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TM


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WE RUN

YO UR BUSINESS

WI TH THE FUTURE IN MIND

F O2L| FALL/WINTER L O W U S2018 :


MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 3


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42

OPPORTUNITY

zones 22

The Growth and Future of Multifamily in

Central

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50

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58

120

68

134

PROOF


EDITORIAL & DESIGN LEANNE JENKINS CAT RAY ERICA RAGLAND ALFONSO LOMELI MARINA RUBIO

SPECIAL THANKS TO


Market Trends Amid widespread optimism, here is a snapshot of the commercial real estate market and the trends set to define dealmaking and investments.

To p 5 Tr ends

Apartments are still the most desired investment

4 | FALL/WINTER 2018

Industrial assets are in high demand

Construction prices are increasing

Technology will define the trajectory of CRE

Unknown surrounding rising interest rates


Overall CRE Market Cap Rates

Property Prices Office

Source: RCA

Retail

Industrial

20% YOY change in property prices

9.0%

8.0% Cap Rate

Apartment

7.0%

6.0%

5.0%

15%

10%

5%

0%

-5% 13

14

15

16

17

18

13

14

15

16

17

18

Year

Year

Q2’ 18 | YOY Change in Cap Rates & Property Prices Source: RCA

CAP RATES

YOY CHANGE

PROPERTY PRICES

RETAIL

6.50%

$83 per sqft

INDUSTRIAL

6.40%

$184 per sqft

APARTMENT

5.50%

$151,000 per unit

YOY CHANGE

August ‘18 | YOY Change in CRE Source: RCA

17 bps

46.00%

7.70%

cap rate

volume

price MATTHEWS™ | 5


Multifamily Market Construction Delays Have Mounted Preference for Yield in Key Texas Markets

Average Months Delayed - 3M Rolling Average Source: CoStar

6

Trailing 12-mth Source: CoStar

6.2%

4 3

Avg Cap Rate

# of Months Delayed

5

2 1

Houston

6.0% Dallas

5.8% 5.6%

0

5.4%

(1)

5.2%

Austin

-50%

(2) Jan 14

July 14

Jan 15

July 15

Jan 16

July 16

Jan 17

July 17

San Antonio

-25%

0%

Volume YOY Change

Jan 18

Large Cities: Population, Housing, and Renters Source: 2016 American Community Survey, 5-year estimates, U.S. Census Bureau (Updated 10/2017)

POPULATION

TOTAL HOUSING UNITS

TOTAL OCCUPIED UNITS

APARTMENTS PERCENT OF ALL HOUSING

NEW YORK, NY

8,426,743

3,422,225

1,556,161

45%

LOS ANGELES, CA

3,900,794

1,436,543

562,060

39%

CHICAGO, IL

2,717,534

1,192,544

306,150

26%

HOUSTON, TX

2,217,706

927,107

318,888

34%

PHOENIX, AZ

1,514,208

598,236

114,537

19%

SAN ANTONIO, TX

1,413,881

535,145

116,723

22%

SAN DIEGO, CA

1,359,791

522,410

141,922

27%

DALLAS, TX

1,260,688

533,556

191,200

36%

SAN JOSE, CA

1,000,860

325,256

68,004

21%

AUSTIN, TX

887,061

380,280

126,153

33%

ATLANTA, GA

420,003

231,432

189,343

82%

6 | FALL/WINTER 2018

25%


Most Active Apartment Markets H1’18

U.S. Rental Apartment Vacancy Rate (5+ Units)

Source: RCA

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

14%

MARKET

SALES VOLUME ($M)

Los Angeles

$4,200

41%

Dallas

$3,949

-15%

NYC Boroughs

$3,037

52%

Atlanta

$3,009

-6%

Houston

$2,897

41%

Phoenix

$2,895

39%

Manhattan

$2,835

79%

2%

Seattle

$2,007

11%

Denver

$1,744

-29%

0%

Chicago

$1,687

2%

YOY CHANGE

12%

Vacancy Rate

10% 8% 6% 4%

00

02

04

06

08

10

12

14

16

18

Year

U.S. Multifamily Permits, Completions and Starts (in 000s)

Permits Authorized, but Not Started (2+ Units, Unadjusted)

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Starts

Permits

Source: RCA

Completions

600 500

Permits

July ‘18

Northeast

17.4

12.7

Midwest

24.7

18.9

South

86.3

72.2

West

46.6

36.8

200

United States

175.0

140.6

100

July ‘17 Amount

400 300

0 00

U.S. Rent Inflation (Annual Rate)

