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APRIL 2018

The BOGE brand: First-Class-Engineering made in Germany.

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TREATMENT


APRIL 2018

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BUSINESS NEWS Petroleum ban – wrong tool for right times.

DEVELOPMENTS

11 Engineers and

architects confront their gender problem.

EMEX 2018

12

The show that can’t be missed.

Revolution Fibres gains aerospace certification, triples production capacity West Auckland nanofibre producer Revolution Fibres is tripling production to meet increased international demand from a range of industries including cosmetics manufacturers through to Formula One teams. West Auckland nanofibre producer Revolution Fibres is tripling production to meet increased international demand from a range of industries including cosmetics manufacturers through to Formula One teams.

continue to develop an even wider range of products for its aerospace clients. The company is the only nanofibre producer in the world to meet aerospace industry standards.

Revolution Fibres use ground breaking electrospinning technology to create nanofibre out of a range of materials including polymers and natural sources such as collagen from hoki fish skins.

“We are now working right across multiple sectors, using both synthetic and bio-based materials. We are ramping up production to ensure we can supply a wide range of new clients and opportunities.”

Traditionally, nanofibre has been used in air and water filters, and in lithium batteries. However, a growing number of applications means Revolution Fibres’ products are finding niche uses across a vast range of industries.

Mr Hosie says there are endless applications for nanofibres and this is reflected in the growing demand for products. Of prime value is Revolution Fibres’ skincare and natural health product actiVlayr, a NZ marine collagen skin treatment which looks like a dressing yet acts as a cream.

THE BOGE PRODUCT RANGE

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CEO Iain Hosie says international demand has meant tripling production with more growth expected this year as nanofibre is used increasingly for large scale manufacturing as well as niche application areas such as the aerospace industry. The lift in production levels comes at a time when Revolution Fibres has renewed its AS9100d certification, a quality assurance requirement which allows it to

“There’s now a steady stream of industries embracing the characteristics of nanofibre material. This will only increase as research uncovers even greater opportunities in life sciences, and so the potential for nanofibre becomes even more limitless.” Mr Hosie says companies are constantly searching for ways to enhance and make products better and stronger

or to enhance existing products. “That’s the beauty of nanofibre, it can give those in highly competitive industries, where innovation is key, a crucial edge over the competition.” Nanofibres are textiles made from super-fine fibres between 100-500 nanometres in width (a human hair is 50,000 nm wide), made from a wide variety of polymers. These small fibres

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Read the Manufacturing Stories that Matter

FEBRUARY 2018

Need High Quantities of Prototypes Fast

5 .nz

rer.co ufactu

www.nzmanufacturer.co.nz BUSINESS NEWS What’s all the blockchain fuss about?

14 DEVELOPMENTS

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www.n

2018

Media

Kit inc

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Analytics leaders wrestle with AI challenges for 2018.

direct3dprinting.com.a

16 DEVELOPMENTS

Engineering firm takes mentoring to another level.

dar

Calen

Is there a standard for smart manufacturing?

Waiting for smart manufacturing standards to develop before implementing the Industrial Internet of Things into your operations may not be the most productive choice. By Dave Vasko, director of Advanced Technology, Rockwell Automation Smart manufacturing is called different things in different countries: Manufacturing USA (United States), Industrie 4.0 (Germany), China 2025 (China) or Industrie du Futur (France). The U.K., Sweden, Japan, Korea and India all have country-specific efforts as well. What do these initiatives have in common? They are all: • Creating a vision for smart manufacturing. • Using the power of digitalization to help manufacturers reduce capital expenditures, improve time to market, reduce inventory and improve productivity. • Extending existing standards to realize the vision. The last point is an important distinction: These initiatives are not creating new standards — they are classifying how best to use existing standards. That means the groundwork for smart manufacturing, Industrie 4.0 and other initiatives is being done in standard developing organizations such as the IEC, ISO, ISA, IEEE and the OPC Foundation. These organizations are where the influence starts and leadership takes hold.

Trade cess / s rt SucThis is particularly important as thought leaders prepare terview / Expo is for In s / ie the g G20 (or Group of Twenty) in D lys August. This olo / 3Economy tDigital eninternational Techn ofiles / Ana elo forum for governments from m e p v ti p cs Pr Dev 20 major/ economies isru Robotiis host to high-level discussions of mpany / Regional t ing / D o r n C le tu r / c a e ufa 018 &T Cyb ity MEX 2 Skills IIoT / rt Man ductiv r Sma Reports – E cture / Pro Economy / struction / ials fo r on la tru C s u a / c Mater eviews and fr ir e C In anc Pr / The ing / ainten ution Show factur ate Change tive M ib Manu m reventa tics & Distr P / / Food turing / Cli g is turin / Log fac anufac ufacturing Manu M r an n fo / Desig / Additive M y Securit

policy issues pertaining to, among other things, global economic growth. On the agenda is digital technology. Countries and companies around the world are eager to adopt digitalization strategies because it levels the playing field for smaller companies, allowing them to reap the same benefits as larger firms, and remain globally competitive and relevant.

Industry is slow to adapt to new technologies, mostly because replacing existing assets with new, smart manufacturing versions can be complex and take time. The transition should take place in phases.

This means if you look only at one count initiative, you’ll have a limited view of global movement. You must look at glo standards to understand global impact.

So rather than the name of the initiative t differentiates the work, it’s the standa behind that initiative that make the differen

The Time to Start Is Now

For organizations hesitant to start their journ

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CONTENTS DEPARTMENTS

NEWS 5 BUSINESS Business impacted by oil and gas ban. 6 MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY

ADVISORS

The value of design to your business.

How the IoT is transforming the customer experience with B2B eCommerce.

10 COMPANY PROFILE

5

When not to pull the plug on innovation.

2018 12 EMEX Labour saving tools at EMEX 2018. All electric technology gives manufacturers competitive edge.

7 Catherine Beard

Floorplan.

Is Executive Director of Export NZ and Manufacturing, divisions of Business NZ, New Zealand’s largest business advocacy group, representing businesses of all sizes.

List of exhibitors. Greater uptake in helmets that minimise fume inhalation. Something for everyone on Hi-Q stand. Industrial Technologies at EMEX 2018.

19 SMART MANUFACTURING

Craig Carlyle

Is Director of Maintenance Transformations Ltd, an executive member of the Maintenance Engineering Societyand the Event Director of the NationalMaintenance Engineering Conference.

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Wellington’s knowledge economy an incubator for graduate employability. Phoenix Contact introduces the world’s narrowest surge protection solution. Inventors and innovators wanted for 2018 Fieldays Innovation Awards. Revolutionary new process for self-healing concrete.

Dieter Adam

12

Disrupting business models is not enough.

Chief Executive, New Zealand Manufacturers and Exporters Association has a Ph.D. in plant biotechnology, consulting and senior management roles in R&D, innovation and international business development.

24 FOOD MANUFACTURING

Kiwi academics develop new food design technique. New education programme to support Kiwi entrepreneurship. NZ well positioned to be global player in alternative protein market.

Lewis Woodward

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26 DEVELOPMENTS

Is Managing Director of Connection Technologies Ltd, Wellington and is passionate about industry supporting NZ based companies, which in turn builds local expertise and knowledge, and provides education and employment for future generations.

Maintenance Society holds network evenings in the regions. Inspirational mum balances surveying with motherhood. Researcher developing e-bike safety sensors receives boost from KiwiNet. OmniPage Server 2 delivers comprehensive and powerful document conversion solution.

INTERVIEW 29 THE Revolution Fibres CEO, Ian Hosie.

Dr Troy Coyle

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30 HEALTH DIY drug testing not the answer. 3D printed organs and medical devices to redefine healthcare.

VIEW 31 REAR Predictive Maintenance: What the future holds for manufacturers ready to invest in IoT analytics. Engineering NZ elects new president.

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Is HERA Director, she has extensive experience in innovation, research management and product development, most recently as Head of Innovation and Product Development & Pacific Islands Export Manager at New Zealand Steel.


Interesting times Labour is having difficulty balancing the books

PUBLISHER

Media Hawke’s Bay Ltd,1/121 Russell Street North, Hastings, New Zealand 4122.

before May budget, dogs wear muzzles inside the

MANAGING EDITOR

cents to 12 cents a litre does not include GST which

Doug Green T: +64 6 870 9029 E: publisher@xtra.co.nz

will be added at the fuel pump tests the cost of living and the small rise in the basic wage is making

CONTRIBUTORS

some companies jittery.

Dieter Adam, Holly Green, Aaldert Verplanke, Ian Hosie, Kirk Hardy, John Duda www.mscnewswire.co.nz

Or is that only coffee sellers in Auckland?

ADVERTISING

Doug Green T: + 64 6 870 9029 E: publisher@xtra.co.nz

For business to get a fair go there needs to be positive intent and the whiff of negativity around a couple of the topics above challenges our sense of fair play and future direction.

DESIGN & PRODUCTION Kim Alves, KA Design T: + 64 6 870 8133 E: kim.alves@xtra.co.nz

WEB MASTER

Bruce Metelerkamp E: bruce@hha.co.nz

The food on the table and the widgets made in Albany and sold to a Waikato company are delivered by truck. As is furniture, white wear and a whole host of machinery manufacturers buy to enhance their levels of productivity.

PUBLISHING SERVICES On-Line Publisher Media Hawke’s Bay Ltd

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MEDIA HAWKES BAY LTD T: +64 6 870 4506 F: +64 6 878 8150 E: mediahb@xtra.co.nz 1/121 Russell Street North, Hastings PO Box 1109, Hastings, NZ NZ Manufacturer ISSN 1179-4992

Vol.9 No.3 April 2018 Copyright: NZ Manufacturer is copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission of the publisher. Neither editorial opinions expressed, nor facts stated in the advertisements, are necessarily agreed to by the editor or publisher of NZ Manufacturer and, whilst all efforts are made to ensure accuracy, no responsibility will be taken by the publishers for inaccurate information, or for any consequences of reliance on this information. NZ Manufacturer welcomes your contributions which may not necessarily be used because of the philosophy of the publication.

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NZ Manufacturer April 2018

house in Christchurch, the proposed fuel tax of 9

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From Labour we have lots of working groups and hand wringing and the favourite line of how bad the last government left the state of the books. No one expects handouts in the Budget and, as usual, businesses will just get on with life and do the best they can. The cost of living keeps on going up and any wage increase is sucked into the great pit of never ending costs. Did I mention fuel? A creative, decisive government we don’t have. The apprenticeship is going on far too long now.

This development also comes at a time when a basic income rise has been announced – and we all know that every man and his dog will find a way to take the extra money out of your back pocket. So, a little bit more petrol in the car becomes quite difficult for a lot of people. And the food and equipment we buy becomes a little bit more expensive.

Doug Green

Success Through Innovation

EDITORIAL


BUSINESS NEWS Petroleum ban - wrong tool for right goal Banning new oil and gas exploration is a crude and unnecessary way to achieve emissions reduction goals and blights New Zealand’s entire energy sector, says the BusinessNZ Energy Council. There will be no overall reduction in global emissions, and potentially an increase in emissions as a result of this ban as global exploration from places with lower environmental standards fills the gap left by our reduced output, BEC Executive Director John Carnegie said. “This is a strong signal to investors that they will respond to immediately, not some time in the future. All plans, current and future, will now be

reconsidered in light of this decision, especially when combined by the prospect of a higher future carbon price. “The likely result will be no further investment or job growth in that part of the industry. “The ban could curtail oil and gas production even from existing fields and increase gas prices - unfortunate outcomes, since gas is the logical fuel to use for transitioning to higher renewable energy levels. “If contingent gas reserves are never commercially proven, we face a serious risk to our future energy security in about a decade.

“Recent weather has proven how invaluable our low-cost gas-fired sources of electricity are when needed.

of schools and hospitals will also be affected.

“We strongly support climate change action, but ultimately the cost and efficiency of new energy solutions and therefore the pace of the transition will be dictated by global, not domestic action. Acting sooner will add costs.

“We believe that market mechanisms are better than bans. We trust the instincts of consumers and the choices they make ahead of bureaucratic ones.

“In the absence of commercially viable and reliable alternative fuels the ban will also impact on the competitiveness of our major gas users and while supply to commercial and residential customers will not be jeopardised in the near term, it will hit already hard-pressed consumers in the hip pocket when they heat their homes. Commercial heating

“The ban undermines the focus of the New Zealand’s Emissions Trading Scheme on pricing externalities in business and consumer decision-making.

Business impacted by oil and gas ban BusinessNZ says banning new petroleum and gas exploration will have significant implications for New Zealand business. BusinessNZ Chief Executive Kirk Hope said the Government’s decision to continue to recognise existing permits was important, as doing otherwise would have had a potentially devastating effect on investment into New Zealand.

