centre. The Concert was a fitting farewell for all of our talented Year 12 musicians who have given our audiences many years of stupendous performances. We thank each and every one for their dedication and leadership, particularly during their VCE years. GAVIN CORNISH HEAD OF PERFORMING ARTS DIRECTOR OF MUSIC

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CREATIVITY CENTRE BALL

IN JULY, MORE THAN 400 MEMBERS OF THE MENTONE GRAMMAR COMMUNITY DRESSED UP AND HEADED INTO THE SPECTACULAR ATLANTIC, DOCKLANDS TO CELEBRATE THE NEW CREATIVITY CENTRE. The exciting new Creativity Centre, located on the corner of Como Pde West and Lucerne Street, is currently under construction and due for completion in 2017. It will be the largest development seen at Mentone Grammar, transforming the School’s performing and visual arts, technology and senior school facilities. The cutting edge design includes a 450 seat theatre; inspiring learning facilities for middle and senior students including light-filled purpose designed visual arts studios for painting, sculpture, drawing, digital photography, printmaking and visual communication design; specialist food and materials technology, robotics, animation and 3D labs, a recording studio as part of an extensive new music school, drama and dance studios, passive and active learning zones and courtyards, and a stunning gallery space.

A big thank you for the Creativity Centre Ball major sponsor, Mercedes-Benz Brighton. 28

Mentone Grammar MENTOR ISSUE 2 2016

As part of the fundraising effort, guests were treated to a variety of entertainers including our very talented student performers, funny man Brian Nankervis and the gorgeous Kate Ceberano AM. There was something for everyone! Some lucky guests also picked up a bargain in the live and silent auctions on offer. A big thank you and congratulations to Mentone Grammar Staff and our parent group organisers who worked tirelessly to bring the night together: Margie Read Flavell, Heather Para, Trudy Brooks, Tim Leonard, Kristin McKinnon, Michelle Sfameni, Renee Rimanic, Gavin Cornish, Anne Louise Halliday, Nicki Wragg, Andrew Oxland, Caroline Phillips, Mia LeFevre Taylor, Christine Davie and Jo Shermon.


29


MENTONE GRAMMAR

FOUNDATION BUILDING FUND THE SCHOOL GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES THE FOLLOWING DONORS TO THE MENTONE GRAMMAR SCHOOL FOUNDATION BUILDING FUND UP UNTO, AND INCLUDING, SEPTEMBER 2016.

