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£3.00 where sold

THE

ISSUE 93

I

MARCH 2012

BRISTOL THE MAGAZINE FOR THE CITY OF BRISTO

MAGAZINE

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Bristol DROP TOP TBM tests the Audi A3 cabriolet

FACE THE MUSIC Sharron Davies on life, love, and her desert island discs

WHERE STARS ARE MADE Behind the scenes at the Old Vic Theatre School

BEST OF BRITISH The Clifton Sausage

ZEITGEIST Things in the air in March

Spring Fashion With bold colours and big prints

ART ON SHOW Previews of Leonardo da Vinci and Ravilious exhibitions

WIN A TREAT

With our Mothering Sunday competition

INTERIOR DESIGNS Inspiration for the perfect home

The very best in local writing, what’s on, the arts, lifestyle, property and so much more in your guide to life and living in Bristol


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CONTENTS march:Layout 2 copy

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contents

March2012 25 20 52 10

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ZEITGEIST

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Five things to do in Bristol this month

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TALK OF THE TOWN News and views Bristol-fashion

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WHAT’S ON Our indispensable guide to the major cultural events coming up

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

FOOD & DRINK For anyone planning to plight their troth we’ve got ideas and inspiration

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FOODIE PROFILE The Fabulous Baker Brothers

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COUNTRY LIFE The goat’s cheese makers and their happy herd have a new home

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TRAVEL Try a weekend in Brighton

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FAMILY FUN

THE WALK Visit the site of an English Civil War battle

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INTERIORS A stylish Bristol home that’s also practical and child-friendly

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CITY GARDENING Jane Moore sets out tasks for spring

101 PROPERTY A round-up of some of Bristol’s finest homes, to sell or to rent

RESTAURANT REVIEW We visit the home of the Great British Banger – the Clifton Sausage

TREAT YOUR MUM We’ve teamed up with Cabot Circus for a competition to win a great day out

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BEAUTY REVIEW We trial the latest in nail design

LOCAL HEROINE The remarkable story of a Fry’s factory girl who became an international singing star

SPRING FASHION The new season at Cribbs Causeway where everything’s bright and beautiful

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HOMEGROWN TALENT A behind the scenes look at Bristol’s outstanding drama school

OLD MASTER Bristol’s chance to get a closer look at work by Leonardo da Vinci

MR BRISTOW Not-so fond memories of dressing up for the Queen’s coronation

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FACE THE MUSIC We talk to Olympic swimmer turned TV commentator Sharron Davies

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James Russell previews a major exhibition of Eric Ravilious’s beautifully simple work

BARTLEBY In praise of the NHS

GREAT BRITISH ART

THE

BRISTOL MAGAZINE

TBM can be viewed with the online edition on our website: www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

ON THE COVER Erdem pink tweed dress, £1,150, from Harvey Nichols, Bristol

Ideas for activities and events for the kids March 2012

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The Bristol Magazine 3


Knight Frank March:full page

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Knight Frank

Stoke Bishop A detached family house in a popular & private development. Drawing room, sitting room, spacious kitchen/ breakfast room, conservatory. Utility room. Cloakroom. Master bedroom with ensuite bathroom, 3 further double bedrooms, bathroom. Integrated garage, OSP. Fully enclosed & generous family garden to the rear.

Guide ÂŁ625,000 KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999


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Knight Frank

Almondsbury Carefully designed home for family living (4,174 sq ft) with detached 1 bed oak framed annexe (945 sq ft). Galleried entrance hall, 4 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, utility room. 6 bedrooms, 4 bath/shower rooms (2 ensuite). Landscaped gardens, swimming pool, pool room with shower, 1 bed annexe. In all about 0.85 acres.

Guide ÂŁ1,200,000 KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999


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Knight Frank

Clifton A truly beautiful Grade II Listed Clifton townhouse, with a self-contained Courtyard apartment generating an income below and fabulous views both front and rear. Main house comprises a bespoke kitchen, separate dining room, conservatory. Full width first floor drawing room, sitting room. Master bedroom with en-suite bathroom. 5 further double bedrooms. 2 bathrooms and separate shower room. Private garden and balcony. Beautiful 3 bedroom courtyard maisonette below with its own access. Private garage and separate storage.

Price On Application KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999


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Knight Frank

Computer Generated Image

Sneyd Park A stunning state of the art modern family home, built with an exceptional attention to detail in a private and sought after location. The house has been meticulously designed to provide beautiful living spaces, coupled with 6 well-proportioned double bedrooms with luxury bathrooms and en-suite facilities. Features include under floor heating throughout, fully integrated media system and surround sound; double height living room and a very private landscaped garden. In all approx. 4400 sq. ft. Separate double garage and gated drive-way. Guide Price £1,495,000 KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com • 0117 3171999

KnightFrank.co.uk/bristol bristol@knightfrank.com 0117 3171999


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Over 20 Years’ experience of designing and installing Kitchens, Bathrooms and Bedrooms including carpentry and joinery works.

BeautiFul C S K B • 400 GLOUCESTER ROAD • HORFIELD • BRISTOL BS7 8TR TEL: 0117 924 6165

DESIGNS FOR LIFE!

E: sales@cs-kitchens.co.uk www.chippingsodburykitchens.co.uk

Open: Monday to Friday 9am – 5.30pm. Saturday 10am – 5pm.

Custom Designed. Computer Imagery. Total Project Management.


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EDITOR’Sletter

W

hat does Disney’s Lion King have in common with Leonardo da Vinci? The answer is that both are coming to Bristol, leaving London for the first time. We’re previewing these two very different shows and also the major exhibition of work by 20th century British painter Eric Ravilious this month, in an issue which really reflects that Bristol must surely be the most creative city outside London, excelling as it does in writing, art, film-making and all other kinds of media. Did you know, for example, that the city is home to the country’s best drama school outside London? I was invited to take a look behind the scenes at The Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, which has produced some of the country’s best known actors and whose current crop of students are a talented bunch and passionate about their craft. There’s more creativity going on in the city this month for Bristol Fashion Week, with a series of fast-paced catwalk shows at The Mall at Cribbs Causeway so we’re celebrating that with a preview of this spring’s new looks. Prepare to be bright and bold. We were talking the other day about the places around the city that we’d recommend visitors to go and see, and there’s a growing list. There’s the Cifton Suspension Bridge, of course, along with the ss Great Britain, the harbourside and the zoo, but we’d like to venture to suggest that we add Nelson Street to the list of ‘must-sees.’ Following on from Banksy becoming an international figure with a huge fanbase, the Nelson Street See No Evil project really puts Bristol’s street artists on the cultural map with the largest permanent display of street art in the whole country. As always The Bristol Magazine strives to bring you the best of what’s happening this month, so we can all make the most of the city’s extremely diverse and diverting cultural scene.

GEORGETTE McCREADY All paper used to make this magazine is taken from good sustainable sources and we encourage our suppliers to join an accredited green scheme. Magazines are now fully recyclable. By recycling magazines, you can help to reduce waste and contribute to the six million tonnes of paper already recycled by the UK paper industry each year. Please recycle this magazine, but if you are not able to participate in a recycling scheme, then why not pass your magazine on to a friend or colleague.

CONTACT THE BRISTOL MAGAZINE: Editor Tel: Email:

Georgette McCready 01225 424592 georgette@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Deputy Editor Email:

Samantha Ewart sam@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Contributors

Mick Ringham, Bethany Wivell, James Russell, Andrew Swift, Megan Tatum, Jane Moore

Production Manager Email: Commercial Production Email:

Jeff Osborne production@thebristolmagazine.co.uk Catriona Stirling cat@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Publisher Tel: Email:

Steve Miklos 0117 974 2800 stevem@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Contact the Advertising Sales team on tel: 0117 974 2800 Advertising Sales Email:

Kathy Williams kathy@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Advertising Sales Email:

Jodi Monelle jodi@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Advertising Sales Email:

Sue Parker sue@thebristolmagazine.co.uk

The Bristol Magazine and The Bath Magazine are published by MC Publishing Ltd and are completely independent of all other local publications.

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

March 2012

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ZEITGEIST Visit

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things to do in March

Fashion photography is the latest art form to really capture our imaginations, combining as it does, culture with a record of social history. The Norman Parkinson exhibition at the M Shed is going down a storm, and now the RWA is bringing a touring exhibition called Selling Dreams: 100 Years of Fashion Photography to the city. The show, which opens on 9 March and runs until 29 April, is £5 to view (£3 concessions) features 60 works by 20 photographers, including this delightful shot by Ronald Traeger of Twiggy having fun in 1967.

Vote

Share When tourists come to Bristol, what do we encourage them to see – the suspension bridge, the harbourside, the zoo, or maybe the Downs? So how about adding to that list of must-sees, the largest piece of street art in the UK, namely the Nelson Street See No Evil project? The street art project was launched with a massive art attack last summer and filmed by Bristol production company, Hurricane Media, which has just picked up an award for its film. The documentary about the project, Who’s Lenny? won Best Short Film and Best Community Media at the Royal Television Society West of England awards. The buildings of Nelson Street remain covered in their art work for all to see and make up their own minds about what street art means to us. Hurricane Media weren’t the only Bristol creatives to win at the RTS awards, Aardman Digital and the BBC’s Frozen Planet also won accolades – more reasons to be proud of Bristol’s cultural contribution to the world.

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It’s always nice when we’re asked for our opinion, and there are currently two Bristol institutions enlisting our support at the moment. M Shed is one of ten UK museums who have been put forward to compete for the Art Fund Prize. The museum needs local people to say why they like the M Shed. Comments can be registered at www.artfundprize.org.uk – we have until Sunday 22 April to vote. All who register are entered into a draw to win an iPad 2. Over at ss Great Britain staff are urging people to get a wobble on and vote for the Bristol attraction to win the chance to get a ship inspired installation made out of jelly brought to the waterside. You’ll have to be quick though, as votes need to be in by 5 March. Visit: http://bit.ly/wCUM4d. The jellymakers are artists Bompas and Parr, who have made jelly replicas of Buckingham Palace and St Paul’s Cathedral.

Book One of Disney’s best loved films, The Lion King, which transferred so spectacularly to the West End, is for the first time leaving London and coming to the Bristol Hippodrome from August to November. Tickets are already on sale and the show is expected to be a roaring success in this, the Hippodrome’s 100th birthday. Christiaan de Villiers, general manager at the Hippodrome, said: “Ever since the show opened in London our patrons have been asking when is The Lion King coming to Bristol? Now, we can finally confirm that the wait is over and what better way to celebrate. We very much look forward to the arrival of the Disney company later in the year.”

Ride Take a fresh look at the city from The Bristol Wheel, newly arrived in Broadmead shopping centre, and here until May. Open daily, the 60-metre wheel slowly revolves to allow riders inside its pods to get a bird’s eye view over the area. After dark its reflection makes a dramatic addition to the night scene in the city centre. Tickets are £6 (£4 for children, £5 concessions) and there’s a ten per cent discount if you book online: www.bristolwheel.co.uk


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TALKofthe TOWN

My cultural life

BOOK OF THE MONTH Up the Feeder, Down The Mouth By Anthony Smith, published by Redcliffe Press, £12.95 The subtitle reads, ‘the long life and sudden death of Bristol City Docks’ and this new volume draws on the authentic voices of the dockers, sailors and their wives to bring the story of the city’s harbourside to life. Originally written as a play and last staged on the dockside in 2001, this new edition combines dialogue with historic pictures of the working docks and of the stage production. Author Anthony Smith was faced with trying to get the essence of 1,000 years of history into an evening’s performance. Behind the humour and the talk of ships coming and going is the stark fact that Bristol’s dockers led a precarious working life. Every morning around 600 men would be penned in together (outside where the Arnolfini stands) and the gang bosses would then pick out those lucky ones who were to work that day – and therefore be able to put food on the table for their families. As one character remarks, he doesn’t know how he’ll look his missus in the eye if his name isn’t called out. And although it does tell tales of hardship it’s also a celebration of the human spirit and will be of interest to Bristolians who take pride in the city’s gritty heritage.

A date for your diary . . . NEWS IN BRIEF

O

n Sunday 22 April Rotary Clubs from all over the south west are gathering on College Green to show the rest of us some of the activities they take part in and causes they support in the UK and abroad. The Festival of Rotary is free to attend. The Rotary Clubs of Bristol will be joined from fellow members from as far afield as Worcester and Marlborough. One of the many displays will be ShelterBox tents, which are supplied by Rotary Clubs and can be sent out to sites all over the world to provide immediate shelter, bedding and cooking equipment for families hit by hurricanes, earthquakes and other natural disasters. Life Education Centres will be bringing along a mobile classroom to show their work with local children and Rotary members will be making briquettes to highlight their work in Kenya, along with a selection of other activities. There will also be games for children and performances on the stage. Rotary’s major project, End Polio Now will also be represented with a competition on a treadmill for the polio cause. Rotary district governor Martin Greaves said: “It is tremendous how all the clubs in the district have responded to this event.It is important to us that we let the public know of our work and the fun we all have just getting stuck in. I would like to thank all concerned and invite families in Bristol to come along and enjoy the day with us. It is free and is a family fun day, we want people to stay and enjoy themselves.” The Festival of Rotary starts at 11am on 22 April, with an official opening at 11.30am, and goes on until 3pm.

Author to visit Andrew Miller, winner of the Costa Book of the Year for his novel Pure, will be at Foyles bookshop in Cabot Circus on Tuesday 20 March from 6pm. He will be talking about the book which is set in the years just prior to the French Revolution. He will also be talking about his previous books. Reserve free tickets by emailing bristolevents@foyles.co.uk.

Bursting with ideas Bristol’s Festival of Ideas offers a variety of free cultural events to encourage debate and discussion. Established in 2005 it runs events throughout the year, while the main festival is staged in May. This month there are talks at the Wills Memorial Building, Foyles, Arnolfini and Watershed – and all are free. There’s the chance to hear a passionate opponent of the death penalty, or an Australian novelist tackling the American Civil Rights movement, or to learn more about film special effects. Find out details at: www.ideasfestival.co.uk

Women’s workshop The Bristol Magazine The Bristol Magazine 2 Princes Buildings George Street Bath BA1 2ED Telephone: 0117 974 2800 Fax: 01225 426677 editor@thebristolmagazine.co.uk sales@thebristolmagazine.co.uk © MC Publishing Ltd 2012 The Bristol Magazine is distributed free every month to over 24,000 homes and businesses throughout Bristol. Published by MC Publishing Limited Disclaimer: Whilst every reasonable care is taken with all material submitted to The Bristol Magazine, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage to such material. Opinions expressed in articles are strictly those of the authors. This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in any form either in part or whole without written permission from the publishers.

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Teacher and trainer Claire Chidley is coming to Bristol as part of a four-date tour of the UK, starting at the Barbican in London, with her workshops, Empowering Women. She wants to share her 30 years’ experience to help women get more joy out of life and work. The Bristol workshop is on Sunday 25 March, tickets are £50 (£40 concessions) from: www.360wisdom.co.uk

A correction In the February issue of The Bristol Magazine the phone number for John Kennedy of Noble Caledonia cruises was incorrect. The correct number is 0117 946 6000.

Joni Farthing, founder of the Athena Network in Bristol talks about what she’s doing this month Which book are you reading? A Short History of Almost Everything by Bill Bryson. The explosion in science writing for non-scientists over the past couple of decades has been pure joy to me. The ability to unravel the wonders of science to a non-specialist is a great skill. Nobody does it better than Bill.

Which museum or gallery will you be visiting? The da Vinci drawings from the Queen’s collection at the Bristol Museum, because he’s so brilliantly clear and clever. And, at the Arnolfini, Sophie Rickett’s installation based on the Severn Bore because she goes where words can’t go.

Film or play? What will you be going to see this month? Bim Mason’s Folie a Deux at The Brewery theatre is where human physicality meets technology; circus meets touch screen. What a task to set a company. What fun. Theatre is always exhilarating when it has that bear-pit closeness you get in intimate spaces such as the Brewery – I can’t wait.

Which local restaurant/café will you be visiting? When family visit I take them for a traditional Sunday lunch at The Botanist. The quality of light in this restaurant is exquisite and puts everyone in a great mood, ready to chatter.

Shopping habits – local market or big department store? Where do you most enjoy spending your cash? I buy my flowers from Elaine at The Florist Ltd, a cute shop surprisingly smack in the centre of town on Broad Quay, then wander along to Bordeaux Quay – my favourite deli/snackerie.

What local outdoor activity/location will you be going to do or visit this month? Westonbirt arboretum to see the spring nudge back into our lives. The Athena Network is a lunchtime group, meeting monthly at The Square, Clifton, for women to build their businesses through advice, partnership and referrals. Visit: www.theathenanetwork.com.


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Pale Blue THE HEALING TOWER OF HENGROVE

T

he NHS occupies a unique place in our culture. We moan about it. We rely on it. And when it is threatened, we rally round to defend it. Quite right too: when the history of our time is written the creation of a National Health Service will be seen as one of the great achievements of a civilized society. What better gift can a democratic country bestow on its citizens than the freedom from this basic fear: who will look after me and mine if I am sick or injured? Of course there’s much more to the NHS than this. People aren’t excited about the new South Bristol Community Hospital solely because it is a place where the sick can be cured. The new hospital also promises economic prosperity. Healthcare is a massive industry these days, and the influx of doctors, nurses, technicians and, yes, patients, will provide a much-needed fillip in a part of the city that has been neglected for decades. Hengrove is not high on the list of Bristol beauty spots, but now people have a reason to go there, and you can already see the effect of this development in the regeneration of the old Imperial Tobacco HQ in nearby Hartcliffe. There’s nothing new in the equation of sickness with economic wellbeing. Medieval pilgrims made arduous and dangerous journeys to monasteries not just for the sake of their spiritual health but also because monks were the doctors of the age, prescribing herbal remedies for a multitude of ailments. Of course the sick paid for their treatment, and for the monks’ hospitality, and this in turn funded building work, the writing of books, and so on. By the early 19th century medicine was emerging as a profession with a split personality; as a doctor you could do amazing works, finding a cure for smallpox or campaigning for better sanitation, but if you chose your patients well you could also make a lot of money. We all want to live long and healthy lives and will happily pay for the privilege.

If I get run over by a bus, it doesn’t matter whether I have a million pounds in the bank or 10p in my pocket, I will be scooped up, taken off in an ambulance and nursed back to health

What makes the NHS so incredible is the way in which it channels these tremendous, primal human urges – the desire to be well, and the desire to live well – into an institution that benefits us all equally, irrespective of wealth or rank. If I get run over by a bus, it doesn’t matter whether I have a million pounds in the bank or 10p in my pocket, I will be scooped up, taken off in an ambulance and nursed back to health. This kind of service costs money, as healthcare has always cost money, but it is worth every penny. In America, by contrast, being run over by a bus can be an extremely expensive business. A short ride in an ambulance will cost you hundreds of dollars if you have health insurance, thousands if you don’t, and when you arrive at the hospital the first thing you will be asked for is a credit card number. You might argue that this is as it should be – why should the healthy and fortunate support the sick and unlucky? The NHS isn’t just an organisation set up to provide medical care, but one of the institutions that defines what modern Britain stands for. We believe that people should live as free as people ever can live from the fear of illness or injury, and to ensure that we have a system of public ownership and accountability. It can always be improved and will never be perfect, but we shouldn’t let the fact that a hospital can make money blind us to the fact that it’s main function is to look after people who need looking after. Yes, the new South Bristol Community Hospital will bring prosperity, and that’s great news, but that prosperity is a welcome side-effect, not the hospital’s raison d’etre. ■ 14 The Bristol Magazine

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March 2012

but only if you want

something different

Womens clothing and other lovely things

14 Hill Road, Clevedon, BS21 7NZ 01275 874420


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NEVER ONE TO TREAD WATER

Record breaking swimmer Sharron Davies talks to Mick Ringham about music, her career and family, and why she’s excited to be involved in this summer’s London Olympic Games

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FACEtheMUSIC

ALL THE SINGULAR LADIES: left to right, Amy Winehouse, Back to Black, Macy Gray, I Try, and Goldfrapp, Clowns

I

t was the summer of 1976 when a 13-year- old girl plunged onto the world stage representing Great Britain at the Montreal Olympics. That was the springboard for the young Sharron Davies to become a household name and the rest, as they say, is history. Over the next 18 years, the nation witnessed this determined athlete win a tally of medals, including four bronze, three silver and two gold, competing in the European, Commonwealth and the Olympic Games. Sharron was born in Plymouth, where she learned to swim at the age of six, with her father, who two years later became her coach. So focused was this future sports superstar, that she continued training even after breaking both her wrists in a childhood accident. She reflects, “I credit my father for giving me the enthusiasm and drive in the pool and I relished the challenge. Dad still coaches today at the age of 78, there’s just no stopping him!” When Sharron reached 18, she embarked on a television career and was also in demand for modelling. However, the lure of the chlorine and the cheers of the crowd proved too much for her to resist and she plunged back into the world of competitive swimming, picking up further medals and a MBE along the way. Sharron has broken an impressive 200 British swimming records, and with experience gained as both an athlete and television presenter, it became obvious that she would enter the world of celebrity and media. She joined ITV’s Gladiators and was involved with a number of health and fitness videos, she modelled glamorous outfits to raise money for sports charities and presented Channel 4’s Big Breakfast. Never one to tread water, she recently took part in the series Dancing on Ice and has also been busy building a reputation as a TV sports commentator. She explains “I have devoted most of my life to sport in one way or another, but I also enjoy the business side of things – I’m lucky in that respect.” Sharron has recently moved to a former Georgian mansion in the Wiltshire countryside, just a few miles from Bath where she juggles family life with her children, Grace, Elliott and Finley, and a multitude of commitments to business and a hectic charity schedule. After three marriages and a diverse, hugely successful media career, I asked her what advice she would pass down to her three children. She smiles: “There are so many things you learn about life, for instance, I believe you make your own luck. I also strongly believe you should treat people as you wish to be treated and above everything, follow your heart – but listen to your head.” As for her future plans, she is looking foward to being one of the team of commentators for the BBC’s coverage of the London Olympics this summer. She believes the Games will prove to be one of the most exciting global events of the century. She may not be in the water competing, but you can be sure that Ms Davies will make a splash.

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Sharron’s top ten: ● Joan Armatrading – Fast Car This reminds me of taking part in Dancing on Ice with my fabulous partner Pavel and our best score. Joan even requested a copy of our routine when she saw it, which is marvellous. In rehearsals and training, you hear each song over and over, but I never get tired of this wonderful piece of music. ● Joni Mitchell – Both Sides Now My favourite feel-good film is Love Actually. This reminds me so much of the first time I saw it. The depth in the lyrics is amazing, I get caught up and lost in it. ● Amy Winehouse – Back to Black I was in Shanghai at the World Championships last year and all the news channels were reporting on the tragic killings in Norway. The next piece of terrible news was the death of Amy Winehouse. She had such a great voice and amazing delivery and was a trail blazer for female singers. ● John Lennon – Woman Similar to Amy, the negative fact that such a creative talent was cut short, especially after his resurgence in the early 80s. I loved the album this track was from and will forever wonder what creativity we have all missed. ● Robbie Williams – Mr Bojangles It’s so hard to pick between Michael Buble, Jamie Cullum, Nina Simone or Sinatra, who all sang this. I chose Robbie’s version as it reminds me of my children’s introduction to jazz, albeit soft jazz. To my mind Frank Sinatra is still the king. ● Macy Gray – I Try Most of us ladies have songs we attach to men in our lives, I’m no exception. This has memories of Tony, my third husband and how it just didn’t seem to work out, even though it should have. This was our song from the start, which is odd if you listen to the lyrics.... it makes me rather sad but it is still a beautiful record. ● David Bowie – Space Oddity A true classic – my family know every word and always sing along with it. The imagery it conjures up and the story it tells is so original. I was determined to introduce the kids to the pop classics such as Bowie, Clapton, The Beatles and the great sound of Motown. ● Gorillas – Dare Something totally different. Slightly curious because I love Fleetwood Mac, Queen and U2 among others, but I really enjoy how electric and animated this is, it’s almost surreal, like Dali. I’ve played this album to death, but when I put my cans on, that’s when I can really appreciate it. ● Goldfrapp – Clowns This is haunting and relaxing, I love it. Kate Bush has just brought out a new album after quite a long break and that’s in my car. Similarly I love Eva Cassidy when I need to chill. ● Journey – Who’s Crying Now Finally a bit of rock, this is a survival song; everyone needs a few of those. I used to blast it out in my first car; it’s funny how songs go around, just like fashion in many respects. Everything gets recycled eventually doesn’t it? ■ March 2012

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Mr Bristow NOSTALGIA: NOT ALL IT’S CRACKED UP TO BE

Estuary All things irresistible....