Commercial & industrial growth

“It will be important to see what Government commitment is being made to affected businesses, and how quickly other high value businesses can be developed to fill the void. “Many businesses will be affected by this ban, particularly those using gas. It will likely mean higher gas prices because of the restriction in supply, raising costs for enterprises that use gas for their operations.

“Exporters such as Fonterra, NZ Steel, Methanex and Refining NZ may find their products less competitive in world markets.

industry can be banned, what other industries might face the same fate?

“It is concerning that the ban has been imposed without any consultation with industry.

“Confidence among both overseas and domestic investors may be the longer-term casualty of today’s decision,” Mr Hope said.

“For the longer term, this decision may raise doubts among investors as to the viability of investing in New Zealand business. If a multi-billion dollar energy

Employment growth

Economic output

Crime rate East Tamaki is the largest industrial precinct in Auckland with 2000 businesses and a growth rate higher than the regional average.

getba

getba.org.nz

Greater East Tamaki Business Association Inc.

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MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY

The shortest Lifeway grants to donothing many things to us is mortals to dowithout only one thing hardat work. once. -Samuel-Horace Smiles

The Value of Design to Your Business 3. The chance to experience revenue growth increased by more than threefold if the company used design to lead and guide the product or service development process. 4. Design alert companies saw an average revenue growth of £602,000 The contribution of product design to increased profits is particularly relevant because it incorporates expenditures on industrial design staff salaries or industrial design consultants’ fees and so provides clear proof that the benefits actually exceed the expenditures. The Design Institute of Australia (DIA) defines industrial designers as “[Those who] develop and prepare products for manufacture... They explore solutions to meet marketing, manufacturing and financial requirements and arrive at the optimum design of a product. They consider both functional and aesthetic aspects and pay particular attention to ergonomics, those factors that relate to ease of use and human behaviour.” Industrial design, therefore, goes beyond just making products aesthetically appealing. In fact, it’s core purpose is to develop an effectively functioning product of a high quality build that is also user friendly and efficient to produce. These fundamental principles of good product design are inherently good for business. A well-functioning,

1. For every £1 spent by “design alert” companies, revenue increased by £2.25. 2. Companies that increased their investment in design were more likely to experience revenue growth.

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NZ Manufacturer April 2018

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The benefits of good product design

Industrial design has a positive and measurable effect on business metrics including revenue, profit, and market share. An annual survey of over 1,500 companies by the Design Council, UK measured the impact of design on revenue in a number of ways. It revealed that:

TechRentals® is an IANZ endorsed Calibration Laboratory. We offer both IANZ Endorsed and Traceable Calibrations of test and measurement equipment, including:

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Use of design can also decrease the amount of time needed to bring a product to market.

high-quality, user-friendly, and appealing product improves your competitive advantage while efficient use of materials and manufacturing processes reduces production and distribution costs.

A seven year study among almost 200 manufacturing companies submitting filings to the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) demonstrated that companies with more effective industrial design (ranking done by design managers globally) outperformed their counterparts systematically. For “effective design” companies; the EBITDA (Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortisation) to Net Sales was on average 75% higher than the industry average over the seven years. Companies with less effective industrial design had a 55% lower ratio than the industry average.

0800 832 473

The role of industrial design in creating cost savings is critical since up to 90%-95% of the product’s production costs are locked in the design stage. Cost savings can be achieved through improving the manufacturing of the product, developing new solutions to achieve specific functionality, and seeking high-quality and low cost materials.

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for a businesses show that design is integral to the success of any product business in the current economic landscape. The value of industrial design can be summarised as improved product innovation, quality, and efficiency; all effects whose outcomes are greater competitive advantage, higher market share, increased revenue, greater profits, and reduced costs. Hone PD is a Melbourne based industrial design studio that offers design services to clients across Australia & New Zealand.


Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work. -Aristotle

MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY

Lumenium Desktop Metal Studio System™ for rapid prototyping: Virginia-based startup to reduce product development timeline by 25%

Rapid prototyping is essential for startups. For Lumenium, the ability to iterate quickly has a direct impact on time-to-market and engine performance. Currently, they use an in-house CNC machine and wire electrical discharge machining (EDM) to make prototype parts, but the process is relatively time consuming and costly. Lumenium is seeking a faster, more cost-effective approach to prototyping parts within the engine assembly. Parts within the IDAR engine must withstand the extreme heat and stress inherent to internal combustion engine operation. Each component must adhere to specific requirements—including high dimensional accuracy, strength under dynamic loads, and low thermal expansion. Also, the weight of each part is an important consideration for overall power density and efficiency. Additive manufacturing allows Lumenium to meet these requirements and tackle complex part geometries—like internal cooling channels to improve engine performance. With the Studio System, Lumenium can bring this technology into their existing workspace for faster design iteration and functional prototyping. www.objective3d.com.au/desktop-metal

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MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY

You have to be a good individual first before you can be a good team player. -David Goggins

How the Internet of Things (IoT) is transforming the customer experience with B2B eCommerce In the past manufacturers have connected applications on the factory floor to increase productivity, quality and reliability of machinery.

increased risk for human error and longer order processing times. This in turn has a flow on effect on customer experience and satisfaction.

Today, manufacturers have to start thinking of ways to utilise IoT technology beyond the factory floor to unlock its true potential. B2B eCommerce is a key driver for this, opening up an array of opportunities for manufacturers to deploy IoT technology in order to improve efficiency and reliability, but also have a profound impact on the customer experience.

Connected systems on the other hand enable manufacturers to manage inventory real-time across both the online and offline commerce environment. Smart shelves can monitor stock levels and place automatic orders when required without the need for human intervention.

With the introduction of more self-service B2B eCommerce solutions, businesses have to integrate online systems with other business applications for effective data exchange and coherent communication flows. The failure to do so could cause major disruptions. Just think about order and inventory management as an example. Without the use of IoT, processing online orders and tracking inventory quickly becomes problematic or at the very least more time consuming with

Smart devices can be deployed to improve order processing efficiencies and speed up order delivery times. GPS technology can track orders in transit to give customers live updates via email or SMS and customer service can be enhanced through advanced reporting, enabling potential issues to be identified before they become a problem. Over 70% of customers will stop doing business with a company following a poor support experience. It is therefore absolutely vital to implement the right IoT technology throughout the organisation and integrate the

online and offline experience to avoid disruption to business operations and ultimately the customer experience. What’s more, the IoT can also help deliver a more personalised online experience. Shared customer data across systems allows for the creation of complete customer profiles including information on purchasing patterns and behaviours. This enables manufacturers to tailor product offerings with customer specific catalogues, pricing and payment preferences. Beyond the online purchasing process, measuring real-time engagement can also be used for service requests, lead generation and many other processes within B2B commerce.

B2B commerce environment, which will not only lower operational costs and increase efficiencies but enable manufacturers to improve the customer experience throughout the B2B buying cycle. Start your journey to a unified commerce experience today with enterprise B2B eCommerce, powered by Insite, supported locally by Solutionists. Call us on 09 630 3074 or visit www.solutionists.co.nz/insite to find out more.

In 2018, businesses have to think beyond traditional commerce. The internet of things has the potential to disrupt and transform the manufacturing industry through a truly connected

eCommerce & Integration Experts

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If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or things. - Albert Einstein

MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY

Fuji Xerox expertise in 3D Scanning Fuji Xerox is the authorised distributor of Kreon 3D Scanning technology and 3D Systems scanning software in New Zealand. The Kreon 3D scanning arm enables users to easily generate high-quality 3D images from physical objects (even those with shiny paint or metal surfaces) with incredible speed and precision to 42um. Professionals involved in the design, reverse engineering and inspection of parts and products use the Kreon Arm in conjunction with Geomagic Software. Components of the Geomagic software suite designed for reverse engineering, CQ and design are DesignX (DX) and ControlX (CX). These are part of a larger approach on behalf of 3D Systems to provide end-to-end solution from the beginning of the product design cycle to the final product quality inspection before the product goes on to end use applications. Geomagic DesignX is the most comprehensive reverse engineering software that combines history-based CAD with 3D Scan data processing, allowing feature-based, editable

solid models compatible with your existing CAD software. It is purpose built for converting 3D scan data into high-quality feature-based CAD models DX has a great feature called LiveTransfer™ that outputs complete models and feature trees into most popular CAD software packages Geomagic ControlX is a comprehensive inspection automation platform for streamlining in-line and repetitive inspection processes that use 3D scanners and other portable metrology devices. With this feature-rich software platform, you can easily program CAD comparison, GD&T and go/ no-go operations to be performed automatically on any type of part. You can rely on your inspection results. Geomagic ControlX has geometry calculation algorithms that have been tested by America’s NIST, Britain’s NPL and independently certified by Germany’s PTB metrology authority as Class 1 accuracy. These approvals allow

world leading manufacturers trust

Find out more at http://betterbusiness.

ControlX to measure their parts every

fujixerox.co.nz/3d-printing

day.

ACE 7 AXES Measuring Arm 2 m to 4.5 m and Kreon scanner Up to 200mm laser line width Very high scanning speed: up to 600,000 pts/sec Accuracy to 15 microns Integrated battery and WiFi Contact and non-contact measurement

7 Distributed in NZ by Fuji Xerox NZ Ltd.

SCANNING HAS NEVER BEEN SO INTUITIVE To learn more about the high precision Kreon Ace measuring arm and scanner, contact: Fuji Xerox NZ Ltd, Head office: 79 Carlton Gore Road, Newmarket, Auckland, Tel 09 356 4200 www.fujixerox.co.nz/3D http://betterbusiness.fujixerox.co.nz/kreon-scanning-arm/

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COMPANY PROFILE

The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance. -Aristotle

When not to pull the plug on innovation Trevor Schwass is the inventor of the DSH Dust Suppression Hopper, and everything else that has to do with getting the invention from the idea stage to a successful patented system that is sold worldwide. The key ingredients of this success are passion, determination and perseverance while putting everything he had on the line. The only thing he was sure of was that he was onto something good. Trevor was working in a fertiliser plant as maintenance engineer when he was asked if he could do something about the dust problem that they had when loading trucks and the store with fertiliser. The dust was sometimes so bad that visibility was reduced to less than a metre. This was a Health and Safety issue. He was told that getting the product into a solid mass could help but how to achieve that? He tried many methods but found the fertiliser built up. Trevor was driving through the country-side and saw a plastic fertiliser spreader being used in a paddock. This was the start of lots of trial and error before a hopper was developed that contained the dust in a free-flowing column. Many parts were made and remodelled in his home workshop. The key parts in the system are a plug and a set of

springs. It proved to be a journey to find a spring-maker who was prepared to help him and develop the correct springs for the job. Trevor also had to get a CAD programme and learn how to use it through night school and with some assistance from his son.

his day job and he and his wife Judi started working full time on the DSH system. The biggest surprise they had was to discover the number of products and industries it could be used in. The DSH system for the fertiliser industry is made from rotational moulded plastic, but for more abrasive products it is made of steel.

The only thing he was sure of was that he was onto something good. I asked Trevor what help he received to bring this product to the market. The only financial help he got was in the form of a government grant towards the patent and marketing. He patented in the early stage of development to protect his idea.

The original hopper was made with a 300 mm outlet; the biggest now is 1000 mm diameter and often made from high abrasive resistant steel. The steel and polyethylene hoppers are made in NZ, but the polyethylene models for North America are made in the USA.

He realised that it was a very simple product and people would want to copy it. He was lucky enough to find a patent attorney who understood engineering, as the patient had to be applied and amended for just about each country.

The mould for the USA hoppers was made in Napier as that proved cheaper and quicker than having it made in the USA. While developing their product and marketing strategy they were lucky enough to get good advice from their PWC accountant, who proved to be much more than a bean-counter and helped them immensely.

In the meantime, Trevor resigned from

One of the surprising difficulties was

to convince the customer that such a simple product worked so well. They thought some trickery was done with the website demonstration, and if they see the actual product being demonstrated in a plant they still find it hard to believe. These days Trevor and Judi are semi-retired, and the business is now run by a CEO. They are very happy knowing that they created a product that is good for the environment, staff and neighbourhoods. When an order comes in, the support frame must be made to fit the customers’ requirements. Modelling up the frame to ensure it fits the clients plant is all part of the service. The geometry for each new size that may be required is quickly done in CAD by their engineer. Trevor and Judi’s advice; Never give up if you know you are onto something good, get good advice at the start, pay someone to do the parts you’re not confident about and think hard about patent protection. Have a look at this http://www. dshsystems.com/ You better believe it. Article by: Aaldert Verplanke www. mandesign.co.nz

Trevor Schwass with a hopper. The picture was taken at a trade show and shows the demo hopper attached to an Olds Elevator. The other two men are Peter Olds and the Editor of Australian Bulk Handling.