04

06

08

10

12

14

16

18

Year

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Age of Population in Rental Housing

9%

Rent Inflation Rate

02

Source: NMHC tabulations of 2016 American Community Survey Microdata

6% 3% 0% -3% 00

02

04

06

08

10

12

14

16

18

AGE DISTRIBUTION

PEOPLE IN RENTAL HOUSING

SHARE

Under 30 Years Old

55,518,756

50%

30-44 Years Old

23,341,534

23%

45-64 Years Old

20,670,939

19%

65 Years and Older

9,154,032

8%

Total

108,685,261

100%

Year

MATTHEWS™ | 7


Q2’18: Price Averages & Volume Source: RCA

SALES VOLUME ($M)

YOY CHANGE

NUMBER OF PROPS.

YOY CHANGE

$/UNIT

CAP RATE

YOY CHANGE (bps)

APARTMENT

$34,473

-7.0%

1,855

-12.0%

$152,965

5.50%

-14.0%

GARDEN

$22,117

-15.0%

1,469

-8.0%

$126,227

5.70%

-13.0%

MID/HIGHRISE

$12,355

12.0%

386

-26.0%

$246,569

4.90%

-9.0%

6 MAJOR METRO

$10,206

13.0%

570

-18.0%

$275,850

4.80%

8.0%

NON-MAJOR METRO

$24,266

-13.0%

1,285

-9.0%

$110,997

5.80%

-22.0%

Quarterly Change in Demand & Supply Vacancy

Demand

Supply

120

7.0%

100

6.5%

80

6.0%

60

5.5%

40

5.0%

20

4.5%

4.0%

0 12

13

14

15

16

17

18 Year

8 | FALL/WINTER 2018

19

20

21

22

Vacany Rate

000s Units

Source: CoStar


2-Year Supply and Demand (Units)

5-Year Supply and Demand (Units)

Source: Yardi Matrix (2018)

Source: Yardi Matrix (2018)

METRO

APARTMENT SUPPLY

APARTMENT DEMAND

New York

52,547

Dallas

45,551

Washington DC

28,009

Los Angeles

27,436

Denver

27,016

Atlanta

19,524

Inland Empire

3,704

METRO

APARTMENT SUPPLY

APARTMENT DEMAND

52,935

New York

98,815

128,988

14,503

Los Angeles

59,465

86,637

16,184

Dallas

47,112

29,865

36,385

Washington DC

43,607

36,748

10,802

Miami

39,289

34,061

6,551

Atlanta

17,497

15,610

5,482

Inland Empire

3,217

13,090

2-Year Supply and Demand

5-Year Supply and Demand

Source: Yardi Matrix (2018)

Source: Yardi Matrix (2018)

METRO

APARTMENT SUPPLY

APARTMENT DEMAND

METRO

SUPPLY GROWTH

DEMAND GROWTH

Denver

10.70%

4.50%

Los Angeles

14.00%

21.90%

Seattle

10.00%

4.40%

Seattle

14.30%

10.00%

Miami

9.30%

5.70%

Miami

14.30%

13.00%

Charlotte

8.00%

2.70%

San Francisco

14.00%

14.20%

Boston

7.10%

4.50%

Boston

11.60%

10.80%

Los Angeles

6.70%

9.20%

Chicago

7.80%

11.50%

Dallas

6.40%

2.20%

Dallas

6.60%

4.50%

Atlanta

4.60%

1.60%

Atlanta

4.10%

3.90%

Inland Empire

2.50%

3.80%

Inland Empire

2.10%

9.10%

National Rent Trends Year-Over-Year Change

Rent

$1,400

8%

$1,350

7%

$1,300

6%

$1,250

5%

$1,200

4%

$1,150

3%

$1,100

2%

$1,050

1%

$1,000 11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

Year-Over-Year Rent Change

Rent

Source: Costar: State of the Multifamily Market- 2017 Review & Forecast

0%

Year

MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 9


Retail Market Best Assets Still Alluring in Los Angeles Most Active Retail Markets H1’18

12-Month Trailing Data Source: RCA

Top Quartile Cap Rate

Avg Cap Rate

Source: RCA

7.0% SALES VOLUME ($M)

YOY CHANGE

Los Angeles

$3,873

139%

Manhattan

$1,558

34%

San Diego

$1,382

188%

San Jose

$1,082

669%

Chicago

$1,012

-36%

Dallas

$1,005

9%

NYC Boroughs

$962

40%

Seattle

$954

67%

North New Jersey

$904

44%

Long Island

$864

53%

Cap Rate

6.5% MARKET

6.0% 5.5% 5.0% 13

14

15

16

17

18

Year

Trending Drugstore Tenants Price and Deal Activity Source: RCA

Malls Are Highly Polarized Mall Vacancies By Rating

VOLUME ($M)