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ll this fuss about the Jubilee! I can just about remember Coronation Year 1953 and I can tell you it was really dull. The coronation itself was probably amazing, but your average citizen sans telly only saw grainy copies of an official film that was distributed to village halls after the event. It certainly looked to be a very rainy day, and although the nation was purportedly deeply touched by Queen Salote of Tonga’s decision to ride in an open carriage, even at my tender age I harboured doubts that they would have been able to squeeze her impressively large frame into a conventional closed coach. After seeing the film, I worried for weeks about the aged lords who had to walk backwards down the steps away from the new monarch. I just knew that if I ever became a lord I would surely take a tumble in similar circumstances. As a five-year-old I was forced to wear my older brother’s itchy handme-downs (that included itchy too-long flannel shorts that stuck out each side like cardboard, itchy too-big grey shirt and super-itchy thick hand knitted grey socks that gathered around the ankles Just William style unless your mum could afford a bit of elastic to make a pair of painful garters). I understand that clothes rationing was still in existence in 1953. It certainly was in our house. But not enough unfortunately to prevent the purchase of a yard and a half of red woollen fabric with which my aunt made me an elf costume for the village parade. I hated it. And yes, you’ve guessed, it was as itchy as all the other garments that had been forcibly thrust upon me in my short life.

the old lady in the grocers shop still ❝ remembered Dad’s illicit lettuces, which she said were lovely ❞ Actually, I can remember hanging onto our buff coloured dog-eared rationing book for dear life every time I was sent round to the shops to buy tea, bacon or butter. Woe betides if you left it behind or lost it. Starvation would surely follow. Though my dad had a market garden, staffed by German prisoners of war, so we had eggs and veg coming out of our ears. I went back to the village a few years ago and the old lady in the grocers shop (who would have been a young slip of a thing back then) still remembered Dad’s illicit lettuces, which she said were lovely. She gave me an apple in fond memory and gratitude. Our coronation parade was, naturally, a suitably dull affair. The local scoutmaster did a passable impersonation of Mr Pickwick, waving from atop a union flag draped delivery van. Very Dad’s Army. And my brother sported a rather fine Indian chief outfit which I coveted, but which he confided was equal in itchiness to anything I had to wear. At least it didn’t rain where we were, and we all got a free coronation mug. These days you get retro clothing fairs and 50’s revival nights. All very exciting. But the real thing was austere, penny-pinching and dull. Being gay was a prisonable offence, politics was mostly run by very boring old men and the wearing of Brylcreem obligatory. For most people in our village, making a simple phone call meant a trudge through all weathers to the phone box up on the main road. And there being only one telly for miles around and buses to town limited to Tuesdays and Saturdays, entertainment was sitting round the radio listening to obscure ‘personalities’ (we didn’t have celebs then) reminiscing about the war on Desert Island Discs. Hmm. Some things don’t change! ■ 18 The Bristol Magazine

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85 Hill Road, Clevedon, BS21 7PN 01275 343030 e: estuaryltd@yahoo.co.uk gifts • home • jewellery • accessories


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â?? Bristolians have a front row seat when watching these emerging talents honing their craft

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THEATRICALcity

WHERE THE STARS ARE MADE Georgette McCready visits the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School – the best drama school outside London and training ground for talent which wins hearts and minds on stage, screen and television

GRADUATES: Clockwise form top left: Patrick Stewart Laura Carmichael, Pete Postlethwaite, Joseph Mawle, Patricia Routledge, Patrick Stewart, Daniel Day Lewis, Miranda Richardson, Amanda Redman, all trained at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. bottom right, a scene from the student production of What The Dickens Photos courtesy of Graham Burke

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he BBC in Bristol is widely fêted for its contribution to television and its enviable worldwide reputation for excellence. But how many Bristolians, strolling along the Downs, know that behind the doors of three ordinary looking villas, are being trained some of the actors and technicians who will one day make a huge impact on our small screens and in award-winning stage productions? The Bristol Old Vic Theatre School’s past graduates names read like a hall of fame – from the late Pete Postlethwaite and Christopher Cazenove, to Jeremy Irons, Brian Blessed, Patrick Stewart, Samantha Bond, Patricia Routledge and Miranda Richardson. Most recently, television audiences will have been enjoying performances by alumni Laura Carmichael in Downton Abbey, Olivia Colman in Rev and Joseph Mawle in Birdsong. What’s so exciting is that we Bristolians have a front row seat when watching these emerging talents honing their craft. Students at the school put on 150 public performances in Bristol and throughout the south west every year. These range from Nativity plays for schools to Shakespeare alfresco. They stage shows, such as a musical version of Dickens’ Hard Times, at the Tobacco Factory and run a season at the Redgrave Theatre each year. Principal Paul Rummer, takes me on a tour of the theatre school, housed in those three white villas overlooking Clifton Downs. Unlike students in many universities, the Old Vic’s candidates are expected to begin classes at 8.45am and to work all day, and into the evenings if they are preparing for a show. “What we always say to them is that their first day here is the first day of their professional career,” says Paul. “And they are passionate about what they do. If that means sometimes we have to lock the doors at night and send them home to bed, so be it.” Competition for places is fierce, but every single person who applies is seen. Entry to the school is based on talent, not academic achievements. From around 1,800 applicants, around 300 are called back for day-long auditions and workshops for 26 places on the acting course. The school has 160 full-time students, studying a wide range of theatrical skills, including stage management, costume design and making, and set construction. A tour of the theatre school is like walking into the pages of one of the books I loved to read as a child, in which our heroines win places at stage school and go on to make lifelong friendships and see their names in lights. From one rehearsal room comes the sound of shouting and the clash of metal on metal – how many other schools can boast sword fighting techniques as part of the curriculum? In another room, bodies are flick-flacking across the space with enviable athleticism, and in yet another we see an earnest huddle of students, sitting with books in hand, studying the text of a play prior to bringing their characters to life. Up flights of old stairs there’s a studio devoted to set building.

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Talking to the students about the projects they’re working on elicits a universally enthusiastic response. There’s a model of a set for Macbeth, based on the forbidding interior of a castle with doors that clank shut, one after the other, shutting off the ambitious schemer’s options and exits. At another desk is a pile of beautifully hand-painted designs for costumes for the same production. Lady Macbeth bears a striking resemblance to Wallis Simpson and the designer comments that the costume makers will be delighted that there is fine woven chainmail involved, as they like projects which will show off their craft. Paul explains: “We are here to prepare our students for the world of employment, and that includes working to deadline and to budget. They will be freelance workers, so they have to be prepared for that.” Because the school is the best drama school outside London – it is affiliated to the prestigious Conservatoire for Dance and Drama – it has an exceptional graduate employment record. Theatrical agents come to cherry pick the brightest stars and students never know who is sitting in the audience when they put on their productions. Paul tells the story of the first night of a show at the Tobacco Factory, when unknown to the cast, Sir Ian McKellen was in the audience. He was clearly impressed by what he saw and asked for the name of the theatre company and how long the show had been running. “When we told him it was the first night of a continued over ☞

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THEATRICALcity student show, he was surprised and asked if he could go backstage afterwards and meet the cast,” said Paul. You can imagine the faces of those young students in the dressing room when Sir Ian arrived in their midst, immediately putting them at their ease. It was a generous act that none of those actors will forget. Anna Travers, marketing manager at the school, is just as passionate as the students about the institution and what it achieves. “When we see one of our students doing well it makes us all so proud. It might be in costume for Downton Abbey, or taking a major role, as Joseph Mawle has done recently in Birdsong, or it might be a voiceover on a TV advert that we’ll recognise. It’s a great feeling to see them doing well.” That is an emotion we, as theatre goers can all share. When we go to see productions in the various Bristol venues that the students are in, we begin to pick out our favourite performers. Then, as the years go by, we may see those actors in later, professional stage productions or in the cinema. Olivia Colman, for example, recently had big screen exposure when she played Carol Thatcher to Meryl Streep’s Iron Lady. The drama school was founded by Sir Laurence Olivier in a cramped room behind the stage door of the Bristol Old Vic, moving out to Downside Road in 1954, where, like Topsy it has grown. The school is a registered charity and gets no funding from Bristol City Council, which means donations, sponsorship and bequests are always welcome. Fundraising is currently underway to create a new rehearsal space between two of the school buildings, and to give disabled access. Paul Rummer values the support that Bristolians give the school: “Audiences are really important to us. We enjoy going out into the community – for a lot of schoolchildren a visiting production can be their first taste of live theatre. “One project we all enjoy is our annual visit to Wedmore Village Hall. We’ve been putting on shows there for 21 years and we always get such a warm welcome.” Many of the schools’ graduates choose to make their homes in the south west and go on to be ambassadors for their alma mater. On the school website Bristol’s contribution to the acting profession is acknowledged by its strapline: “World class training – made in Bristol. ■

Hard Times, the musical ran at the Tobacco Factory.

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Theatre school shows

Mother Goose, one of many great student productions staged in Bristol

The students’ next productions are:

■ Time and the Conways by JB Priestley, at Circomedia, St Paul’s Church, Portland Square, 9 – 17 March ■ Cold Comfort Farm, adapted from the novel by Stella Gibbons by Paul Doust, Redgrave Theatre, Percival Road, Clifton, 9 – 12 May ■ Dancing at Lughnasa by Brian Friel will be at the Tobacco Factory, 11 – 23 June ■ The Good Soul of Szechuan by Bertolt Brecht, at Bristol Old Vic Studio, 14 – 23 June ■ The Rover by Aphra Behn, at Bristol Old Vic Studio, 27 – 30 June

For tickets visit: www.oldvic.ac.uk or tel: 0117 973 3955


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SPRINGfashion

STYLE SWITCH Bristol’s fashion mix-up TV stylist Mark Heyes is making a welcome return to Bristol this month as he presents the catwalk shows as part of Bristol Fashion Week at The Mall Cribbs Causeway. Ahead of this exciting spring event he talks to The Bristol Magazine about the key trends to look out for this season

Geometric top, £22.50, Per Una. Speziale abstract print palazzo trousers, £45, Marks & Spencer

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SPRINGfashion

Vintage fashion takes centre stage with the 1950s trend set to be one of the hottest of the season. Throw on a prom dress for a feminine retro look, mix wild fruits and flowers for classic elegance and team with peep toe shoes and cats eye sunglasses for some old-fashioned glamour. Main picture: Palm tree tea dress, £79, John Lewis. Clockwise from top right: lace cami, £38 and peplum skirt, £45, Warehouse; sleeveless flower blouse, £140, Karen Millen, beige closed toe platforms with pink bow, £42, Dorothy Perkins; green collared top, £26, rose embellished bag, £32, Next; Olivia polka-dot blouse, £79, Hope pleated skirt, £110, mini jean bag, £169, Paris bow courts, £139, Hobbs

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SPRINGfashion

PASTELS

After the dark and dreary winter months pastels offer a subtle way to work colour into your spring wardrobe. Think spearmint greens, lemon sherbets and parma violets. Go for it head to toe a la Dolce and Dior or try colour blocking tones for a look that’s bright and fresh. Main picture: Yellow lace dress, £45, Warehouse. Clockwise from top right: earrings, £7.50, Next; mint green top, Wallis; zip pocket skinny crop, £59, Mint Velvet at John Lewis; cube clutch, £30, Accessorize

While pastels take centre stage this spring, there is still plenty of room to add some fabulous brights to the mix. Look out for cobalts, corals and canary yellows for a more vibrant take on colour. Add an eye-popping accessory in highlighter shades to add an instant edge to your outfit. Clockwise from far left: Bodycon dress, £40, Next; Limited Collection open front jacket, £55, Marks & Spencer; yellow suede tassel clutch, £140, Karen Millen. Anise in blue, £85, Dune; elderflower neon mix kitten heel, £120, Kurt Geiger

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SPRINGfashion

GLOBAL TRAVELLER This season prints are big and bold, embracing a fantastic cultural mix of tribal, ethnic, paisley and animal print. Print clashing is the way forward and don’t be afraid to experiment, keep to similar tones and throw a bit of print in to the mix. Main picture: Rihanna jacket, £55, Rihanna suit trousers, £30, River Island. Top right: deco diva limited top £35, trousers £25, shoes £29.50, earrings £12.50, watch £25, Marks & Spencer. If you’re not quite brave enough to tackle this trend head on then there are plenty of accessories to choose from for a more subtle nod to the global traveller style. Tiki clutch bag £45, Accessorize; Kara shoe, £55, Monsoon; bangle set, £14, Next; print trousers, £115, Karen Millen 28 The Bristol Magazine

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Join Mark Heyes at Bristol Fashion Week, from 21-25 March 2012. Tickets from www.mallcribbs.com or the Mall’s information desk. Get the best view in the house with a platinum FROW (front row) ticket, £13.95. Standard seating £8.95. All of the stores listed in this feature can be found at The Mall at Cribbs Causeway, Bristol. Tel: 0117 903 0303. www.mallcribbs.com


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COMPETITION

WIN TICKETS FOR BRISTOL FASHION WEEK oin the fashion pack and enjoy the best view in the house with a pair of platinum FROW (Front Row) tickets to Bristol Fashion Week. The Bristol Magazine and The Mall at Cribbs Causeway have teamed up to offer one reader the chance to win a pair of free tickets. Spread across five days, from 21 – 25 March, Bristol Fashion Week allows fashion lovers to indulge in fashion, style and pampering. Guests can sample the delights of an M&S 50’s style champagne tea party in the Fashion Theatre Reception, win a designer handbag during every catwalk show, courtesy of John Lewis, and indulge in the feel good treatments on offer at the BFW Pamper Zone. Lust after the latest catwalk looks while TV stylist Mark Heyes and celebrity hairdresser Andrew Barton entertain with their valuable fashion knowledge and celebrity gossip. Pastel hues are set to sweep the catwalk this season and as sharp whites wash through the runway, hems drop to reveal a fabulous 50’s silhouette before the 20’s swish back through with a current twist of Gatsby glamour. To win a pair of FROW tickets to Bristol Fashion Week, simply answer the following question:

J

● Which two decades have inspired the trends on this season’s Bristol Fashion Week catwalk? Send your answers, marked Bristol Fashion Week to: The Bristol Magazine, 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath, BA1 2ED or by email to competitions@thebristolmagazine.co.uk by noon on Friday 16 March. Don’t forget to include all of your contact details. Entrants must be 18 or over, and free for the 5.30pm fashion show on Saturday 24 March. If you would like to hear more from The Mall at Cribbs Causeway, please indicate on your entry. The editor’s decision is final. Tickets to Bristol Fashion Week are available online at www.mallcribbs.com or from The Mall’s Information Desk. #BFW to join in the fashion conversation. The BFW Pamper Zone opens from Thursday 22 March. Some treatments are chargeable. ■

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CITYstyle

SPRING WISH LIST For March we’ve opted for all things bright and beautiful NATIVE AMERICAN ART: exquisite turquoise, coral and mother of pearl inlay earrings. By Stephanie Medina of the Kewa Pueblo tribe, £85. Rainmaker, 123 Coldharbour Road, Bristol. Tel: 0117 944 3101

TALISMAN: angel wings pendant, £120 by Jacqueline Beavington. Workshop 22, 22 Upper Maudlin Street, Bristol. Tel: 0117 3290393. www.workshop22.co.uk

VINTAGE STYLE: cardigan with bird and flower print. Available in coral, blue and black, this season’s key colours, £39. Sweet Pea, 127 Coldharbour Road, Redland. Tel: 0117 9245 478. www.sweetpeafashion.co.uk

FLIGHT OF FANCY: acrylic and etched mirror finish butterfly earrings, £39, from Clifton Rocks. 100 Queens Road, Clifton. Tel: 0117 9731342. www.cliftonrocks.co.uk

SPRING STAPLE: the classic trench coat gets a style overhaul with this texture block trench by Helene Berman, £150. House of Fraser, The Circus, Cabot Circus. Tel: 0117 9125505. www.houseoffraser.co.uk

TURN HEADS: bold colours and prints are going to be big this spring/summer. Dress, £45, by Amari at Pale Blue. 14 Hill Road, Clevedon. Tel: 01275 844 420.

LOOK COOL: Pau Hana dark tortoise with green lens sunglasses, by Maui Jim £221, from Juul & Payne advanced eyecare. 70 Alma Rd, Clifton. Tel: 0117 9737667. www.juulandpayne.co.uk 30 The Bristol Magazine

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GO DOTTY: French designer dress, £195, only at Motiq. 8 Boyces Avenue, Clifton. Tel: 0117 9738 686


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COMPETITION

WIN A MOTHER AND DAUGHTER DAY other’s Day is fast approaching and to celebrate, we’ve teamed up with Cabot Circus for a competition offering one lucky reader the chance to take their mother – or daughter – on a day of shopping and pampering. The prize includes: ■ A Sanctuary Spa manicure for two ■ Afternoon tea for two at Harvey Nichols Second Floor restaurant ■ £200 Cabot Circus gift card, valid at all stores, bars and restaurants in Cabot Circus and Quakers Friars. Sanctuary Spa, based in Quakers Friars, is just one of three of its kind outside of London. The spa offers luxurious treatments which combine relaxation, pampering and rejuvenation with progressive techniques and technologies. The winner and their guest will receive an Express Polish Manicure courtesy of the spa’s team of expert therapists. After being pampered, head to the Second Floor restaurant at Harvey Nichols for afternoon tea for two. Enjoy a delicious range of sandwiches on homemade bread, scones with Cornish clotted cream and miniature homemade cakes, all served with a pot of Harvey Nichols loose leaf tea. And what better way to finish your day than

M

with a little retail therapy? The Cabot Circus gift card is redeemable at all 120 stores, bars and restaurants, including Harvey Nichols, Reiss, French Connection, Oliver Bonas and Links of London – with £200 to spend you will be spoilt for choice. To be in with a chance of winning this fabulous prize, just answer the following question: What is the name of the Harvey Nichols restaurant? Send your answer on a postcard marked Cabot Circus Competition to The Bristol Magazine, 2 Princes Buildings, Bath BA1 2ED or email: competitions@thebristolmagazine.co.uk, to arrive by Friday 23 March. Don’t forget to include all your contact details. ■ Terms & Conditions: The Harvey Nichols prize consists of afternoon tea for two. Bookings at Harvey Nichols restaurant are subject to availability. The Sanctuary Spa prize consists of an Express Polish Manicure each. General spa terms and conditions apply. The Sanctuary Spa is exclusively for women. Over 14s only. Both treatments must be redeemed on the same day. www.thesanctuary.co.uk. For further information about Cabot Circus visit: www.cabotcircus.com

TREAT FOR TWO: our prizewinner will enjoy a shopping spree, luxury afternoon tea and a manicure

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DO SOMETHING YUMMY o something yummy and help support children and young people with cancer this month for CLIC Sargent’s annual Yummy Mummy Week campaign. The week, which takes place between 10 – 18 March is all about mums doing something yummy by hosting their own fundraising events and spending quality time with their children, family and friends – anything, from hosting a cake sale or afternoon tea to a pamper party, goes. All the money raised will help CLIC Sargent, the UK’s leading cancer charity for children and young people, to continue to provide clinical, practical and emotional support. Last year mums across Bristol pulled out all the stops as part of Yummy Mummy Week and fundraising events ranged from coffee mornings and pamper evenings, to nursery PJ days and dress pink days at work, all helping to raise £8,000. This amount could pay for a CLIC Sargent Social Worker at the Bristol Children’s Hospital for two months. CLIC Sargent Social Workers help the whole family, including siblings and grandparents, to understand and cope with the emotional, practical and financial effects of cancer, from the very moment their child is diagnosed. Well established south west bakers, Parsons Bakery will be supporting Yummy Mummy Week for a second consecutive year. During Yummy Mummy Week, Parsons will be calling on cake lovers across the south west to visit one of its 24

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stores in Bristol, Gloucestershire and Somerset to sample one of its special Yummy Mummy cupcakes. The family run business, which has been in operation for more than 100 years, will be donating 10p from the sale of every cupcake priced at 65p. Managing director, Nick Parsons says: “We are glad to be supporting such a worthwhile cause for a second year at our bakeries across the south west. Last year, sales of our Yummy Mummy cupcake led to over £500 being donated to CLIC Sargent, so we are hoping for an even more successful year this year”. As well as hosting fundraising events and popping along to a Parsons bakery for a Yummy Mummy cupcake, you can also support the campaign by purchasing gifts from the Yummy Mummy product range online. ■ Getting involved is easy, just visit yummymummy.org.uk or tel: 08451 206 658 to register for a fundraising pack


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WHAT’Son THEATRE, DANCE & COMEDY – listed by venue

IT’S ELECTRIFYIN’

1984, and moved to the UK as a teenager. Inua’s work merges visual art, spoken word and theatre, and he is known for his iconic imagery, beauty and attention to detail. He writes about his upbringing, the experience of immigration, and of living in the UK today, bringing words to life with pace, rhythm, cadence and intonation. The poet and performer who brought us The 14th Tale and Untitled, performs his new work at Bristol Old Vic as part of its first national tour.

T he To bac co F ac to ry The at re Raleigh Road, Southville, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactory.com

King Lear, Until Saturday 24 March, please contact theatre for times One of the pinnacles of world drama, and one of Shakespeare’s greatest masterpieces, King Lear is the most complete account we have of what it is – and what it is not – to be human. The play launched Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory on an unsuspecting world in February 2000; and the company is delighted to offer this new production to a much larger audience in 2012. King Lear is played by John Shrapnel. Directed by Andrew Hilton. Grease at the Bristol Hippodrome

B r i s t o l H i p p o d ro m e St Augustine’s Parade, Bristol. Box office tel: 0844 847 2325 or visit: www.bristolhippodrome.org.uk

Top Hat, Wednesday 21 – Saturday 31 March, 7.30pm; matinees: 2.30pm on 22, 24, 28, 29 and 31 Tom Chambers and Summer Strallen star in Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers’ legendary Hollywood hit of the 1930s. Top Hat tells the story of Jerry Travers, a famous American tap dancer who arrives in London to appear in his first West End Show. Jerry meets the irresistible Dale Tremont, the girl of his dreams, and follows her across Europe in an attempt to win her heart with his wonderful song and dance routines. Irving Berlin’s celebrated score features classics as Cheek to Cheek, Let’s Face The Music & Dance, Isn’t It A Lovely Day To Be Caught In The Rain and Top Hat, White Tie & Tails. Beautiful sets, lavish costumes and sensational dancing will sweep you off your feet in this new musical comedy.

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King Lear

Grease, Monday 2 – Saturday 7 April, Monday – Thursday, 7.30pm; Friday, 5.30pm & 8.30pm; Saturday, 5pm & 8.30pm Grease is coming to the Bristol Hippodrome for one week only. Danny Bayne (winner of ITV’s Grease is the Word) stars as Danny with Carina Gillespie as Sandy. Dust off your leather jackets, pull on your bobby-socks and take a trip to a simpler time as Danny and Sandy fall in love all over again. It’s the original high school musical, featuring the unforgettable songs from the hit movie including You’re the One That I Want, Grease is the Word, Summer Nights, Hopelessly Devoted To You, Sandy, and Greased Lightnin’. So throw your mittens around your kittens and hand jive the night away to this electrifyin’ extravaganza.

B ri sto l Ol d Vi c King Street, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 987 77877 www.bristololdvic.org.uk

Black T-Shirt Collection, Thursday 15 – Saturday 17 March, 8pm A T-shirt is something most people have. It is a common denominator like a pair of blue jeans or a pair of Converse All Stars. In Black Tshirt Collection Inua Ellams tells a story about where a T-shirt comes from and what it means. Inua Ellams was born in Nigeria in

The Cherry Orchard, Thursday 29 March – Saturday 5 May, please contact theatre for times In his final tragi-comic masterpiece Chekhov portrays an aristocratic family bewildered and impotent in the face of financial bankruptcy and the huge social changes sweeping Russia in the early years of the twentieth century. This will be Shakespeare at the Tobacco Factory’s third excursion into Chekhov, following its 2005 Three Sisters, and the 2009 SATTF/Bristol Old Vic co-production of Uncle Vanya.