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DEVELOPMENTS

The size of your audience doesn’t matter. Just keep up the good work. -Unknown

Engineers and architects confront their gender problem Engineers and architects across New Zealand have come together to launch a provocative campaign calling for increased representation of women in their professions. The Diversity Agenda is a collaboration between Engineering New Zealand, the New Zealand Institute of Architects (NZIA) and the Association of Consulting Engineers (ACENZ). It is a commitment to diversity and inclusion, with an initial focus on women, with the goal of getting 20 percent more women in engineering and architecture by 2021. The campaign launched in Auckland last week.

levels, where women are massively underrepresented – quite frankly, it’s changing too slowly.” NZIA President Christina van Bohemen says only 20 percent of all Registered Architects and NZIA Fellows are female. She is only the second female President of NZIIA in 113 years. “The pursuit of gender equality is both a moral issue, and an economic imperative for success in the 21st century.” ACENZ President Mike Kerr says the

“We’ve seen the benefits of diversity in thought as we transformed into Engineering New Zealand – our leadership team includes an engineer, an accountant, a marketer, an educationalist and a lawyer.” Engineering New Zealand President Dean Kimpton says it’s time to stand up for a better gender balance. “While other professions have increased their proportion of women, our industry has remained stubbornly male-dominated. Especially at senior

fact that firms are lining up to support the campaign shows there is a drive for change. “It’s the first time our professions have rallied around this issue. We want to see tangible action – and that’s why we’ve launched the Diversity Agenda.”

Susan Freeman-Greene. Chief Executive at Engineering New Zealand

Nearly 40 organisations have already committed to the Diversity Agenda and its initial focus on women in the profession.

from the United Kingdom. She has three

The campaign will continue to sign up organisations, ask them to commit to taking action – and publicly hold them accountable. It’s backed up by a hard-hitting social media campaign featuring the stories of women working in architecture and engineering.

who’s sympathetic to these needs.

See more at diversityagenda.org and #statsthatsuck Organisations supporting campaign include:

the

children under the age of seven, and works four days a week. “It’s much easier if you’re got an employer

“The whole of society is realising we need to change the way that the working week is organised. The companies that do best will be the ones that embrace the change earliest.” Darryl-Lee Wendelborn Managing Director of Beca Darryl-Lee has been at Beca for 22 years, in seven different roles.

AECOM, architectus, Arthouse Architects, Auckland Council, Aurecon, Beca, Batchelar McDougall Consulting, Bossley Architects, Cheshire Architects, chowhill, Contact Energy, Context Architects, Davis Ogilvie, Designgroup Stapleton Elliott, Downer, Electricity Engineers’ Association, GHD, Herriot Melhuish O’Neill Architects, Harrison Grierson, HEB Construction, Holmes, isthmus, Jasmax, Meridian Energy, Moller Architects, NZ Transport Agency, RTA Studio, Salmond Architecture, Scarlet Architects, Sills van Bohemen, Stantec, Studio Pacific Architecture, Thorne Dwyer Structures, Tonkin + Taylor, University of Auckland, Warren and Mahoney, Watercare, WSP Opus.

She sees engineering as all about creating

Katie Symons

When all is done I’ll have another look

Structural engineer at Batchelar McDougall

communities and making them work for people to live in. “[As a profession], we’re losing women and we’re not bringing them back in – and that’s our biggest challenge right now.” “No one comes into this industry intending to discriminate – they’re just not aware. This campaign is about making it clear we’ve got an intention to do something different – so that we talk about it. And the more we talk about it, the more we lift that unconscious bias.”

through……………………………….

Consulting Katie moved to New Zealand a year ago

Only 14% of all our engineers are women. We want to change that. Join us and scores of other Kiwi organisations that have galvanised around one common goal: 20% more women engineers by 2021. www.diversityagenda.org

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EMEX 2018

In the modern world of business, it is useless to be a creative, original thinker unless you can also sell what you create. - David Ogilvy

The Show that can’t be missed! EMEX 2018 can’t be missed, as over 170 international and local exhibitors will inform, delight, entertain and celebrate kiwi design and innovation across the 3 days. There’s also the serious business of putting forward great commercial deals for the manufacturing community. If you’re in Engineering, Manufacturing or Electronics then you really need to visit this free event to best position your business with the latest technology on offer.

DISCOVER – what not to miss! World leading automated and robotic plasma cutting systems, designed and build right here in New Zealand for local and international markets by Plazmax in Rotorua, is highlighting the Kiwi Made Innovation feature at EMEX 2018 showcasing 3 separate automated plasma cutting systems, bringing both new and improved innovation to the market. Plazmax will be showcasing their world class capabilities with live demonstrations for all interested parties.

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After their introduction at SouthMACH 2017, Caliber Design and Locus Research are back at EMEX 2018 and proud to present some amazing examples of collaborative product design in the newly created Innovation Quarter. The products on display at EMEX 2018; the Stabicraft 1600 Fisher, the Ubco 4 x 4 bike and the 2018 Oscar winning Shotover Camera System, are the result of an intensive interaction during the entire product development process. You’ll be impressed by what you’ll see!

ENGAGE - Find the right people for the job The Employment and Training Hub will provide you with the opportunity to discuss the well documented skills shortages in the industry with experts from M.I.T and Competenz. As a manufacturer or engineering company this is your chance to learn more about these highly successful programs. You’ll

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have your chance to engage potential apprentices who have chosen a career in technology by signing up for the ’speed meets’ that are organised during EMEX 2018.

GROW- Get your finger on the pulse - for free With national and internationally renowned speakers, one of the key features of EMEX 2018 is the comprehensive Seminar Program. With close to 30 presentations over 3 days. There are informative and thought-provoking sessions covering topics ranging from Additive Manufacturing (incl. 3D and metal 3D printing), Industry 4.0, Collaborative Product Design, skill shortages in the industry and how to address these as well as practical solutions for implementation of Health & Safety practices, all presented by some of the most respected experts in their field. Check out the seminar program https://

www.emex.co.nz/visitor-information/ seminars-2/ Clearly, as Aad van der Poel, sales and event manager of EMEX says, “EMEX is New Zealand’s premier technology trade show and if you are employed in any of these industries then EMEX offers great opportunities to discover the latest trends and products, engage with leading industry suppliers, professionals and experts and grow your know-how of technologies within these fast moving industries” EMEX 2018 runs from 1 to 3 May at ASB Showgrounds, Greenlane, Auckland. Free registration is now open for industry professionals wishing to attend. Simply visit: www.emex.co.nz/ visitor-information/register/ To see a full list of EMEX 2018 exhibitors www.emex.co.nz/visitor-information/2018-exhibitors/


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EXHIBITOR LIST

If you want to live a happy life, tie it to a goal, not to people or things. - Albert Einstein

title text

Company.................................................... Stand#

Global Communications Ltd................................. 2024

PPT......................................................................... 4068

3D Printing Systems................................................. ET1

Global Machine Tools Ltd..................................... 4008

Precision 3D Printing............................................. 3051

ACSE....................................................................... 1047

Global Shop Solutions........................................... 3011

Professional CAD Systems..................................... 3013

Advanced Seals & Services.................................... 4116

GWB Machine Tools NZ Ltd.................................. 4090

Prosoft.................................................................... 4056

Air-Mech Ltd.......................................................... 2038

Haas Factory Outlet............................................... 3065

PunchTooling NZ................................................... 3074

Airtight Solutions.................................................. 4001

HGM - High Grade Metals.................................... 3007

Pyrotek Products Limited...................................... 4052

AM Prom Ltd..............................................4037 - 4095

Hi-Q Components.................................................. 3016

Q-Subs.................................................................... 3077

Amaya Asia Pacific................................................ 1021

HW Technologies................................................... 1007 IFM Electronic........................................................ 3009

Radius Benders........................................................ ET3

Arburg.................................................................... 3030 Aspex Ltd............................................................... 2089

Imagin Plastics....................................................... 2066

Autoline Automation............................................ 3002

Industrial Lubricants & Services Ltd...................... 4032

Balluff New Zealand Ltd....................................... 2011

Industrial Technologies......................................... 2072

BASKIVILLE.COM LTD............................................ ET17

JFY.......................................................................... 3030

Beijing Hengboshan Science&Technology Developm.Co.,Ltd.................................................... ET7

Jonel Hydraulics Ltd.............................................. 2032

Bell Technology Ltd............................................... 3001

Kemppi Australia Pty Ltd...................................... 2035

BOC........................................................................ 2069

Leabourn & Rose..........................................4038-4039

Boge Compressors Austalia.................................. 2106

Lean Projects.......................................................... 2012

Braemac Ltd........................................................... 2116

Leap Australia Ltd................................................. 2039

BV Products............................................................ 3014

Leister..................................................................... 2066

Rostech Surface Finishing..................................... 3032

Bystronic................................................................ 4117

LEP Engineering Plastics........................................ 3051

Safety Step NZ Ltd................................................... ET4

CAD Central........................................................... 1062

Leussink Engineering Pty Ltd................................ 2071

Scotia Services Ltd................................................... ET6

Cadpro Systems Ltd............................................... 2065

Linak New Zealand Ltd......................................... 2037

Scott Machinery Limited.............................3080+4011

Caliber Design....................................................... 1012

Lincoln Electric Co (NZ) Ltd................................... 2052

Semikron................................................................ 1056

Callaghan Innovation............................................ 1014

Linear Motion........................................................ 1046

Shuk Engineering Distributors............................. 3051

Casting Technology New Zealand........................ ET13

Locus Research....................................................... 1012

SICK NZ LTD........................................................... 3010

Central Innovation (Intercad)............................... 2075

Machineryhouse (NZ) Pty Ltd............................... 4017

Simuserv................................................................. 1029

Challenge Partners................................................ 3051

Machineryseller.co.nz............................................ 4078

Solutionists............................................................ 1028

Chevpac Machinery (NZ) Ltd................................. 3020

Mandeno Electronics 2015 Ltd............................. 3012

Sprockets New Zealand......................................... 3000

Cigweld PTY Ltd.................................................... 2007

Manufacturers Network....................................... 1042

Steelmasters Auckland Ltd................................... 2022

Clone 3D................................................................ 2066

Manukau Institute of Technology........................ 1031

Storicom................................................................. 1041

CNC Services Ltd.................................................... 3040

Marsden Maritime Holdings................................. 2047

Co-Mac................................................................... 2020

Sulco Tools............................................................. 1063

MDH - Mardag Holdings Limited......................... 2026

Combined Technologies (CTEK)............................ ET23

Supply Services Ltd................................................ 3034

MESNZ Maintenace Engineering Society of NZ... 1035

Competenz............................................................ 1032

SupplyPoint Systems.............................................. 1040

Metal Science Technologies.................................. 2045

Contract Sealing.................................................... 1022

Metrology Group.................................................. 2114

Supreme Metal Component Solutions................. ET25

Control Devices New Zealand Ltd........................ 2044

MindKits................................................................. 1045

CSE - W Arthur Fisher Ltd..................................... ET12

Modern Tools......................................................... 2006

DEMM - Engineering & Manufacturing............... 1038

Monocrane 2010 Ltd............................................. 2033

Design Energy Limited.......................................... 2001

Mulcahy Engineering Ltd...................................... 3004

Digital Weld........................................................... 4055

National Instruments............................................ 1036

DMG Mori Australia Pty Ltd................................. 3085

National Springs & Wire Products NZ.................. 3062

Dyno NZ................................................................. 3060

New Zealand Engineering News.......................... 4112

ECI Software Solutions.......................................... 2063

Nitto Kohki Australia.............................................. ET5

Eco Light................................................................ 1055

NZ Duct & Flex....................................................... 2031

Egmont Air............................................................ 1048

NZ Laser................................................................. 4114

Emona Instruments.............................................. ET 14

NZ Machine Tools.................................................. 3075

EMS Limited........................................................... 4080

NZSafety Blackwoods............................................ 2030

Energy Management Association NZ................... 1052

Objective 3D Printing............................................ 2013

Engineering & Compressor Services..................... 4107

Omron Electronics................................................. 2110

Etech NZ - RMI Steel Services................................ 3076

Optrel (Euroquip).................................................. 2055

Eurotec Ltd............................................................ ET24

Orbital Tools.......................................................... 4058

Vertigo Technologies............................................ 3061

FICEP....................................................................... 3030

Phoenix Contact.................................................... 3035

Viking Ltd.............................................................. 3015

Filtercorp International Ltd.................................. 4057

PhoenxPLM.............................................................. Bar

W & R Jacks Ltd..................................................... 4105

Fluke Corporation................................................. 2008

Pilz ......................................................................... 1065