Source: CoStar

MAY ‘18

472.4

261.7

88.0

MAY ‘17

891.7

438.1

99.3

A

B

C

9% 8%

MAY ‘18

6.0%

5.8%

6.7%

MAY ‘17

6.0%

5.9%

6.3%

PROPERTY COUNT

Vacany Rate

7%

AVG CAP RATE

6% 5% 4% 3% 2% 1%

MAY ‘18

75

44

15

MAY ‘17

146

86

18

10 | FALL/WINTER 2018

Mall Quality:

10%

0% 07

08

09

10

11

12

13

Year

14

15

16

17

18


Q2’18: Price Averages & Volume Source: RCA

SALES VOLUME ($M)

YOY CHANGE

NUMBER OF PROPS.

YOY CHANGE

$/SF

CAP RATE

YOY CHANGE (bps)

0.0%

$186

6.50%

0.0%

RETAIL TOTAL

$20,708

39.0%

1,504

CENTERS

$15,129

56.0%

651

-11.0%

$152

7.00%

2.0%

SHOPS

$5,579

7.0%

853

10.0%

$273

6.00%

17.0%

6 MAJOR METRO

$9,411

111.0%

428

-3.0%

$289

5.70%

18.0%

NON-MAJOR METRO

$11,297

9.0%

1,076

1.0%

$129

6.80%

-8.0%

GROCERY

$2,753

-19.0%

192

-9.0%

$178

6.00%

-37.0%

UNANCHORED RETAIL CENTER

$2,018

-14.0%

345

-12.0%

$168

6.80%

-18.0%

SINGLE TENANT

$1,752

16.0%

268

24.0%

$232

6.10%

-2.0%

DRUG STORE

$547

-5.0%

103

1.0%

$354

6.50%

54.0%

Quarterly Supply and Demand VS. Vacancy National Fundamentals Outlook

Quarterly Demand Growth

Source: CoStar Portfolio Strategy

Quarterly Support Growth

8%

60 50

7%

40

6%

30 5% 20

Vacancy Rate

SF, Millions

Vacancy

4%

10

3%

0

2%

(10) 08

09

10

11

12

13

14 Year

15

16

17

18

MATTHEWS™ | 11


Industrial Market Most Active Industrial Markets H1’18

Property Prices

Sales Volume

Source: RCA

Industrial

YOY change in RCA CPPI

15%

All-Property

10%

5%

0% 13

14

15

16

17

Source: RCA

MARKET

SALES VOLUME ($M)

Los Angeles

$2,049

1%

Chicago

$1,985

32%

YOY CHANGE

Dallas

$1,679

-1%

Inland Empire

$1,455

43%

NYC Boroughs

$1,107

54%

San Jose

$1,077

-5%

Atlanta

$1,036

-10%

North New Jersey

$955

-30%

Phoenix

$835

71%

East Bay

$793

41%

Austin

$501

136%

18

Year

E-Commerce Will Contribute 40% or More to Industrial Absorption In 2018 Source: CoStar

Non-E-Commerce

Rest of E-Commerce

Amazon 60%

200

150 SF, Millions

40% 30%

100

20% 50 10% 0

0% 12

12 | FALL/WINTER 2018

13

14

15

16

17

18

E-Commerce As % of Net Absorption

50%


Q2’18: Price Averages & Volume Source: RCA

SALES VOLUME ($M)

YOY CHANGE

NUMBER OF PROPS.

$/UNIT

CAP RATE

YOY CHANGE (bps)

INDUSTRIAL

$18,217

17.0%

1,643

2.0%

$84

6.40%

-8.0%

FLEX

$4,631

18.0%

463

5.0%

$116

6.90%

33.0%

WAREHOUSE

$13,587

17.0%

1,180

1.0%

$76

6.20%

-21.0%

6 MAJOR METRO

$6,473

8.0%

538

-5.0%

$133

5.80%

-1.0%

NON-MAJOR METRO

$11,744

23.0%

1.105

7.0%

$75

6.70%

-29.0%

SINGLE TENANT

$2,748

18.4%

300

11.5%

$113

6.80%

-15.0%

Markets to Watch for Amazon-Influenced Pricing Top Markets for Amazon-tenanted Industrial assets Source: RCA

Austin Average Sale Price is 80% higher than Long-Run Average for the Market 12-Month Trailing Data

300

Source: RCA

Long-term Avg

400

250

Current Avg

Min-Max

300 Sale Price, $M

200

150

200 100

100 0 Austin

50

Dallas

Houston

San Antonio

SF Metro

Nashville

San Diego

St. Louis

Polk Co

Columbus

Philly Metro

San Antonio

Pheonix

0 Dallas

Past 24mnths, $M

YOY CHANGE

MATTHEWS™ | 13


14 | FALL/WINTER 2018


o n m u lt i fa m i ly r e a l e s tat e i n l o s a n g e l e s As interest rates begin to normalize, multifamily investors should consider the effect a higher interest rate environment may have on their portfolio. More importantly, investors can take proactive steps to better position themselves for this coming change.