Mrs M Adams

Mr & Mrs F Filikotzias

Mr & Mrs R Langenfelds

Mr & Mrs K A Reed

Mr D Butler & Ms E Akasaka

Mr M Flavell & Ms M Read-Flavell

Mr & Mrs H Latchford

Mr & Mrs M Reinehr

Mr & Mrs R Alford

Mr & Dr N Fletcher

Mr S Lawson & Ms C Ditchburn

Mr T Riley

Mr & Mrs T Appel

Mrs T Flower

Dr & Mrs P Leason

Mr & Mrs G Robson

Mr & Mrs M Armstrong

Mr & Mrs N Fraser

Mr & Mrs L Leonard

Mr & Mrs R Roos

Mr N Armstrong & Ms K Lane

Mr A Fraser

Mr & Mrs R Leydin

Mr & Mrs J Rosaia

Mrs P Avery

Mr & Mrs M Frost

Mr X Li & Ms H Zheng

Mr & Mrs R Rotar

Mr & Mrs S Basin

Mr G Furneaux

Mr L Liu & Ms J Xia

Mr P Roy & Ms B Khoo

Mr & Mrs S Bera

Mr & Mrs S Gardiner

Mr Y Liu & Ms D Ji

Mr & Mrs P Ryan

Mr & Mrs S Blain-Bartle

Mr & Mrs L Gelbak

Mr Lowe & Ms C Barker-Hemings

Mr S Sabih & Mrs G Hassoun

Mr A Blasse

Mr & Mrs F Giannioglou

Mr J Orr & Mrs A Lucena-Orr

Mr & Mrs D Scott

Mr & Mrs R Booth

Mr & Mrs D Gill

Mr & Mrs O Magee

Mr & Mrs G Shepherd

Mr P Bosa & Mrs R Stobart

Mr & Mrs E Glotzer

Mr P Magennis & Ms J Haslam

Mr & Mrs D Sheridan

Mr & Mrs M Bouwmeester

Mr & Mrs C Gold

Mr & Mrs N Maggio

Mrs H Shi

Mr & Mrs M J Bowden

Mr D Grant & Mrs N Grant

Mr & Mrs A Malby-Luke

Mr & Mrs M Skinner

Mr K Brodie & Ms B Morris

Mr & Mrs D Grant

Mr R Maluga

Mr & Mrs M Smith

Mr & Mrs A Bromidis

Mr & Mrs R Grey

Mr & Ms D McCall

Mr & Mrs D Smith

Mr & Mrs A Bryant

Mr J Grigoriou

Mr & Mrs M McGrath

Mr & Mrs A So

Mr & Mrs T Bucci

Mr & Mrs N Hall

Mr & Mrs P McKinnon

Mr Y Sun & Ms W Li

Mr & Mrs P Burmeister

Mr & Mrs I G Halliday

Mr & Mrs A Meehan

Mr & Mrs I Svojtka

Mrs S Callaghan

Mr & Ms M Heaven

Mr & Mrs P Mentiplay

Mr B Swifte & Ms A McCormick

Mr & Mrs S Campbell

Mr & Mrs S Hecker

Mr J Miao & Mrs C Lin

Mr & Mrs M Tarlinton

Mr & Mrs D Carnegie

Mr & Mrs R Hennig

Mr & Mrs S Michell

Mr Taylor & Ms M Le Fevre Taylor

Mr & Mrs K Carson

Mr & Mrs R Henricks

Mr A Moore & Ms M Momsen

Mr A Terry & Ms S Clark

Mr M Chan & Miss R Wane

Mr & Mrs G Holland

Mr K Mooney & Ms K Brown

Mr & Mrs S Thai

Mr & Mrs B Chaplin

Mr & Mrs A Hood

Mr & Mrs S Mottram

Mr & Mrs B Thiele

Mr & Mrs V Chun

Mr & Mrs S Hooker

Mr & Mrs C Nassau

Mr & Mrs T Thompson

Mr & Mrs D Close

Mr & Mrs Hopkins

Mr & Mrs J Natsioulas

Mr M Turnbull & Ms S Maurer

Mr & Mrs P Colliver

Mr & Mrs S Howell

Ms J Considine

Mr & Mrs S Turner

Mr & Mrs L Cox

Mr & Mrs D Ingram

Mr & Mrs L Nung

Mr & Mrs S Vallis

Mr & Mrs G Cunnington

Mrs D Jackson

Mr M Officer

Mr & Mrs D van Straaten

Mr & Mrs S Dakic

Mr C Ji & Ms L Zhang

Dr & Mrs O-J

Mr & Mrs J Vear

Mr & Mrs A Demura

Mr & Mrs D Jones

Mr & Mrs G Orfanidis

Mr & Mrs D Vise

Mr & Mrs K Devers

Mr & Mrs B Jones

Mr & Mrs C Papadopoulos

Mr M Wagstaff & Ms S Chaffey

Mr & Mrs J Di Tirro

Mr A Littleford & Ms C Jupp

Mr I Parker

Mr & Mrs R Watkins

Mr S Ding & Ms C Wu

Mr & Mrs J Kalogerakis

Mr & Mrs D Parr

Miss D Watson

Mr R Djurovic & Ms I Ross

Mr J Karras & Miss T James

Mr R Paterson & Ms M Valenti

Mr & Mrs B Weber

Mr P Dykas & Ms A Bondini

Mr & Mrs P Kelsey

Mr & Mrs Patron

Mr & Mrs W White

Mrs K Edwards

Mr & Mrs S Kennedy

Rev & Mrs K J Pedersen

Mr & Mrs F Hutchinson

Mr & Mrs P Ellix

Mrs K Keogh

Mr & Mrs Pertich

Mr & Mrs M Winestone

Mr & Mrs M Evans

Mr & Mrs G Kershaw

Mr & Mrs N Petrie

Mr M Griffith & Ms C Woods

Ms J Ewart & Mr B McTigue

Mrs E Kidd

Mr & Mrs G Phillips

Mr G Xu & Ms S Wu

Mr & Mrs A Fagan

Mr & Mrs L Krol

Mr & Mrs P Piotrowski

Mr & Mrs R Zallmann

Mr & Mrs G Felsenthal

Mr M & Ms M Landgraf

Mr & Mrs S Poll

Mr R Zallmann Mr W Wang

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Mentone Grammar MENTOR ISSUE 2 2016


THE MENTONIANS

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

I AM HONOURED TO BE WRITING TO YOU AS THE PRESIDENT OF THE MENTONIANS ASSOCIATION. HAVING LED THE WAY FOR THE PAST SEVEN YEARS AS PRESIDENT, MARK PEARMAN HAS MADE AN EXTRAORDINARY CONTRIBUTION TO OUR ALUMNI COMMUNITY. Mark has ensured The Mentonians Association is well positioned to continue to be a dynamic and relevant organisation for all present and future Alumni. On behalf of the entire Alumni community I thank Mark for his great work in his role as President and I also look forward to continuing to work closely with him as an active member of the committee in the year ahead.