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T h e B re w e r y T h e a t re North Street, Southville, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 902 0344 www.tobaccofactorytheatre.com

What I Heard About the World, Friday 9 & Saturday 10 March, 8.15pm Join Third Angel and Mala Voadora as they attempt to describe the world through theatre and song.

Folie a Deux, Tuesday 13 – Saturday 24 March, 8.15pm A feast for the imagination where circus, theatre and state of the art technology meet with the physicality of expression. Groundbreaking multi-touch screen technology has been developed especially for this show to allow the performers and set to become intrinsically one. Folie à Deux takes the audience on a journey through the minds of two very unique individuals: one who believes he is dead, the other who has forgotten her past. The story takes place in a retreat for the mentally unwell where we meet the two characters sharing a room and their memories. Centred around a huge scaffold structure and ground-breaking multi-touch screen, these unforgettable characters will whisk you away into the theatre of their minds where the imagination in unleashed. Falling from extreme heights, entombed under rubble, the impossible journey of a ball, all become reality in this mesmerising horizon of the imagination. Directed by internationallyrenowned physical theatre expert Bim Mason, this story universally resonates with the search for who we are and where our place in the world is. Folie a Deux

Wasted, Thursday 29 – Saturday 31 March, 8.15pm For old friends Ted, Danny and Charlotte, life will never be the same again. Wasted is a dayglo trip through the parks and raves and cafes of South London, where life is what you make it. A play about love, life and losing your mind from one of the country’s leading producers of new writing, Kate Tempest. Wasted is her debut play and features her trademark lyrical ferocity in a dynamic theatrical staging.

C i r co m e d i a St Paul’s Church, Portland Square, Bristol. www.circomedia.com

Time and the Conways, Friday 9 – Saturday 17 March, 7.30pm; matinees: Saturday & Thursday, 2.30pm When the Conway family gathers in 1919 to celebrate Kay’s 21st birthday, they seem like a golden family – still intact despite the Great War and ready to enter a new era with bright careers and happy marriages in prospect. But appearances can deceive, and through masterly manipulations of time, J B Priestley lets the audience share the fate-deciding moments from the family’s past, present and future. To book, contact the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School on tel: 0117 973 3955 or visit: www.oldvic.ac.uk

The Blake Diptych: Innocence and Experience, Thursday 29 and Friday 30 March, 2pm & 8pm Fleur Darkin’s ever exciting dance-theatre ensemble makes its Circomedia debut with two distinct and original shows, each inspired by the passions and imagination of the poet, artist and printer William Blake. Innocence (2pm) is for under-sevens and their carers – a weaving together of dance, play, live music and story-telling combine to create a journey into a realm of fun, mystery, beauty and adventure. Experience (8pm) is for audiences aged 12+ and is a blistering display of dancetheatre excellence, combining fearless choreography, eight world-class dancers, music by Bristol-based Paul Bradley and designs by award-winning Alex Lowde to conjure the visions of Blake: the boy who believed in angels; the man who reshaped British art and literature. To book, tel: 0117 922 3686. The Blake Diptych

Improv, Sunday 25 March, 7.30pm Instant Wit, the quick-fire comedy improvisation show, presents an evening of sketches, songs, gags, games and general silliness – and all of it based around audience suggestions. Good suggestions get packets of custard, the best wins a bottle of wine.

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Take your mama out...

Bristol Vintage at the RWA

I t ’s a d a y t o c e l e b r a t e m o t h e r s o n S un d a y 1 8 M a r c h , s o w e’ ve f ou n d s o m e l o ve l y ev e n t s f or y o u t o e n j o y t o g e t h e r. . . ✿ Catch up over a drink and enjoy an afternoon of jazz inspired folk music by James Macpherson and friends in Colston Hall’s Foyer performance space at 12.30pm. Free. ✿ Treat mum to a glorious afternoon of food, art and music at the RWA’s Vintage Afternoon Tea event from 2pm-5pm, £15. Relax in the company of other pampered mums while you sip Champagne served in classic Babycham glasses and let Shellac Sound serenade you with their collection of 78s played on original 1930s gramophones. Come dressed in your finest regalia or model the pieces in the dressing up box and have your picture taken in a photo booth. You can also have your hair dressed in a classic style or try out a vintage makeup look. Tickets include tea/coffee, sandwiches, scones and cakes served on authentic Bristol Vintage crockery, entry to all four exhibitions, and a chance to browse the gallery’s collection of original Penguin paperbacks and vintage fashion magazines. Book on tel: 0117 973 5129 ✿ Have a special day out at the National Trust’s Tyntesfield House and Gardens – join a free one hour garden tour with a knowledgeable guide and get some inspiration for your own garden and then enjoy delicious local food at the Cow Barn restaurant. Book a table for lunch on tel: 01274 461965 or just pop in for tea and cake. And don’t miss the Top Floor Tour where you can scale the narrow staircases and explore some of Tyntesfield's lovliest rooms, still unseen by visitors. Book on tel: 0844 249 1895 or visit: www.nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield

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WHAT’Son M USI C – listed by date ■ Renowned pianist Paul Lewis will be performing his Schubert series at St George’s Bristol on Friday 9 March, 7.30pm. Paul draws in listeners with not only the intimacy and poetic nuances of his interpretations, but also the fierce and turbulent power of his performances. His recent rendition of the Wanderer Fantasy left everyone on the edge of their seats and drew a euphoric reaction from the St George’s audience. This latest concert brings his intellectual rigour and imaginative vigour to some of the most passionate and haunting piano music ever written. Book tickets on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

Bristol Bach Choir, Saturday 10 March, 7.30pm

Bristol Schools Chamber Choir, Friday 16 March, 7.45pm

Bristol Cathedral, College Green, Bristol. Tickets are available on tel: 0117 214 0721 or visit: www.bristolbach.org.uk The Bristol Bach Choir will be performing a glorious concert under its new conductor, Christopher Finch. They are joined by the Bristol Ensemble and a range of superb soloists, including Charlotte Newstead, Josephine Goddard, Will Unwin and Niall Hoskin. The concert features Mozart’s majestic Mass in C Minor, Handel’s Chandos anthem No. 9, Haydn’s Te Deum in C and Purcell’s O sing unto the Lord.

St James Priory, Whitson Street, Bristol. Tickets £5 on the door, under 18s free. Bristol Schools Chamber Choir present a concert of music from the 17th century to the present day. In aid of Childreach International.

Bath Choral Society, Saturday 10 March, 7.30pm Bath Abbey, Bath. Tickets from Bath Festivals Box Office on tel: 01225 463362 or visit: www.bathfestivals.org.uk Bath Choral Society with The English Cornett and Sackburt Ensemble presents Monteverdi’s Vespers. Conducted by Will Dawes and featuring a host of fantastic soloists.

City of Bristol Choir and The Bristol Ensemble, Sunday 11 March, 7.30pm St George’s Bristol, Great George Street, Bristol. Tickets from the Box Office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk The City of Bristol Choir and The Bristol Ensemble with tenor Jeremy Budd tell the story of Easter through Bach’s personal and meditative St John Passion. 36 The Bristol Magazine

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Bristol Choral Society with Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, Saturday 31 March, 7.30pm Colston Hall, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 922 3686 or visit: www.bristolchoral.co.uk Bristol Choral Society teams up with its cousin from Gloucester, the Cathedral choristers of the two cities and the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra to make a total of several hundred performers for this tour de force of French choral masterpieces featuring the grandeur of the Berlioz Te Deum and the intimacy and familiarity of Fauré’s Requiem.

Michel Legrand, Saturday 31 March, 7.30pm St George’s Bristol, Great George Street, Bristol. Tickets from the Box Office on tel: 0845 40 24 001 or visit: www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk A triple Oscar-winning composer of over two hundred film soundtracks for directors including Jean-Luc Godard, Joseph Losey, Clint Eastwood, Jacques Demy and Claude Lelouch, and a songwriter whose melodies have helped define the popular song-form for the last half century, Michel Legrand visits St George’s for a special concert performance as part of his year-long 80th birthday world tour.

A noted pianist and conductor who has worked with some of the world’s leading orchestras, as well as a leading figure in both French and US jazz, Michel appears in a duo with his wife Catherine, a celebrated harpist for the Paris Opera.

Redland Wind Band Spring Concert, Saturday 31 March, 7.30pm St Monica’s Theatre, Cote Lane, Westbury-onTrym, Bristol. Tickets £7 on the door on email redlandwindband@googlemail.com The Redland Wind Band’s spring concert this year takes place in a new venue and will again present the local ensemble’s diverse repertoire. The programme will include swing, film and dance music as well as the classics.

Bristol Phoenix Choir, Saturday 31 March, 7.30pm St Mary Redcliffe Church, Bristol. Tickets from Providence Music on tel: 0117 927 6536 or the ticket office on tel: 01454 880 458 Bristol Phoenix Choir conducted by Leslie Bunt and accompanied by organist Paul Walton, present a programme featuring Haydn’s Little Organ Mass, Kodaly’s Missa Brevis and Britten’s Rejoice in the Lamb.

Exultate Singers: Easter Mysteries, Wednesday 4 April, 7.45pm St James Priory, Whitson Street, Bristol. Tickets from Providence Music shop on tel: 0117 927 6536 Bristol’s accomplished chamber choir, Exultate Singers will perform a programme of music for Holy Week.


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SILVER Jewellery Courses Interested in making your own silver jewellery for yourself or a loved one? A course at workshop 22 offers the perfect opportunity to explore your creativity and learn how to create beautiful silver jewellery. Our friendly, well-equipped teaching studio can cater for up to six students at a time, providing an enjoyable learning experience.

6 week beginners’ silver jewellery - £150 Wednesdays, from 18th April, morning/eve

6 week progression silver jewellery - £150 Tuesdays, from 17th April, morning/eve

Make a Mothers’ Day Gift - £55 Friday 9th March 10am -1pm Saturday 10th March 10am – 1pm

Make a Ring/Make a Pendant - £45 Spend a few hours creating your own piece of jewellery to wear with pride. For info & dates call us on 01173290393 or email us; info@workshop22.co.uk workshop 22, 22 Upper Maudlin Street, Christmas Steps Arts Quarter, Bristol, BS2 8DJ

www.workshop22.co.uk

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OTH ER EVENTS – listed by date Mad March Sewing Classes, Sundays, 10am – 2pm or 2pm – 6pm A Little Bird Said, St Nicholas Parade, Bristol. All classes £40, including handouts and fabric. Book on tel: 07758 219006 or email: alittlebirdsaid@me.com Beginners can learn how to use a sewing machine and make a tote bag; or join a class and learn how to make mice and roses or bunting for a party – perfect for the Queen’s Jubilee celebrations.

from his travels around the world as one of the world’s leading cameramen. From being dragged under water by a hungry walrus to being poked by a polar bear in his sleep, Doug never fails to entertain with his exciting stories and sense of humour. With mesmerising footage and incredible photographs Doug chats about his latest stories and adventures.

Mastering Milonga, Sunday 4 March, 7pm – 8.30pm The Redland Club, Bristol. Cost: £10. For further information or to book, tel: 07981 756965 or visit: www.tangowest.co.uk Enjoy learning the basic of the playful milonga in this special class for all beginners.

Doug Allan Talk, Wednesday 7 March, 7.30pm At-Bristol, Harbourside, Bristol. Tickets £15 from tel: 0845 345 1235. For further information visit: www.dougallan.com Multi-award winning wildlife photographer, cameraman, explorer and two-time winner of the Polar Medal, Doug Allan will be hosting an evening of enthralling personal recollections

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Doug Allan on location

Author Event: Partners in Crime, Tuesday 13 March, 7pm for 7.30pm Bristol Grammar School, University Road, Bristol. Tickets £7/£5 available from www.bristolgrammarschool.co.uk/events/litera ry-events.aspx Bristol Grammar School and Hodder in association with the Bristol Festival of Ideas presents an evening with crime writers Sophie Hannah and Erin Kelly in conversation with

Carolyn Mays, publishing director at Hodder. Blackwell’s bookshop will also be on hand for you to buy copies of the authors’ latest novels.

Simon Munnery: Hats Off to the 101ers & Other Material, Sunday 18 March, 8pm Tobacco Factory Theatre, Raleigh Road, Southville, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 902 0344 or visit: www.tobaccofactory.com Star of BBC2’s Attention Scum and Radio 4’s Where Did It All Go Wrong?, Sony Radio Award-winner Simon Munnery presents a brand new show. It’s an extravagant mess of foaming bubble hats, superlative jokes, bad guitar riffs, delightful monologues, handmade engineering feats and an overly ambitious oneman punk musical about the R101 airship of the 1930s. All performed with a plum. Simon Munnery


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THE SIMPLE REALITY James Russell, who has recently written a book about 20th century British artist Eric Ravilious, previews a major exhibition of his work opening in Bristol this month

A

rt lovers are in for a treat this month, as an exhibition of watercolours by Eric Ravilious opens at the Royal West of England Academy. Visitors to the City Museum and Art Gallery may well have seen his triptych of a tennis match – originally a set of door panels in a swanky London flat – but Eric Ravilious: Going Modern / Being British will be the first large-scale exhibition of his work in this part of the world. Seventy years ago, in 1942, Eric Ravilious was killed in action, one of a handful of British war artists to die while serving their country. He was 39 years old, father of three young children and a respected printmaker and watercolourist. To his contemporaries he was perhaps best known for his wood engravings, which remain virtually unsurpassed, but it was his talents as a painter that got him appointed as a war artist. A quiet man who rarely talked about his work, Ravilious painted on a fairly small scale and in an understated sort of way, with a preference for delicate washes of colour and subjects that were rarely glamorous. Yet his apparently simple pictures of abandoned buses, Downland views, harbour scenes and the like captured the attention of collectors and critics; when faced with a wall of his paintings they found themselves reaching for words like ‘mystical’ and ‘mesmerizing’. Someone once wrote that Ravilious could make you feel as though you were looking at a barbed wire fence, or a greenhouse, or a vase of flowers for the first time, and this childlike sense of wonder at the simple reality of things is I think what people enjoy about his work now, decades later. Ravilious studied at the Royal College of Art in London in the 1920s, where he was fortunate enough to be taught by a supremely talented landscape painter, Paul Nash. He later became friends with Paul’s brother John, a successful artist in his

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own right, and the two of them went on painting trips in the 1930s. It was thanks to John Nash that Ravilious visited Bristol in November 1938, where he witnessed the fireboat Pyronaut at work tackling a massive blaze on Gas Ferry Road. Given his love of nautical subjects, it’s surprising that it took him so long to get to Bristol, which was well known as an interesting place to paint. The chief attraction was the City Docks. The leisurely scenes we see today around the harbour are very different from those of the 30s; the port’s 18th century glory may have faded but dockers and stevedores still went about their trade as hundreds of cranes unloaded cargoes of American tobacco, Swedish timber, Welsh coal and Spanish sherry into wagons that were shunted day and night around a maze of railways lines. John Nash had originally visited the city in the early 1920s, having been told about its charms by an older artist, Edward Wadsworth. By a stroke of luck, he was able to rent the same rooms on Cornwallis Crescent, overlooking Hotwells and the City Docks, in 1938, so that the artists were easily able to carry their watercolour gear – Ravilious carried his in a large canvas satchel – down to the quayside. They were intrigued by the paddle steamers that were operated as pleasure craft during the summer by P&A Campbell and moored in Bristol for the winter, and they were keen to draw them at night under artificial lights. One evening Ravilious was out by himself, and was working intently on his painting when he heard a horrible grinding noise behind him. Suddenly a voice cried out: “Lucky for you I saw you, old cock, or you’d have been a box of cold meat!” The artist had, without realising, set up his easel on the tracks of the Harbour Railway. The tracks are still there, embedded in the quayside across the water from the SS Great Britain, and so too are the distinctive iron mooring posts shown in the painting Bristol Quay. The PS Britannia (Ravilious always spelt the name wrong) saw service during World War II as a minesweeper, before being scrapped in

CLEAN LINES: Main image, the Westbury Horse, 1939, by Eric Ravilious


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FRESH APPROACH: Interior at Furlongs, left, and Bristol Quay, right, were both painted by Ravilious before the outbreak of the Second World War but they have a contemporary resonance Note: Ravilious spelled Britannia incorrectly

the mid 1950s; nowadays paddle steamer fans have to make do with occasional sightings of the PS Waverley on the Bristol Channel. However, there is an intriguing postscript to this story. A few years ago, the Bristol shipbuilder David Abels won the contract to reconstruct the famous paddle steamer Medway Queen. You can see the iron hull of the ship and the gradually evolving superstructure, complete with covers for the paddle wheels, in the dry dock behind the SS Great Britain. At some point, presumably, the restored PS Medway Queen will emerge reborn into the Floating Harbour – what a sight that will be. Eric Ravilious only stayed in Bristol a few days, but counted the old port among his ‘good places’. Although he often completed work indoors, sometimes leaving pencilled notes on the paper that can still be seen beneath the paint, he invariably began his paintings in a particular place, usually early in the

morning. During the 1930s his career evolved into a quest to find new sources of inspiration – places that had that magical combination of good light and visual interest – and he travelled widely. Some of his best work was inspired by the Downs of southern England, and visitors to the RWA will (as far as I know at the time of writing) get to enjoy several luminous paintings of white horses carved into the turf, hillside cottages and sweeping Downland views. It’s fabulous to see the RWA hosting such an exciting exhibition, a testament to the energy of director Trystan Hawkins and his staff. ■ Eric Ravilious: Going Modern / Being British is at the RWA, Bristol from 10 March until 29 April. Visit rwa.org.uk. James Russell will be signing copies of his book Ravilious in Pictures: A Travelling Artist at the RWA on Saturday 10 March.

Cook’s recipe for success

Beryl Cook (1926 - 2008) was a self-taught artist and had no formal training. Her style is unique and her place in 20th Century art history is assured. When Clevedon Salerooms offered this oil on panel titled ‘Brian Entertains’ at their recent Specialist Sale it was not long before all available telephone lines were booked by bidders eager to secure the picture. Brian’s stage name was ‘Ruby Venezuela’ and locals can be seen tittering as they peer through the window of a Pub watching Brian’s drag act. Clevedon Salerooms Fine Art Consultant Sheena Stoddard, former Curator of Fine Art at Bristol City Museum & Art Gallery was involved in the 2011 Beryl Cook exhibition held at the Bristol Art Gallery and was delighted to see a relatively early work by Beryl come on to the market. Exceptional works are currently making exceptional prices and this oil on panel measuring 61cm x 30cm proved the point, the winning bidder paying £25,000 to take Brian home.

£25,000 www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

If you have Antiques or Fine Art that you may be thinking of selling why not bring them to one of Clevedon Salerooms Free Valuation Days held at the salerooms on 12th 13th 14th & 26th 27th 28th March, 9am - 1pm & 2pm - 5:30pm.

Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers The Auction Centre, Kenn Road, Kenn Clevedon, BS21 6TT

Tel: 01934 830111 www.clevedon-salerooms.com

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CITY ARTexhibition gardens

THE RENAISSANCE MAN Samantha Ewart talks to Jenny Gaschke, curator of the Ten Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci exhibition, about what audiences are to expect from this unique show ahead of its arrival at the Bristol City Museum & Art Gallery later this month

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ARTexhibition

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RECORDING AND UNDERSTANDING: main image, Leonardo da Vinci’s the head of Leda, c.1505-6 and below; a study of an equestrian monument, c.1485-90. © The Royal Collection 2012, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

ristol’s status as a city for the arts is this month confirmed further, as the Royal Collection Trust moves its touring exhibition of Ten Drawings by Leonardo da Vinci to the Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery. The collection of this great Renaissance master’s drawings has left its home in the Royal Library at Windsor Castle to go on tour around the country, stopping at five galleries, to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Her Majesty the Queen. Ten of Leonardo da Vinci’s finest drawings have been selected from the unparalleled holdings of the Royal Library to reflect the whole range of Leonardo’s activities, and these will be on show, free to view, at the Bristol City Museum & Gallery from 30 March to 10 June. Julie Finch, Director of Bristol Museums, Galleries & Archives, said: “Working with esteemed collections, such as the Royal Collection, is both a privilege and a pleasure. The Bristol audience will appreciate the quality of work on show and the exhibition will be extremely popular, drawing in visitors from across the south west and beyond. Bristol has gained a reputation for showing national collections and gained recognition for this.” Curating the show in Bristol is Jenny Gaschke, who joined the museum at the beginning of the year. “The exhibition is so important in terms of understanding the artist,” says Jenny. “Leonardo’s work is so varied and it shows how broadly he was thinking. He thought visually and through drawing attempted to record and understand the world around him, leaving no part untouched. His subjects of interest included sculpture and architecture, engineering, botany, geology, mapmaking, hydraulics, optics and anatomy.” Leonardo’s principal tool of investigation was drawing, and he maintained that an image transmitted knowledge more accurately and concisely than words, although some of his drawings are extensively annotated. Through the hundreds of his sheets that survive it is possible to piece together the life and work of the archetypal Renaissance Man. Leonardo’s drawings were executed in a range of different media – pen and ink, red and black chalks, and metalpoint, in which a silver stylus is drawn across coated paper to produce studies of great finesse. Included in the exhibition will be a sheet of designs of chariots geared to flailing clubs, and a sketch of an enormous equestrian monument to Francesco Sforza, the father of his patron Ludovico Sforza, ruler of Milan. More peaceful are a study of the head of Leda, the mythical princess seduced by Jupiter, and – intended for the same painting of Leda – a

detailed botanical study of oak leaves. Leonardo’s pioneering scientific work is exemplified by a double-sided sheet of anatomical studies, based on human dissection carried out by the artist in the medical school of the university of Pavia. Two very different landscapes record a scheme to drain marshland to the south of Rome, and a minutely detailed view of a river taken from the window of the Villa Melzi at Vaprio d’Adda, where Leonardo was staying in 1513. In his sixties Leonardo moved to France, and a costume study of a man on horseback is evidence of his work as a festival designer for King Francis I. More personal is a sheet of studies of apocalyptic scenes, showing Leonardo’s fascination with destruction towards the end of his life; and the final drawing in the show is one of the last drawings by the artist; a rough study of an old, decrepit man, which many argue captures something of Leonardo’s own feelings about his bodily decay. This will be a unique opportunity to see some of the most fascinating and accomplished drawings ever produced, and to engage at first hand with the one of the greatest minds of all time.

He thought visually and through ❝ drawing attempted to record and understand the world around him

“We are preparing for masses of visitors,” says Jenny, “so numbers admitted into the exhibition at one time will be limited so that people really get a chance to appreciate each piece.” Jenny continued: “The people of Bristol are so supportive and forthcoming and it’s made preparing for the exhibition even more exciting. People think creatively in Bristol and it’s been so helpful to have their input in planning the events programme that will accompany the exhibition.” The public programme will include talks, events and family activities and highlights include a public lecture by an anatomist who will talk about the legacy of Leonardo’s drawings on modern anatomy; a concert by the Exultate Singers held in the museum’s great hall; and the Jubilee celebrations will kick off on Tuesday 5 June when Professor Peter Barham will talk about the physics of ice cream. So inspired by Leonardo’s drawings, he has created ten new ice cream flavours – an intriguing connection that will no doubt be a popular event. The programme is available to pick up at the museum and all tickets can be booked in the museum shop. A catalogue will also accompany the exhibition with a commentary on each drawing in the show written by Martin Clayton from the Royal Collection Trust. “Much work has gone into the planning of the arrival of the exhibition in Bristol and there have been many things to consider with regards to the display,” says Jenny. “A lot of care has to be taken as the paper is so delicate so we have to keep the light levels really low in order to protect the drawings so it will look quite dark when you enter, but don’t be put off – this is a really great opportunity to see Leonardo's work up close.” Supporting the ten drawings by Leonardo Da Vinci will be a display in the watercolour gallery showcasing pieces from the museum’s permanent collection by Italian masters and artists that have been influenced by Leonardo’s drawings. “It’s a great opportunity to showcase the other works in the museum’s collection,” says Jenny. “It will be interesting for visitors to compare, contrast and make connections between Leonardo’s drawings and the other pieces on display. There will also be trails through the permanent gallery that highlight themes that re-appear in Leonardo’s work, contextualising the whole museum. The exhibition really is coming to the right place.” ■ For further information about the exhibition contact tel: 0117 922 3571.