By: Daniel Withers MATTHEWS™ | 15


Learning from the Last Ten Years While the federal funds rate and market rates don’t always move together, in theory, interest rates mirror economic cycles. The fact is that the Federal Reserve can heavily influence interest rates in the market. A review of how the federal funds rate has correlated with moves in the market over the past ten years is therefore predictive of what is on the horizon today. Recessions vs Interest Rates (1950-2018) | Source: FRED Economic Data

PERCENT, %-%

20.0 15.0 10.0 5.0 0.0

50

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

00

05

10

15

18

YEAR recessions

Historical data illustrates that the Federal Reserve typically responds to recessions by dropping the federal fund rate. For example, ten years ago, in response to The Great Recession, the Federal Reserve dropped interest rates to historic low levels in order to stimulate the economy. Recessions vs Interest Rates (2010-2018) | Source: FRED Economic Data

PERCENT, %-%

3.5 3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

YEAR

The low interest rates for investors meant the cost of borrowing money was minimal, which encouraged investors to deploy capital and purchase commercial real estate. For banks, the low rates meant less risk of repayment, incentivizing the bankers to more easily lend to more investors. Together, the result was a dramatic influx of money chasing multifamily product acquisition, particularly in Los Angeles. In short order, the cheap money generated so much demand, that by 2011, the Los Angeles multifamily market was already reaching pre16 | FALL/WINTER 2018

recession highs, and soon after, moved even further along, and hit an all-time high. In 2015, this same demand lowered cap rates below five percent, while property prices skyrocketed. Even so, product continued to be acquired at an intense velocity. As the market charged ahead, the Federal Reserve simultaneously determined that the economy was healthy enough to begin raising interest rates. By the end of 2015, the Fed raised rates for the first time in almost seven years.


where the market stands today The number of transactions in the Los Angeles market drove forward and peaked in 2015 and 2016.

Sales Volume in Los Angeles | Source: CoStar

Then, in 2017, as interest rates began to make their impact, deal velocity finally began to slow. More specifically, compared to 2016, the sales volume in 2017 dropped approximately $8,436 million, and an additional $1,346.02 million in 2018.

The strength of the assets lie in two major camps.

$8,000

SALES VOLUME, MILLIONS

From a valuation standpoint, however, in 2018, multifamily product is quite strong in nearly every part of Los Angeles. While underwriting is changing, investors still see Los Angeles as an overall strong market.

$10,000

$6,000

$4,000

$2,000

One is the large number of sources for money seeking the safety of multifamily investment opportunities in a major gateway city. As can be seen, there are a tremendous and varied number of investors now in the market for Los Angeles multifamily properties.

$0 08

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

YEAR

Investor demographics in the past 12-months for Multifamily in the LA Metro | Source: RCA INVESTOR TYPE

VOLUME

UNITS

#PROPS

AVG PRICE

AVG PPU

$1,017,269,440

4,383

30

$43,104,187

$312,530

Institutional: Pension Fund

$723,252,608

2,362

9

$71,234,538

$371,229

Institutional: Insurance

$276,700,000

847

3

$92,233,333

$354,614

$53,775,000

346

5

$12,258,333

$179,246

$1,525,627,608

4,715

19

$78,817,643

$422,425

Institutional: Sovereign Wealth Fund

$663,752,608

2,197

8

$82,696,076

$381,852

REIT

$275,999,984

847

4

$68,999,996

$339,957

REOC

$720,008,400

2,861

8

$61,444,033

$364,723

Private: High Net Worth

$464,324,452

1,833

87

$5,131,148

$281,372

$8,977,704,853

36,604

843

$9,281,405

$291,334

$55,243,500

408

6

$7,734,500

$274,668

$7,000,000

67

1

$7,00,000

$110,828

$42,991,000

199

3

$11,947,750

$209,117

$150,880,000

409

2

$75,440,000

$329,464

Institutional: Equity Fund

Institutional: Finance Institutional: Investment Manager

Private: Developer/ Owner/ Operator Corporate Government Non-Profit Educational

MATTHEWS™ | 17


Secondly, the demand side of the equation is keeping rents at all-time highs across Los Angeles.

both start-ups and new offices for established major tech brands.