to connect with us. As a committee we try hard to create an environment of inclusion and connectedness through events and social gatherings. Our latest undertaking is the establishment of Panther Productions which you can read more about later in this edition. What else can we do? Have you any suggestions? If you have please contact me at: president@mentonegrammar.net

I would like to take this opportunity to ‘set our course’ for the future and articulate what we stand for. We are here for you and we want to hear from you! As the new President I am committed to reaching out and engaging with as many current and new members as possible. I encourage you

I look forward to hearing from you.

TMA COMMITTEE President

Andrew Oxland (1988)

Vice President

Tony Falkingham (1981)

Secretary

John Ponnusamy (2010)

Treasurer

Vic Stroumos (1978)

Committee Members

Georgia Ahern (2011) Josh Burt (1989) Cameron Dunkerley (1986) Phil Harrington (2010) Mark Henricks (1977) Miranda Ingram (2013) Imogen Lawson (2014) Mark Pearman (1982) Sven Samild (1987) Rob Sinclair (1976) Ben Tardrew (2004)

ANDREW OXLAND PRESIDENT

A Note from Principal Mal Cater There is a ‘changing of the guard’ occurring within our Alumni Association, The Mentonians. After eight years as President, Mr Mark Pearman, is standing down and after six years as our Alumni Manager, Mr Greg Wilkinson, is retiring at the end of the year. Mark’s leadership of the Association has been extremely robust and it has thrived as a result. He will continue on as a committee member leading the introduction of Panther Productions, the Mentonians arm of the Arts. Mark graduated from Mentone Grammar in 1982 and has maintained a strong and passionate interest in the School ever since. His children, Jasmin and James, have attended the School and he has played many games of basketball for the OMBC. We are extremely grateful to

Alumni Director

Greg Wilkinson

Alumni and Development Office Manager

Fiona Dallas

him for his leadership and his continued involvement. Unlike Mark, Greg never attended the School but the passion he has exhibited in the last six years you could mistake him for a former student. Greg brought to the School much expertise in the area of Alumni Management and it is through his considerable knowledge of the sector that our Association has been able to further improve. We thank Greg for his fine service to the School and wish him well, when the time comes about, for his retirement. We also look forward to him visiting the School and maintaining contact through the Alumni.

MAL CATER PRINCIPAL 31


01

FUNCTIONS AND EVENTS

02 REUNIONS CONTINUE TO BE OUR LIFEBLOOD. IN ADDITION TO REUNIONS FOR THE YEARS OF 1976, 1981 AND 1986 WE HAVE ALSO HAD GATHERINGS IN SYDNEY, BRISBANE AND BANGKOK BOTH THE SYDNEY AND BRISBANE DINNERS PROVED SUCCESSFUL EVENTS WHILE IN BANGKOK JOHN (1965) AND ANNA DAWSON MET WITH JITTI RACHAIBUN (1964) AND SUKIT (1961) AND SUSAN PACHIMSAWAT AT THE BANGKOK POLO CLUB.

As usual the final reunions of the year were impossible to bring to a close as old friends just wanted to chat the night away. All efforts of dimming lights and asking politely failed, but eventually the room was cleared and many then stood outside continuing their conversations. It’s a great problem to have! Next year will be the turn of the 1977, 1982, 1987, 1992, 1997, 2002, 2007, 2012 and 2016 year groups. Please don’t let the opportunity pass you by. Come and see what all the excitement is about. You will receive your calendar of dates early in the new year.

01

Meeting up with Mal Cater in Brisbane.

02

Mal Cater meets up with his 1981 Peer Year.

03

A big group managed to meet in Sydney for dinner.

03

04

05 04

Members of the 1986 group enjoying the Greenways Campus.

05

Members of the 1976 group.

06

Former staff member Rick Thomas with Jonathan Pilbrow (left) and David Sheppard.

07

An enjoyable dinner in Bangkok.

06

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Mentone Grammar MENTOR ISSUE 2 2016


TMA ANNUAL DINNER

01

01

Ben Cavey (left) and Ivan Prosper.

02

Brooke Anderson with Hockey Club President Rod Tansey (left) and Vice President Jeremy Longstaff.

03

Basketballers Roger Stansfield and Richard Hogg.

04

Honorary Mentonians Natalie McLennan, Kathryn Lawlor, Jan Longworth, Mary Howard and Elizabeth King.