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ARTSgardens &EXHIBITIONS CITY SHER RAJAH

Sher Rajah, Damask Rose

Grant Bradley Gallery Number One St Peter’s Court, Bedminster Parade, Bristol. Tel: 0117 9637673 www.grantbradleygallery.co.uk

3 – 24 March

Andrew Hood, Avon Gorge

▲ ANDREW HOOD & PAUL LEWIN Innocent Fine Art 7a Boyces Avenue, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 973 2614 www.innocentfineart.co.uk

Until 18 March To celebrate its recent re-launch following refurbishment, Innocent Fine Art is showcasing the work of two established artists: Andrew Hood and Paul Lewin. Andrew’s work is a blend of contemporary impressionism, expressionism, abstraction and realism. He uses an amalgamation of bold oil colours, torn card, sticks and bit of plastic, layered together to capture the atmosphere of the locations he visits all around the world. In contrast, Paul Lewin is predominantly a painter of the coast and sea and has emerged as one of the leading contemporary landscape painters in the south west.

DANCING WITH DAFFODILS Jenny Life Studio & Gallery 15 Christmas Steps, Bristol. Tel: 0117 302 0003 www.jennylifegallery.co.uk

1 – 31 March The gallery is celebrating the arrival of spring with a heady mix of fragrant flowers and dancing figures in its exhibition full of colour and movement featuring ceramics, paintings, pastels and prints by Jenny Life and other Bristol artists.

Sher Rajah is known for engaging in the most challenging of art forms of installation and conceptual work. He also paints exquisite flowers, butterflies and landscapes, capturing the personality of flowers, whether it is the opulent extravagance of the tulip or the sweetness of honeysuckle. Colour and the inimitable beauty of nature are the source of inspiration in his work which is now shared through greetings cards and limited edition prints.

ACCIDENTAL BEAUTY

SOPHY RICKETT: TO THE RIVER Arnolfini 16 Narrow Quay, Bristol. Tel: 0117 917 2300 www.arnolfini.org.uk

Tyntesfield House & Gardens Wraxall, North Somerset. www.nationaltrust.org.uk/tyntesfield Open every day from 10am

3 March – 22 April Sophy Rickett’s new work To the River takes its inspiration from the Severn Bore – an amazing phenomenon of nature whereby a large tidal wave runs along the River Severn during the moon’s equinox. Sophy’s installation incorporates video and surround-sound audio, creating an immersive environment that portrays the anticipation of the crowd on the banks of the river at night awaiting the tidal surge.

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From 10 March

Jenny Life, Dancing Figure

An exhibition by local photographer and UWE graduate Neil McCoubrey documenting his look behind the scenes as Tyntesfield is carefully conserved, restored and unpacked. Image: Neil McCoubrey, Green Jugs


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ARTS&EXHIBITIONS MIXED EXHIBITION

David Roberts, Vortex I, Vortex II, Raku fired ceramic

▲ Beaux Arts 12 – 13 York Street, Bath. Tel: 01225 464850 www.beauxartsbath.co.uk

Bobby Sansom will be showing his work at the Paintworks art market

▲ PAINTWORKS SPRING ART MARKET

KINGSLEY & CLARK

Paintworks Bath Road, Bristol. www.paintworksbristol.co.uk

Lime Tree Gallery 84 Hotwell Road, Bristol. Tel: 0117 929 2527 www.limetreegallery.com

11 March, 10.30am – 4.30pm

24 March – 24 April

The Paintworks spring art market will once again bring together a vibrant mix of Bristol’s finest artists to exhibit and sell their goods. Showcasing the work of over 35 local artists, the market will feature paintings, ceramics, textiles, accessories, crafts, houseware, jewellery and much more – all at affordable prices. The market will sprawl through the large exhibition space underneath Bocabar, enabling visitors to soak up the atmosphere and chat to artists. There will also be a children’s colouring area for all the budding young artists, as well as a small café serving hot drinks and delicious homemade cakes.

An exhibition of new work by John Kingsley DA PAI and Michael G Clark, two of Scotland’s most admired and successful painters. Old friends, both have roots in the traditions of the classic Scottish art schools where they learnt from some of the great names of 20th century British art teaching. John’s powerful painting has a sharp control of light and shadow, and strength of colour, whilst Michael’s work is a fine balance between abstract and representational built from a delicate palette.

LISA MALYON & KATE EVANS

Kate Evans, Winter Barn

Bristol Folk House 40a Park Street, Bristol. Tel: 0117 926 2987

2 – 29 March An exhibition of paintings and drawings by Bristolbased artists Lisa Malyon and Kate Evans. Lisa uses fine ink pen on pastel paper and torn paper to create texture and interest; wile Kate combines a gritty drawing style with blocks of colour using a variety of media.

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Throughout March Following his sell-out debut exhibition, Beaux Arts gallery in Bath welcomes back Stewart Edmondson for another stunning show of land and sea vistas, all painted in situ and within a few miles of his Devon home. On show alongside Stewart’s work will be Christopher Marvell’s naïve and charming bronzes and raku-fired ceramics by Dave Roberts, one of the most influential makers in the country.

John Kingsley, Landscape at Evanos


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Kingsley and Clark March 24 - April 24

An exhibition of new work by John Kingsley DA PAI and Michael G Clark, two of Scotland’s most admired and successful painters.

Lime Tree Gallery, 84 Hotwell Road, Bristol BS8 4UB

Tel 0117 929 2527

www.limetreegallery.com

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BRISTOLinterest

FRY’S SINGING ANGEL Bethany Wivell looks at the life and hugely successful career of Elsie Griffin, who went from packing chocolates in a Bristol factory to achieving fame for her beautiful singing voice

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blue plaque has been unveiled at St Michael on the Mount Without Primary School to commemorate the life and success of a Bristol woman who came from modest origins to take the international stage by storm. Elsie Griffin was a soprano whose renditions of Danny Boy and Roses of Picardy rocketed them to fame, performed all over the world with the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company and in 1929 received an award for Best British recording. Before the days of fairytale fame and without the stepping-stones laid out by the likes of X Factor, Elsie’s journey to success came bound in trials and tribulations. Born in Bristol and with barely a penny to her name, just how did this former Fry’s chocolate packer transform herself into an operatic sensation? Elsie left school at 14 as she said later; “my parents were not in a position to keep me.” But she had a singing voice that quickly attracted attention, performing in concerts all over Bristol, many of them at the Colston Hall where she sang as part of a large Temperance Choir accompanied by 500 voices.

in its centre ❝everyeveryrunnoteas dead clear as a whistle and the whole number sung with an ease and mastery which has never been bettered

Her cousin Anne Colley, who still lives in Bristol and cherishes a cup which Elsie won for her singing, said: “We were a musical family and Elsie was regarded as a celebrity.” But Elsie had to put her hopes of becoming a performing artist on hold and take up the position of chocolate packer at Fry’s factory. Using every opportunity to sing, Elsie joined the company choir and between 1909 and 1911 formed part of the Fry’s Angels performing at morning prayer meetings. Scraping all of her wages together from the factory, as well as any extra income earned from sewing blouses for the local women, Elsie was able to pay for her first professional singing lesson. Without a penny to spare for bus fare, Elsie had a four mile walk each week to get there but her determination certainly paid off. 48 The Bristol Magazine

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At the age of 19, Elsie won first prize at the Bristol Eisteddfod and was awarded a scholarship to train as a singer. Waving goodbye to her days as a factory worker, she embarked on a musical journey across Europe. During the First World War Elsie began making gramophone recordings and made a name for herself singing to war casualties. A trip to France performing to troops on the front line, turned out to be a major turning point in her career. Approached by lyricist Fred Weatherly, Elsie gave the first ever performance of Danny Boy and Roses of Picardy which both went on to receive international acclaim, and the latter was recently heard in the film War Horse. From that time Elsie Griffin became a household name. Just months after joining the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company, Elsie was made principle soprano and her popularity continued to escalate over the next eight years, during which time she married Ivan Menzies who sang with the same company. At the age of 34, Elsie Griffin was at the peak of her career and in 1929 was awarded Best British Recording for Gilbert & Sullivan’s Poor Wandering One. It was a far cry from her days boxing up chocolates in a Bristol factory. A critic at the time noted of her performance:“Every note dead in its centre, every run as clear as a whistle, and the whole number sung with an ease and mastery which has never been bettered.” With the outbreak of the Second World War Elsie and her daughter, Mahala left Bristol for the Lake District to escape bombing while her husband Ivan remained stranded in Australia. After seven long and very quiet years apart, the Griffin family was finally reunited in London. Wasting no time, Elsie and Ivan threw themselves straight back into work, joining a musical production that toured four continents. In 1975, aged 70, Elsie gave her last performance at the Savoy Centenary Celebrations at the Savoy Hotel in London, when she and Ivan took part in a stage performance of Trial by Jury. She died in 1989, aged 94. Showing that with hard work and passion anything is possible, a blue plaque now stands as a reminder of Elsie’s remarkable story and inspiration for other hopeful singers amongst St Michael’s students. Who knows, there may be another Elsie just waiting to start her journey… ■

LOCAL HEROINE: main picture, Elsie Griffin in Gilbert & Sullivan’s Mikado. Top, the blue plaque unveiled in Bristol and, below, Elsie’s cousin Anne Colley in the media spotlight at the unveiling of the plaque


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FOOD&DRINK

Discover a sunny corner by the waterfront As the weather gets warmer we’re always on the lookout for places to sit outside and watch the world go by, and Jacks Bar and Brasserie on the harbourside is a great spot to meet up and get a bite to eat. The view across the water is just as enjoyable inside as out, and being south facing it gets the best of the sun. Chef Simon Davis has left the north of England for the south west, where he is clearly enjoying the chance to cook with the local fresh produce and create classic dishes with a modern twist. At a recent reception to launch the spring menu guests enjoyed samples of some of his signature dishes, including a delicious vegetarian take on beef Wellington, using

A touchline treat Isn’t it funny how armchair rugby fans, a beer at their elbow, still insist on talking about how ‘we’ played when watching their favourite team? To mark this sporting year, Bristol based Pieminister has produced a rugby pie in time for the Six Nations tournament, called Hope & Glory. It has been made with British beef steak and smoked bacon slowcooked in Green King IPA beer. Hope & Glory pies are available in Sainsbury’s as well as in Pieminister’s own shops in Bristol. The twin packs include the chance for rugby fans to win tickets to see England play at Twickenham on 17 March.

Not so bitter rivals Six local breweries have teamed up to brew a special beer in time for this spring’s CAMRA Bristol Beer Festival. The Collaboration 2012 is to be released in mid-March, just in time for the annual festival, which promises to be the biggest yet. The beer festival runs from Thursday 15 to Saturday 17 March at the Brunel Passenger Shed at Temple Meads. Organisers have laid on more than 140 real ales and cider for festival goers to sample and there will be food on sale too. The Collaboration 2012 will be a traditional style dark beer known as a porter, which used to be enjoyed in Bristol in the 18th century. The brewers who are working on the new brew are Arbor Ales, Bath Ales, Bristol Beer Factory, Great Western Brewing, RCH and Zero Degrees. The new beer will be on sale in pubs owned by the breweries as well as some freehouses. To buy tickets for the 2012 CAMRA Bristol Beer Festival visit: www.camrabristol.org.uk

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aubergine, red pepper and halloumi cheese, along with a seasonal rhubarb jelly given a kick with stem ginger and ginger cream. For after work informal gatherings or a relaxed date the brasserie menu includes standards such as steak, chicken and fish and chips, along with fresh fish of the day, duck breast with soy and plum sauce and Bath Pig chorizo and smoked paprika croquettes with bravas potatoes. Simon’s partner Tori runs the front of house and Jacks prides itself on offering wines from around the world – we particularly enjoyed a glass of Vidal Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand, as pale as water to look at but packed with flavour.

FOODIE TITBITS

Bumper farmers’ market Make a note in your diary for June, when Bristol will once again host the Big Green Week. The festival runs from 9–17 June and kicks off with a celebration of local food and what promises to be the UK's biggest ever Farmers’ Market on Saturday 9 June. Confirmed speakers include: Grand Designs’ Kevin McCloud, US activist and author Bill McKibben, IPCC chair Rajendra Pachauri, chief executive of the Eden Project Tim Smit, the National Trust's Fiona Reynolds, Green Party leader Caroline Lucas, and author and activist Tony Juniper.

FOOD & DRINK A celebration of Bristol’s food producers and eateries

A taste of spring For the third year running, the Love Food Spring Festival is being held in the city, offering all kinds of foodie treats. The festival is being held over the weekend of Saturday 31 March and Sunday 1 April at Brunel’s Old Station at Temple Meads. It will include the Love Food market with more than 70 stalls selling all kinds of produce including cheese, olives, sausages and bread. The Fabulous Baker Brothers, aka Tom and Henry Herbert will be headlining the festival’s cookery school and joining them on stage will be Bristol’s own foodie, chef and eco-hero Barny Haughton to talk about his new project The Square Foundation cookery school. The festival will also host the Bristol Good Food awards producers’ category, organised by the Guide2Bristol and with judges including food writers Fiona Beckett, Xanthe Clay and Thane Prince, with the winners announced live. Children will also be catered for with arts and crafts workshops, cookery lessons and an Easter egg hunt. Entrance to the Spring Festival is £2.50 for adults, £1.50, concessions, children free. To find out more about the festival visit: www.lovefoodfestival.com/spring.

Café wins accolade for giving value for money The family owned Tart Café and shop on Gloucester Road has been named one of the 50 best cheap eats in the UK by the Independent newspaper. Tart’s owners, mother and daughter team Jennie and Ellen Bashforth, are delighted with the accolade, having been singled out by judges including James Ramsden, food writer for The Times. Jennie said: “We work really hard to try and give our customers a bigger experience than a slice of cake and a cup of tea without it costing them the earth.” During the day there are savoury tarts and salad to enjoy, while the café has also re-started its Tart After Dark supper evening, which sold out within 24 hours. Also new is Molly’s sweet treat of the month, which gives apprentice chef Molly Griffin the chance to create some sweet delights of her own. Her first was Tart-misu, Mollie’s own version of a tiramisu with a Tart twist.

LABOUR OF LOVE: head chef Andrew Griffin


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ITALIAN BAR & KITCHEN

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If you would like to make a reservation please call 0117 973 0496 7 North View, Westbury Park, Bristol BS6 7PT

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The Clifton Sausage 7-9 Portland Street, Clifton, BS8 4JA, tel: 0117 973 1192

REVIEW

GOING OUT FOR A BRITISH . . . W hat would get your vote as the British national dish – Roast beef maybe with Yorkshire pud and all the trimmings? Or fish and chips (with or without mushy peas)? Or maybe you’d opt for chicken tikka masala? I’d like to nominate good old bangers and mash as my personal patriotic favourite. And if I had to introduce a visitor from overseas to the great British banger experience for the first time I’d definitely take them to this little corner of Clifton where I could rest assured they’d get the most authentic and delicious experience to initiate them in to the ritual. You might wonder why you’d go out for sausages, when you can enjoy them at home, as we regularly do. But there’s something that bit special about the onion gravy they make at The Clifton Sausage and the combo of juicy, meaty sausages, mashed potato and gravy is always perfectly served up. We like peas with our bangers at home too, but never have we served them as a creamy side dish with bacon pieces. The Clifton Sausage as a venue has a lively buzz about it. Visitors are welcomed by candlelit windows and there’s a jolly crowd at the bar, where you can sup fine British ale in the form of pints of Butcombe, or any number of decent wines by the glass. The last time we were there the diners were an entertainingly mixed bunch, including a party of older gentlemen who were obviously all members of the same club, gently teasing one of their number about his hip op. At another table a young couple were on a date – he boasting about his achievements at work, her continually swishing her long hair about and both keen to impress each other. We were happy to unwind with a glass of velvety Merlot and a selection of bread at our candlelit table (no background music and no need for it in this convivial atmosphere). The menu changes regularly, with a series of specials on offer, including some rather good sounding fresh Cornish sole. But we were here to enjoy the sausages, and there are always at least half a dozen varieties to choose from. For starters we diverted from our carnivorous intentions. I tried the veggie-friendly Capricorn goat’s cheese and thyme souffle with a leafy salad. It was a pretty little dish, warm, light 52 The Bristol Magazine

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and moreish, which is exactly what you want from a starter. I did pinch a beer battered king prawn from John’s plate – a pipingly hot British take on tempura and served with homemade tartare sauce.

If I had to introduce a visitor from ❝overseas to the great British banger experience for the first time I’d definitely take them to this little corner of Clifton

If you did have a vegetarian date you could bring them here as there are dishes with a reassuring V next to them on the menu – meat-free Glamorgan sausages being among the options. Let’s get back to the meat of the matter. In short, the restaurant’s crowning glory. The highlight of the evening. The sausages. Three large, plump meaty sausages each – for me, pork, plum and spicy ginger, and for him, Old Spot – served with smooth, creamy mash and that onion gravy, intensely savoury. These were everything we’d hoped they’d be and little was said while we concentrated on enjoying every last morsel of them. The main sausage dishes are £9.75, while if you opt for a toad in the hole version, it’s £10.75. We saw these go past and they looked hearty enough to satisfy the biggest appetite. At this stage we were both replete and very happy. There was nothing to spoil our mood as we enjoyed our wine and the harmony induced by good food eaten in pleasant surroundings. The service was very efficient, but our waitress was very patient when we needed time before we ordered our puddings. I oped for another British classic, apple and cinnamon crumble with a jug of hot homemade custard which I could add little by little, after I had ‘borrowed’ a spoonful of vanilla ice cream from my long suffering dining partner to enjoy the hot/cold sensation. But The Clifton Sausage had put him in such a good mood, he didn’t object and so the evening ended amicably.■ GMc

CLASSICS DONE WELL: The Clifton Sausage welcomes visitors with candles in the windows, top, comfy, cosy tables and the best of British cooking, executed unpretentiously


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ere are many reasons to dine at the

IndIan FIne dInIng

What’s yours!

The Mint Room Longmead Gospel Hall, Lower Bristol Road, Bath BA2 3EB 01225 446656 • www.themintroom.co.uk


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BRINGING IN THE DOUGH

If you think cupcakes are too girlie or passé a new recipe book by the Fabulous Baker Brothers – as featured on Channel 4 – will have you plunging up to your elbows in flour and engaging in the satisfying and robust art of breadmaking says Georgette McCready

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he Baker brothers, Tom and Henry Herbert really understand the visceral pleasures of making and eating bread – the loaf on the table, pieces pulled off and shared, the smell of baking bread filling the house – their writing evokes the pleasures of family life and of home baking. This pair from Hobbs House in Chipping Sodbury are among the pioneers of real bread, along with the Bertinet Bakery in Bath, Mark’s Bread in Southville and the Thoughtful Bread Company, spreading the word that British bread, made with good ingredients by hand is healthy, wholesome and, indeed the staff of life.

I’m custodian of our family ❝ sourdough that’s been rising award-winning loaves at Hobbs House Bakery for over 55 years

Their recipes and approach to cooking go back to a time before mass produced pappy white sliced bread, to when people either baked their own loaves overnight or sent a youngster round the corner to the village baker for bread wrapped in paper. It was a time before people declared themselves gluten intolerant, as families were eating bread free from preservatives and additives. You may have seen them on their Channel 4 series, the Fabulous Baker Brothers recently. Older brother Tom follows his father and grandfather’s foosteps as the baker and champion of different kinds of bread, while Henry runs the Hobbs House Butchery. The two of them together are advocates of such oldfashioned delights as Scotch eggs, potted shrimps and slowroasted meat. Their book is beautifully photographed and unashamedly blokey. They relish the mess and the fun that can be had in the kitchen. There’s even a chapter called Things Men Like to Make (which includes a full English breakfast, a massive pork pie and a 54 The Bristol Magazine

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chocolate cake recipe which, apparently, never fails to win the hearts of fair ladies) as well as practical advice on creating and looking after a sourdough culture. Tom writes: “It’s quite laughable just how simple it can be to keep your sourdough in peak condition for really tasty loaves, if you feed it occasionally and mostly keep it in the fridge. “I’m custodian of our family sourdough that’s been rising award-winning loaves at Hobbs House Bakery for over 55 years.” Tom shares his sourdough culture, the Hobbs House Monster as he calls it, with people who go on his breadmaking courses and so he spreads the love of honest-to-goodness bread around the world. He writes about making hot cross buns in such a way that you immediately want to start measuring and mixing. “A split, toasted hot cross bun with a good cup of tea can transform a good Friday into an excellent one. It’s one thing to buy them from a bakery (never get those 12-for-£1 packs from a pallet in the supermarket entrance) but to bake them at home is a very special thing to do. “Share your hot cross buns while still warm and spicy from the oven, slathered in butter that will yield into the soft, soft crumb with its plump fruit and trickle down the wafer crust.” Mouthwatering stuff. ■

ARTISAN SKILLS: Henry and Tom Herbert, the Fabulous Baker Brothers, left, and below, a classic sourdough loaf

The Fabulous Baker Brothers is published by Headline, £20

Turn to Page 56 for recipe


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HOW IT ALL STARTED Tom and Henry Herbert come from a long line of bakers, which began with great-grandfather Thomas back in the 1920s

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homas Herbert, Tom and Henry’s great-grandfather started the bakery in 1920 after Thomas was put out of business as a farrier. With six children to feed he turned to breadmaking, using the overnight method and a recipe from Mr Thompson, a baker in the village of Sherston. Years later, Thomas’s son David went looking for work in Bristol and called in at all the bakeries asking for a job. Eventually he found one who wanted to sell and retire, and so he began his own business. David carried on baking the traditional way and taught people, including ex-offenders, how to bake. Following in David’s footsteps were Trevor and Polly Herbert, also bakers, who used to let the young Tom put the jam in the doughnuts. He won Young Baker of the Year as a young man. Younger brother Henry trained as a chef and did his own thing developing recipes. And now Tom is bringing his own four children up in the breadmaking tradition. Two of his sons already have their own sourdough culture and enjoy getting messy making bread.

RECIPE

POTTED SHRIMP This recipe from the Baker brothers is good because it can be made days in advance and if the seal is intact it keeps for up to a fortnight in the fridge. The humble brown shrimp is often overlooked for bigger, meatier cousins, but these little things have power in numbers. They are sweet and delicate but with enough flavour to keep you coming back for more. They go really well with soda bread. Makes 400g and serves four as a starter.