The demand is driven by multiple factors. One of these is that many former homeowners who lost their homes during the recession are still uneasy, and therefore choose to rent instead of buy a home.

It’s become clear that today’s renters are willing to pay top dollar to live in Los Angeles, pushing the average rent to nearly $2,000 a month, according to CoStar.

In addition, the average age to buy a home in Los Angeles is rising due to the notable price increases for residential real estate during this same tenyear period, which creates a larger pool of renters. Also, employment in Los Angeles has climbed, with Silicon Beach attracting people from out of state, and outside the country, into Los Angeles to engage in an increasing number of tech firms,

However, and it may be too early to tell, but for the first time in several years, rents seem to have begun to stabilize in pockets across Los Angeles. With tenants paying close to 50 percent of their income to rent, this may be right the time in the cycle when a correction needs to take place. From 2014 to mid-2017, rents were on a steep slope trending upwards, but by the end of 2017 a slight dip in rents can be seen.

Asking Rent Per Unit in Los Angeles | Source: CoStar

ASKING RENT PER UNIT

$1,700 $1,600 $1,500 $1,400 $1,300 $1,200

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

YEAR

Cap rates and price per unit seem to be unaffected by the rise in interest rates. Cap rates are at the lowest they have been in decades and even though deal velocity slowed in 2017, prices climbed higher and continued throughout 2018. Values are still closing at

18 | FALL/WINTER 2018

record prices, and we are starting to see a decrease in the number of buyers who are willing to meet the dollar amount that sellers are demanding. Investors are still willing to pay a bit more to borrow money and at the same time, pay a premium price for their real estate asset(s).


Cap Rate in Los Angeles | Source: CoStar 7.0% 6.5%

CAP RATE

6.0% 5.5% 5.0% 4.5% 4.0% 3.5%

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

15

16

17

18

YEAR

Average Sale Price Per Unit In Los Angeles | Source: CoStar $320 $300

THOUSANDS

$280 $260 $240 $220 $200 $180 $160 $140 $120

08

09

10

11

12

13

14

18

YEAR

INTEREST RATES PREDICTED TO MOVE UP The Federal Reserve kept interest rates at historical lows for several years after the recession, but in 2015, when the economy began to stabilize, they began increasing rates back to normal levels. At the end of 2017 interest rates were trending upwards at the time when the Federal Reserve officially raised the rate from 1.25 to 1.50 percent. The Federal Reserve then announced that they would continue raising interest rates and implemented an additional three rate hikes scheduled for 2018. As expected, in the first few months of 2018, the Federal Reserve pushed the rate up again. As economic conditions improved, the Feds decided

to throw a curve ball when they announced that they would be increasing the rate four times in 2018 instead of the original three times that was previously stated. In June, the Federal Reserve pushed the federal funds rate to two percent, and in September, up to 2.25 percent. During the Federal Open Market Committee in September, the Federal Reserve signaled it would raise rates to 2.5 percent in December 2018, 3.0 percent in 2019, and 3.5 percent in 2020. As we come into 2019, mortgage rates have already passed original predictions, and experts don’t expect to see the Federal Reserve taking their foot off the gas pedal any time soon. Major housing agencies are all forecasting rate hikes for 2019 and beyond. MATTHEWS™ | 19


Mortage rate predictions for 2018 and 2019 Source: RCA

didn’t grow substantially. This leaves them with four options. Investors can either: Pay off their loans in full

MORTAGE BANKERS ASSOCIATION 2018 Prediction: 4.9% 2019 Prediction: 5.4%

Refinance at higher rate Pay down a portion of the existing loan and refinance at higher rates

FREDDIE MAC

2018 Prediction: 4.6% 2019 Prediction: 5.1%

FRANNIE MAE

2018 Prediction: 4.5% 2019 Prediction: 4.5%

REALTOR.COM

2018 Prediction: 5.0% 2019 Prediction: No Forecast

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS 2018 Prediction: 4.5% 2019 Prediction: 4.8%

KIPLINGER

2018 Prediction: 4.7% 2019 Prediction: No Forecast

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HOME BUILDERS 2018 Prediction: 4.5% 2019 Prediction: 5.0%

the effects on multifamily Ten years ago, investors found themselves in sticky situations when rates were high, and valuations and liquidity were below normal levels. As a result, it led to a negative effect on values of commercial properties. In Los Angeles, the average loan term is five years. Investors who paid a premium for their assets during the height of the market in 2014 and 2015 are seeing their loans come to term, and with a net operating income that 20 | FALL/WINTER 2018