Waterworks Wholesale......................................... 3006

Fraser Engineering Services Ltd.............................. ET8

Plastic Machinery Solutions.................................. 4101

Weldwell New Zealand Ltd.................................. 3064

Fuji Xerox New Zealand Ltd................................. 4048

Plastic Machinery Works....................................... 2076

Wheelco................................................................. 2034

General Compression Ltd...................................... 2068

Plazmax.................................................................. 3050

Wurth..................................................................... 1066

German New Zealand Chamber of Commerce.... 1067

Powerbox Pacific Ltd............................................. ET15

Zumtobel Group.................................................... 3042

Kaeser Compressors.............................................. 1059

RAM 3D.................................................................. 3008 Replika Ltd............................................................. 3044 Reptech Corporation............................................. 1070 Revolution Precision Machinery........................... 3073 Reynolds Group Ltd............................................... 2084 Ricks Trucking Service........................................... 4054 Ricoh New Zealand Ltd......................................... 4031 Rittal NZ Ltd........................................................... 2046 Rivtec...................................................................... 2000 Roadrunner Manufacturing NZ Ltd..................... 3067

Synergy Electronics Ltd......................................... 2115 Syntech Surface Finishing .................................... 3041 Tasman Machinery Limited................................... 3005 TechRentals............................................................ ET16 Tesla....................................................................... 1030 The University of Auckland Formula SAE Team Inc................................................................. 4119 TiTeNZ.................................................................... 1008 Torks Precision Engineering.................................. ET26 Total CNC Products Ltd...............................4006+4040 Trans Ocean Developments Ltd............................ 2036 Treotham New Zealand Limited........................... 2048 Trotec Laser............................................................ 1050 Trumpf................................................................... 3030 Vanguard Group Ltd............................................. 2064

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EMEX 2018

Be loyal to those not present. In doing so, you build the trust of those who are present. - Stephen Covey

Labour-saving tools at EMEX 2018 A time and labour-saving range of Enerpac Sync Grip Pullers that enable one person to safely handle many jobs previously requiring two will be highlighted at the EMEX 2018 engineering machinery exhibition in Auckland from May 1-3.

The SG puller range – in mechanical and hydraulic capacities up to 45 tons – will be a highlight of the joint Jonel Hydraulics-Enerpac stand 232 at EMEX, which will simultaneously feature Enerpac’s go-anywhere XC cordless pumps, offering the performance capabilities of an electric or pneumatic powered pump with the convenient portability of a hand pump. XC cordless pumps are constructed of lightweight materials, equipped with a powerful, one-half horsepower motor, and feature 28-volt, Lithium-Ion battery technology. Used with Enerpac’s global range of lifting, forming, crimping, cutting, fabrication and maintenance tools – including hydraulic SG pullers – they promote operator safety by removing trip hazards associated with traditional powered pumps. SG pullers – which feature synchronised movement of their locking jaws for simultaneous engagement and optimised safety – can be used as a standalone tool or hydraulic units can be combined with the cordless

pump to deliver outstanding safety and convenience, particularly in hard-to-access areas. “The XC/SG combination is ideal for a wide variety of common maintenance tasks either off-site or in workshops where operations staff appreciate the power and precision of safety-first hydraulics that are easy and convenient to apply to sometimes less accessible and potentially hazardous jobs,” says Enerpac New Zealand Country Manager Mr Neville Stuart.

SG-Series Sync Grip Pullers optimise safety, simplicity and speed of removal of bearings, bushings, gears, sleeves, wheels, fly-wheels, sprockets and other shaft-mounted items. They enable one person to do jobs that often previously took two, in applications such as maintenance of fixed and mobile machinery and plant as well as heavy vehicles and rolling stock in industries such as the automotive, construction, civil, mechanical, production and process engineering, manufacturing and metal working, mining and energy, oil and gas, materials handling, primary production, road, rail and tracked vehicle transport, water and wastewater industries. When one jaw is closed around the bearing surface, the others automatically close at the same time, making the puller easier and safer

Enerpac’s new manual and hydraulic Sync Grip Pullers and XC cordless pumps offer high convenience, power, efficiency and safety to operate. The synchronous feature of the SGM (mechanical) and SGH (hydraulic) Series Pullers makes positioning the puller simple.

A safety and workplace benefit of SG pullers is that they will grip even on surfaces where normal pullers would slip off – for example, on tapered bearings. “Their, smooth, simple and safe operation means that, instead of impact hazards created by removal methods using hammers and levers – with risks to both the workpiece and maintenance personnel – Sync Grip Pullers draw parts smoothly and precisely without the need for heating or prying,” says Mr Stuart, who will be on hand at EMEX to provide guidance on Enerpac tool use. He will also introduce specials on purpose-built sets that will be offered for products on display.

Sync Grip Pullers are the latest evolution of Enerpac’s advanced puller technology, while XC pumps are part of Enerpac’s extensive hydraulic pump ranges with reliability and service backing throughout Australia, New Zealand and PNG.

Many tools from Enerpac’s global range can be powered by the XC cordless pump, including hydraulic versions of the Sync Grip Pullers (hydraulic model, bottom left, left and manual model, right)

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EMEX 2018

If you want to change the culture, you will have to start by changing the organisation. -Mary Douglas

Greater uptake to helmets that minimise fume inhalation Protecting welders against welding fumes is an ongoing topic of discussion. This is partly because of the importance to maintain welder safety, and partly because of the common law and statutory obligations of employers to do so. The subject is again in the spotlight following the release of findings by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which re-classified welding fumes as “carcinogenic to humans”. (See the reference abstract at The Lancet Oncology) http://www. thelancet.com/journals/lanonc/article/ PIIS1470-2045(17)30255-3/abstract For employers, the reclassification of welding fumes as “carcinogenic to humans” will spur many to consider changing the type of welding helmets issued to their staff or supplied by sub contractors working in a welding environment on their behalf. Traditional basic welding helmets do provide protection against different intensities of light from arc flash using appropriate shading in welding lenses. They also protect against airborne metallic debris from the grinding process by using a suitable grinding visor, as well as afford the welder physical protection against external hazard.

However, the IARC findings will now likely further fuel the need for the use of helmets that also minimise the risks associated with inhaling welding fumes. When assessing such helmets, employers and welders should consider integrated respirator systems that supply positive pressure airflow to reduce heat discomfort experienced from continuous welding. The system should also include filtration that removes particulate, fume and odour. Additionally, the system would include a gas scrubber/ filter to remove potentially harmful elements in vapour phase associated directly with the welding activity.

helmet adjustment control or change to a grinding visor function without the need to remove the helmet, will likely help to ensure the welding activity is achieved without forgoing quality and productivity.

These safety features, when combined with a helmet that maximises the viewing area and clarity, offers simple

At EMEX 2018, Stand 2035, Kemppi will be displaying its range of established high-quality welding helmets which

Sumitomo Demag’s all electric technology gives manufacturers competitive edge New Zealand plastics manufacturers have long held a world-wide reputation for innovation, and the uptake of the latest technologies.

ensured that Sumitomo (SHI) Demag is the No.1 selling all electric injection moulding machine across the globe, including here in NZ.

It is for this reason that many of our companies continue to excel on the world stage. Tasman Machinery is proud to supply many of these world leading organisations.

Included in the display will be the latest robot takeout technology from Yushin.

Tasman Machinery (Stand 3005) will be running a live display of a Sumitomo (SHI) Demag all electric injection moulding machine, in combination with a Yushin 3 axis servo driven robot.

The YCII Series from Yushin combines many interesting features, including carbon fibre reinforced axis, design optimisation for weight reduction, and energy efficiency designs, to ensure the lowest running costs.

are all designed compliant to relevant AS/NZ standards. The range includes the latest GAMMA series, which incorporates technology features to meet welder safety, comfort and work quality needs. www.kemppi.com

Energy saver. The new IntElect Maximum performance – Minimum consumption. Optimise your energy efficiency. The new IntElect all-electric injection moulding machine consumes an average of up to 20% less energy than conventional all-electric injection moulding machines. Thanks to its dynamic drive system with specially developed motors, it is more economical than many household appliances!*

1,1 kWh

2,4 kWh

Features of the Sumitomo (SHI) Demag machine include the latest direct drive servo technology, to ensure the ultimate in accuracy, repeatability, energy efficiency, and durability. Sumitomo’s patented direct drive technology sets it apart from all its competitors and has

Phone: (09) 379 5716 Email: info@tasmanmachinery.co.nz www.tasmanmachinery.co.nz * Consumption of a commercially available electric kettle: approx. 2,4 kWh. IntElect 50-110, cycle time 7s, shot weight 1,3 g PP, energy consumption 1,1 kWh. Pictures are for illustrative only.

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EMEX 2018

The world always seems brighter when you’ve just made something that wasn’t there before. -Neil Gaiman

Something for everyone at Hi-Q Stand No 3016 Hi-Q Electronics Ltd trading as Hi-Q Components is showcasing their new range of Martin Levelling feet at EMEX this year. Hi-Q is a leading NZ Plastic Hardware and Electronic Component importer and distributor, celebrating over 30 years of trading. The new range of Martin levelling feet has recently been added to Hi-Q’s successful range of European industrial components. Martin is an established Italian company manufacturing high quality affordable levelling feet. This extensive range covers requirements and applications for

levelling feet for all machines and equipment used in many industries. This includes packaging, food (milk, meat, fish, dairy, tanks, industrial kitchens) chemical, brewing, conveyors, material handling, electrical cabinets, injection moulding, CNC, lath, mills, white industry, marine, green energy, scaffold and fitness equipment. The popular, Martin standard plastic range, come with plastic feet and either steel or stainless steel threaded studs. This range is available as separate parts, feet and screws. Customers can mix and match the right

size foot with the right screw length and thread to get the best fit for their application. Hi-Q can assemble the parts for customers free of charge. For the food industry Martin manufacture a range of hygienic stainless steel feet and accessories including hygienic locking nuts. Hi-Q will also have on show, their popular, affordable range of quality toggle clamps, manufactured by Kukamet in Turkey. The range is huge with stainless steel clamps alone numbering 150 different types. Features include high quality

galvanized steel which has been produced specifically for Kukamet surpassing the quality of lesser brands. The cylinder used in the pneumatic clamps is one of the best in the world. Protector parts ensure there is no pinching of fingers and the plastic handles are food and health grade safe. “We have been waiting for the opportunity to showcase our new range of Martin Levelling feet and EMEX 2018 is the perfect occasion,” says Richard Higham, Managing Director of Hi-Q Components.

Industrial Technologies at Emex 2018 Industrial Technologies will have on show the latest Weicon range of products and solutions for the Engineering and Manufacturing industry. The range of products includes special adhesives and sealants, technical sprays and high-performance assembly pastes and greases for all areas of industry from production over repair up to maintenance.

High-performance Assembly Pastes and Sprays (Anti-Seize)

Elastic Adhesives Product description Weicon Silicone is a one-component sealant/ adhesive which has been developed to meet the high demands of industrial fabrication. Weicon Black Seal is a one-component special grade silicone rubber, dispensed from the practical spray can. Weicon Flex 310 provides long-term resistance against water, seawater and many diluted acids and alkalis. Under the brand Weicon Flex 310 M®, a variety of high-quality adhesives and sealants is available. Weicon Flex 310 M® are one-component products on an MS polymer basis. Weicon Flex+bond® remains permanently elastic and can be sanded and overpainted after cure. Weicon Fast-Bond is a fast-curing one-component structural and assembly adhesive, universal in use and made based on polyurethane. Weicon Speed-Flex® is a fast and universally usable power adhesive. Weicon Aqua-Flex is a special adhesive and sealant for a variety of applications, also on wet and humid surfaces.

Technical Sprays Product description Weicon Technical Sprays are available for the following areas of application: cleaning, degreasing, lubrication, care, maintenance, release, separating, surface and anti-corrosion coating.

Weicon Anti-Seize are used as protecting and separating agents, as well as lubricants, for highly stressed parts, especially at high temperatures.

All-round Lubricant Product description Even in the present “High-tech age” problems due to friction and wear are a matter of course in a lot of industrial sectors. Extensive repairs, longer downtimes, shorter maintenance intervals and lower serviceable lives of plant and equipment are the consequence and cause enormous costs each year.

Weicon All-round-Lubricant high-performance greases are specially developed to meet these high demands and provide sustained protection against friction and wear.

Many Weicon Technical Sprays are alternatively available as a liquid.

NZ Manufacturer April 2018

All kinds of influencing factors, such as moisture and friction, lead to damage due to corrosion, seizure, and wear on machines and installations. Extensive repair and maintenance work at considerable cost are the result.

Modern high-performance greases for lubricating, separating and protecting are increasingly gaining in significance.