02 03 MORE THAN 120 MENTONIANS, TEACHERS AND FRIENDS FILLED THE MENTONE GRAMMAR FUNCTION CENTRE FOR WHAT WAS ANOTHER OUTSTANDING EVENING OF ENTERTAINMENT AND CELEBRATION. AN INNOVATION THIS YEAR SAW US SUPPLEMENT OUR ENTERTAINMENT WITH PERFORMANCES BY CURRENT AND PAST STUDENTS.

We thank James Pearman and Adam Pratt from Year 12 and Kelsey Cotton (2012), Ned Dixon (2012), Caitlin New (2015) and James Shaw-Driver (2015) for adding so much to our night. This will undoubtedly become a regular feature in the years to come as we build our Panther Productions affiliate, an alumni arm of the Mentone Grammar Arts. A number of Mentonians, teachers and club members were honoured with our major award, the Tony Drinan Medal, being presented to Professor Tim Brailsford (1981). Tim, who is currently the Vice Chancellor and President of Bond University, has enjoyed an outstanding academic career and is featured overleaf. Our Sportsperson of the Year was Brooke Anderson from the Mentone Hockey Club.

Brooke, who is 17, plays in the Senior Women’s team in the Premier League. This year has been a standout year for her where she has been selected in no less than four Victorian teams – the Victorian U18 Women’s Indoor Team, the Victorian Open Age Women’s Indoor team, the Victorian U21 Women’s Team and the Victorian U18 Women’s Team. These selections resulted in her attending the National Championships in Launceston, Sydney and Wollongong and also saw her selected in the Victorian Emerging Viper Squad. Richard Hogg of the Basketball Club was named as our Club Person of the Year. Rick has been playing basketball under the banner of the Old Mentonians since the earlier 1980s. He has competed in over 1000 games and has coordinated the weekly roster of the senior over 35s team for the last 16 years comprising 33 seasons. Unfortunately, Richard was unable to attend the dinner and the award was accepted on his behalf by fellow basketball veteran Roger Stansfield. We congratulate both Brooke and Richard on their outstanding achievements and contributions. Honorary Mentonian status was conferred on Cricket Club stalwarts Ben Cavey and Ivan Prosper.

04 Ben first played Cricket for the Old Mentonians Cricket Club in 1992/93 and over the years has been a hard worker and fully involved member, not only on the field where he has captained and coached various teams, but also in running and organising the Club’s Social Functions and as a committee member. Ivan started playing with the OMCC in 2000, joined the committee the following year and has been a member ever since. He has been the adviser on all things IT and has even developed an ‘APP’ for the Club. While he has been a willing contributor off field he has also been instrumental in enabling the OMCC to win Grand Finals and is an OMCC Premiership Player. We were also pleased to induct the following staff members as Honorary Mentonians in recognition of their 10 years of service to the School; Kathryn Lawlor, Elizabeth King, Natalie McLennan, Mary Howard and Jan Longworth. Also accepting Honorary status, but were unable to attend the dinner, were Michael Prabaharan, Vikki Octigan, Joanne Kamp, Jenni Harrison, Christine Altidis, Meg Hayes and Veronica Byrnes. We thank them for all they do to make Mentone Grammar the school it is today and will present them with their certificates at a time in the near future. Our congratulations to all of the above and our thanks to all who came along to make the 2016 Annual Dinner another successful and enjoyable occasion.

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TONY DRINAN AWARD 01

Tony Drinan Award Medal.

02

Tim Brailsford (centre) with Jan Drinan and TMA President Andrew Oxland.

03

Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Tim Brailsford.

02

01 AS A PERPETUAL MEMORIAL TO AN EXCEPTIONAL MENTONIAN AND TO RECOGNISE THE ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF FORMER MENTONE GRAMMAR STUDENTS, THE ‘TONY DRINAN AWARD’ IS AWARDED EACH YEAR TO A PAST STUDENT WHO HAS ACHIEVED OUTSTANDING SUCCESS BRINGING HONOUR TO THE SCHOOL AND SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY.