Sell their property

market slow down When rates go up, banks tend to pull back on issuing loans because there is more risk. To qualify for a loan, the net operating income (NOI) on investment properties needs to be enough to dilute the risk of a bank refinancing at higher rates. This is compounded by the fact that because interest rates are higher, the NOI must also be higher to counteract the banks risk. Traditionally, the best way to increase NOI is to increase rents. Unfortunately, as noted, rents in Los Angeles are beginning to level out. While continued demand may prevent rents from decreasing, many experts do not believe that rents will continue to rise. Furthermore, with the income to rent ratio being above average and the possible repeal of Costa Hawkins, many believe that there will be a downward pressure on rents. With the rental income plateau, it will be hard for investors to create enough NOI to support a refinance without having to pay a significant amount of capital towards the existing loan.

ytd 2018: Source: Costar

496 transactions

94% of transactions were less than $10M Of that $10M, the averages were: Sale Price: $2.7M

Price per unit $284k Asset class: Class C

Down payment: $1.4M

Investor Type: Private Clients


In 2018, 94 percent of all transactions were under ten million dollars, with the average transaction being about $2.7 million. Of those 94 percent of transactions below ten million, the average acquisition down payment was $1.4 million, according to CoStar data. The overwhelming majority of buyers were private clients. This would then also decrease the buyer pool for owners who bought at the height of the market and are now willing to dispose of their properties at a potential loss.

what should investors do? There is a path forward for investors who take the right steps to increase net operating income. As the economy continues to prosper, the Federal Reserve’s rate normalization is likely to continue. Investors therefore need to begin thinking about structuring their investments to withstand the rising interest rate market. On the income side, it is important that current owners coming to term on their loans ensure they are up to date with market rents in their area. If rents are below market, owners must begin making the increases as soon as possible. Rent controlled property: Owners must be sure that three percent rent increases are implemented If property requires more than a ten percent increase to reach market rents, a 60 day notice must be provided to tenants. Non-rent controlled property: Owners should consult with an agent to determine market rents Owners will also need to stay on top of their turnover programs to maximize rents and keep occupancy high during this strong period. Owners should take time evaluating day-today operations to make sure that they aren’t over spending and are maximizing the most out of their investments. In some cases, this may mean cutting people from payroll, rather than doing anything that would detract

from the maintenance or amenities at the property while seeking rental increases. Should the rental increases and expense decreases not solve the challenge, some owners may find themselves in an unfavorable situation where they would no longer able to obtain enough loan dollars from a lender to support the prices they paid at the height of the market. Their only options may be to sell, or pay down a significant amount of their current loan to secure new debt. For those owners, it may be smart to start taking a proactive approach and analyze their current portfolios today to get ahead of any issues that may arise. Investors seeking acquisitions in the higher interest rate market will need to anticipate a 200 to 300 basis point swing in rates compared to the past years. Although sometimes riskier, higher cap rates typically yield higher incomes. Investors able to underwrite their deals, as well as qualify for the loans, may find themselves in a superior negotiating position on the sale price. Owners and investors in Los Angeles multifamily properties do have an opportunity to continue to have positive NOI even with the higher interest rates. It will simply require more diligence in each aspect of the property, from qualifying for a loan, to ensuring strong tenant retention at market rates, to minimizing property expenses. For those with vision, the opportunity in Los Angeles is still very much in place. Owners are still experiencing low vacancies, historically, high rents and the current development pipeline for new construction apartments is still under supplied. All of these factors should help overall operations but, it’s important for owners to keep growing NOI to insure a successful refinance when debt comes due.

Daniel Withers Senior Vice President | Multifamily daniel.withers@matthews.com 818.923.6107

MATTHEWS™ | 21


22 | FALL/WINTER 2018


The Growth and Future of Multifamily in

Central

By: Kyle Mirrafati

Los Angeles, also known as the City of Angels, is home to iconic celebrities, perfect weather, and some of the highest rental rates in the United States. Having the fourth highest share of renters in the country, the Los Angeles Metro Area averages a rental rate of almost 54 percent. That seems high, but in parts of Los Angeles, such as Central Los Angeles, the percentage of renters climbs even higher.