Ingredients: 250g butter 1 blade of mace 2 peelings of lemon rind 250g brown shrimps, cooked and peeled juice of half a lemon pinch of cayenne salt and pepper cucumber pickles to serve

Method: 1 Gently melt the butter with the mace and lemon rind until it separates. Scum will float to the top. Remove this with a spoon. The salty wheys will sink. The pure fat in the middle is clarified butter. This is what we want. 2 When the butter has been infusing for 40 minutes or so, ladle off the clarified butter into a bowl, keeping a few ladles back for later use. Add the brown shrimps while the butter is still warm. Mix together, add the lemon juice and cayenne and season with salt and pepper. Spoon the mixture into four small pots (100-120ml). Place in the fridge to firm up. When firm, spoon on a top layer of the butter you set aside to seal all the shrimps in. 3 The potted shrimps will last for a couple of weeks in the fridge. To serve, take them out of the fridge 20 minutes before you need them to take the chill off, and spread on top of freshly baked soda toast. Cucumber pickles don’t go amiss here either. From The Fabulous Baker Brothers by Tom and Henry Herbert, published by Headline, hardback, £20

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BEAUTIFUL K ITCH EN S F ROM ÂŁ10,000

102 Whiteladies Road, Clifton Bristol BS8 2QY Tel: 01179 466433 Web: www.intoto.co.uk


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GRANDdesigns

GOATS HAVE FEELINGS TOO . . . Alex Sykes meets a pair of Somerset cheesemakers whose state-of-the-art dairy had to be built with its users in mind – the result is an award-winning building which produces great cheese and happy goats too

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any of us harbour the dream of getting away from it all, of starting a new life in the country, or of returning to our roots. Some of us moved out of London to do exactly that but few of us are brave enough to venture much further than the civilised confines of town let alone to give up everything to start an entirely new business. Hill Farm Dairy is the brainchild of Will and Caroline Atkinson. It was born out of Caroline’s passion for cheese, kindled during a period working at Neal’s Yard Dairy in London, and the couple’s desire to leave London for more rural surroundings. Neither Will nor Caroline were born to farming – they sort of fell into it. In June 2006 they left London and made it as far as Bath. Here they stayed for 18 months while Will continued to work as lawyer in Bristol and Caroline made cheese with Mary Holbrook at her small, highly regarded dairy in Timsbury. It was here that Caroline turned away from her initial intention to open a cheese shop and determined to make goat’s cheese. From the outset Caroline was clear that their produce would be manufactured on site using only their own milk – the emphasis being on quality not quantity. So turning their lives upside down, Will and Caroline quit their respective jobs and moved to the heart of the Somerset countryside and a collection of listed buildings centred on a late 16th century farmhouse, Hill Farm. Although already operating as a farm their new home was far from ready to house the livestock needed or produce cheese. It was clear that they needed a plan. The project was ambitious and both Will and Caroline were embarking on an enterprise of which they had little experience. In late 2007 a friendly recommendation led the Atkinsons to Designscape Architects, based in Bath. What attracted Will and Caroline to Designscape was the fact that they had not done a dairy building before. This enabled the design team to see the project from their client’s perspective, to tailor their service to the level required, and to embark on a collaborative and productive learning process where client and architect travelled a similar path towards the end objective. The benefit of this approach was the team’s ability to see each stage afresh and suggest innovative and elegant solutions to the client’s brief. The result is a unique and satisfying building for all users (human and goat) as well as being efficient and easy to use.

the milking parlour is a short ❝ distance from the barn, limiting the goats’ exposure to bad weather

The Atkinsons very much wanted to get away from the image of ‘agri-industry’ which they felt was inconsistent with their basic ambition for the business and their product. Designscape introduced the Atkinsons to Momentum (structural engineers) and E3 (building services consultants), also Bath based, to assist with the design. Working together and with specialist technical expertise provided via Caroline’s list of contacts gathered during her time at Neal’s Yard Dairy, plans were swiftly put into motion for a new livestock barn, milking 58 The Bristol Magazine

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parlour and dairy. These needed not only to answer the client’s brief for a small scale, state-of-the-art production facility, but also to provide a building whose quality and design matched the ethos of an artisan goat’s cheese company – a quality handmade product using natural materials and low energy solutions, created with respect for its surroundings. The result was a contemporary, cost effective design where a complex brief required an efficient, programme-led design response. Designscape split the brief into three separate elements running parallel to each other and dropping down a south facing hillside. The topography of the site led directly to the design response. Cheese maturing rooms sit under the milking parlour, enabling them to take advantage of more stable climatic conditions as they are built into the hillside. The dairy is given large linear windows which enable the occupants to enjoy panoramic views across the valley. The milking parlour is a short distance from the barn limiting the goats’ exposure to bad weather (goats are sensitive creatures) and handy when they must be milked twice a day. Finally the milk is able to flow by gravity from parlour to dairy, avoiding pumping / agitation and thus preserving the quality of the milk. It is Caroline’s belief that these factors directly affect the quality of their cheese.


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GRANDdesigns

PATIENCE REWARDED: Stawley cheese is produced in the dairy next to the milking parlour CHEESEMAKERS: opposite, Will and Caroline Atkinson, with daughter Kitty, in their new dairy

Despite considerable forward planning the construction process was far from straightforward. The timescale revolved around the gestation period of the goats. Eager to get started, the goats arrived at Hill Farm in April 2008 and were temporarily housed in the existing stable block. Meanwhile the design team waited for Planning and Listed Building Consent. Once necessary permissions were obtained the first phase works started with the construction of a new barn. On completion, a little behind schedule, the goats were rehoused and construction of the dairy and parlour was able to begin in December. The mating season soon arrived and the goats could wait no longer. Construction of the new building continued but the challenges of the project, including a sophisticated services strategy demanding the input of several specialist subcontractors led to delays in its completion. Will was soon hand milking his goats, one by one, twice a day, throughout June and July – nature waits for no man. It was a trying time for the Atkinsons but fortunately the works were completed before their enthusiasm for the project had been extinguished. Completion of the project enabled the design team to breathe a sigh of relief, to look back at what had been achieved and reflect on a successful collaboration with their client. Not so Will and Caroline who now embarked on their real trial – making their business work. This required them not only to produce a quality cheese but also to convince others to market it. After a period of trials, tests and sampling, Stawley (named after their local community) was ready to meet its public. Swiftly adopted by Neal’s Yard Dairy, Stawley has recently become available in Chipping Sodbury via the Hobbs House Butchers, it’s also featured on the cheese board at the brilliant Hobbs House Bistro. A couple of years have passed and Will and Caroline are now getting into their stride. Reflecting on the project, the loss of weekends and holidays –

cheese making is a full time business – the Atkinsons have little time to miss the turmoil of their old London life. They are rewarded by a sense of accomplishment in all that they have achieved. Stawley has sold out every season and is well received by all those who have tried it. As for Hill Farm Dairy, the result was a new cheese production facility built in beautiful rural surroundings taking its cues from an analysis and understanding of the landscape. The project has been recognised as exceptional by its peers and was runner-up in the Royal Institute of British Architects (south west) Town and Country Awards 2010, in addition to being shortlisted for the Regional Awards in 2011. Designscape’s reward is a happy client and a successful business. As Caroline says, “Designscape’s work on our project has resulted in a barn, milking parlour and dairy that perfectly match our aim to have modern agricultural/commercial buildings that sit comfortably within their rural backdrop, and in particular compliment our medieval farmhouse and outbuildings. This aesthetic result was achieved while still achieving the required functionality of the buildings – we have a well ventilated, light barn, a neat, efficient milking parlour and a dairy that has been described by a French cheese consultant as one of his top five dairies in the world – highly recommended in every way.” Stawley is a soft goats’ cheese made with unpasteurised milk. Neal’s Yard Dairy describes it as: “dense and smooth in its paste with a nutty, creamy breakdown under the wrinkled geotrichum rind. Flavours are floral, honeyed and lactic.” Keep the cheese wrapped in its waxed paper and store in a cool, humid place, such as the salad compartment of the fridge. Take the cheese out of the fridge a couple of hours before serving. ■ For more information on Hill Farm Dairy and other projects by Designscape Architects: tel. 01225 858500, or visit: www.dscape.co.uk Hill Farm Dairy: tel. 01823 674436, www.hillfarmdairy.co.uk Hobbs House Butchery, 39 High Street, Chipping Sodbury, Bristol BS37 6BA: tel. 01454 312136, www.hobbshousebakery.co.uk

About Cleo and her chums The first 23 goats arrived at the farm early in 2008. The Atkinsons are currently milking 48 goats (aiming to increase the herd to a maximum of 100 milking goats). There are also three Billies, who are on duty from October onwards, but spend the spring and summer in their own residence on the other side of the farm. The herd comprises three different British goat breeds. Cleo, pictured, is

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one of the Anglo-Nubians, and Hill Farm also has British Toggenburgs and British Saanens. The Saanens give higher yields, but the Nubians and Toggenburgs produce richer milk. The herd is fed with a mixture of cereals, hay taken off the RSPB nature reserve at West Sedgemoor and, from early spring until late autumn, they browse on our permanent pasture. March 2012

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BUSINESSnews

A sound portrait captures memories A new business has been launched in Bristol that will allow families to record personal stories and reflections to treasure and pass on to future generations. Professionally edited and of broadcast quality, VoiceGifts are for all sorts of occasions, from the birth of a baby to wedding anniversaries, a personal legacy or as a Mother’s Day present. Redland-based Trish Caverly, pictured right, came up with the idea after the premature death of a friend, when Trish realised that her friend’s young daughter may not remember her mother’s voice. Trish then developed the concept to mark happier occasions for friends. Trish said: “I was looking for simple yet

News in brief

heartwarming but was disappointed to find only cold and impersonal or cutesy and overly sentimental. VoiceGift fills that gap with beautiful bespoke gifts that mean everything to the people both giving and receiving them.” Trish starts by with an informal phone consultation, she then follows this up with a home visit to make the recording. Carefully crafted questions capture the personality, thoughts and feelings of the individual in an informal, natural way. The questions are then skillfully edited out to create a sound portrait of ideas, thoughts and stories. Samples of recordings can be found on the VoiceGift website www.voicegift.co.uk

LATEST BUZZ

Competition for glass artists Wrington-based Warm Glass UK is giving glass artists the chance to win one of three awards in the Warm Glass UK Glass Prize 2012. Artists can make a piece of contemporary kiln glass, with the Artist’s Prize, Student’s Prize and Bullseye Glass Prize all up for grabs. The deadline for entries is 20 March and the winners will be announced on 13 April. The Artist’s Prize winner will receive glass products, worth £500, while the Student’s Prize winner will get £300 worth of vouchers to be spent on classes from the education programme at Warm Glass UK. For full details visit: www. warmglassprize.co.uk ■ Congratulations to Riverstation wedding co-ordinator Michele Jetzer, pictured above, who was crowned Best Wedding Co-ordinator at the 2012 national Wedding Industry awards. ■ Applause too for the city’s The Adventurists, a travel company in Stokes Croft which has inspired teams taking part in its adventurous trips in far-flung places to raise £3.5m for charity. The company was launched because its founders felt: “There’s a traffic jam to get to the top of the world’s tallest mountain, every millimetre of our good planet has been scanned by satellites and rammed into mobile phone. What room is left for those of us who still yearn for a bit of old school adventure?” And so The Adventurists now have eight adventure packages, including most recently an ice run on motorbikes along the frozen rivers of Siberia. If this is the sort of holiday you’d enjoy and you’d like to raise money for charity, visit: www.theadventurists.com. ■ Entrepreneurs have a rare opportunity to acquire the first and last 18-hole golf course in Britain after administrators were called in to a Cornish leisure business. Bristol-based accountancy and business advisory firm, BDO LLP, has been appointed to manage the administration of Cape Cornwall Golf Hotel and Leisure Resort at St Just, near Penzance. 60 The Bristol Magazine

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BRISTOL BUSINESS news & views

A round up of achievements and events from the city’s business community

Light up the sky for Queen’s Jubilee A Bedminster based firework company is doing its bit to ensure celebrations around the city for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations go with a bang. Skyburst is staging displays the length and breadth of the UK but would like to see Bristol give other cities a run for their money. And to help the party really sizzle Skyburst is offering a helping hand to firework planners by giving them twice as many fireworks than they pay for if they have a display in the area that will use between £1,000 and £5,000 of pyrotechnics. Skyburst, which has a shop in Nelson Parade, is sourcing new fireworks in China. Managing director Alan Christie said: “I know we’re biased but we’d have a real sense of pride to see the city out-sparkle other parts of the country,” added Alan. “There’s a lot of doom and gloom around at the moment and it’s important we still all manage to have some fun.” Skyburst has fired more than 8,000 major national and international displays. “There will be a lot of red, white and blue, sparkly diamond effects and fire writing at the Jubilee celebrations. We can even match the display to music, so if you want Diamonds are Forever or God Save the Queen we can do it for you,” added Alan.

A royal visitor

NEW HOME: The Princess Royal is introduced to staff, residents and their families at Patchway

HRH The Princess Royal performed the opening ceremony at Chescombe Trust’s new, purpose designed home at Patchway. Princess Anne was introduced to the Trustees, staff, the property team who helped procure the new home and to the residents and their families. The Trust which was also celebrating its 20th anniversary was first run from a large house on The Downs in Bristol. The new home provides comfortable and homely residential accommodation for adults with learning disabilities. There are 14 residents, with provision to accommodate five more. For further information contact executive manager, Kevin Johnson, email; kevinwilliamjohnson@hotmail.com.


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ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

CHARITABLE GIVING AND AN APPEAL FOR CLIC SARGENT I f you wish to donate to charity and are a UK tax payer, do not forget to use gift aid as a way of maximising your donation to the charity. If you are a higher rate taxpayer you will also save yourself some tax. The benefits of gift aid are best shown by an example. If you give £80 to a charity, and make the gift aid declaration to the charity, then H M Revenue & Customs will deem the donation to have been paid net out of your taxed income. This means that the charity can claim the basic rate tax on the donation from H M Revenue & Customs. On a £80 net donation the tax reclaimable is £20 (20% of the gross donation of £100). If you are a higher or additional rate tax payer, then by making the donation, you are also able to claim tax relief of £20 and £30 respectively. Charities are currently facing a difficult time financially as public sector grants to the

charitable sector are being cut. Also with the current low investment returns, grant making charities have less funds to distribute to other charities. Please give generously to your favourite charities and by using gift aid make the government pay back some of the tax that you have paid to charities. As a firm we are supporting CLIC Sargent, the charity that supports children and young people with cancer. The son of one of our partners was diagnosed with leukaemia last summer and the charity is close to our hearts. Jack is making progress with his treatment and our prayers are with him and his family at this time.

However as well as providing support we wanted to raise at least £5,000 for CLIC Sargent. We are going to swim 21 miles (the width of the English Channel) in a relay swim at Churchill School swimming pool on 30 March 2012. All donations would be gratefully received and by the time this article appears, our Just Giving page will be set up. We will have a link from our website www.hollingdalepooley.co.uk If you have any questions about charitable giving our any taxation questions, please contact Mark Pooley at our office.

Beautiful villa in Sainte-Maxime, South of France The House

Sleeps 8, 4 bedrooms, 4 bath/shower rooms, private swimming pool. The house and its 2000 m2 private landscaped garden are situated at the end of a cul-de-sac in a peaceful, wooded residential area with views from the villa of the Gulf and village of St Tropez. The town centre with its marina, beach and many shops is within comfortable walking distance. From the port, St Tropez is 15 minutes by ferry across the bay. The property was recently renovated to a high standard providing 4 double/twin bedrooms (all with en-suite bath or shower room), living and dining areas and fully equipped modern kitchen. The dining room opens directly onto a covered dining terrace with table and chairs for 8 people.

Garden and Pool

Access to the property is through remotely-controlled gates to a private drive, leading to a turning area and car park for up to 4 cars. Terraced flower-beds slope down to the pool are and lower garden which is bounded by a small stream. The heated pool measures 10m x 4.5 m, has steps and a removable ladder and a solar powered cover for security and to keep the water warm over night. The pool is surrounded by a paved sunterrace, lawns, olive and other fruit trees. The terrace is equipped with tables and chairs, a sun-shade and full-length sun loungers for all 8 guests. There is a pool kitchen with poolside glasses and a small fridge for cold drinks, a shower and WC. In addition to the pool and dining terraces, a further sun terrace is located at mid-level, and may also be accessed directly from the master bedroom. The pool, garden drive and car park are equipped with feature lighting, and movement sensor security lights are located outside the house.

For reservation Enquiries contact 00 33 494 96 62 24

www.sainte-maxime-holidays.com

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MOTORINGcity

THE AUDI A3 CABRIOLET TBM test drives the Audi A3 Cabriolet and finds the new convertible the perfect harbinger of summer writes Jeff Osborne

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MOTORINGcity

THOROUGHLY CONVERTED

I

n the early spring sunshine we sat in the car and looked at each other. Was it too soon in the year to embrace the holiday spirit? The sun was out, we’d both got jackets on, dammit. And so I took the plunge, pressed the switch and the roof effortlessly peeled back. You can’t beat the feeling of cruising along in an open top car, a light breeze blowing, shades on and your best girl by your side. On this occasion that was my four-year-old daughter, an early convert to the glamour of the convertible. The A3 Cabriolet rolls off the Audi assembly line with a range of four petrol and two Turbo Diesel Injection engines. Its direct fuel injection and turbocharging pack both a powerful performance and high efficiency. Most engines feature both the recuperation system and the start-stop system. The S tronic with six or seven speeds is available for the three most powerful engines. The Audi A3 looks sporty and has an elegant style, but hey it also makes for some fun driving, with its agile ways. This new generation of cars hosts some new, exclusive touches. The single-frame grille element and the trims on the Bposts are high-gloss black, the lower air inlets have chrome struts, the exterior mirrors are aerodynamically optimised and there are chrome strips in the door handles. At the rear, all A3 versions have a new diffuser insert with eyecatching separating edge, and the rear lights are tinted on the three-door version. The interior of the A3 is even more exclusive. The key features are dials with a grey background, a flat-bottomed leather sports steering wheel complete with trim ring and a high-gloss trim for the optional navigation system plus. There are gleaming aluminum-look trim inserts on the centre console, mirror adjuster switch and window lifter buttons. The four-cylinder power unit develops an ample 77 kW (105 hp) from a swept volume of 1,197 cm3 and generates a hefty 175 Nm of torque (129.07 lb-ft), yet averages just 42.77 mpg. The most efficient engine version in the car line – and one of the most efficient compact models on the market – is the A3 1.6 TDI developing 77 kW (105 hp) and 250 Nm (184.39 lb-ft) of torque. It is available in three different versions, the most economical of which is an A3 three-door version averaging 61.90 mpg. In-detail modifications to the body and running gear contribute towards this excellent figure, which equates to CO2 emissions of just 159.33 g/mile. Depending on engine version, the dual-clutch transmission has six or seven speeds. The seven-speed version operates with dry clutches; the absence of an oil supply improves the transmission’s efficiency yet further. The option of power transmission to all four wheels likewise underscores the exceptional position that the Audi A3 enjoys in the premium compact class. Audi supplies quattro permanent all-wheel drive for four engine versions. The Cabriolet is the exception; on the other hand, quattro drive is standard on the S3 and S3 Sportback. Its electroniccontrol multi-plate clutch, mounted on the rear axle for a

balanced weight distribution, apportions most of the engine’s power to the front wheels in normal driving conditions. If need be, it diverts drive torque swiftly and adaptably to the rear wheels. The running gear of the A3 car line combines a sporty character with superb safety and high comfort. Its precision and poise stem from technically elaborate solutions such as four-link rear suspension, which handles longitudinal and transverse forces independently, and the electromechanical power steering, which is as responsive as it is efficient. On all versions with front-wheel drive, the ESP electronic stabilisation programme incorporates an electronic differential lock. When close to the limits of handling on bends, this intelligent software solution manages how the drive torque is distributed among the wheels by small, barely detectable brake applications. These suppress any understeering, improve traction and further enhance driving safety. For the engines developing 103 kW (140 hp) and upwards, except on the Cabriolet, Audi supplies the adaptive damper control system Audi magnetic ride, which exploits the properties of an electromagnetic fluid. The dampers can be set for a comfortable or sporty characteristic. Within the parameters, the system adjusts the damping forces in milliseconds depending on the road conditions and the driver's style. The body sits 15 millimeters (0.59 in) lower with this system. There are also the options of conventional sports suspension and the supple S line sports suspension from quattro GmbH. The S3 comes complete with specially tuned 25 mm (0.98 in) lower S sports suspension. The improved models in the A3 family will be arriving at dealers in the early summer. Their extensive range of high-end options demonstrates their high technological calibre. These include the dynamic cornering light system adaptive light for the xenon plus headlamps, the high-beam assistant and the navigation system plus with MMI operating logic. It calculates routes particularly fast, has a higher resolution and features three-dimensional map graphics. The parking assistant is another very attractive feature, especially when parking in the city. When driving at slow speeds (up to 18.64 miles) its ultrasound sensors scan the parking spaces parallel with the road; when it detects one that is large enough to reverse into, it then indicates this in the instrument cluster. All the driver need do is engage reverse and operate the accelerator, clutch and brakes – the car manoeuvers independently and precisely into the space. The Audi A3 is priced between £21,180 and £29,055. Whatcar? said of the Convertible: ‘It’s hard to think of a more desirable drop-top at this price, or one with such a quick electric roof. Residual values will be outstanding and some fine engines are available.’ There’s one four-year-old who’s pleased to hear that. ■

You can’t beat the feeling of ❝ cruising along in an open top car, a light breeze blowing, shades on and your best girl by your side

SITTING PRETTY:

The Audi A3 cabriolet on location in Bath. Picture by TBM

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

To arrange a test drive contact: Bath Audi, Roman Way, BA2 8SG. Tel: 01761 438 300

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WEEKENDgetaway

ESCAPE TO THE COAST Looking forward to spring Megan Tatum recommends a city-seaside break in lively, cultural Brighton

F

amous for the paradox of its vibrant and hedonistic cultural scene set against the nostalgic backdrop of traditional pebbled beaches, Brighton has long tempted tired city dwellers to its shores. At just a few hours from the west country by train it makes for the ideal weekend break to either relax and recoup, or to dive headfirst into its buzzing eclectic mix of sights, sounds and experiences. Although affectionately dubbed Little London it avoids the ennui of a sprawling concrete mass, retaining the quirkiness and colour that has attracted visitors for generations. It was circumstance rather than choice that first took me to the city a few years ago but I have remained faithful to its charms, returning time and time again to find surprises round each corner.

Brighton looks as though it is a ❝ town helping the police with their enquiries ❞ Keith Waterhouse, Writer

On arrival at the central train station, a short downhill stroll takes you into the heart of the city’s cultural epicentre, The Lanes, where narrow cobbled streets lead the way through a maze of independent shops and cafés. From chic charity shops to contemporary jewellery boutiques to oh-so-cool vintage clothing outlets, this part of the city is perfect for retail therapy with a twist. When the jostling crowds get too much, escape from the hubbub to the tiny Casa don Carlos in Union Street where the authentic Spanish hot chocolate is divine, and delicious freshly cooked tapas is served steaming hot around cosy oak tables. Walking towards the city centre you pass the Royal Pavilion, its Indian-inspired turrets as exotic as they were upon its completion in the 17th century as a pleasure palace for the Prince Regent. Its ongoing restoration has brought the lavish interiors back to their former glory and it’s well worth a visit. No visit to Brighton would be complete without sampling the legendary coastline and its modern perspective on the traditional seaside break. Pale British bodies strewn over red-striped deckchairs sit comfortably alongside chic beach bars serving up everything from snacks and coffee, to full-blown three course meals. Just as atmospheric though is a portion of delicious fish 66 The Bristol Magazine

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and chips eaten with toes buried in the sand as the sun glints off the waves. As evening draws in the city comes to life with an eclectic mix of excellent pubs, bars and restaurants serving up cuisine from across the globe. A great place to start the night is The Foundry, just off North Street, where its cosy décor of oversized leather armchairs and dimly glowing candles envelops like a warm blanket. Brighton’s restaurants cater for the even the pickiest of palates, but a personal favourite of mine is the Genghis Khan serving ‘interactive’ Mongolian cuisine. Rather than waiting for a server, guests are invited to pile their bowls high with a huge buffet-style choice of meats, veg, herbs, and spices before handing to a chef to be sizzled on the hot plate into a BBQ blended masterpiece. The set menu allows limitless trips so you can experiment with different mixes and creations to achieve that perfect dish. If you’re booked into a hotel then walk just a few minutes after dinner to Japanese cocktail bar, Madame Geisha, tucked away up East Street, but far from shy and retiring. Its drinks list features traditional cocktails with a sake twist served in an incredible bar that deserves its own art exhibition. Bold anime paintings snake across the walls above the minimalist furniture and beautiful Japanese prints adorn the seating. Its contemporary twist on traditional pan-Asian culture reflects perfectly the attitude of Brighton as a city, and offers a fantastic way to end the day in the midst of the city’s own cultural cocktail. ■ How to get there: Direct train services from Bristol leave once a day in each direction. Advance singles booked approximately two weeks ahead will set you back around £20 each way from Bristol Temple Meads. Upcoming events: Food and Drink Spring Harvest Festival, 30 March to 9 April Brighton Arts Festival, 5 to 27 May, Foodies Festival, 25 to 27 May, Brighton Marathon, 15 April, Yacht Race 1 June Where to stay: For information on hotels and B&Bs visit: www.visitbrighton.com

SUSSEX BY THE SEA: main picture, the domes of Brighton Pavilion. Top, traditional pastimes include strolling along the pier or lolling in a deckchair, below, the bustling Lanes area packed with independent shops, cafés and restaurants


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The Hannafore Point Hotel

The most

stunning location in Devon and

Cornwall for

EVERY Occasion

Looe : Cornwall AA *** • Fresh Fish from the boats to your plate • Fresh locally sourced produce • A well stock wine cellar and Real Ales • Brasserie and À la Carte Restaurants • Devon and Cornish Cream Teas

www.berryheadhotel.com www.hannaforepointhotel.com For....

ates for Special r pring nd s winter a eaks r leisure b

Weddings and Celebrations • Romantic Breaks • Conferences • From 2 to 200 guests •

The Berry Head Hotel Brixham : Devon AA *** • Indoor Swimming Pool and Spa • Non Residents and families welcome • Comfortable and well equipped en-suite accommodation • Traditional Warm Hospitality

stay@hannforepointhotel.com • tel: 01503 263273 : stay@berryheadhotel.com • tel: 01803 853225

Small Ship Cruise Expeditions

A bespoke portfolio of fascinating itineraries aboard comfortable, fine quality small ships. Unique travel experiences for the curious and discerning. SOUTH SEAS ODYSSEY - Celebrate Christmas on Pitcairn Island during an epic voyage from Easter Island to Fiji via the Gambier Islands, the Tuamotus, Tahiti, the Society Islands, the Cook Islands, Niue, Tonga and Wallis & Futuna Group. Depart 16 December 2012 ex London via Santiago to Easter Island return 21 January 2013. The portfolio has an enticing array of options from around coastal Britain, circumnavigation of Iceland, Norwegian Fjords to Murmansk and the White Sea, the intimate Mediterranean, the Levant and Black Sea, West to South Africa, South America and coastal New Zealand. Explore in depth at :

www.johnkennedy-noblecaledonia.com or call John Kennedy on: 0117 946 6000

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

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Department of modern languages Czech, Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Turkish, Welsh

Do you want to learn a language? We offer a variety of foreign language courses for all levels at our language centre close to the Clifton triangle.