Ongoing product development ensures the excellence of our products - today, tomorrow and beyond - in meeting the constantly changing performance and environmental requirements.

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The Weicon range is available from Industrial Technologies, part of the Contech Group who have proudly been a successful family owned New Zealand company for the past eighteen years. Industrial Technologies looks forward to seeing you at Stand 2072.


ADVISORS Mike Shatford

Sandra Lukey

Matt Minio

Phillip Wilson

is an expert in the field of technology development and commercialisation. His company Design Energy Limited has completed over 100 significant projects in this vein by consulting for and partnering with some of New Zealand’s leading producers. Among Mike and his team’s strengths are industrial robotics and automated production where the company puts much of its focus.

Managing Director, Objective3D Matt has extensive hands on experience as a user and supplier of 3D Printing technology. He comes from a mechanical design and engineering background with 25 years’ experience in multiple high end 3D cad applications across a range of industries, including aerospace and automotive. He has been heavily involved in the 3D printing evolution - from initial early prototyping to todays advanced 3d printing technologies producing production parts straight off the printer. As Managing Director of Objective 3D, he provides Stratasys, Desktop Metal and Concept Laser 3D printing solutions to a host of industries across Australia and New Zealand.

Sandra Lukey is the founder of Shine Group, a consultancy that helps science and technology companies accelerate growth. She is a keen observer of the tech sector and how new developments create opportunity for future business. She has over 20 years’ experience working with companies to boost profile and build influential connections.

Phillip Wilson of Nautech Electronics has over 25 years of experienced in the development, commercialisation and implementation of advanced manufacturing technology, robotics, automation and materials. Serving companies operating within the aerospace, automotive, offshore, defence, medical and scientific industries on a global basis. More recently specialising in change management and business re-alignment for a range of commercial entities from medium sized SME’s to divisions of large corporates.

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Work in silence. Let your success be your noise. -Unknown

Wellington’s knowledge economy an incubator for graduate employability Wellington and graduates working in the city are well-positioned to navigate technology-driven upheavals, according to a new report by Victoria University of Wellington researchers. The It Takes a City to Raise a Graduate report was prepared by Victoria’s Working Capital project and is based on nearly 90 interviews with Wellington managers, human resource specialists and recent graduates at a cross-section of businesses and public sector and not-for-profit organisations. The interviews, conducted by Victoria students, focused on the impact on employers of radical technological changes in what is being called the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Wellington’s place-based advantages were one of the key themes of the interviews. The capital is New Zealand’s strongest knowledge economy, says the report, with the youngest average population and highest level of qualifications. It has nearly 50 percent of workers in knowledge-based roles, compared with a national average of 35 percent. The report highlights Wellington’s compact size and its benefits for

networking and communication, including between employers and tertiary institutions such as Victoria. The

concentration

of

high-tech

businesses which are similar in the talent that they require”. The city’s strong international workforce, particularly in the IT sector,

The concentration of high-tech companies in the city has had a snowball effect on talent and opportunities, says the report. companies in the city has had a snowball effect on talent and opportunities, says the report.

attracts further international talent, improving Wellington as “the country’s IT capital”, said a corporate employer.

One employer at a post-production company told interviewers “there is a real ecosystem in Wellington around that talent and I think there is a real advantage in having a cluster of

Other key themes of the report include how employers increasingly value workplace diversity and inclusion, and their expectation that job applicants will have general work experience

as well as ‘soft’ interpersonal skills to match their ‘hard’ qualification-based ones. Interviewees frequently expressed interest in connecting with tertiary educators. The report was co-written by Dr Richard Norman, a Senior Lecturer in Victoria’s School of Management, independent social researcher Kate Peters and Victoria PhD candidate Sarah Hendrica Bickerton. “The key themes of employability, engagement, inclusion and the place-based advantage of Wellington in fostering graduate outcomes are brought to the fore in this report,” says Professor Warburton. “This important study provides critical insights into the changing nature of the workplace and highlights the major challenges and opportunities that exist for graduates as they enter a strong knowledge economy underpinned by digital technology.”

Phoenix Contact introduces the world’s narrowest surge protection solution Leading global electrical engineering manufacturer and innovator, Phoenix Contact, has revolutionised surge protection devices for Measurement and Control Technology (MCR) and extra low voltage applications with the release of its new Termitrab Complete range which features the world’s narrowest surge protection solution. At just 3.5mm, this device is ultra slim and compact. The use of leading edge components in the 3.5mm arrester means technicians can now build smaller systems to protect analogue and digital signals transmitted using MCR as well as gain valuable installation space for system planning and save money. Further, the 3.5mm devices provide the highest density for system expansion on the Din-rail, and technicians can quickly and easily expand their systems to protect up to 572 MCR signals per meter. The 3.5mm arrester is available as a push-in model, while the 6.2mm Termitrab arresters provide technicians with considerable choice. They can choose from versions with screw or push-in connections, knife disconnections, pluggable arrestors,

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and Ex approval, to meet their individual requirements. The 6.2mm arrester models also feature an integrated status indicator that lets technicians see when the unit has reached its end of life and requires replacing. Better still, the indicator on the surge protection device does not require any auxiliary power. And during the disconnection process, the measuring signal is unaffected, to help ensure the ongoing reliability of the system. Technicians can also choose to install the optional, low cost, remote signalling module to remotely detect overloaded surge protective devices and maintain the integrity of their system. The module is easy to retrofit and does not require any programming or additional wiring. It uses a photoelectric barrier to monitor the status of up to 40

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The new Termitrab Complete range from Phoenix Contact.

adjacent protective devices and a floating contact transmits the status to the control room. The new Termitrab Complete range delivers outstanding reliability and durability. To ensure each device is robust and can perform, the arresters undergo testing in Phoenix Contact’s accredited test lab. The comprehensive tests include surge current tests, vibration and temperature tests as well as salt spray and corrosive gas testing. The devices meet SIL 3 and IEC 61508. For additional peace of mind, all Phoenix Contact pluggable surge

protective devices can be tested with the Phoenix Contact mobile test lab. The Termitrab Complete range has over 130 models and includes the ultra narrow 3.5mm, to simple, single-stage 6mm surge protection units, right through to multi-stage devices. The extensive range is suitable for 12, 24 and 48V systems as well as RTD, Tc and serial communications. The portfolio of Termitrab Complete arresters is ideal for use in process technology, wind power, water and wastewater treatment, building services and infrastructure.


The most successful people are those who are good at plan B. -James Yorke

Inventors and innovators wanted for 2018 Fieldays Innovation Awards Calling all agricultural inventors and innovators: entries are now open for the 2018 National Agricultural Fieldays Innovation Awards. The Innovation Awards showcases innovation across several industry areas: dairy and drystock farming, horticulture, information and communication technology, cloud and mobile-based software, animal health and genetics, water and waste management, environment and clean-tech, animal and farm management, farm safety and leading research. This year marks Fieldays’ 50th year of showcasing agriculture and innovation to rural and urban audiences. The theme for this year is the “Future of Farming”, with visitors and exhibitors being encouraged to start discussions around what the future of farming means to them. Entries are housed in Fieldays’ popular Innovations Centre, with entrants able to access free advice from lawyers, patent and trademark attorneys, accountants and product development consultants. The winner of the 2016 international

innovation and agribusiness category, Fraser Smith and Matt Yallop’s heat detection device FlashMate, is a good example of a product that had its end user in mind. They spent a lot of time with farmers to get their product right, and they made sure to show that in their entry. FlashMate is a small plastic dome housing touch screen electronics that accurately detects the activity associated in cows that are in heat and ready for insemination, with a flashing red light signalling to the farmer it’s ready for insemination. .Since winning the innovation award, Smith and Yallop have taken FlashMate to the world. It is currently sold in Australia, Ireland, the UK, South

The innovators centre.

Africa and South East Asia, with more enquiries coming in from around the world. Smith is currently overseas instigating research projects with the University of Cambridge in the UK and Teagasc, Ireland’s agriculture and food development authority. “The Fieldays Innovation Awards gave us instant international recognition,” says Smith. Entries for the 2018 Fieldays Innovation

Awards are open now and close at 5pm, 1 May 2018. There are three main categories: Fieldays Prototype Award, Fieldays Launch NZ Award and Fieldays International Award. Other awards also up for grabs include Fieldays Young Inventor of the Year, Vodafone Innovation in Technology Award of the Year, Locus Research Innovation Award, the Crowe Horwath Agri Innovation Award, the Tompkins Wake IP and Commercialisation Award and the Origin Intellectual Property Award.

Revolutionary new process for self-healing concrete Using concrete as a medium, scientists

nanobiotechnology, making concrete

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lead to structural failure.

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PhD student Mostafa Seifan are the only ones who have used a nanobiotechnological approach to address it. They believe their process will have a wide range of applications, including the oil and gas industry, medicine, environmental remediation, and construction materials.

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Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination.

-Oscar Wilde

Disrupting business models is not enough. We need tech innovation too A smartphone shows the Mexican bike-sharing scheme Mobike app, near the scheme’s shared bikes. We hear the word “innovation” all the time. It has become such a buzzword that we forget what it means. For some people, innovation means building the next Facebook. For others, it’s a new way to cook an omelette. For the purposes of this article, let’s break innovation down into two general categories: Product Often, when people are talking about innovation, they are thinking about a product innovation. This could be the development of a new product, such as a 3D TV; a new feature in an existing product, such as a watch with Bluetooth; or an improvement in a product’s performance, such as the iPhone X compared to the iPhone 6. This type of innovation is typically driven by technological advancements, and is visible to consumers. One example is Tesla’s electric vehicle, which is a product innovation in the automobile industry. Process This is typically an internal operational innovation. It could involve using technology in manufacturing and supply chains, or even in sales and accounting methods. One of the best examples of process innovation is Henry Ford’s invention of the world’s first moving assembly line. This process shortened the time it took to produce a single vehicle from 12 hours to 90 minutes. Over the last decade, one particular innovation - the shared economy has sparked many more. This was a type of process innovation, disrupting the business models of traditional industries. Uber and Airbnb are popular examples of the shared economy. Both firms have transformed the business models of taxi companies and hotels, rejecting the asset-heavy model for one that leverages existing under-utilised assets. E-commerce is another example of process innovation. Platforms such as Amazon and Ebay facilitate the trade of goods between suppliers and consumers without a physical retail store. But can process innovations fuel the Fourth Industrial Revolution alone? In this article, we’ll take a look at the growth of shared economy start-ups, compare the two types of innovation and explore ways to find a balance

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between them.

“That could be me”

The hype around shared economies

With disruptive growth potential and a relatively low barrier to entry, the perceived upside seems huge. Often we hear about unicorns (start-ups valued at more than $1 billion) making immense amounts of money, and begin to think: “I could have done that if I had stumbled upon the right idea”.

The shared economy, best known for crowd-based marketplaces such as Airbnb and Uber, blossomed as the recession set in. It was also a time of aggressive growth for social media. Technology platforms enabled the shared economy by providing access to idle assets such as hotel rooms and car rides. People with something to spare or share gained fresh streams of income. The international sharing economy was worth around $15 billion in 2014, and is on track to reach $335 billion by 2025, according to PwC. There are 3 reasons for the growing number of shared economy start-ups: Low barrier to entry The shared economy’s business model innovation is not typically capitalintensive, as it utilises access to previously private resources, such as cars for Uber or homes for Airbnb. This lowers the overhead for young companies or any individual with basic programming skills trying to enter the market. Disruptive growth potential The shared economy increases the available customer base, as it enables customers who can’t afford to own an asset to access it on demand. For example, Boatbound, a US leisure boat rental firm, offers customers the chance to enjoy an afternoon on the water without the cost and burden of boat ownership. Since these start-ups connect producers and consumers directly, and further depend on the growth of both producers and consumers for the success of the platform, they can often achieve exponential growth with network effects. Given the massive growth that shared economy start-ups have reached in the past few years, and the attention the media has given them, entrepreneurs are attracted to Uberizing the next industry. An estimated $23 billion in venture capital funding poured into the market between 2010 and 2016. Successful start-ups, such as Airbnb, have gained immense growth and valuation. In March 2017, Airbnb was valued at about $31 billion - roughly the same as Marriott International after its acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide.

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While the shared economy is disrupting several traditional industries and making conventional companies rethink their business model, it’s important to consider whether innovation based on the shared economy alone is sufficient.

It’s easy to think these entrepreneurs just got lucky - that they picked the right direction at the right time, then leveraged technology to accelerate.

Business model innovation must be accompanied by technological innovation, too. If the smartphone had not been invented, we would have no ride-hailing app. It’s important that we continue to reinvent the wheel.