MATTHEWS™ | 23


Central Los Angeles Central Los Angeles, a historic area within the heart of LA, is a vital part of the Los Angeles real estate market. As the economic hub of the West Coast, some of the region’s top financial and professional service firms such as banking, engineering, law, and accounting firms occupy the Central Business District in Central Los Angeles’s downtown area. Beyond the tall skyscrapers of Downtown, Central Los Angeles is also host to many trade districts such as the flower and the fashion district. In addition, industrial buildings are spread throughout the districts, serving as the birthplace for many top designer clothing brands, toys, and various other products.

As of the year 2000 Census, Central Los Angeles was recorded as the home to over 900,000 people with the densest neighborhood being Koreatown and the least dense neighborhood being Elysian Park. In Koreatown, there are over 42,000 residents per square mile, making it one of the highest densities for the city and the County of Los Angeles. In comparison to Los Angeles’ percentage of renters, Central Los Angeles averages at just above 80 percent, higher than any other area in Los Angeles. Within Central Los Angeles, the neighborhood with the highest percentage of renters is Westlake, which bears an astonishing amount of renters.

OF THE

RESIDENTS IN

WESTLAKE

94.9 PERCENT ARE RENTERS Due to the high demand for rentals, it makes sense that Central Los Angeles also possesses an extremely high number of multifamily buildings. There are over 7,000 multifamily properties with over eight or more units and 147,190 total throughout the area, both rent controlled and non-rent controlled. Matthews™ analyzes how the Central Los Angeles multifamily real estate market came to be, where it’s at today, and what’s in store for the future. 24 | FALL/WINTER 2018


The Comeback THE RECESSION In the years prior to The Great Recession, the multifamily market in Los Angeles was prospering tremendously. In Central Los Angeles alone, almost $900 million in inventory was traded during the year 2007, but by 2009, that number had dropped to under $170 million. Vacancy rates almost doubled, rising from an average of 3.5 percent in 2007 up to an average of 5.2

percent in 2010. Studios, one-bedroom and two-bedroom units were hit the hardest within the first few years after the recession hit, mostly due to families consolidating into three bedrooms to afford rent. Property prices instantaneously fell by almost $200,000 per unit and cap rates soared from the five percent range up into the sevens. Of course, all new construction came to a halt and absorption rates were in the negatives.

ABSORPTION, DELIVERIES, VACANCY

9%

1,200

8%

1,000

7%

800

6%

600

5%

400

4%

200

3%

0

2%

-200

1%

-400

05

07

09

11

ABSORPTION

13

DELIVERIES

15

17

Vacancy Rate

Absorption & Deliveries Units

SOURCE: COSTAR

1,400

0%

VACANCY

JOBS LOST/GAINED DURING GREAT RECESSION SINCE DEC. 2007 SOURCE: HUFFPOST ANALYSIS OF BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS DATA Government

Financial and business services, construction, and retail trade were some of the industries hit the hardest during the recession. These happened to be the same industries that provided a majority of the jobs to the residents of Central Los Angeles. It wasn’t until a few years after the recession hit as economic factors began to align that the multifamily market started to dig itself out of the recession.

Other Services Leisure and Hospitality Education and Health Services Business Services Financial Activities Information Utilities Transportation and Warehousing Retail Trade Wholesale Trade Nondurable Goods Durable Goods Construction Mining and Logging

2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000

500,000

0

500,000 MATTHEWS™ | 25


The Economy Responds In response to the Great Recession, in December of 2008, the Federal Reserve dropped interest rates to a historical low of 0.25 percent in hopes of kick starting economic growth. The lowest interest rates previously recorded had been at 0.63 percent in the late fifties. Nevertheless, the drop in interest rates worked and began to breath air into the economy.

unemployment rate decreased, the Central Los Angeles multifamily market began to prosper. This increase in employment brought people back to the city and created a demand for rentals as many households were opting into paying rent instead of buying property again. The demand drove rents up across all the prime markets in Los Angeles, including Central Los Angeles.

From 2010 to 2011, Los Angeles’ unemployment rate was still hovering around 13 to 14 percent. It wasn’t until 2012 that the unemployment rate even saw the elevens. However, Central Los Angeles started to see recovery sooner than most of Los Angeles and the United States, as vacancy rates began to lower and rental rates began to climb at the beginning of 2011.

By the end of 2011, the Central Los Angeles multifamily market was on its way to making an incredible comeback. At the end of 2013, rents and transaction volumes had already surpassed pre-recession highs, absorption rates were outpacing deliveries, and cap rates were back to normal. Interest rates remained at historic lows, allowing investors to borrow money at a lower cost. Thus, the market continued to thrive, reaching record highs.