Price per term is £145 for 12 x 90 min lessons Courses will run subject to minimum numbers, price may increase to run small classes.

IH Bristol is the only IELTS test centre in Bristol. If you are thinking about emigrating to Australia or Canada and need to take the IELTS test, then visit our website for further details and how to apply.

E-mail or call us today for further information

Telephone: 0117 9090911 www.ihbristol.com info@ihbristol.com 2 Queen’s, Ave, Bristol, BS8 1SE

dance dance movement

voice

therapy centre

BRISTOL B ASE D MAST E RS PROGRAMME IN DANCE MOVE ME NT PSYCHOT HE RAPY Validated by Canterbury Christ Church University INTERVIEWING NOW for October 2012 intake and NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN DANCE MOVEMENT and the THERAPEUTIC PROCESS (BTEC) 1 year programme starts September

Ffi: Dance Voice, Quaker Meeting House, Wedmore Vale, Bedminster, Bristol. BS3 5HX tel: 0117 953 2055 e-mail: admin@dancevoice.org.uk www.dancevoice.org.uk 68 The Bristol Magazine

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FAMILYfun

n ace in a ff to sp o t s la B th e u r e with t n ve d a the nan a at N u t j e ll y y actor o Tobacc F

Get cr eative in the ki t c h e f or T y n n in pr e t esf iel parat d ’s ion biscuit bak e

com pet

ition

MARCH MADNESS The city has a range of events and activities on offer for the family to enjoy this month; from storytelling to baking and scientific experiments to music-making. Use our guide to help plan quality time with your little ones

Kids theatre Tobacco Factory Theatre, Raleigh Road, Southville, Bristol. Box office tel: 0117 902 0344. www.tobaccofactorytheatre.com

Voyage of the Nutjellynana, Sunday 18 March, 11am & 1.30pm Dare to imagine, aim for the stars, blast off with the Nutjellynana, and discover why space is the cuddly frontier. Alice, Melby and Fidge are three cuddly toys forgotten in an old attic who build a rocket ship, blast off, and boldly go where no toy has gone before. Take an out-of-this-world voyage with Angel Heart’s puppets, fabulous storytelling and a cosmic soundtrack. Suitable for ages 4+.

Discover science Explore At-Bristol, Harbourside, Bristol. Tel: 0845 345 1235 www.at-bristol.org.uk

Toddler Takeover: Super Senses, Friday 23 March, 10am - 4pm Let your little ones get stuck-in and feel, hear and sniff their way around At-Bristol’s hundreds of exhibits, and the special activities areas. Explore the ‘make and take’ activities and then listen to a spot of storytelling filled with actions and sounds. Take a trip to see sparkly stars in the Planetarium and enjoy the special under

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eights areas which are filled with fancy dress and imaginative play. Under threes are free.

Brilliant Brains Week, Tuesday 13 – Sunday 18 March Come and take part in some of the amazing demonstrations Prof Hood from Bristol University delivered at the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, meet other psychologists and brain scientists from Bristol University, watch a real dissection and learn all about your incredible brain.

World music St George’s Bristol, Great George Street, Bristol. Box office tel: 0845 40 24 001 www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk

Metropolitan Brass: Around the World, Saturday 10 March, 11am The fabulously entertaining Metropolitan Brass Ensemble take a whirl-wind, brass-celebrating world tour featuring Hollywood through The Simpsons, Britain through Hosepipe Voluntary, Africa through The Pink Panther, the Caribbean through Pirates of the Caribbean and beyond. And in a real musically interactive treat for all the family, see how brass instruments work, learn about the science behind the playing, explore how music can be fast, slow, descriptive, emotional, and have a go at conducting the band. Suitable for kids aged 6+.

Fun on-board ss Great Britain, Great Western Dockyard, Bristol. Tel: 0117 926 0680 or visit: www.ssgreatbritain.org

Sea Hear, Tuesday 6 March, 11am Join professional storyteller Sarah Mooney for adventures on the high seas for pre-school children aged 3 to 4 years.

Fashion design RWA, Queens Road, Clifton. Usual admission applies (£5 adults, free for under 16s). Book in advance on tel: 0117 973 3171

Paper Dolls Workshop, Saturday 14 April, 10am – noon Design a doll-size wardrobe in this creative collage and colouring workshop for children aged 4-8 years.

Baking competition The National Trust’s Tyntesfield House, North Somerset. Tel: 0844 249 1895. £1 to enter.

Biscuit Bake, Saturday 24 March Bring your homemade biscuits along to be judged by a panel of chefs in the Cow Barn restaurant. Junior and adult categories.


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EDUCATION

Graduates apply course work

DRESSING UP: pupils at Red Maids’ Junior School dressed as characters from Charles Dickens’ novels as part of the school’s celebrations of the author’s 200th anniversary

News in brief ■ Bristol’s group of four schools, South West Academies, launched its 2012 sports programme with a basketball competition. Pupils came together at Merchants’ Academy in south Bristol to battle it out on the basketball courts. Colston’s Girls’ School won both the junior and senior girls’ tournaments, while City Academy won the boys’ junior tournament and Bristol Cathedral Choir School narrowly fought off a challenge from their hosts at Merchants’ Academy to take the boys’ senior title. As well as basketball, the programme covers football, netball, rugby sevens, hockey and athletics. To coincide with Olympics year, an Olympic-themed pentathlon is planned for May, while in July the programme will conclude with a sports celebration evening. Other planned SWA interschool events include a summer concert. ■ There is the chance for parents to find out more about more than 25 independent senior schools from across the south west, all under one roof, on Saturday 24 March. The schools day is being held at All Hallows School in East Cranmore, near Shepton Mallet from 10am until 1.30pm. It is a great opportunity to speak directly to key personnel about their schools and to collect information. No tickets are required and all are welcome. Schools represented include: Badminton School, Bruton School for Girls, Bryanston School, Chilton Cantelo School, Dauntsey’s School, Downside School, King’s School, Bruton, King Edward’s School, Bath, Kingswood School, Leweston School, Millfield, Milton Abbey School, Prior Park College, Sherborne School, Sidcot School, Stonar School, Taunton School, The Godolphin School, The Royal High School, Bath, Wells Cathedral School and Westonbirt School. For more information about the day contact info@allhallowsschool.co.uk

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UWE Bristol graduates, David Hayhurst and Gemma Beeching, have set up a business called Product by Design, with the intention of improving the standard of product design. David Hayhurst graduated in business management and Gemma Beeching in creative product design last summer. Gemma said: “We specialise in refining products so that they are better suited to purpose, ensuring that every product that leaves our studio is efficient, effective, and satisfying, for the person who will use it. This was an important element highlighted in the creative product

design course at UWE Bristol. Our inspiration comes from international leaders like Apple and IDEO.” The company’s innovative take on designing headphones for outdoor enthusiasts exemplifies this rationale. Gemma said: “We went out with professional climbers and casual hill walkers to understand what the headphones were being put through and designed a solution that was warm, waterproof, secure and safe. People tend to use just one pair of headphones – so the design packs features like a no-tangle wire, that make the day to day commute that bit more enjoyable.”

State-of-the-art pool for city It is fitting in this Olympic year that people on the eastern side of Bristol will be able to take their children along to enjoy a brand new leisure centre, complete with a ten-lane competition pool as well as a learners’ swimming pool. The Hengrove Park Leisure Centre is a brand new building offering all kinds of facilities, including a large gym, a special studio just for spinning classes and two dance studios. It also has a climbing wall and a creche. It is important for the health of future generations that they should enjoy taking part in physical activity and learning to swim allows parents the chance to give their children the freedom to exercise with play. The £35m facility has a spectacular looking egg on its side, pictured as an artist’s impression, which is known as the Golden Egg and forms part of the café. The centre is being managed in partnership by Parkwood Leisure along with Bristol City Council. During its development regular swimmers at Bishopsworth Pool were invited to come along and test the waters at the new pool. Bishopsworth Pool is to close. Champions of the future will be able to train

at Hengrove as part of Swim Bristol, which allows club swimmers to train there regularly to prepare for competitions. Who knows, maybe at the next Olympic Games in four years’ time we may be able to boast that a medal winner was trained right here at Bristol’s newest swimming pool.

ON AN ADVENTURE: the joint choir of Queen Elizabeth Hospital School and Red Maids’ School have recently flown to China on a tour which took in the Great Wall, the Forbidden City and seeing the famous Terracotta Army, as well as giving three performances. The 40-strong mixed choir is pictured here at The Lord Mayor’s Chapel in Bristol. Its repertoire includes a variety of classical and modern pieces, including Zadok the Priest, Simon and Garfunkel’s Bridge Over Troubled Water and Disney’s The Bare Necessities


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DO YOU HAVE A SPARE ROOM? FRIENDLY HOSTS WANTED FOR OUR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS We are looking for welcoming, hospitable hosts to accommodate our international students. • Long and short stays available • Great experience • Great rates of pay For more information, please contact: Elaine Sawyer Accommodation Officer 27 Oakfield Road, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 2AT Tel: 0117 909 0911 Fax: 0117 907 7181 Email: elaine@ihbristol.com Web: www.ihbristol.com

Study Travel Exams Holidays

T HE

BRISTOL

MAGAZINE

We deliver to over 24,000 addresses every month. But if you live outside our distribution area or would like us to send a copy to friends or family then we are able to offer a mailing service for only £15.00 (6 issues) or £25.00 Euro zone; £30.00 (12 issues) or £50.00 Euro zone World Zone 1 £95.00 World Zone 2 £120.00

To subscribe just send a cheque payable to MC Publishing Ltd 2 Princes Building, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED or Telephone 0117 974 2800 for card payment

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NATURAL LOCKS

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ew organic hair salon, Hush Hairdressing opened its salon in style last month with an exclusive party hosted by owners Mark Andres and Glenn Holmes. The sparkling new salon can be found on Baldwin Street and promises to give clients fabulous-looking hair through the use of natural, plant-based products that are ammonia, sulphate and chemical-free and certified organic. The team of four talented stylists successfully combine a modern, caring approach with the latest skills

■ If you’re thinking of taking part in the Bristol 10k on 20 May, why not run for a good cause and help raise money for Macmillan Cancer Support? For further information or to join the team, tel: 020 7840 4937 or email: bristol10k@macmillan.org.uk ■ Children’s Hospice South West (CHSW) has opened registration for its annual Ride for Precious Lives event – a three day, 200 mile sponsored bike ride – taking place from 22-24 June. The event will see 100 intrepid cyclists get in the saddle and enjoy the scenery of the south west as they cycle from St Austell in Cornwall, which is the site of the newest hospice, via the hospice in Barnstable, before finishing at the Charlton Farm hospice in Wraxall, near Bristol. To sign up, visit: www.chsw.org.uk/rfpl. The registration fee of £100 includes the cost of two nights accommodation with a buffet dinner and refreshments for three days. ■ Be a dare-devil and take part in St Peter’s Hospice’s sponsored abseil challenge on Sunday 22 April. Make the exhilarating 185 feet abseil down the Premier Inn in central Bristol and help the charity hit its target of £20,000 to help care for even more patients in 2012. For all those wanting an adrenalin rush, visit: www.stpetershospice.org. Entry fee is £15 and there is a minimum sponsorship of £150 to be raised.

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IT’S MOTHER DAY: so mums, put your feet up and relax with a cup of peach and cherry blossom green tea (£1.39 for a box of 20 tea bags) from Twinings’ new green tea range which has been refreshed with authentic and natural ingredients. One sip and you’ll be floating on your very own cloud. And if you’re really lucky, you’ll receive a Washing Up Fairy Bubble Bar Wand from one of your little ones (Dads, take note) so you won’t have to lift a finger. A charming and perfect pocket money gift (£3.75) from Lush, it’s a solid washing up wand that you can swirl around the water to create bubbles with a gorgeously unmistakable Lush scent. It produces a surprising amount of lather and is effective as well as being extra kind to hardworking hands

SKIN DEEP The latest health and beauty news and product reviews from Samantha Ewart, including Mother’s Day gift ideas

Berkeley Square cosmetics company has introduced something special to its award-winning 1920s range – a collection of luxurious skincare products and a perfume made from essential oils under the name of Black Cassis. The sensual fragrance of blackcurrant, lavender, patchouli and vetivert is glamorous and elegant and together with the 1920s inspired artwork, captures the true essence of the period. Available from Harvey Nichols

New for April, Estée Lauder has introduced a new Pure Color Blush (£24, available at House of Fraser from April) to give cheeks a fresh, radiant colour in a new palette of shades. This ultra-silky powder blush adds instant sheen and dimension to the face, whether you want a soft flush or a dramatic contour that lasts all day

Turn a warm bath into a wonderful aromatherapy experience with the help of the Aromatherapy Associates miniature bath and shower oil collection (£28.50 for 9 x 3ml bottles from Space NK). The set contains award-winning blends of natural oils with different fragrances to help you relax, de-stress, revive or support

■ World-renowned yoga teachers Angela and Victor Farmer are visiting Bristol City Yoga in Stokes Croft on Sunday 11 March to give a one-day workshop that will help you enhance your practice. The workshop costs £95 and can be booked via the website: www.bristolcityyoga.co.uk/workshops or tel: 0117 924 4414

The salon is open from 9.30am – 7.30am Monday to Friday and 9am – 5pm on Saturday. To book an appointment, contact Hush Hairdressing on tel: 0117 930 0350 or for further information visit: www.hushhairbristol.co.uk

Challenge yourself

and organic technology, ensuring individual service for every client. In addition, two highly experienced nail technicians offer gel and CND Shellac nails in a relaxing environment at the salon. ■


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MAGNETIC STYLE Samantha Ewart takes a break from shopping to indulge in a champagne manicure

W

hat could be more indulgent than taking a break from shopping to sip Champagne whilst you have your nails manicured? And that’s exactly what I did on a recent retail therapy trip to Cabot Circus. I booked in for a Heavenly Hands manicure (£42, 30 minutes) at the swanky Nails Inc nail bar in Harvey Nichols and had a delightful half hour of pampering – it’s the perfect pick-up for all weary shoppers. In keeping with the top quality and luxury brand reputation of Harvey Nichols, a complimentary glass of champagne is offered with any nail service here. You can let the bubbles just fizz away while you sit back, relax and let the experienced nail technicians do their work. Nails Inc, like Harvey Nichols has a reputation which speaks for itself. It was founded in 1999 by young British entrepreneur Thea Green who spotted a gap in the market for professional high quality manicures for women with little time to spare. Nails Inc is well known for its affordable luxury products that are innovative and on-trend with catwalk fashions, formulated with the latest professional technologies and created for women who demand uncompromising quality and instant results. It is always first to market the hottest trends, most recently the magnetic nail polish, special effects 3D glitter nail polish, crackle and overglaze top coats. These revolutionary products give customers the opportunity to experiment with the latest fashions. I chose the Magnetic Polish in the metallic Kensington Palace shade – a lovely raspberry pink/red colour perfect for the day to evening transition, although I was tempted by the striking teal shade. The Magnetic Polish is the newest product to be launched by Nails Inc and it already has a huge celebrity following. And why is it so popular you ask? Well, Magnetic polish is the most exciting nail polish you will have ever seen. It allows you to create a unique two-tone wave effect in just a few minutes thanks to the unique formula which has been specially developed with metallic particles to create a pattern using magnetic forces. As a patterned magnet is held over the nail, the iron powder in the polish gravitates toward the magnet forming the pattern on your nail. It gives a fantastic finish and adds style to any outfit. I promise you’ll get lots of compliments – I did. Before the polish was applied, the nail technician filed and shaped my nails to perfection, tidied my cuticles and gave my hands an exfoliation with a gorgeous-smelling product containing sugar and geranium oil to really soften the skin. This was followed by a relaxing hand massage with moisturising hand lotion containing caviar – a special ingredient used in a lot of Nails Inc products which I am told is rich in vitamin A and perfect for conditioning and nourishing your hands. Scented with delicate orchid oil, the lotion smelt beautiful and was easily and quickly absorbed. The nail bar also offers a three week manicure featuring the popular gel polish, pedicures, and an express manicure amongst other treatments for special occasions. To make a booking, contact tel: 0117 916 8888 or pop in to the nail bar in Harvey Nichols. ■

REVIEW

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THE HAIRCOLOUR YOU’VE BEEN WAITING FOR!

NEW CHROMATICS LEAVES HAIR FEELING UP TO 2X STRONGER

hair

CARLO &beauty M

MOROCCANOIL ®

Stockists

Main stockists of REDKEN

Tel: 0117 968 2663 • www.carlohairandbeauty.co.uk 6 Rockleaze Rd, Sneyd Park, Bristol BS9 1NF


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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

www.naturopathy-uk.com

New Career as a CNM trained Nutritionist worth a Gamble Jo Gamble, Nutritional Therapist and College of Naturopathic Medicine (CNM) graduate, tells us her inspirational story of how she built a business following her daughter’s serious illness.

“At 19 months old my daughter Georgia was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. By her third birthday she was having chemotherapy to try and combat this auto-immune disease. “I tried a variety of therapies and took my daughter to nutritional therapists and we regularly saw a Naturopath in London but after a while thought, ‘I could train and do this myself’. I knew a distance learning course wasn’t for me and I needed to study locally as Georgia was still in hospital. The College of Naturopathic Medicine (CNM) course is recognised as one of the most respected within the industry and I was able to study at weekends so this worked perfectly for my situation. Training gave me an in-depth knowledge of naturopathic nutrition and its effect on the body so it really helped me to treat my daughter. Georgia is now nine years old and is fit and healthy – this is a miracle after doctors told us she would be in a wheelchair for life. “I’ve taken my passion and knowledge and turned it into my career. Previously I’d worked as a behavioural therapist for 12 years but after graduating I wanted to help other people who’d been through the same situation. When my daughter was sick I desperately wished that someone could have guided me through it and showed the different treatments and options out there. Now I do this for families 82 The Bristol Magazine

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with a child going through cancer, offering advice on food, supplements, homeopathy and herbs to work alongside medical treatment. It’s such a personal journey that has led me to this point where I have a career I love and is also very flexible for when I still need to take Georgia to hospital. Being a working mum is never easy and I’m constantly pushing myself further but this is the most rewarding job in the world and, most of all, I have a healthy daughter.” Jo set up Nutrition Mission in 2009 with fellow CNM graduate DebiAnn Wrigglesworth with the aim of helping people with their health and vitality using primarily food but also lifestyle changes and supplements (www.nutritionmission.co.uk). Jo set up two charities KICT (Kids Integrated Cancer Treatment) and The Alfie Gough Trust in memory of a young patient who lost his battle with cancer. Alongside this work, Jo is also a senior lecturer at CNM. To find out more about CNM’s Nutritional Therapy course go to www.naturopathy-uk.com or call 01342 410 505. Colleges are in London, Bristol, Birmingham, Brighton, Manchester and Edinburgh.

If you’d like to find out more about training in Bristol for a new career as a Nutritional Therapist, come along to CNM Bristol's next free-to-attend Open Evening – for details check the website www.naturopathy-uk.com or call 01342 410 505


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Established in 2001, we offer a wide range of beauty treatments and services in a relaxed friendly yet professional environment. As a [comfort zone] and caci appointed salon Candice and her team of highly skilled beauty therapists, are always available to offer free consultations or advice you on any queries you may have. Open five days a week with two late evenings, we hope that our opening hours will offer a convenient appointment time to suit your busy life. Drop-in clients are most welcome. The only salon in Clifton to offer the amazing Caci Non-Surgical Face-Lift!! Airbrush tanning for only £10.

Please telephone or come into the salon to arrange your next beauty appointment. A - 52 Royal York Crescent, Clifton. T - 0117 9730727

www.cwbeauty.co.uk

A smile a day goes a long way Our friendly dental practice can help you to maintain healthy teeth and really give you something to smile about.

ble Afforda l a t n e D ts n la p m I

• Private and Denplan • Dental Implants • Sedation for Nervous Patients • Tooth Whitening • Veneers, Crowns & Bridges • Hygienist • Onsite Dental Lab Technician • Removal of Wisdom/Difficult Teeth

Referrals Welcom e

• Apicectomies • 0% Finance (subject to contract) • Off Street Car Parking Charlton Park Dental Practice

Mr M Mr M Othman BDS FDSRCS, Specialist in Oral Surgery

30 Charlton Park, Keynsham, Bristol 0117 9862627 • info@charltonparkdental.co.uk www.charltonparkdental.co.uk www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

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OUT&ABOUT

THE ROUTING OF

OLIVER’S ARMY Andrew Swift heads east to the downs above Devizes for a walk with spectacular views, as well as an iron-age encampment, the old Bath road, a 1500-year-old rampart, Wiltshire’s newest white horse and a Civil War battlefield

T

he Battle of Roundway Down on 13 July 1643 was the greatest cavalry victory of the English Civil War, with the Royalists routing the Parliamentary forces who were besieging Devizes. It was fought on a high, treeless plateau, which the fleeing Parliamentary horsemen soon came to the edge of. The slopes down which they tumbled to their deaths are still known as Bloody Ditch. Standing there today, with one of the finest panoramas in southern England spread out below you, it is impossible not to think of them thundering along and seeing – too late – the land shelving away beneath them.