We tend not to attribute their success to their intelligence, as we might with, say, Tesla, and other tech innovations that require a PhD in engineering or physics.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution will be driven by both types of innovation. Product innovation has already fuelled technology-enabled shared economy businesses.

In this sense, I compare entering the shared economy to playing the lottery: you have a small chance of winning; anyone can enter; and if you do win, you will win big. Product innovation is a different scenario.

Disruptions such as quantum computing, artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things will also fuel business model innovation across traditional sectors such as healthcare, law and insurance. The relationship can be symbiotic.

Balancing business model innovations & product innovations


Some are born great, others achieve greatness. -William Shakespeare

the stock exchange. It can be lucrative for both the entrepreneur and the investor, by delivering bigger profits, but it brings greater risks. In Australia, one of the seven licensed equity crowdfunding companies, Equitise, is currently raising money for Xinja, Australia’s first independent digital bank.

Creating symbiotic hype Increasing interdependence between the two types of innovation, in an organic manner, would create balance and reduce the two key barriers to entry for product innovation - investment and talent. Here are several means of doing so:

Investment through crowdfunding

equity

Crowdfunding has been a popular shared economy means to fund new ideas. It can be as simple as a Kickstarter project to raise money and interest, or as sophisticated as equity crowdfunding. The latter enables individuals to buy shares in businesses before they list on

Opinion Manufacturing Profiles Letters to the Editor Politics of Manufacturing Trade Fair World Diary of Events World Market Report Q/A Export News Machine Tools Business Opportunities Commentary As I See It Business News Appointments Around New Zealand Australian Report New to the Market Lean Manufacturing Equipment for Sale Recruitment Environmental Technology Manufacturing Processes

It has already raised more than twice its minimum target of AUD $500,000 through investment parcels as low as AUD $250. About 700 investors have each injected an average of AUD $1800. Equitise anticipates unveiling more investment opportunities, including a gin distillery, brewery, boutique clothing company and food chain. The minimum investment will be as little as AUD $50 and will be open to anyone over 18. Equity crowdfunding provides a good foundation for generating shared value in the form of ownership, and

allows anyone who wants to invest to do so. Leveraging equity crowdfunding would reduce the barrier to entry for product innovation. It would make capital easily and efficiently available, and encourage people with ideas for tech innovation to pursue them. Talent through crowdsourcing Several platforms have emerged on which the shared asset is talent. They connect people looking for flexible and freelance employment with people hiring for short-term projects. So far, the shared economy has disrupted traditional sectors. But it’s time we leverage it to disrupt the way we innovate. There are more Elon Musks and Mark Zuckerbergs out there, with product ideas to fuel the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Equity crowdfunding and talent crowdsourcing could encourage the necessary “that could be me” motivation.

NZ MANUFACTURER • May 2018 Issue • Features

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EMEX 2018 REVIEW

SUPPLY CHAIN

FUTURE OF WORK

NEW TECHNOLOGIES

REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT PRODUCTIVITY Advertising Booking Deadline – 11 May 2018

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Editorial Copy Deadline – 11 May 2018 Advertising – For bookings and further information contact: Doug Green, P O Box 1109, Hastings 4156, Hawke’s Bay Email: publisher@xtra.co.nz

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FOOD MANUFACTURING

The only way to do great work is to love what you do. -Steve Jobs

Kiwi academics develop new food design technique Two leading academics have developed a new food design technique to help inspire the next generation of culinary designers and make artistic food presentation more accessible to New Zealand restaurants. The new technique developed in consultation with EPIC Otago Polytechnic R & D centre and The Food Design Institute at Otago Polytechnic allows chefs to produce large quantities of artistically designed food products by hand on a commercial scale with a small team, and at reduced cost. Otago Polytechnic’s Timothy Lynch, who and lectures on sustainability in the food industry, says they wanted to present ingredients in a way that was consistent with multisensory food design concepts.

“The process involves working with natural products to design handcrafted foods that look identical to fruit and vegetables but are filled with contrasting flavours.” “Initially we couldn’t find a way to make these products on a small scale, but a collaboration with the EPIC helped us overcome several barriers, and we were able to develop a method of crafting the lifelike products using food-grade silicon moulds, which we made ourselves,” he says. Lynch says a project of this scale and complexity would require international assistance and a large team of scientists and food specialists. This would have made the project cost prohibitive by New Zealand industry standards, he says.

through being part of an innovative collaboration between the food industry and education. “We were conscious that to inspire the students we needed to take on a challenge that solved a real-world problem and used design thinking at the same time,” he says. “The technique involves making edible fruit and vegetables replicas from vegan white[HS1] chocolate and So Good milks –,” says Heptinstall. The hand moulded products are then filled with a variety of contrasting l recipe combinations using a diverse range of readily available ingredients including the nut milks.

“Thanks to the ingenuity of some of our colleagues and the dedication of our staff and students we have managed to find a way to bring these food creations to life,”- says Lynch.

“It’s not every day that you get to have a dhal curry which is encased in tumeric chocolate and presented in a red or green chilli shell or an apple pie smoothie presented in an apple hanging on a tree. We’ve got a series of other quite contrasting flavours all designed to ‘shake up’ what a plant-based diet can look like.”

Senior lecturer Tony Heptinstall who has catered for Prince Charles and other royal family members says one of the objectives was to increase current industry capital

“What we’re doing is not only highlighting the design evolution of the food we are able to create, but also embrace the contemporary movement towards flexitarian and vegetarian

diets,” says Heptinstall. “People are looking at food from not just a taste and health consideration but from a sustainability and environmental perspective,” he says. Sanitarium’s marketing business manager Hayley Scott who approached the tertiary institution with the technical challenge said the outcome surpassed their expectations. “We approached the polytechnic to help us come up with a way to show Kiwis how Non-Dairy milks can be used creatively in kitchens around the country. “Throughout their collaboration with their students and colleagues they have completely embraced this challenge and we have been amazed at what they have been able to produce “We are thrilled to see it inspire students, the food industry and the public as well,” she says A proof of concept display has been created in the form of an entirely man made, edible garden where more than 3,000 hand-crafted fruit and vegetables will be made available to the public to sample.

New education programme to support Kiwi entrepreneurship Aspiring and seasoned entrepreneurs alike will see their business ideas reach new heights thanks to two high-profile business leaders who have developed an entrepreneurial education programme to put New Zealand at the top of the world map when it comes to innovation. This month, the Practical Innovation and Entrepreneurship Paper – an online course for Kiwis striving for success built around The Periodic Table of Innovation – launches out of an innovation hub at Auckland University of Technology. Co-founded by AUT Adjunct Professor and former advertising expert Mike ‘the Hutch’ Hutcheson, and educator, business mentor and inspirational speaker Catherine Newton, the Paper will give Kiwis the opportunity to ‘think differently’. “We want to help New Zealanders turn an idea into a tangible business model. We designed this course to provide business insight and practical tools to launch into the world of entrepreneurship,” says Hutcheson. “Kiwis are not short of great ideas, but they are short of being able to

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implement and commercialise their ideas. Our geographic isolation and ability to attract funding are some of the reasons behind not being able to develop scalable businesses that create jobs,” Hutcheson adds.

At the outset of the course students present a business idea and upon completion, they will have a robust business plan in place for how to bring their concept to life, attract capital, business partnerships or collaborations.

The Practical Innovation and Entrepreneurship Paper (ENTR770) welcomed its first official intake of students on 14 March, following its successful pilot programme in 2017.

Newton says this Paper appeals to people all around the country because it’s a supportive and flexible learning environment for all ages and backgrounds and highly accessible through a website and app. Those wishing to participate don’t have to be enrolled as a full-time student at AUT either.

Just 12 weeks in length, the course arms participants with practical skills to test, develop and bring a business idea to life, or develop an existing entrepreneurial idea or business. Newton, responsible for co-creation and delivery of the course training modules, is driven to inspire, educate and empower students – with a strong focus on helping women reach a level playing field. Newton, who holds a Bachelor of Education Degree and Diploma of Teaching, as well as 20 years’ experience running her own businesses, draws on her experience as a teacher, business owner and business coach to mentor students to transform their ideas into reality.

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As part of the course students can also attend a two-day Masterclass and ‘Dragon’s Den’, during which they showcase their work. While ENTR770 is largely self-directed learning, students access top business mentors for an hour each week via live ‘mastermind’ calls. Hutcheson, who published his thesis ‘Creativity in New Zealand Business’, says “as a nation of small businesses and comprised of people that derive from a pioneering heritage, creativity is in our DNA so it’s time to encourage entrepreneurialism locally to realise

profits generated by the productive economy”. While New Zealand ranks fifth in the world for local patents filed, it only succeeds in converting 22% of those into international patents. By comparison, Denmark and Singapore convert 80%, and Finland 100%. The framework of ENTR770 is The Periodic Table of Innovation – a world-first methodology developed by Hutcheson that is a powerful, responsive and applicable resource for developing and evaluating new ideas. Students use The Periodic Table of Innovation to identify and address practical elements – from legal, cashflow, brand design, product design, infrastructure, quality control compliance, sales tools and customer experience to social media and sponsorship - needed for commercial success.


Luck is a dividend of sweat. The more you sweat, the luckier you get. -Ray Kroc

FOOD MANUFACTURING

NZ well positioned to be global player in alternative protein market Eco conscious millennial consumers are reshaping demand for alternative sources of protein according to the country’s largest manufacturer of vegetarian foods. Mark Roper spokesperson for Life Health Foods - which makes plant based Bean Supreme and recently launched Alternative Meat Co. products, says growing concern for the environment is leading this demographic to seek out other options to integrate into their diet. A nationwide survey commissioned by the company has found that millennials aged 18-34 are the most likely demographic to adopt a mostly meat-free lifestyle in the next decade. “Among this age group, factors such as concern for animal welfare and the environment were some of the most important drivers of purchase choice; whereas if you look at older consumers, health considerations and cost of meat were the primary reasons for choosing

vegetarian foods,” he says. Roper says New Zealand is well positioned to take advantage of this emerging trend - which has seen accelerated growth in the global meat substitute market. “Our research is showing that many consumers are not completely replacing meat in their diet - instead, they are integrating more meat-free options throughout the week. This makes development of a plant protein market complementary to our existing agricultural exports,” says Roper. He says the new consumer driven trend is something that farmers should not fear, but rather capitalise on. “As a producer we are looking at this growth as a promising future market. As well as a growth industry locally, there is increasing demand for these products in the more well-established markets of the US and Europe where there are potentially large export opportunities for us,” he says.

Roper says at the same time, New Zealand is well positioned as a producer nation to capitalise on millennial’s demand for plant based products. “As a country, we have a strong agricultural research base, we are great at growing crops here, and the development of a more environmentally friendly, alternative protein market will potentially enhance the ‘pure NZ’ brand equity. “With demand for meat alternatives expected to grow significantly in the coming years, we are looking at other sources of protein that have similar texture and taste to meat and that can be developed into added value products for the domestic and export markets. “Plants like pea, soy, mushrooms and even seaweed can be made into products with similar properties to meat and food companies around the world are investing millions of dollars

to be at the forefront of this,” he says. Roper says the local market for vegetarian food is developing quickly with category growth exceeding 20 percent per annum. He says sales of their recently launched Alternative Meat Co. have exceeded initial volume expectations in this market and they have expanded production to accommodate. “Currently around 80% of our added value vegetarian products that are sold in NZ are made here. With increased demand locally and globally, greater volumes of ingredients will be required from suppliers

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DEVELOPMENTS

Please think about your legacy, because you’re writing it every day. --Gary Vaynerchuck

Maintenance Society holds network evenings in the regions The Maintenance Engineering Society has hit the ground running in 2018 with a hectic schedule of network evenings ranging from MIT in Auckland to Advanced Boiler Services in Hamilton and Allied Industrial Engineering in Kawerau in the first three months of the year. Sponsored by Kaeser Compressors, kicking off the 2018 series was a well attended evening at Advance Boiler Services in Hamilton. With a legacy founded from Rolls Royce and John Thompson NZ, Advance are recognised as a major contributor to the industry. They have evolved their operation to suit the requirements of industry, converting boilers to unmanned operation, conducting boiler surveys and inspections and even manufacturing fin tube and heat exchangers

procedures required when taking on a prospective apprentice. Competence ATNZ were present to explain the support they offer employers and apprentices and how the qualifications are structured. This also involves the mentoring provided throughout the apprentice’s qualification. MIT staff gave a tour of the workshop facilities, one of the highlights of the evening. The MESNZ team were then back down to the Bay of Plenty with an evening at Allied Industrial Engineering in Kawerau.

Auckland was next with the third annual Manukau Institute of Technology evening. This collaborative evening involved MESNZ, MIT, Competenz and Apprentice Training NZ. MIT’s Dean of technology, Paul Hollings, welcomed the gathering of attendees wanting to know more about trade apprentice training and relayed an update on the future for MIT’s Auckland campuses.