This year the recipient is Professor Tim Brailsford (1981). Tim graduated from Mentone Grammar as a Prefect in 1981 and has subsequently enjoyed an outstanding academic career. He is currently the Vice Chancellor and President of Bond University. His previous positions include Executive Dean at the University of Queensland; Dean at the Australian National University, and other senior academic positions at the University of Melbourne and at Monash. He holds a PhD, Master and Honours degrees and is a Senior Fellow of the Financial Services Institute of Australasia, Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management and Fellow of CPA Australia. Tim’s area of expertise is finance and investments. He was appointed as the inaugural Frank Finn Professor of Finance at the University of Queensland and has published a number of books and

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Mentone Grammar MENTOR ISSUE 2 2016

monographs, together with over 70 research papers and is the co-author of the best-selling Australasian text, Investments: Concepts & Applications, which is now in its 5th edition. His research has been recognised through various prestigious manuscript awards and in 2003 he was awarded the Prime Minister’s Centenary Medal. Tim is a regular consultant and advisor to industry and government, both State and Federal, particularly in the field of investment management and valuation. He also has experience on several company boards and government committees. In addition, he has also served on a number of professional committees, including the Professional Education Board of CPA Australia and is the past President of the Accounting and Finance Association of Australia & New Zealand, the Australian Business Deans Council and the

03 Association of Asia-Pacific Business Schools. Tim was a keen and talented sportsman at school and has continued to be active in this area. He has coaching qualifications in cricket, is a qualified rugby referee and has served on the Boards of the Queensland Rugby Union and Australian University Sport. He has also made an outstanding contribution at the local level and in 2011 was made a Life Member of the Kenmore & Districts Rugby Club. The Mentonians Association congratulates Tim on being named the 2016 Tony Drinan Medal recipient and all hope his fine example will serve as inspiration to the current generation of Mentone Grammar students. Acknowledgement Our appreciation to the Bond University for providing the TMA with information for this article.


SIR ROBERT JACKSON – A TRULY GREAT AUSTRALIAN

02

01 THE AUSTRALIAN DICTIONARY OF BIOGRAPHY IS AUSTRALIA’S NATIONAL BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY, RECORDING FOR POSTERITY AUSTRALIA’S GREAT ACHIEVERS FROM ALL WALKS OF LIFE. Until recently, Mentone Grammar could claim affinity with but one name in this monumental work that being our revered former art master and internationally recognised sculptor, Karl Duldig. Now he is joined by Mentonian, Sir Robert Jackson (1928), a man who made a monumental contribution on the world stage in saving the lives of countless thousands. The author of Sir Robert’s entry, Dr Chad Mitcham of the Australian National University, claims that Jackson “was an international logistical genius who displayed exceptional ability in dealing with large-scale, multinational emergencies”. Showered with honours by the end of his life, his beginnings at a modestly appointed Mentone Grammar School in 1923-28 were nevertheless promising. On the death of his father young Jackson chose a career with the RAN. Although a comparatively junior officer, he was by the outbreak of World War II thoroughly involved in plans to defend the island of Malta

against Axis attack. His brilliant contribution to the success of these plans through his mastery of supply in all its ramifications earnt him great credit in high places. His skills in logistics readily transferred to the civilian and international fields. Though he was later to manage massive international relief efforts with the UN, an organisation struggling to fulfill its mandate, Jackson’s first assignments were of a diplomatic and economic character, largely centred on the Middle East. Jackson’s characteristic energy and abilities resulted in his being appointed UN Assistant Secretary General for Co-ordination. Here, his blunt Aussie style brought him into conflict with the then UN and government called upon his services to head the new Department of National Development. This embraced, amongst other things, issues associated with the Snowy Mountains hydro-electric scheme. In Ghana in 1953 he was Special Commissioner advising on the Volta River Project, a vast hydro-electric power and aluminium smelting scheme. Later, based chiefly in New York, Jackson undertook consultancies and assignments for the UN. Additionally, working in a part time capacity, he advised the Liberian government. On the Mekong Committee’s advisory board in 1962, he was, by 1968, charged with the task of reviewing the UN’s capacity for aiding developing countries. The resulting

01

Jackson (top middle) as a member of the school’s first group of students in 1923.

02

Robert Jackson in 1928.

report was one of singular significance for the UN and indeed the entire world. Further calls upon his extraordinary talents were not slow in coming. In 1972 it was the UN relief operations in Bangladesh, which tested his abilities to the limit but produced model solutions. Then there followed UN assistance tasks in Zambia, Indochina, Cape Verde and Cambodia. His occasional abruptness notwithstanding, he was also regarded as being firm, but fair. His biographer records his “remarkable capacity for absorbing the technical details of specialist work”. His utter commitment to the task in hand, together with his extraordinary ability were marks of his genius. He was appointed OBE in 1941, CMG in 1944, knighted in 1956, appointed KCVO in 1962 and appointed AC in 1986. He died in London in 1991. It was following Sir Robert’s death in 1991 that perhaps the greatest honour was bestowed upon him. In a remark made in 1997, UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan implored: “Jacko, where are you now when we need you?”