Directions To get to the starting point, head east along the A420 from Bristol to Chippenham. At Chippenham, head south along the A342 towards Devizes. Before reaching Devizes – just past the village of Rowde – turn left along a road signposted to Rowdefield and Roundway. Follow this for two miles to the village of Roundway. Just past a phone box turn left along a lane with a no through road sign. After half a mile turn left. After another third of a mile the road turns into a rough gravel track. Continue along this to a car park (SU005648). Go through a kissing gate on the west side of the car park and carry on along the path forking right. Soon you are in open country, with a fence on your right and a steep declivity on your left. When the fence ends – and the path turns right – carry straight on around the perimeter of the iron age fort known as Oliver’s Castle. On a clear day, the view as you turn along its western edge is breathtaking. On the slope below you a white horse was cut in 1845, but all trace of it has disappeared. As you turn along the northern side of the fort, 84 The Bristol Magazine

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the steep slopes down which the Parliamentary soldiers tumbled to their deaths can be seen ahead. After walking along the north side of the fort, follow the path through a kissing gate. At the next gate, turn left along a bridleway bordered by fences. When you reach a T junction (SU001654), turn right along a broad track. This is the old Bath Road, which you will be following for the next two miles. After 500 metres the track turns into a tarmaced lane. As you bear left, views far to the north open up on your left. When you reach a junction, bear right. After another 750 metres, the tarmac ends. After heavy rain, this stretch of road can turn into a quagmire, giving an idea of what the Bath Road was like for early 18th-century travellers.

it is impossible not to think of them thundering along and seeing – too late – the land shelving away beneath them

When you come to a cross track (SU021659), carry straight on for 600 metres. When you reach a busy road, cross over and head along the byway opposite. After 75 metres, the track swings sharply right – don’t be tempted to take the track leading uphill through the gate ahead. After 1,250 metres, the track divides to pass either side of a large sycamore. Fork left and, just before rejoining the righthand fork, turn left through a gap in the hedgerow (SU040666). This may not look promising, but a few metres further on you will see a metal gate ahead. Go through it and follow the path


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OUT&ABOUT

ON A CLEAR DAY: above, shadows of clouds racing across the undulating Wiltshire Downs WALKING THE BATTLEFIELD: opposite, main picture, Bloody Ditch takes its name from the English Civil War when the Parliamentarians’ horses and riders plunged down the slope to their deaths

as it curves uphill. For the next mile you will be following the Wansdyke, a defensive earthwork built in the fifth or sixth centuries. As you continue uphill, the Lansdowne Monument appears ahead, with tumuli below it. The monument was erected by the Marquess of Lansdowne in 1845 to commemorate his ancestor Sir William Petty. Over to your right, is the old Bath Road heading east to meet the A361. Follow the Wansdyke as it swings west. Although the path follows the northern rampart of the Wansdyke, the gates through the fences you encounter are down in the ditch. After going through two metal gates, you will see a bridleway leading off to the left. Ignore this, and also ignore a North Wilts Way waymark. Further on, ignore another path crossing the ditch. Carry on, passing the wireless station on your right, and you will be rewarded with superb views to the north. After going through a large wooden gate down in the ditch, look for a small wooden gate on the left, with a sign advising you to watch out for flying golf balls (SU025671). Go through it, bear left and follow the path as it curves round to the right. When the path forks, bear right and follow it as it curves westward – with a couple of waymarks – across the golf

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course, heading to the left of a large clubhouse (SU023667). When you reach the road, cross and carry straight on along a byway. After 125 metres, this swings left to follow an old road heading south for a mile and a half, crossing the old Bath Road en route. The byway leads through the site of the battlefield, from which the Parliamentarians fled westward. Eventually you reach a parking place (SU015642), and the road starts heading downhill. A gate leads to the newest of Wiltshire’s white horses, cut by 200 local people in 1999 to mark the millennium. Follow the road downhill until you come to a junction, where you turn right uphill. Carry on up the road, which you will recognise as the one you drove up earlier, and continue along the gravel track to the car park. ■

FURTHER INFORMATION Length of walk: seven miles Map: OS Explorer 157 ■ Approximate time: 3 hours ■ ■

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CITYinteriors

ASK THE FAMILY Can an interior designer ever meet the needs of a playful, growing family and the adults’ desire to have somewhere tranquil? Sue Chalmers of Merell Design and Create found the solution for one Bristol home

S

o, you’ve got young children who like to wipe chocolatey fingers over the sofa, scribble with crayon on the walls, and tread mud throughout the house, but you also want a designer interior to live in, entertain in and feel proud of. It can be done. When I met Bristol parents Katie Diacon, and her husband Phil, and their two children, they had already had a new extension to the rear of their four bedroom house, opening up the kitchen/living area, and the kitchen was installed too. The bathroom had also had some work done to it. But that was it. The rest of the house was ready for transformation. Katie and Phil run Pack & Send in the city, shipping unusual and everyday items all over the world, so they value their free time with the family at home. I invited Katie to come to our studio to have a look through some fabric and wallpaper sample books. When you’re working with an interior designer it is important that your designer knows they are designing something for you, and not inflicting their own style on you. Katie was pleased to find papers and fabrics she hadn’t seen in high street shops. “They were so different to anything we had ever seen in friends’ or families’ houses, and that was exactly what we wanted – unique designs, not the run of the mill beige and grey. We have young children, so we wanted vibrancy, colour, pattern and texture.” We began by sourcing a treatment for the bathroom windows, as one of them had clear glass, and so was not ideal for showering in front of. Katie wanted something that let daylight in, but hated the thought of old-fashioned nets. So we proposed a decorative sheer voile with horizontal ribbon bands in aqua and chocolate, and a roman blind to black out at night. The children’s bedroom was given a feature wall of bunting

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wallpaper, which manages to be both classic and fun, with neutral curtains and carpet. The fourth bedroom was converted into a study, with a wall of trees wallpaper in teal, stone and cream, a stripy full length curtain, and stone colour to the other walls. Phil was concerned about the large scale of the wallpaper in a small room, but he now sees how it has given the space a third dimension. So, to the ground floor, and the brief was to give the kitchen/living area a cohesive look of stylish, fun and vibrancy, and the front sitting room a more formal, adult-only area. When Katie had visited our studio, she saw a picture of a sofa we had chosen for a bar in Devon, and she loved the bold stripe fabric of purple, lime and linen. This set the colour scheme for their family kitchen/living room, with a rich, chocolate backed fabric with lime and purple flowers to the large bay window in the living area, which creates a beautiful depth to the room at night. To balance the richness of the living room, the kitchen windows are dressed with a contemporary curtain and roman blind fabric, with dining furniture a mix of plum velvet and the purple and lime stripe that Katie originally fell in love with. The breakfast bar stools were co-ordinated in a ribbed subtle lime green fabric, with all of the fabrics at a contract standard, meaning any sticky fingermarks could be easily wiped away. A bespoke dining table was created, which can comfortably seat up to eight people in a hexagonal configuration, or the sides can be folded down to create a generous space for four. Copper lighting in the kitchen sets the cabinets off, and the vinyl stone effect flooring is a great cleaning surface for muddy feet running in from the garden. Katie and Phil wanted a sitting room that was either a child free, or supervised at all times, zone, and so we created an

FAMILY SPACE: main picture, the kitchen/dining room Inset, Sue Chalmers of Merell Design, queen of the swatches Photography: Bluemoon Media


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STYLISH AND PRACTICAL: left, rich textures and colours provide a haven for the adults in the sitting room, while, right, the children have freedom to play in the big family room

elegant atmosphere using rich velvets, damasks and silks in golds, bronze and charcoal grey. The bespoke sofa was given a shallow depth as requested by the Diacons due to their back problems, and upholstered in a commercial standard upholstery fabric, which has a higher than domestic fabric rub count, meaning it’s durable, and cleanable – just in case those crayons come out when nobody’s watching. The large bay window was given a full length curtain with a dramatic charcoal grey background and golden tones of damask pattern to it, set off with a subtle golden patterned wallpaper, which with its pearlescent sheen helps to bounce the light. Finally, we advised that the picture rail to the hallway was removed as it was giving the feeling of a lower ceiling height, and the walls were given a pale green paint finish with a feature wall of wallpaper with a glass bead pattern. Katie said: “Sue has helped us create a fantastic family home that really has the wow factor yet is a safe, comfortable sanctuary for all the family. It was a bespoke, high-end service and it cost us less than using any of the high street retailers. I

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just wish I had found Sue at the start of the project, as we would have achieved a better extension design, by thinking of it from the inside out.” ■ Merell Design and Creatre offers a full interior design and architecture service, project management and supply of soft furnishings. Projects range from small one-bedroom properties to designing extensions and applying for planning permission, listed building and building control. At the moment Merell Design is offering free cushions with any room design or furniture order placed over the next year. For a free appointment visit: www.merell.co.uk. Merell Design & Create, Studio G7, Bristol & Exeter House, Lower Approach Road, Temple Meads BS1 6QS, tel: 0117 325 0360. Products: Harlequin, Romo, Panaz, Skopos, Carlicks Furniture, Rochelles Curtains, Tailored Flooring, Chantelle Lighting, Dulux Heritage Paints

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CITYinteriors

Recline in style Make sure you’re sitting pretty with the latest spring collections of sofas and chairs from the city’s top showrooms

DESIGNS ON YOU: with thousands of metres of designer fabrics and a huge range of cushions, Sofa Magic has any number of styles. All sofas are created and sold from Sofa Magic and Fabric Magic. For pricing and details contact Sofa Magic, 119-121 Coldharbour Rd, Redland. Tel: 0117 9248282

MODERN CLASSIC: wing-back armchair designed by Italian designer Paola Navone for Natuzzi, the Marlene is available in a variety of leather and fabric options, from £1,495. Natuzzi, Clifton Pavillion, 85 Queens Road, Clifton. Tel: 01322 312 550. www.natuzzi.co.uk

CONTEMPORARY TWIST: the Ripple rocking chair, available in red and white, £149 from Dwell. Glass Walk, Cabot Circus, Bristol. Tel: 0845 675 9090. www.dwell.co.uk

SPRING BLOOM: The Cornbury chair, covered in Sanderson Thistle, £1,900, from Wesley-Barrell. 84 Whiteladies Road, Bristol. Tel: 0117 923 8915. www.wesley-barrell.co.uk

SLEEK LINES: the Shanghai chair meets the needs of modern, design-led interior living. £1,199 from Italsofa, which has opened its first UK showroom in Bristol. Clifton Pavilion, 85 Queens Road, Clifton. www.italsofa.com

TAKE A SEAT: with its own factory in Fishponds and a new store at 56/60 Whiteladies Rd, Clifton, The Sofa Library has a huge range of sofas and fabrics. Prices for three seater sofas start from about £850. Tel: 0117 951 2624. www.thesofalibrary.co.uk

ALFRESCO DINING: Gloster’s range of furniture makes outdoor entertaining stylish and comfortable – the new Asta range is practical and design conscious. Gloster Furniture, Collins Drive, Severn Beach, Bristol. Tel: 01454 631976. www.gloster.com

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Bespoke sofas & designer curtains

0117 924 8282 or 8383 119 & 121 Coldharbour Road, Bristol BS6 7SN info@sofamagic.co.uk • www.sofamagic.co.uk www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

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INTERIORstyle

Kitchen design

You’ll be cooking up a storm with bespoke interior design & must-have accessories

UNDERSTATED: Kit Stone’s latest Shakerstyle kitchen, the Suffolk comes in dove grey as standard, but is available in a choice of 28 heritage colours. Kit Stone, 18 Portland Street, Bristol. Tel: 0117 3702453. www.kitstone.co.uk

GREAT BRITISH BAKE-IN: make a focal point in your kitchen with an AGA. Heather AGA Total Control, from £9,595. www.agaliving.com

TAILOR MADE: individually designed and crafted kitchens to fit specific needs, from Intoto. An Intoto kitchen, with appliances included, can be installed from £9,500. Intoto Kitchens, 102 Whiteladies Road, Bristol. Tel: 0117 9466433. www.intoto.co.uk

JUST FOR YOU: bespoke kitchen and joinery company, Detail Kitchens offer a complete design, manufacture and installation service, with an emphasis on quality of service and craftmanship. Detail Kitchens, 80 Alma Road, Clifton. Tel: 0117 9735838. www.detail-kitchens.co.uk

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ON TAP: a revolutionary product from Quooker that allows you to run boiling water straight from the tap. Quooker, call: 020 79233355 or visit www.quooker.com for stockists

COOL BRITANNIA: SMEG fridge with a patriotic twist. SMEG goods are available from Nailsea Electrical, 102 Gloucester Road, Bristol. Tel: 0117 9246002. www.smeguk.com


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Hide & seek With some of the finest leather goods available on your doorstep why not invest in a little bit of luxury?

A SPRING IN YOUR STEP: the Azure sandal in coral stands out as a fashion colour leader. Made to the high standard that LK Bennet has become renowned for. £175, LK Bennet, Cabot Circus, Bristol. Tel: 0117 929 9125. www.lkbennet.com

HANDLE WITH CARE: Dents is one of the few companies in the world that has access to South American peccary leather, which has a soft feel and real depth of colour. Men’s gloves, in peccary leather, lined with Scottish cashmere. £275. From selected stockists in Bristol or online: www.dents.co.uk. Tel: 01985 212291

SETTLE DOWN: sustainably sourced and hand-made to measure in the UK. Liberty chair in leather, £775. Greenwoods Furniture, 56 Hampton Road, Redland, Bristol. Tel: 0845 130 9282. www.greenwoodsfurniture.co.uk

LINE YOUR WALLET: a take on traditional English pinstripe suits, with their formal exteriors and eccentric linings. Pinstripe billfold, £150, from Ettinger. Available from Harvey Nichols, Cabot Circus, Bristol. Tel: 0117 916 8888. www.ettinger.co.uk

ARM CANDY: Mulberry is known for its fashion duality and strong ties to British craft and design with a playful English dose of eccentricity. The alexa hobo, on oak, £639. Mulberry Factory Shop, the Old School House, Kilver Street, Shepton Mallet. Tel: 01749 340 583. www.mulberry.com

TREASURE CHEST: a classic jewellery box from Smythson’s Ruby Viana collection. With fine lizard skin print leather and a removable travel tray, it is the ultimate dressing room accessory. £1,055. Available at selected stockists or online at www.smythson.com

BE A PLAYER: red lizard backgammon set from Aspinal, £450 from Aspinal of London, available at selected John Lewis stores. www.aspinaloflondon.com

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It’s all about wood

S annon F U R N I T U R E LT D

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Introducing nine wooden veneer variations of Arne Jacobsen’s 1958 stacking chair collection and nine new colours inspired by the original colour pallet. Choose all the same or mix and match, … they are all beautiful !

68 Walcot Street Bath BA1 5BD 01225 424222 www.shannon-uk.com

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INTERIORstyle LIGHT MY FIRE: an island of comfort with a beautiful design from Denmark and exquisite performance. RAIS Rina stove from Feature Fireplaces. Units 1-2, Warne Park, Weston Super Mare. Tel: 01934 628142. www.feature-fireplaces.co.uk

EYE CATCHING: mosaic mirror, handmade from coloured rolled glass, set within a solid wooden frame. The eclipse mirror from £179. Quarter Furniture & Accessories. 188 Cheltenham Road, Cotham Tel: 0117 9247777. www.quarterfurniture.co.uk

FINISHING TOUCH: invest in some distinctive Murano glass vases, in on-trend violet. Also available in tobacco and white. £880, from Natuzzi. Clifton Pavillion, 85 Queens Road, Clifton. Tel: 01322 312 550. www.natuzzi.co.uk

INTERIOR

designs

Looking for interior inspiration? TBM makes a statement with some of the city’s finest finishing touches

MAKE A STATEMENT: carved stone Cosmo basins from Mandarin Stone. Available in various stone shades, the Picasso travertine costs £834. Madarin Stone, 15 Regent St, Clifton. Tel: 0117 973 1552. www.mandarinstone.com

EMPEROR’S FAVOURITE: Trend GB has identified the next significant trend in the interiors colour spectrum to be imperial purple. Fashionable shades can be seen inTrend’s new collection. For the nearest stockist and further information, contact Trend GB, Decimus Park, Kingstanding Way, Tunbridge Wells. Tel: 01892 509690. www.trend-gb.com

94 The Bristol Magazine

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DURABLE STYLE: contemporary and traditional stair runners from Roger Oates Wilton. Quality, practicality and flexibility, supplied and fitted by Design Flooring. 5A Regent Street, Clifton. Tel: 0117 973 2266. www.designflooring.co.uk


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BRISTOLinteriors

EXTENSION EXPERTISE

Andy Paterson, from the Architect Your Home Somerset office, gives his top tips for planning a home extension • Layout your objectives Firstly, consider what you want out of your extension – put together a brief plan of your aims and requirements. Secondly, look for an architect who you can work with through the project. An architect will have the professional experience to guide you through what can be a very complicated process, as well as being able to think creatively about your property and suggest solutions or ideas that may not at first be obvious. They should be able to advise you on planning permission and building regulations, which may limit or influence what you can do to your home. Thirdly, work out how much you want to spend and work out a timescale.

• Consider the effect of an extension An extension can be a simple extra room or it can double the size of your house, all depending on what you want to achieve, how much you can spend and, of course, local planning guidance.

• Budget, budget, budget A big budget is not necessary, but some budget is. You need to be realistic about how much you have to spend and what can be done with that amount. Some of the most interesting projects are the outcome of tight budget parameters, and the key is to thinking creatively about how you can direct your budget to get the best use of space out of the money you have available.

• Watch out for the common pitfalls There are three areas where the most pitfalls can occur; the first relates to not planning your project properly, and in particular not getting the correct permissions and costs up front. The second is not having a proper contract with your builder. This can leave you exposed to time delays and cost increases, or in the worst case scenario your contractor disappearing with your money without doing any work. Thirdly, and this is the one that is most difficult to plan for, you don’t know what you might find in your house once you start doing work to it. The older your house the more likely there are to be unforeseeable problems, so have a contingency plan available so if you do discover anything you will have the resources to deal with it. 96 The Bristol Magazine

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Add a whole new dimension to your home with an extension. Above: an example of an extension designed by Architect Your Home

• The top tip Get an architect. Architects don’t just help you create a beautiful building or extension, they are professionals who will guide you through the building process and help ensure your project comes in on time and on budget, as well as looking fantastic and meeting your initial plans. For more information or to discuss a project with Architect Your Home call: 0800 849 8505. www.architect-yourhome.com


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CITYgardens

GREAT EXPECTATIONS The poet Emily Dickinson once wrote: ‘March is the month of expectation.’ She must have been talking about us gardeners says Jane Moore

C

an you feel it? That surge of spring in the air is unmistakeable and if you haven’t felt it just yet, then you soon will. What a mixed bag of a month March is – you name it, we’ll get it. Rain, wind, frost and some sunshine too – and that’s often just in a single day. But when all is said and done, we know that spring proper is just around the corner and, if the last couple of Aprils are anything to go by, it’s going to be a race between gardener and weeds to see who’s the speediest. So this month I’m giving you a checklist of jobs to be getting on with so that we, the savvy gardeners, are well ahead of the game.

Change your beds

season and need to be pruned back before this happens or they waste all that energy. I often prune mine in the autumn these days, but then we do have a sheltered garden and I’m prepared to take a few risks with frost damage, but the ideal time is early spring. Be tough with them – most roses grow vigorously and can become very congested leading to all sorts of horrible diseases and disfigurements. Cut back main stems by about one third to one half to an outward facing bud and make sure you take out any crossing stems and any congestion in the middle of the shrub. When it comes to coloured stem dogwoods you have to be even tougher, cutting all those vivid stems back to the base ruthlessly. I don’t do this every year, though, as I like my dogwoods big and brazen and the new stems just don’t grow back strongly enough if I prune without compunction year after year. Instead the vicious prune takes place on a biennial basis.

This is the last real chance to move any plants about and put in any new ones. Yes, you can plant and lift and divide perennials in April but they’ll need more watering and general fussing over for the whole of the rest of the year than if you get on and do it now. Weed every bed and border now. It saves a whole lot of bother in April as you’ll get all those pesky little seeders like hairy bittercress and annual meadowgrass out of the picture before they get a chance to seed about. Finish off with a nice topdress of garden compost and a little fertiliser and you’ll feel really pleased with yourself. Especially as the garden looks just amazing.

Slugs and snails get going ❝ shockingly early in the season and can devastate plants ❞

Slugs and snails

Brighten up pots

Never underestimate the activity of molluscs. Slugs and snails get going shockingly early in the season and can devastate plants before they even emerge from the ground. One year I left some of our dahlias in over the winter, to find the shoots were shorn off well below ground level long before I had even thought of treating them. Don’t hang about; get some slug pellets or wateron slug buster on those cannas, dahlias, sidalcea and hostas straight away. Don’t forget that you can now get organically acceptable slug pellets too.

Seasonsal cuts There are one or two essential spring pruning jobs that you will kick yourself if you forget. Roses tend to shoot very early in the 98 The Bristol Magazine

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March is the perfect time for refreshing those tired winter pots. No doubt a few of the pansies are past their best, leggy and lacklustre, and while you can cut them back and hope they revive I think it’s worth spending a couple of pounds on some fresh plants to dot in strategically. Remember that you’re going to be living with these pots for a couple more months before it’s time to redo them for summer. Permanently potted trees and shrubs such as clipped bay and box often get a rough deal in the spring as all our attention is concentrated on the more demanding parts of the garden. All they need is a feed of some slow release fertiliser, followed by a topdressing of multi-purpose compost.

ONE I PREPARED EARLIER: main picture, Jane Moore tackles coloured stem dogwoods. below, potted shrubs may need a tidy and a feed


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CITYgardens

POTTING UP: even if you only have a windowsill you can enjoy some freshly picked home-grown food, such as herbs

Grow your own

Rainy days

Make some room to grow a few vegetables. A few bits and bobs isn’t any bother and it’s great to have salads and herbs at hand for just when you need them. Create a small raised bed if you have room and plant it with potatoes, shallots and anything else you fancy. I’m in between allotments at the moment and last year my window box of rocket and cut-and-come-again lettuces kept me in salads for most of the summer. I’ve grown runner and French beans in big pots, peppers and tomatoes too. You won’t believe how easy potatoes are to grow in a pot. There’s always a pot or two of herbs in my garden, such as parsley, chives and mint.

You can’t sit back and relax just because it’s raining cats and dogs, you know. It’s the perfect excuse to head off to the garden centre for a lovely cup of coffee, ahem, I mean for a couple of bags of compost and so on. Stock up on all the things you’ll need for seed sowing, including the seeds. If you’re anything like me you’ll have to do it in batches due to space and memory constraints. ■

www.thebristolmagazine.co.uk

Jane Moore is the award winning head gardener at the Bath Priory. Read her blog http://janethegardener.wordpress.com or follow her on Twitter: janethegardener.

March 2012

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the directory

to advertise in this section call 0117 974 2800

Business Services

House & Home

GOLD STAR PROPERTY MAINTENANCE Interior Decorating Exterior Painting / Kitchens Bathrooms / Tiling / Fencing

Call for a free no obligation quote 01179 773428 or 07891594001

the directory Health, Beauty & Wellbeing

Classified advertising made easy Feature your Business in full colour and reach 80,000+ readers. With our monthly shelf life The Bristol Magazine keeps working, and working, and working. Your ad will be seen by more people, and with our shelf life will last longer and keep working much harder.

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The Bristol Magazine, 2 Princes Buildings, George Street, Bath BA1 2ED Email: classified@thebristolmagazine.co.uk T: 0117 974 2800


Bristol & Clifton’s premier Commercial Property Agents IF YOU ARE LOOKING TO RELOCATE OR ESTABLISH A NEW BUSINESS IN 2012 PLEASE PHONE THE BURSTON COOK TEAM FOR ALL TYPES OF COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

(0117) 934 9977

CLIFTON VILLAGE SHOP

QUEENS ROW, CLIFTON

A large shop of 675 sq ft to let on flexible lease terms at £17,000 per annum, exclusive.

Vacant restaurant unit also suit shop/office. Popular busy location. Ideal opportunity – only £24,000 per annum, exclusive. No premium!

WHITELADIES ROAD

THE MALL, CLIFTON

Large shop to let of 1,125 sq ft – Also suit Estate Agent use. New lease to be agreed.

• • • •

New refurbishment Busy village location Over 2 floors New lease

CLIFTON VILLAGE OFFICES

23 GREAT GEORGE STREET - FOR SALE

An opportunity to improve your working environment – high quality modern open-plan suite.

A stunning substantial period building with a large rear garden.

1,760 sq ft.

Currently providing offices of 5,560 sq ft net.

New lease.

Suit other uses.

CLIFTON OFFICES

CLIFTON OFFICES

Office suite of 1,572 sq ft plus 3 car parking spaces.

Prestigious ground floor offices of 1,200 sq ft with lots of parking!

Great location.

New lease.

New flexible lease.