Centred in the heart of the impressive Kawerau engineering area, AIE was born 23 years ago from the pulp and paper mills desire to exit the engineering expertise required to maintain such a massive operation, and according to owner Paul Raethel, AIE has grown in leaps and bounds since then, exploring new markets and areas of international expertise as it balances its workload.

The meeting brought together industry employers, training providers and prospective apprentices looking to gain employment. It was an excellent platform to see and understand firsthand how the apprenticeship system works and the training and support available to ensure success. One employer desperate for staff was keen to employ the entire group of apprentices!

The attendees were treated to a wealth of heavy machining equipment, expertise and jobs in hand from local and national operations such as turbine and pulp roll rebuilds.

MESNZ provided the link employers looking to engage understand the system and to firsthand the opportunities

The evenings offer the opportunity to look at the host operation and discuss common issues and solutions in a relaxed after work environment.

for and see and

The MESNZ Kaeser Compressors Network Evenings are hosted to showcase local operations and provide networking opportunities for engineers across all regions of New Zealand.

NZ Manufacturer April 2018

Bernie Pitt is a second-year Quantity Surveying student who balances study, work, children and a voluntary role as student representative for the NZ Institute of Quantity Surveyors. “Once I’ve finished my Quantity Surveying qualification I also want to study Construction Management so I have a fully rounded skill set. When I have completed my tertiary study I want to be able to work in many roles in the commercial building industry. I don’t want to be limited in the jobs I can do and I want to understand the whole process of construction,” says Bernie. Already working for construction company Hawkins, Bernie decided to enter the construction industry early on. “Quantity Surveying is a choice and commitment that I would not have made if I did not see a lot of potential and opportunity. It’s such an exciting time to be coming into the industry, and I have thoroughly enjoyed every moment.” Bernie is also the recipient of the 2017 Sally Hasell scholarship for women studying towards non-traditional qualifications. “Although I know my academic achievements are notable, I had never viewed them like that. I see them as meeting my standards and expectations. Being awarded the scholarship helped me realise that

MIT Auckland.

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Inspirational millennial mum successfully balances quantity surveying and motherhood

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actually, what I had achieved was really special and amazing. “I would recommend students considering their study options for 2019 to consider applying for a scholarship to study at WelTec. It’s great to have that support behind you and the whole process is very affirming. Even just being invited for an interview in front of a panel of academics was very encouraging and such an amazing experience.” So how does a Mum of three young children have the confidence to pursue their academic and career goals? “It’s not easy adjusting to fitting in work, life, family and study. A scholarship takes the pressure off and means my student loan will be paid off sooner and it helps me achieve my long term goals faster. My employer allows me to work flexibly when I need to and this is a great help. “I also have a fantastic role model in my mother who completed a Masters in Information Management last year.”


DEVELOPMENTS

People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it. --George Bernard Shaw

Researcher developing e-bike safety sensors receives boost from KiwiNet Massey University researcher Dr. Matthew Miller has received a $25,000 boost to develop e-bike feedback sensors that improve braking control and rider safety. Dr. Miller, a lecturer at Massey University’s School of Sport, Exercise and Nutrition, received the award from the KiwiNet Emerging Innovator Programme which helps early career scientists develop clever new ideas to take to market. He sees an opportunity for the data to be used by brake manufacturers to address safety concerns. “E-bikes have the ability to travel very quickly and often have a less-experienced user. Manufacturers are looking for innovations which improve safety,” he says. Dr. James Hutchinson, CEO of KiwiNet, says: “While the e-bike market is evolving quickly braking technology hasn’t progressed at the same rate as other areas. Currently e-bikes and mountain bikes largely use the same brakes, but the industry is moving towards integration of electronics and

e-bike specific brakes. “Matthew’s sensor technology could be incorporated into new braking technology to both improve control and safety and collect valuable feedback data to improve efficiency.” Through the KiwiNet Emerging Innovator programme Dr. Miller has already met with over a dozen big players within the cycling industry to determine the best applications for his IP for the fast growing e-bike market, which is forecast by some analysts to hit $24.3 billion in revenue by 2025. Dr. Miller started the e-bike meter project based on earlier research that demonstrated the link between changing braking patterns and improved performance. Together with Dr. Philip W Fink, Dr. Miller has already developed a brake power meter (BPM) for mountain bikes, which automatically measures braking power and time spent braking while you ride – a world first. Dr. Miller is also receiving support from Massey Ventures, a fully owned subsidiary of Massey University,

to protect the IP and to license the technology to target e-bike manufacturers. Mark Cleaver, CEO Massey Ventures Ltd, says: “We see opportunities to both integrate the sensors into current market technology to improve feedback and safety, as well as, offer an alternative to existing speed sensors.” The KiwiNet Emerging Innovator Programme, open to early career researchers based at universities and Crown Research Institutes across New

Zealand, is designed to boost research with a commercial application at a critical time. It also enables researchers to partner with a business and refine their project for market. Programme recipients receive expert legal advice from KiwiNet corporate partner MinterEllisonRuddWatts and IP advice from Baldwins, as well as, $25,000 in cash from donations from the Norman F. B. Barry Foundation, which owns the Quality Hotel Parnell Limited.

OmniPage Server 2 delivers comprehensive and powerful document conversion solution Nuance Communications has announced OmniPage Server 2, the newest version of Nuance® OmniPage Server, featuring several optimisations including an enhanced user experience with flexible configuration options, API-enabled document classification and cloud deployment options through Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure. Nuance OmniPage Server 2 extends the capabilities of previous offerings, delivering an industrial-strength, reliable, fast and accurate solution for high volume document and image conversion. The most significant enhancement in OmniPage Server 2, the updated user interface with new simplified installation option, enables set-up on

a single machine in minutes making it accessible to new audiences. Dealers and organisations without networking or server configuration expertise can install and begin executing high-volume document conversion processes almost immediately. Once setup, users will immediately appreciate the enhanced Web Conversion Client, with its intuitive interface, as they configure and run document conversion jobs. OmniPage Server 2’s document conversion and classification services are foundational technologies for robotic process automation applications. Document-based information must be converted to machine-readable formats and be

identified by “type” to perform advanced analytics. Utilising OmniPage Server, organisations can drive analytics, streamline document-based business processes and accurately deliver information to an unlimited number of folders and subfolders. “Folder watching” capabilities can detect PDF and image files and automatically designate them for conversion, bringing greater efficiencies to the end-to-end document conversion workflow. OmniPage Server 2 is said to be the most powerful and versatile document conversion solution offered to date. The new installation experience allows a nearly turnkey setup for dealers and end users, while the integration with

document classifier API enables even greater efficiencies to the document conversion and classification process. The ability to host the solution in the cloud will give users greater flexibility, scalability and robustness to support their growing document conversion needs. OmniPage Server 2 converts PDFs and other popular file types into searchable PDFs and other editable files. Other updates include improved OCR accuracy and speed, support for right-to-left languages, such as Arabic and Hebrew, and enhanced Intelligent Workflow Runner, which when combined with the Workflow Designer can easily create more complex workflows.

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DEVELOPMENTS

“Don’t be distracted by criticism. Remember, -the only taste of success some people get is to take a bite out of you. -Zig Ziglar planes from competitors like Airbus. The company has more than 140,000 employees in the United States and around the world.

Caterpillar Making Caterpillar (CAT) construction equipment could get more expensive if steel and aluminium prices rise. The company employs more than 98,000 full-time workers around the world. About 42,000 are in the United States.

In the firing line President Donald Trump’s steep tariffs on steel and aluminium imports are now a reality. Trump has imposed a 25% tariff on steel imports and 10% on aluminium, but exempted Canada and Mexico. For American companies that make metals, that’s welcome news. But for businesses that consume steel and aluminium, like automakers and beverage producers, it will likely mean higher prices. Many have warned that could cut into profits and ultimately spur layoffs. Here’s a look at some of the US companies that may be hit by Trump’s latest protectionist move.

Anheuser-Busch The aluminium used in beer cans is

expected to get more expensive once the tariffs go into effect. The company employs more than 18,000 people in the United States.

Auto parts manufacturers The Motor & Equipment Manufacturers Association, which represents companies that make vehicle parts in the United States, has said the tariffs could put the many of the more than 800,000 jobs i at risk.

Boeing Uses aluminium and some steel parts to make planes. Boeing(BA) could also suffer if other countries decide to retaliate against US tariffs by buying

Campbell Soup Company Campbell’s (CPB) responded that “any new broad-based tariffs on imported tin plate steel will result in higher prices on one of the safest and more affordable parts of the food supply.” Campbell’s has about 18,000 employees.

DowDuPont An executive at the chemical company told Bloomberg that it might need to start building plants in Canada or Argentina if the cost of construction goes up too much in the United States. DowDuPont (DWDP) has approximately 98,000 employees.

Ford Ford (F) uses steel and aluminium in car production. Ford said that the tariffs “could result in an increase in domestic commodity prices — harming the competitiveness of American manufacturers.” Ford has about 202,000 employees

worldwide.

General Electric GE (GE) makes jet engines, power plant turbines, trains and other heavy machinery, all of which use steel and aluminium. Higher costs could inflict further damage on a company that already faces serious financial troubles. GE has about 313,000 employees total. About 106,000 are in the United States.

General Motors GM (GM) cars contain steel and aluminium, though the company says that more than 90% of the steel it uses to make cars in the United States comes from American suppliers. It has more than 180,000 workers around the world.

Oil companies Members of the oil industry have warned that Trump’s steel tariffs could derail the country’s energy boom by raising prices on foreign steel, which oil companies use in drilling and production, as well as in pipelines and refineries. Canary LLC, a Denver-based oilfield services company that employs about 300 people, said higher costs could force it to lay off up to 17% of its US workers.

Tax Working Group – What matters for manufacturers? The Government’s Tax Working Group is currently receiving submissions before the group provides an initial report. It is critical that manufacturers have their say in this working group to ensure tax settings can be improved to facilitate productive investment and growth in the manufacturing sector. If Labour remain in Government following the next election, this Tax Working group will likely inform tax changes they will implement. The Manufacturers’ Network is providing a submission to the Tax Working Group. The discussion document poses a number of questions, many of which are broad and concerned with the aims and outcomes of the tax system, as well as how we deal with future demographic and technology changes which will impact the tax base. The report shows a graph of company tax rates since 1981, which have been trending downward over this period – New Zealand sits above the OECD average company tax, but below that of Australia. Our aging population is expected to put pressure on the tax base into the future, increasing Government costs in areas like health and superannuation. A later graph, shows that while New Zealand’s

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corporate tax rate is around the middle of the pack, our company income tax revenue as a percentage of GDP is the highest in the OECD. From our perspective, the core issue this Tax Working Group needs to consider is what measures are needed to create a tax system which facilities productive growth and investment in our economy. This needs to especially focus on high-value activities which provide exports and import-competing income and well-paid jobs, like manufacturing. Productivity in New Zealand has lagged for decades and all manufacturers know the challenges involved in trying to access capital for investment in their businesses. One of the most obvious and most significant areas of misalignment in our tax system is that while productive activities are taxed in the form of wages and profits, speculative activities are largely untaxed. The test for what’s a speculative activity is quite simple – it’s an investment where the operational returns alone wouldn’t be enough to justify the investment. (Auckland) rental properties and many dairy farms are prime examples for that. What that means is that the vast majority of capital and new money

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through bank loans goes into existing assets – which not only crowds out productive investment, but has other social implications, such as the house price inflation we have seen over recent decades. There is a lot of discussion around how exactly this imbalance could be addressed. From our perspective, the challenge is finding the most effective and efficient way to do so, helping to direct our economy towards more productive investment while still meeting the housing needs of the growing population, particularly in Auckland. Whatever changes are made, these need to work with a wider Government strategy to move our economy toward high value, productive activities. There are other tax changes that would help Kiwi manufacturers and other businesses keep up with changing technology and improve productivity through innovation. One such change would be the reintroduction of accelerated depreciation for equipment. Accelerated depreciation is an effective way of making investment in new equipment easier for businesses, while remaining largely tax neutral. It would also better reflect

the true life time of equipment and machinery, in a time when keeping up with technology is ever more necessary. In addition, R&D tax credits, which we are already expecting from the current Government, can help improve accessibility of support for innovation. To be effective, these credits also need to take into account process, as well as product innovation. Process innovation is often the most important factor allowing Kiwi manufacturers to stay competitive and will help us further increase productivity. A lot of the time, it’s about finding a smarter way of making a product that brings the greatest gains, rather than creating a new product. There have been Tax Working Groups before, and previously, many of the recommendations have been ignored by Governments. This time, we hope the Working Group can have a quality discussion and analysis on better aligning our economy, through the tax system, to support productive investment which can grow our economy, and that the Government listens. -Dieter Adam, Chief Executive, The Manufacturers’ Network


THE INTERVIEW

An entrepreneur is someone who jumps off a cliff and builds a plane on the way down. --Reid Hoffman

The Interview NZ Manufacturer magazine and Revolution Fibres CEO, Ian Hosie. What does Revolution Fibres do? We are nanofibre producers. Nanofibres are a form of non-woven textiles made up of fibres 500 times thinner than a human hair. It is a platform technology that has uses in many diverse markets. We produce nanofibre products for use in ventilation and other filters, cosmetic products, composites, acoustics and anti-allergy bedding. What makes Revolution Fibres stand out from its competitors in the nanofibre market? As well as our expertise, we have a unique business model that gives us an advantage when it comes to versatility. We have the ability to be nimble in a very wide range of markets compared to our nanofibre competitors that are typically limited to one material and niche applications. Beyond our business model, our strength lies in our know-how. We’ve developed the most robust and adaptable electrospinning method in the world. We can make textiles from a wide range of polymers and biopolymers – and carry ingredients and functional materials in high loadings.