Labore et Honore HUGH GREEN

35


02

01

THE JOY OF VOLUNTEERING 01-03 Cazz Kimber at work rescuing and rehabilitating animals at the Lilongwe Wildlife Trust Wildlife Centre, located in the middle of Lilongwi, Malawi.

VOLUNTEERING IS A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE. IT IS ONE OF VERY FEW WAYS YOU HELP AN ORGANISATION WHILE LEARNING AND GAINING EXPERIENCE IN RETURN. CAZZ KIMBER (2007) FOUND VOLUNTEERING GAVE HER SELFCONFIDENCE AND AN AMAZING INSIGHT INTO THE WORLD OF CONSERVATION, A FIELD THAT HAS BECOME HER LIFE’S WORK. SHE NOW ASKS WHETHER YOU WOULD LIKE TO JOIN HER AND HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO DISCOVER THE JOYS THAT VOLUNTEERING CAN BRING. THIS IS HER STORY...

Being South African born, Cazz has always felt a connection to that continent. After leaving Mentone Grammar she volunteered for six months in a South African school working with special needs children with the aim of integrating them into mainstream classes. She then volunteered with the South African Wildlife ACT which is a conservation organisation that provides endangered and priority species monitoring to wildlife reserves. She would go out twice a day to monitor the behaviour and location of a variety of animals which had been fitted with collars. These animals included African wild dogs, lions, elephants and cheetahs. At this time she was also studying for her Bachelor of Science at Monash University. On graduating she knew her career path would be in conservation and that has brought her to this safe, vibrant and friendly nation of Malawi where she is currently the Volunteer Manager of the Lilongwe Wildlife Trust. The aim of the Trust is to protect the habitat and wildlife in this, one of the poorest nations on Earth.

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Mentone Grammar MENTOR ISSUE 2 2016

Rescuing and rehabilitating animals such as vervet monkeys, baboons, owls and hedgehogs is part of the day-to-day life for staff and volunteers at the Trust’s Wildlife Centre located in the middle of Lilongwi, Malawi’s capital city. However, from the beginning of the rainy season in October to around January they receive an influx of orphaned animals that have lost their mothers. Each animal that arrives has its own tragic story, but the main threats to Malawi’s wildlife are the bushmeat and pet trades. Wild animals are illegally killed for bushmeat and the babies are spared to then be sold as pets. Though against the law, some people still seem to think that’s it’s a good idea to have wild animals such as monkeys as pets – however, they soon realise that they need much more time and attention than regular pets and become overwhelmed. The lucky ones end up at the Centre where they are cared for a round the clock by

03 dedicated staff and volunteers. Some of the orphans need hands-on surrogate care and primates in particular need bodily contact in the early weeks and months to support their emotional development. As soon as possible it’s hands-off, as they integrate orphans with their own kind to give them the best chance of survival back in the wild where they belong. Now the Trust needs your help. If you are an animal lover, don’t mind monkey cuddles and are prepared to don a boiler suit this could be the start of your very own African adventure. Lilongwe Wildlife Trust is currently offering 20 per cent off the placement fee for Australian volunteers for the period of orphan season. The warm heart of Africa needs your warm heart this summer. You can learn more from the Trust’s website: www.lilongwewildlife.org/index/getinvolved/volunteer/about-our-volunteerprogramme/


OUR PERFORMING ARTS GRADUATES CREATE A NEW SPACE PANTHER PRODUCTIONS

01 MENTONE GRAMMAR HAS A LONG, RICH HISTORY OF PRODUCING EXTRAORDINARY STAGE PRODUCTIONS ALONG WITH TALENTED STUDENTS, WHO HAVE GONE ON TO EXCEL IN ALL GENRES OF THE ARTS. Behind the scenes at any Mentone Grammar production you will find former students who have returned to support our current students both on and beyond the stage. Actors, musicians, choreographers, backstage and technical crew all enjoy being welcomed back to share their skills and knowledge with each new generation of performers. Most recently we witnessed a musical fusion of generations in the School’s brilliant production of Legally Blonde. Former student and now the School’s current Director of Choral Studies, Anthony Bingham (1994), worked closely in the orchestra pit with former student, Ned Dixon (2012), a most prodigious musician. From School, Ned went on to study a Bachelor of Music at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, majoring in composition, and minoring in classical piano performance. Anthony and Ned have since collaborated on many a musical project and enjoy the history they share as Mentonians.