We can help you

• Sales • Lettings • • Valuations • Rent reviews • • Acquisitions advice • Investments • • Development advice • Landlord & tenant • For more about who we are... www.burstoncook.co.uk Julian Cook

Jayne Rixon

Andrew Oliver

David Ball

*Winner EGI most active Local Agent in Bristol 2008 & 2009* *EGI Top 5 Regional Agent in Bristol, Bath & Swindon 2010 & 2011*

Please telephone Julian Cook FRICS Jayne Rixon MRICS or Andrew Oliver MRICS or David Ball BA MSc (Hons) (0117) 934 9977 Burston Cook March.indd 1

Awards ‘08, ‘09, ‘10, ‘11 20/02/2012 11:18


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PROPERTYinFOCUS

ABBOTS GATE HOUSE, CHURCH ROAD, ABBOTS LEIGH • 3 reception rooms • 4 double bedrooms • Guest suite • Landscaped garden

Guide Price: £950,000

T

his modern, stylish family home is set in one of Bristol’s most desirable residential locations. The property sits elegantly within its own private garden with views to the west towards Wales. Approached via a private driveway, the house is set back with a lawned front garden, in addition to the mature, landscaped garden at the rear featuring a paved terrace, perfect for alfresco entertaining. Throughout, the house is flooded with light and the downstairs benefits from the flowing living space. The drawing room, overlooking the front garden, sits off the entrance hall and double doors connect it to the dining room, off which lies the conservatory, with access to the garden and dining terrace. The kitchen similarly has access directly to the garden via double doors. It is an excellent space to cook, entertain and dine. The remaining downstairs accommodation consists of a study, utility room and downstairs toilet. The staircase leads up to the galleried landing, off which lie all five bedrooms. The master bedroom has its own generous en-suite, whilst the guest suite features an en-suite shower room and views over the rear garden. The remaining three double bedrooms are well proportioned and share a family bathroom.

Knight Frank, Regent House, 27A Regent Street, Clifton, Bristol. Tel: 0117 317 1999 102 The Bristol Magazine

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Westbury-on-trym

®

www.oceanhome.co.uk

73 Westbury Hill, Bristol, BS9 3AD

0117 962 1973

Westbury on Trym £410,000

Westbury on Trym £355,000

Gardeners paradise. This well presented semi detached home includes a quite magnificent c230' west facing rear garden which is beautifully mature and offers a wonderful safe playing environment for children and superb summer entertaining space for the family. The house itself comprises living room, dining room, modern kitchen, conservatory and downstairs shower room then three bedrooms and family bathroom on the first floor. There is off street parking, garage, summer room, gas central heating, double glazing and no onward chain.

Well appointed three bedroom end of terrace home on popular Cheriton Place in Westbury on Trym. This stylish family home occupies a convenient position equal distance from Westbury Village and Henleaze High Street and the many local amenities. The property comprises living room, kitchen/dining room, utility, Conservatory and three bedrooms and family bathroom. The property benefits of spacious outbuilding which is currently being used as a pool and games room but could easily be a large home office or annexe.

Blaise £265,000

Westbury on Trym £235,000

A beautifully presented modern end terrace townhouse which features smart contemporary decor throughout. This four bedroom home is arranged principally over three floors and comprises living room with 'Juliette balcony, 'L' shaped kitchen/diner and cloakroom to the first floor, three bedrooms and bathroom to the second floor and then a lavish master bedroom suite to the top floor with en-suite shower room, walk in wardrobes and lovely open views to the front towards Wales. The property benefits from a landscaped rear garden, integral garage/utility, parking, gas central heating.

Smart contemporary cottage in the centre of Westbury Village offering two double bedrooms, two bathrooms, good sized living/dining room, modern kitchen and stylish decor throughout. The property is centrally heated has double glazing and would offer a perfect opportunity to own a house in a prime Village location for the same cost of an apartment in nearby Clifton, Cotham & Redland.

oceanhome

®

wills and probate

European legal services

property lawyers


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oceanhome

Clifton

®

www.oceanhome.co.uk

187-189 Whiteladies Road, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 2RY

0117 946 6007

Sneyd Park £259,950

Sneyd Park £325,000

A three bedroom top floor apartment set in this leafy development in Sneyd Park with far reaching views and a South Westerly facing living room and walk out balcony. Accommodation comprises a 21'ft living room, separate kitchen with granite work surfaces, three bedrooms with fitted wardrobes and a modern shower room with a double shower cubicle. Outside there are well maintained communal gardens, a residents car park and a single garage.

An exceptionally well presented Period garden apartment in the always popular area of Sneyd Park. Located in Downleaze, which is one road behind the beautiful open spaces of Durdham Downs, this apartment offers eye catching accommodation including; lounge with a magnificent fireplace, separate kitchen, two double bedrooms and a modern bathroom. This apartment also offers its own private South-East facing garden and an allocated parking space.

Clifton £339,950

Redland £550,000

A stunning two bedroom upper maisonette overlooking the Durdham Downs to the front and Bristol City to the rear. There is a spacious living room with open fire and storage cupboard, stunning country cottage style kitchen/diner with stripped wooden flooring and induction hob, master bedroom, stylish en suite shower room, second double bedroom with storage cupboard, modern family bathroom and potential for a roof terrace subject to planning.

A four bedroom semi detached Victorian family home on Kensington Road in the heart of Redland. This characterful property retains many period features and must be viewed to be fully appreciated. The interior presents: large glass entrance vestibule, principle reception with bay window, spacious kitchen/diner with double doors to the garden, utility room, downstairs W.C., four double bedrooms, master en-suite, large cellar/workshop and 45’ garden.

oceanhome

®

estate agents

letting agents

surveyors

mortgage brokers


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MANAGEMENT • SALES • LETTING • CONSULTANCY

Clifton £375,000 A unique apartment spanning the top floor of the first two houses in The Paragon, renowned for it’s stunning views, and amazing communal gardens. The flat has been completely refurbished over the last two years and whilst having a contemporary feel still retains lovely period features in keeping with the Grade II* listing. There are Oak floors conducive to the under floor heating and Roger Oates carpeting to the stairs and landing. The superb kitchen has high quality integral appliances. There is a great attention to detail across the whole apartment, with the flow of colours and coordinated door handles to each room. This is such a delightful property well worth viewing as the views, ambience and finish cannot be appreciated externally.

Harbourside Offers in excess of £249,950 A very well presented and stylish second floor flat in sought after Perretts Court, an established development which benefits from stunning panoramic views of Bristol’s historic harbourside. The well-planned accommodation comprises a very light and airy sitting room, leading out to a balcony overlooking the waterfront, contemporary kitchen, two bedrooms and modern bathroom. This delightful apartment has a wonderful vista of the constant and ever-changing water traffic. The property benefits from an allocated undercroft parking space and is sold with no onward chain.

Albermarle Row, Hotwells £239,950

FFF 5 Dowry Square £205,000

This spacious apartment forms part of an imposing Grade II listed property in the centre of Albermarle Row. The building is very impressive and the communal hallway has a wide and elegant entrance and staircase with a peaceful communal garden to the rear. The flat has an entrance hall and two double bedrooms to the front with views towards the city. The large and elegant sitting room also accessed from the hall is bathed in light and has an impressive fireplace and sash windows. There is a fitted kitchen at the rear with views of the garden. A very well presented apartment, full of period features and therefore early.

This large one double bedroom apartment situated on the first floor of a stunning red-brick Grade II listed building is in the leafy historic Dowry Square and retains many period features. The accommodation which has a light and airy feel comprises: lounge with stripped wood flooring, marble fireplace and three sash windows with wooden shutters to front elevation overlooking the communal gardens, kitchen/dining area with granite worktops and stripped wood flooring, cloakroom, a generous double bedroom to the rear of the property and contemporary styled bathroom. A great home for a first-time buyer or as an investment property.

21 Princess Victoria Street

Tel 0117 970 6119

enquiries@propertyconcept.co.uk

Clifton, Bristol BS8 4BX

Fax 0117 970 6109

www.propertyconcept.co.uk


Henleaze

Westbury Park

Henleaze

A grand spacious four bed 1930’s home within close proximity to Henleaze Infant and Junior School, this property enjoys; two receptions, conservatory, kitchen/diner, downstairs cloakroom/WC, four bedrooms and spacious bathroom. Further benefits include; lower ground floor with workshop and storage with access to private garden, garage to rear and some original features.

This Victorian style home is arranged over three levels with four double bedrooms, two bathrooms, kitchen/diner, downstairs cloakroom/WC and two reception rooms. The property boasts many original features, landscaped garden and is within easy access to Henleaze shops and amenities. Positioned within 0.5miles of Redland Green School.

Immaculately presented throughout this semi detached property offers; four family size bedrooms, family bathroom, three individual receptions, conservatory, fitted kitchen, downstairs cloakroom/WC, ample parking and double garage. Situated within a prominent position with level access to Henleaze shops and amenities.

Price Guide £475,000

£450,000

Price Guide £500,000

Bishopston

St. Andrews

Montpelier

Located on a popular road, this three bedroom, three storey period property has been professionally renovated throughout. Not only does this property have a sunny southerly aspect garden, it additionally benefits from off street parking, and being well within the Redland Green APR. This property is also marketed with no onward chain.

An immaculate example of period grandeur, boasting an array of lovingly maintained period features, delicately complimented by contemporary decoration throughout. Being linked mid terrace and also 9 metres wide, the property affords three reception rooms and three double bedrooms. Also benefiting from a south easterly facing landscaped rear garden, and off street parking.

Tucked away within the heart of Montpelier is this three storey, four double bedroom, period end of terrace townhouse. The property boasts two good sized gardens to front and rear; both of which are largely private and a good sized garage. Boasting a fine balance of period features, this is truly a unique property which would make an ideal family home.

£395,000

CJ Hole March.indd 1

£495,000

£400,000

20/02/2012 11:10


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propertyNEWS

LETTING AGENTS’ PROMPT SERVICE WINS APPROVAL The newly launched property management and lettings department at Maggs & Allen in Henleaze continues to achieve outstanding success

Q

uick and efficient service from staff at Bristol letting agent Maggs & Allen has won approval from landlords and tenans too. James Goodchild, Partner at Maggs & Allen said: “I am delighted to say that our lettings department is continuing to achieve outstanding success and receive excellent feedback from both landlords and tenants. “In 2011 an average property took less than two weeks to let due to our dedicated letting teams active management of our applicant base. We are building on the achievements of the department and I am happy to announce the appointment of Marcia Turner who adds many years of senior and regional management lettings experience to our already successful team. “We felt it was essential to expand the team with quality and experienced staff as our managed portfolio grows. We are

able to offer a gold standard letting service to compliment our experienced and well regarded estate agency, surveyors and auctioneers.” James added: “We can offer a range of services to suit all landlords, from investors with large portfolios to individual landlords with one or two properties. We are able to tailor our service to meet your requirements and would welcome a call today to discuss exactly what we can do for you.” If you would like to discuss either Sales or Lettings please contact the Maggs & Allen on: 01179 49 9000 agency@maggsandallen.co.uk or call in to the office at 60 Northumbria Drive, Henleaze (near Waitrose) Maggs and Allen also have a Facebook page which is regularly updated with new properties and information www.facebook.com/maggsandallen

Blenheims offers the full range of block management services and excels in delivering outstanding service with a personal touch. We work closely with our clients to devise an approach that works for their building and the way in which they would like it to be run. • Professional property management for blocks of flats of all sizes • • Outstanding Accounts support for collecting and managing service charges • • ARMA members • 28 Chandos Road, Redland, BS6 6PF T: 0117 933 9560 E: Bristol@blenheims.co.uk W: www.blenheims.co.uk

108 The Bristol Magazine

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THE PROFESSIONALS: the Maggs and Allen lettings team, left to right, Thomas Kitchen, Laura Heselgrove, Nicola Henderson, Marcia Turner and James Goodchild


www.maggsandallen.co.uk

0117 949 9000 60 Northumbria Drive, Henleaze, Bristol, BS9 4HW

2011 League Table for Auctioneers in The South West Auctioneer

Lots Offered

Lots Sold

Percentage Sold

Maggs & Allen

167

151

90.4%

Hollis Morgan

123

83

67.5%

Besley Hill

54

33

61.1%

Stephen & Co

53

34

64.2%

Morgan Beddoe

49

35

71.4%

Carter Jonas

36

23

63.9%

With the highest success rate for the fourth year running, why go anywhere else?

0117 949 9000 *Information supplied by Essential information and correct for period 11 Jan 2011 -11 Dec 2011. Data available at eigroup.co.uk Estate Agents

Maggs & Allen March.indd 2

New Homes

Chartered Surveyors

Energy Assessors

Commercial investment

Auctioneers

20/02/2012 10:12


www.maggsandallen.co.uk

0117 949 9000 60 Northumbria Drive, Henleaze, Bristol, BS9 4HW

Due to our continued success, Maggs & Allen are actively seeking new landlords to satisfy tenant demand. In 2011 an average property took less than two weeks to let due to the active management of our applicant base. The testimonials below are from just three of our satisfied clients, call now and join them!

Ò IÊ usedÊ MaggsÊ &Ê AllenÊ toÊ rentÊ twoÊ ofÊ myÊ propertiesÊ whichÊ theyÊ didÊ inÊ aÊ reasonableÊ timescale.AsÊ promisedÊ theyÊ keptÊ meÊ upÊ toÊ dateÊ withÊ viewingsÊ andÊ providedÊ meÊ withÊ feedbackÊ whichÊ IÊ foundÊ toÊ beÊ veryÊ proactive.Ê IÊ haveÊ sinceÊ recommendedÊ MaggsÊ &Ê AllenÊ toÊ aÊ friendÊ whoÊ hadÊ previouslyÊ beenÊ onÊ withÊ anotherÊ agentÊ &Ê theyÊ haveÊ beenÊ ableÊ toÊ secureÊ aÊ tenantÊ forÊ hisÊ propertyÊ withinÊ twoÊ weeksÊ ofÊ marketing.Ê IÊ willÊ beÊ recommendingÊ toÊ friendsÊ and family in the future!’’

Estate Agents

Lettings & Management

Maggs & Allen March Sales & Letting.indd 1

Ò HavingÊ dealtÊ withÊ MaggsÊ &Ê AllenÊ forÊ aÊ numberÊ ofÊ yearsÊ IÊ haveÊ recentlyÊ usedÊ theirÊ LettingsÊ Department.Ê WithÊ theirÊ proactiveÊ teamÊ theyÊ foundÊ aÊ tenantÊ withinÊ oneÊ week.Ê AsÊ alwaysÊ theyÊ providedÊ meÊ withÊ aÊ professionalÊ serviceÊ withÊ regularÊ feedbackÊ andÊ keptÊ meÊ upÊ toÊ dateÊ duringÊ theÊ applicationÊ process.Ê IÊ willÊ beÊ recommendingÊ toÊ familyÊ andÊ friendsÊ andÊ lookÊ forwardÊ dealingÊ withÊ themÊ inÊ theÊ future.Ó Ê

Auctioneers

New Homes

Chartered Surveyors

Ò IÊ haveÊ alwaysÊ foundÊ MaggsÊ &Ê AllenÊ provideÊ aÊ friendly,Ê accessibleÊ andÊ responsiveÊ serviceÊ andÊ theyÊ haveÊ aÊ goodÊ knowledgeÊ ofÊ theÊ localÊ housingÊ market.Ê IÊ haveÊ recentlyÊ rentedÊ outÊ aÊ houseÊ andÊ althoughÊ anotherÊ reputableÊ agentÊ had a fortnight’s start on themÊ MaggsÊ andÊ AllenÊ stillÊ foundÊ aÊ suitableÊ tenant Ê theÊ quickest.Ó Ê

Commercial/ Investment

Energy Assessors

21/02/2012 12:29


www.maggsandallen.co.uk

0117 949 9000 60 Northumbria Drive, Henleaze, Bristol, BS9 4HW

Henleaze

£695,000

Henleaze

£529,000

A recently built, ‘Potton’ 4/5 bed detached home comprising open plan living space with separate utility room. In the centre of the open plan area is a high specification hand built kitchen with living area to the front of the property & large dining area with additional living space & Bifold doors opening on to the landscaped garden with play area & a cedar clad garden building with sedum roof comprising a living space with bifold doors, en-suite shower room & concealed storage room. To the first floor is a large open plan landing/study/living space which could be easily converted to a fifth bedroom, opening onto a balcony, 2 good sized double bedrooms both with ensuites & a further balcony off the master bedroom. On the second floor are 2 further double bedrooms & a family bathroom.

This sizeable and well located 4 bedroom Arts and Crafts 1920’s family house offers an exciting and rare opportunity for buyers looking for a house in this popular family area. The property occupies a corner plot and is situated on Park Grove just a few hundred yards from the Henleaze infant and Junior schools and a short walk from the comprehensive and what some call “Village like” Henleaze Road with its array of Shops, Cafes, Restaurants, amenities along with excellent community. The generous accommodation comprises: four family sized bedrooms, three receptions, fitted kitchen, good sized oak panelled entrance hall plus a family bathroom with separate shower room. Outside there are corner plot gardens along with a drive that provides off street parking and leads to the garage.

Redland

Redland

£550,000

A 1920’s detached property with spacious accommodation comprising large reception hall, sitting room, dining room, extended kitchen, separate utility room & shower room. To the first floor are 3 double bedrooms, bathroom, single bedroom & to the top floor a further double bedroom. To the rear is a level south/west facing garden & garage. Further benefits from gas central heating & eaves storage. The property is situated on the popular Upper Cranbrook Road within close proximity to ‘Waitrose’ and amenities on Henleaze Road along with local schools. Other benefits include a good sized south/ west facing garden and garage. The property has been in the same ownership for a number of year & would benefit from some modernisation.

Estate Agents

Lettings & Management

Maggs & Allen March Sales & Letting.indd 2

Auctioneers

£225,000

Possibly one of the finest apartments in the exclusive Westbury Park retirement development, situated on the edge of Bristol’s Durdham Down. The light and Bright accommodation offers spacious living room with bay that overlooks Durdham Park, two double bedrooms both with pleasant views, generous fitted kitchen as well as bathroom with separate W.C. This popular development is exclusive to over 55’s and is positioned in a quiet residential location adjacent to the Downs and amongst communal gardens. Other benefits include: Residential Estate Manager, communal facilities such as guest suites, communal lounge and laundry area with ironing facility. The apartment enjoys double glazing throughout, an entry phone system and emergency cord system. An internal inspection is strongly recommended.

New Homes

Chartered Surveyors

Commercial/ Investment

Energy Assessors

20/02/2012 10:14


G IN M N COSOO

Redland £589,950

A most civilised and remarkably spacious Victorian town house, within walking distance of Durdham Downs and Whiteladies Road. The property has been meticulously cared for and improved in recent years and offers accommodation arranged over 4 floors - each with impressive room proportions. Briefly comprising: 2/3 reception rooms, 4/5 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms. Outside you will find a modest sized, level town garden.

Stoke Bishop £535,000

Modern detached family house offering deceptively spacious accommodation and ideally suited to growing families. Situated at the end of a tucked away cul-de-sac in central Stoke Bishop the house is private but not remote and with some lovely mature trees surrounding it feels like it is set in a woodland glen. Large kitchen/breakfast room and living room both open onto the rear garden. Dining room, study, utility and cloakroom. Upstairs are five good sized bedroom (master en suite) and family bathroom. Garage and ample parking.

City/Waterfront £250,000

This is a contemporary waterfront living at its best in the very heart of Bristol. This very stylish loft style apartment is set within the surroundings of one of Bristol’s heritage former industrial buildings. The apartment comprises of a well proportioned living/dining room with a recently fitting adjoining kitchen, double master bedroom with en suite, second double bedroom, a lovely contemporary bathroom and the huge benefit of having allocated parking.

Leese & Nagle March.indd 1

Westbury-On-Trym £850,000

Gracious and most picturesque Victorian semi-detached family residence located in one of Bristol’s prime residential areas. The property is set back from this quiet road with a 60’ front garden affording a degree of privacy and enjoys a magnificent family friendly circa 150’ long level rear garden. Well presented accommodation is arranged over three floors with large kitchen/ breakfast room opening onto the garden, three reception rooms, four bedrooms, two with en suites and family bathroom. Garage and off street parking.

Cliftonwood/Hotwells £365,000

A charming Victorian 3 bedroom townhouse that has been modernised yet retains period character and views over south Bristol situated in ever popular area of Hotwells/Cliftonwood. The house offers attractively presented, versatile accommodation of great character arranged over three floors, with period fireplaces and coved ceilings. The lower floor has a spacious kitchen/diner with door opening onto a South facing garden. Sold with no onward chain.

Clifton £295,000

A delightful 2 bedroom apartment with front garden, its own entrance and rear courtyard garden in a desirable Clifton location.The property has been updated by the present owner over the last few months and benefits from a superb new fitted kitchen. Well proportioned accommodation retains period features and mainly comprises sitting room, dining hall with a large storage cupboard and 2 double bedrooms.The spacious bathroom has a separate shower and utility area. A lovely apartment which has been redecorated throughout. Viewing is strongly recommended.

20/02/2012 11:19


Redland £595,000

An exceptionally well presented 5 bedroom, 3 bathroom Victorian family home, stylishly modernised by the current owners the property retains period character and offers spacious accommodation in a favoured Redland residential location. Accommodation is arranged over 3 floors with split level landings. The ground floor comprises entrance vestibule and reception hall with 2 delightful reception rooms both with period fireplaces. The elegant front reception room is enhanced with stained glass leaded bay window and the family No onward chain.

Stoke Bishop £475,000

Attractive Edwardian style four bedroom semi detached house offering generously proportioned rooms ideally suited to growing families in this popular spot within walking distance of Elmlea Schools and Stoke Lane shops. The house is well presented throughout with modern kitchen/ breakfast room, bathroom, modern neutral style decoration and double glazed windows. Ideally suited to growing families we recommend an internal viewing to appreciate the house.

Sneyd Park £275,000

A stylishly presented top floor flat situated in an attractive period building adjacent to the Downs. Comprises; two double bedrooms, contemporary fully fitted kitchen with skylight, living room with storage cupboard and feature fireplace and bathroom. Externally there is a well maintained communal garden and an allocated off street parking space to the rear of the property. This is a great opportunity for someone to purchase a stylish property within a desirable location. Offered with no onward chain.

Leese & Nagle March.indd 2

Sneyd Park Guide Price £699,000

A unique contemporary style 4 bedroom detached house built in 1986 and surrounded by its own garden affording peace and privacy. The ground floor comprises entrance porch, entrance hall, 3 bedrooms, cloakroom, and utility room. Over the first floor the kitchen is open to the wonderful family room with sitting and dining areas and doors leading onto two terraces. Two further rooms and bathroom complete the first floor. The second floor benefits from a stunning spacious sitting room with pitched roof and the master bedroom with en-suite and walk in wardrobe.

Cliftonwood £395,000

Attractive three storey Victorian townhouse of considerable character situated in a historic colourful terrace in perennially popular Cliftonwood. Attractively presented throughout, the house offers flexible accommodation arranged over three floors comprising either four bedrooms and one reception room, or three bedrooms and two reception rooms. What separates it from many other townhouses in the area is a 50ft long rear garden! An early viewing is advised.

Clifton £295,000

Spacious two double bedroom garden flat situated in a favourable Clifton Village location. Boasting its own independent access and direct level access to its own private garden this flat offers comfortable living space, good sized bedrooms and a good size level rear garden with a Southerly aspect. Perfect for someone who wants sunny outside space and the convenience of a Clifton village location.

20/02/2012 11:21


R DE ER UN FF O

Clifton

R DE ER UN FF O

Offers in Excess of £300,000

Lovely 2 bedroom garden apartment with parking. We have two disappointed buyers who missed out on this and are seeking something similar.

R DE ER UN FF O

City Centre

Offers in Excess of £370,000

Contemporary 3 bedroom apartment with secure parking plus visitor parking. We have had interest from a number of buyers searching for large apartments in this area.

R DE ER UN FF O

Offers in Excess of £200,000

Converted 3 bedroom upper floor apartment. This sale proceeding with an investment buyer. We have many more on our register wanting good value properties like this.

The Apartment Company March.indd 2

Sneyd Park

Sneyd Park

Offers in Excess of £135,000

One bedroom first floor apartment with views and parking. Lots of potential here which our buyer identified. Across a wide price range we have waiting buyers anxious to proceed.

21/02/2012 11:37


The Apartment Company March.indd 3

21/02/2012 11:36


Mandarin Stone fp Bristol:Layout 9

17/2/12

15:13

Page 1

The Bristol Magazine March 2012  

The Bristol Magazine is a glossy monthly magazine for the city of Bristol, England

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