You started back in 2009. What is at the heart of your story that you are most proud of? Ours is a story of true Kiwi DIY. We didn’t sell the IP, we didn’t use the traditional angel investment route. We stuck it out, financed ourselves, got good local contracts and made a sustainable manufacturing business in New Zealand and we have every intention of growing it here in the future. Tell us more about what nanofibres can actually do? The best way to describe it is that these are active fibres which do things. They can absorb sound, capture pollutants, sustain life, alter your appearance, and toughen the world’s strongest materials. Nanofibres offer unique properties not seen in textiles before. They provide new, sustainable and functional fabrics that support human health, energy storage, comfort, and improve the products of tomorrow which is hugely exciting.

This has got our product into a number of the Formula One teams and some aerospace clients. We have also recently started an exciting venture with Naturlab in Hong Kong to distribute our actiVlayr product, which is a revolutionary, 100% natural fabric that instantly dissolves onto wet skin, delivering nutrients deep into the skin, throughout China. We are also working on a number of developments in materials innovation with Patagonia Works in USA. What percentage of your products are exported? By volume it has been a small percentage – less than 25%. But in 2018 it will be over half, and growing, and we are also tripling our production capacity and renewed our AS9100 certification. Almost 20% of our current revenue is through R&D and product development for companies that, if successful, will be absolute game changers for us.

Ian Hosie

China is a hugely important market for New Zealand. What importance does it hold for Revolution Fibres? It is hugely important to us because the Chinese community is actively sourcing products that are natural and have significant health benefits. They want products that are seen as high purity and high quality. Our actiVlayr product is the perfect example of this and the Asian community is very receptive to natural New Zealand products – and they’re prepared to pay a premium for these.

What are some of your key products? We have been selling Xantulayr – our carbon reinforcement product, through GPMC Marketing in Italy.

continued from page 1

Revolution Fibres gains aerospace certification, triples production capacity can create vast changes in mechanical strength, reactivity, and conductivity, among many other properties.

of international awards including the Future Textiles Award and RISE Innovation Awards 2017.

Last year its product Xantu.Layr, a nanofibre composite reinforcement veil, was also a finalist for a number

These awards recognise innovations by companies that use advanced science and engineering principles to solve

challenges within the nonwovens and engineered fabrics industry. Revolution Fibres led the commercialisation of nanofibre technology in New Zealand with product lines such as filters for

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HRV Next Generation ventilation systems, the anti-allergy pillow liner Nanodream, and high-performance carbon fibre products.

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HEALTH

Fearlessness is like a muscle. I know from my own life that the more I exercise it, the more natural it becomes to not let my fears run me. -Arianna Huffington

DIY drug testing not the answer By Kirk Hardy, CEO TDDA (The Drug Detection Agency) be aware of the newest tricks users employ to fake results.

Drug use is a real and pervasive workplace problem, and businesses’ most powerful tool to combat it is properly conducted drug testing.

Poor quality and a lack of qualified procedure represent a deadly combination, one that frequently causes incorrect test results. This leads to wrongly accused employees, and unidentified drug users in the workplace.

New Zealand companies continue to look for low-cost testing solutions to maintain safe workplaces. The problem is low cost equals high risk, and despite mounting evidence that demonstrates DIY kits provide poor testing accuracy and lead to procedural issues, companies keep using them.

When working in a safety sensitive environment there’s no room for error. Improper procedure compromises test specimens and incorrect testing produces false negatives, these all too often lead to serious injury – or fatality.

Poor testing procedures risk a company’s reputation and frequently lead to costly court battles. More importantly, they compromise employee safety.

The reverse, a false positive, leads to poor outcomes. Clean employees may face disciplinary action or lose their job. Both paths lead to legal action, usually a personal grievance suit.

Drug testing seems straightforward and DIY kits look like an easy way to lower overheads. But it’s not so simple. There are operational and process complexities to testing. The accuracy of any test depends on its quality, and judges are critical about the accuracy of many DIY tests. Further, you must

When it comes to drug testing employers should adopt a three-step approach. We call it the PIS test: Policy, Independence and Standards. Te first step in creating a safe and drug

free workplace is establishing a Drug Alcohol Management Programme (DAMP). This is a robust, company-wide drug and alcohol policy. Beyond having the policy, a business also needs to correctly enforce it. Communication is key, ensure workers are made aware of the policy, and consider introducing it as early as at interview stage. Remember, employment courts heavily weight how an employer addressed its policy and enforcement obligations in their decisions. For a company to be viewed as serious about drug and alcohol testing, it helps to use an independent service provider for testing. One that provides the professional level of expertise required to deliver accurate results in a professional manner. The Australian FairWork Commission recently ruled against a diagnostic services company, citing disciplinary process flaws, in a case with DIY drug testing.

The company conducted a drug test on a female employee after being informed by her neighbour that she was under the influence of drugs. When asked to give a urine test the employee became agitated, claiming she had tried to gain an Apprehended Violence Order against the neighbour. The employee left the building saying she would come back after lunch and never did. She was later called into a disciplinary meeting for failing to return for the test and her employment was terminated for serious misconduct. The FairWork Commission determined that while the company did have reasonable grounds for requesting a drug test, it was not best practice to take a drug sample from a person they work with and manage. Nor was the process to take the sample in line with Australian and New Zealand Standards. This highlights the importance of using a professional, independent and accredited tester - best practice and knowledge of international standards is critical. Best practice is to ensure that your policy, your independent testers and your ongoing approach to testing conform to the highest international standards. You can’t afford to take short cuts when people’s lives and livelihoods - as well as your company’s reputation - are on the line.

3D printed organs and medical devices to redefine healthcare The increasing adoption of direct digital manufacturing and expiry of key patents of 3D printed products contributes to the growth of the global 3D printing medical devices market, across the globe.

For instance, in January 2016, surgeons at the Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust (U.K.) used 3D printing for supporting the successful transplantation of an adult kidney into a child.

Further to the growing applications of 3D printing in the healthcare industry, surgeons have started using 3D printing in a number of surgical procedures.

Likewise, in June 2015, an Australian maxillofacial surgeon collaborated with the Melbourne University and 3D Medical Limited (Australia), to implant a 3D-printed titanium

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prosthetic jaw in a patient.

estimated to command the largest

By component, the software & services segment is expected to hold the largest market share in 2017

share of the global 3D printing

On the basis of component, the global 3D printing medical devices market is segmented into three broad categories, namely, equipment, materials, software and services.

software solutions to manufacture

The software and services market is

medical devices market. Increasing development of advanced high-quality

3D-printed

medical

products is the key factor driving the growth of the services and software segment.


REAR VIEW

If you can’t fly, then run; if you can’t run, then walk; if you can’t walk, then crawl; but whatever you do, you have to keep moving forward. -Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Predictive maintenance: what the future holds for manufacturers ready to invest in IoT analytics By John Duda, Vice-President of Global Solutions Engineering, Birst (an Infor company)

With the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT), industry has never had access to so much data. Among the possibilities of connected devices and artificial intelligence models, predictive maintenance is one of the most promising areas of development. As we all know, plant and equipment downtime is costly, often causing delays in the production schedule and further delays in deliveries to demanding customers. In an era where market where product quality and customer service are critical to businesses’ survival, these are issues and costs manufacturers can’t afford anymore. The recent massive compulsory car recall of some four million cars on Australia roads to protect drivers from exploding airbags is just one example of the impact a simple production default can have on an organisations’ bottom line and reputation. Data-driven predictive maintenance has proven to increase equipment lifetime, improve plant safety, prevent costly waste, reduce energy consumption, and create stable assent performance. But as companies rush to obtain IoT systems, they are making costly mistakes. It’s tempting to modernise right away, maintenance managers who do not establish a larger strategy to collect and leverage data will end up drowning in data they do not use, or miss opportunities to improve business efficiencies. Here are six steps manufacturers need to establish an IoT predictive maintenance strategy:

1. Business Care The first step is to figure out where,

why, and how the IoT predictive maintenance model fits into the organisation’s needs. It is essential to identify which questions the company expects this system to answer, what criteria it will be measuring, and the goals the organisation aims to meet. By understanding which critical assets are likely to fail and when, and thinking about how this failure impacts personnel, operations, and production costs, it will be easier to understand what metrics the organisation needs to focus on and how data-driven decisions can be integrated within the constraints of existing maintenance practices.

2. EAM & Analytics The easiest and quickest way to create value is adding an analytics solution on top of an EAM (Enterprise Asset Management) solution. EAM systems are already accumulating a wealth of transactional data, which is usually not being fully leveraged for its potential. The reporting from an EAM solution is one dimensional, and while it might be enough to support day-to-day activities, these reports fall short in providing stakeholders with intelligence that draws attention to inefficiency, ineffectiveness, bottlenecks, and other risks in their maintenance operations. Layering business analytics on top of the existing EAM data creates the opportunity to examine trends and establish meaningful insights for

enables the creation of rules for condition monitoring of real-time data coming directly from machine sensors. From there, historical and third-party data such as reliability models and logs can be added on to create failure patterns that further refine rules and offer actionable insights in real time.

more accurate decision-making.

3. Identify Data Solutions Once EAM data is optimised, next step is to leverage additional data sources. Most equipment manufactured today has built-in sensors that provide real-time information to industrial control systems such as Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems or Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). For older equipment, there are simple ways to retrofit assets with sensors.

6. Operationalise Operationalise data analysis and start monitoring the streaming data assets against the defined performance threshold is the final step of any successful predictive maintenance strategy. The key here is to visualise the data to easily understand potential problem areas and accelerate preventive maintenance.

With so many potential data sources, maintenance managers can start small by identifying one or two assets to tackle initially and map out the remaining assets to prioritise down the road.

4. Collect & Model

Dashboards can display assets and their health in intuitive ways such as in a map, list, or hierarchical view. This allows operators to see the status of individual assets for further analysis or information, such as sensor or meter data history or current operating condition.

It is not necessary, or even advisable, to collect all sensor data in a single location. But what is crucial is that the data be modelled in a central location where it can be analysed, and where additional data sources can be brought in. An ideal analytic solution should be adaptable enough to aggregate from all data sources, wherever the data lies, and model it in a central location where anyone can analyse it.

Gathering a mountain of data, and hoping for it to suddenly turn into business insight is a common mistake. True predictive maintenance requires data to be consistently collected from the equipment sensors and analysed for possible patterns. It then can reveal actionable insights and be incorporated into normal operations.

5. Analyse Data analysis is key as this is what will enable the definition of thresholds for asset performance and create models for failure patterns. This

Engineering NZ elects new president Engineering New Zealand welcomes Dean Kimpton as the new President, three new Board members – Colin Crampton, Tim Fisher and Sina Cotter-Tait – and one re-elected Board member, Geoffrey

Farquhar. Mr Kimpton is Auckland Council’s Chief Operating Officer, a passionate advocate for engineers, who he says have a critical role to play on issues that matter to New Zealand. Mr Kimpton is also Chair of QuakeCoRE, a Board member of Infrastructure New Zealand and a member of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and

Employment’s Building Advisory Panel. He was previously Managing Director of engineering consultancy AECOM NZ. He takes over the presidency from Craig Price, who oversaw a period of immense change for the organisation, as it rebranded itself from IPENZ to Engineering New Zealand. The

new

Vice

President,

Colin

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Crampton, was appointed unopposed. Tim Fisher, former Auckland Branch Chair, and Geoffrey Farquhar, who returns for his third term, were voted in by members from a record-breaking 27 nominees. The Board has also appointed Sina Cotter-Tait onto the Board for a two-year term. She was the third-highest polling candidate.

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