By mentoring Ned, in many ways Anthony is repaying a debt to all who had mentored him in his younger days, former Director of Music, Lewis Plumridge, being foremost. “When I was studying Music at university Lewis came to as many performances as possible and he would also phone regularly to see how I was getting on. Over time he gave me some opportunities to work in orchestra pits at Mentone and also to assist with choral teaching. Twenty years on, Lewis is still interested in what I am doing. At a younger age it was fantastic to know that I had someone like Lewis in my corner.” Now it is Ned’s turn to enjoy being one of many Mentonians to return to the Performing Arts in a professional capacity. Later this year he will work with Bayview students on their production of The Lion King JR. With the opening of the Creativity Centre and to harness such great talent, we are excited to announce the creation of Panther Productions, a Mentonians Performing Arts company. We envisage that all forms of music, theatre and dance will be represented and we invite all Mentonians with a passion for the stage to join us. Former TMA President, Mark Pearman, will manage the group and is motivated by the endless opportunities that abound for anyone who would like to be part of supporting and performing at future Mentonian and School events and productions. Performance opportunities are many with reunions, the

02

01-03 Panther Productions in action behind the scenes at Legally Blonde The Musical. Mentonians Anthony Bingham, Ned Dixon and Jonathan Kuhn (2012) perform.

Annual Dinner and the Community Sports Day all springing to mind. Our members will also be able to utilise the magnificent 450 seat Thorold Theatre or the smaller performance space of the Mary Jones Theatre. To register your interest in joining Panther Productions we welcome you to contact Mark Pearman at: www.facebook.com/PantherProductions-633577926824133

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02

TMA NEWS

01

Vale Beryl White We record with sadness the passing of Beryl White. Beryl, with her warm and outgoing personality, was the wife of the late Mick White and mother of Keith (1971) Michael (1972) and Brian (1981). She was a tireless worker for the School and a great support for Mick in his role as Chair of the Board (1982 – 1995). Our condolences go to her family and friends.

Arts Karl Duldig Revisited While in Singapore our archivist, paid a visit to the National Gallery where he viewed the late Karl Duldig’s, ‘Malay Boy’. Karl completed this work in 1939 whilst in Singapore after fleeing Nazi occupied Vienna. Shortly after Karl and his family were deported to Australia as ‘enemy aliens’ and interned at Tatura. Karl went on to teach art at Mentone Grammar from 1945 – 67 and also became an internationally recognised sculptor whose work is represented in the National Gallery of Victoria. The ‘Malay Boy’ sculpture was lost for many years and has an interesting story narrated by his daughter, Eva de Jong-Duldig. One can only marvel at the Duldig story. It’s one of prodigious talent, both artistic and sporting, and the human spirit’s triumph over adversity. I wrote a piece for the June 2015 Mentor which you may like to access via our website.

Sport Honour for Mentone Grammar Founder One of our founders, Cecil Godby, was recently inducted into the Australian Racing Hall of Fame. With a thriving local racecourse the Mentone district attracted many racing people and much wealth. One was Cecil Godby who started life as a jockey and then went on to become a very successful trainer over the next 40 years. In 1921-22 he was the leading Victorian metropolitan trainer where he enjoyed much success with his 20 horses, the most notable being ‘Heroic’. Heroic won a succession of races including the VRC Ascot Vale Stakes and Maribyrnong Stakes, the AJC Champagne and Chelmsford

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Mentone Grammar MENTOR ISSUE 2 2016

Stakes, the AJC Derby and the Caulfield Guineas. Among Godby’s many feature wins in later years were two more Caulfield Cups, an Australian Cup, three Moonee Valley Cups, two Futurity Stakes, an Epsom Handicap, a Cantala Stakes, Oakleigh Plate and Toorak Handicap. Cecil sent his sons to the School, Ken being our First Cricket captain in 1923. We congratulate the late Cecil Godby on his induction and remember him as one of the small group of men who foundered our School.

03

RIO Olympics We were represented by three Mentonians at the Rio Olympics: John Peers (2009) currently ranked 13th in the world in men’s doubles, competed in the tennis while two others were officiating. Josh Burt (1989) was one of six judges in a pool of nine hockey officials. He was the only male official to be selected from Australia. Josh has a wealth of officiating experience behind him including the Youth Olympics, Junior World Cup, Indoor World Cup, Hockey League Finals and Championship Trophy. Also officiating is Andre Blasse (1981) who originally worked as a volunteer at the Sydney Olympics in 2000 and has enjoyed his first appointment as chief measurer of the Finn Class yachts.

05 01

Beryl White at the Mentone Grammar Fete in 1983.

02

Cecil with Northwind winner of the 1936 Caulfield Cup.

03

John Peers in action.

04

Josh Burt – Olympic hockey official.

05

Mickelburough family – three generations.

Celebration of Soccer Next year is the 20th anniversary of the Old Mentonians Soccer Club. To mark the occasion, and to recognise soccer at the School, a dinner will be held on 24 March 2017 in the Mentone Grammar Sports and Function Centre. We call on all past and present club players, coaches, past school soccer players and soccer lovers in general to come and celebrate our great game. In addition, we will be recognising the teachers whose foresight and hard work established the game at the School back in the early 1980s. It’s going to be a night to remember! Please spread the word amongst your soccer friends.

Are You a Third Generation Family? It is pleasing that the School continues to attract ever-increasing numbers of children of Mentonians. We currently have more than 70 Mentonians with children at the School. But, how many third generation families have attended or are attending the School? We have been able to identify four – the Rearks, Mickelburoughs, Ingrams and Smyths. Is your family a third generation Mentonian family? Do you know a third generation Mentonian family? If so, please contact Fiona in the Mentonians’ Office. fionad@mentonegrammar.net

04


CONNECTING OUR COMMUNITY School Tours

Our Clubs Continue to Thrive

Our next School Tour dates for 2017: Saturday 11 Feb 9.30am & 11am including Scholarship Testing. Twilight Tour: Tuesday 25 March 6pm

2016 has been yet another great year for our clubs with much success and growth. They remain the backbone of The Mentonians Association and provide a wonderful environment for past students to remain connected. All clubs welcome new members and sponsors. Further information can be gained by visiting the following web sites.

To book, visit: www.mentonegrammar.net For enrolment enquiries email: enrol@mentonegrammar.net

Creativity Centre – Sponsorship Opportunities

or phone 9584 4211.

Take your seat and be part of history!

Cricket: www.oldmentonianscc.com

Find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/mentonegrammar

Seat Sponsorship Sponsor a SEAT in the new Thorold Hall, which will have YOUR NAME on it for the life of the building.

Football: omfcpanthers.teamapp.com

Seats are only $1000 each.

And introducing Panther Productions: www.facebook.com/PantherProductions-633577926824133

Follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/mentonegrammar

Facilities R. M. Sykes Shoreham Camp Marine Parade, Shoreham (Melways Ref: 256 J7) Keysborough Playing Fields 756–768 Springvale Road, Keysborough

Room Sponsorship Sponsor a ROOM, join in a syndicate and have it named after you for the life of the building. Contact Principal, Mal Cater for further room sponsorship enquiries – email: kpl@mentonegrammar.net Black Box Theatre Seats – 24 seats ($500 per seat)

Mentone Grammar Aquatic Centre Lucerne Street, Mentone Grammar Campus Phone: 9581 3288 Greenways Café Greenways Campus Manager: Katherine Nish Phone: 9584 4211 Parents and Friends Association pandf@mentonegrammar.net President: Mia le Fevre School contact: Natalie Wilson nataliew@mentonegrammar.net

Community Events 2017 Visit www.mentonegrammar.net for details

Thorold Theatre Seats – 450 seats ($1000 per seat) Creativity Centre Raffle Tickets – Buy online To be in the running for some great prizes, including a Mercedes Benz A180 car and having your school fees paid, visit: www.mentonegrammar.net/event for prize details and to purchase tickets! Winners announced: P&F Christmas Lunch: Friday 2 December 2016.

Basketball: www.facebook.com/ombcbasketball

Soccer: www.facebook.com/OldMentoniansSC Hockey: www.mentonehockey.org.au

For information regarding Netball and Touch Rugby please contact the Mentonians Office.

We’d like you to Like, Tweet, Tag or Join Us! Social media is the quickest most up to date form of communication of our time. With this in mind The Mentonians have adopted a suite of social media platforms to help get our message out and keep our community connected. Like us and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to keep up to date with all the latest news and events. By downloading the TMA app you are able to have all three platforms as well as event calendars, contact details and so much more. It is free and is available for both android and iPhone by searching The Mentonians.

The Mentonians Association (TMA)

The Mentonians can be found via the below details;

Our purpose is to serve our members and to support the School.

Twitter: @the_Mentonians

We aim to excel at meeting our members’ needs and to achieve this we have expanded the events calendar to maximise contact with as many past students as possible through reunions, breakfasts, clubs, special events and other TMA activities.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/thementonians LinkedIn: The Mentonians Mentonians App: Search for The Mentonians

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Mentone Grammar 63 Venice Street Mentone Victoria Australia 3194 Tel: +61 3 9584 4211 Fax: +61 3 9581 3290 enquiry@mentonegrammar.net

TOGETHERAPARTTOGETHER ELC-YEAR 4

YEAR 5-9

YEAR 10-12

www.mentonegrammar.net

Outstanding Coeducational Opportunities ELC-12

Mentor Spring 2016  
Mentor Spring 2016  
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