As GDP began to increase, surpassing prerecession levels by the end of 2010, and the

AVERAGE SALE PRICE PER UNIT SOURCE: COSTAR

AVERAGE SALE PRICE PER UNIT, THOUSANDS

$350

$300

$250

$200

$150

$100

$50 05

26 | FALL/WINTER 2018

07

09

11

13

15

17


The Effect on Apartment Values Economic factors had aligned and Los Angeles was in the midst of an economic boom. Due to the increase in rental demand, low interest rates, rising GDP, low unemployment rates, and rising populations, the demand for rentals rose. Rents grew by four percent year over year from 2011 to 2017, thus causing property values to soar. In accordance to the rising property values came an increase in property sales. In 2015, the market saw multifamily transaction volume reach a record high. During the next year, the market pulled back slightly, most likely due to political uncertainty during the election, but it picked up again during 2017, only to succeed record numbers seen in 2015. In the first eight months of 2018,

a little over $700 million in assets have traded throughout Central Los Angeles. If momentum keeps up, by the end of 2018, the year’s total sales volume may be similar to 2017’s total. The increase in sales volume year-overyear drove prices higher and led to the compression of cap rates. Investors were taking advantage of the low interest rates and were willing to pay higher prices thus cap rates quickly compressed from the six percent range in 2011 down to the fours in 2017. In 2018, cap rates for the Central Los Angeles market remain at an all-time historic low of four percent.

CAP RATES SOURCE: COSTAR

7.5% 7.0% 6.5%

CAP RATES

6.0% 5.5% 5.0% 4.5% 4.0% 3.5% 3.0% 05

07

09

11

13

15

17

MATTHEWS™ | 27


Current Trends On a risk-adjusted basis, Los Angeles multifamily real estate is one of the safest investment assets there is. Today, the market is sitting on record highs - rents are up, vacancies are down, and the number of renters in Los Angeles continues to increase every year. HOMEOWNERSHIP DROPS OFF For millennials between the age of 25 and 34, home ownership is down by eight percent across the nation when compared to Generation X. Due to the high entry barriers required to buy a home in Los Angeles, within five years from 2010 to 2015, home ownership rates dropped two percent throughout the County. If home prices continue to rise, ownerships are expected to keep moving downwards. With less people owning homes, the demand for rentals continues. In Central Los Angeles, asking rents have increased 30 percent over the last five years. Because of the incredibly high appreciation in property value, Los Angeles is one of the most unique rental markets there is.

HOME OWNERSHIP RATE FOR LOS ANGELES COUNTY Hom e O wn er s h ip R a te

SOURCE: FRED ECONOMIC DATA

51.5% 51.0% 50.5% 50.0% 49.5% 49.0% 48.5% 48.0% 2010

28 | FALL/WINTER 2018

2011

2 01 2

2 01 3

2 01 4

2 01 5

2 01 6


FOREIGN INVESTORS

The potential for huge upside in rents is attracting investors from all over the world to invest in Los Angeles multifamily real estate. In 2017, Los Angeles stole New York’s title as the top destination for foreign capital in the United States as investors pumped over $8 billion dollars into Los Angeles’ real estate market.

TOP 10 FOREIGN INVESTORS SOURCE: REAL CAPITAL ANALYTICS

1. SINGAPORE 5. SOUTH KOREA 2. QATAR

3. CANADA

4. FRANCE

10. HONG KONG

9. SWITZERLAND

6. GERMANY

7. CHINA 8. JAPAN

VALUE ADD PROPERTIES ARE A HOT COMMODITY Both domestic and international investors are purchasing value-add buildings, buying out tenants and renovating units to achieve higher market rents. Today, older class B and C value-add properties have become easier to sell than fully renovated class A or B properties. Many investors are purchasing class B and C value-add properties and taking advantage of the upside through tenant buyouts.

Tenant buyouts, also known as the “Cash for Keys” program, allows landlords to offer a monetary incentive for tenants to move out so the landlord can then raise the rent on an otherwise rent-controlled unit. Tenant buyouts have become increasingly more popular as the economy is supporting much higher rents. In the first nine months of 2017, almost 700 buyouts had been reported to the City of Los Angeles.

MATTHEWS™ | 29


The Outlook for Central Los Angeles RISING INTEREST RATES COULD LEAD TO A MARKET SLOWDOWN To maintain a healthy economy, the Federal Reserve prefers to keep interest rates between two and five percent. While the Feds kept interest rates at historical lows from 2008 to 2015, when the economy began to stabilize, they initiated raising rates back up to normal levels accordingly.

In 2018, alone there have already been three rate hikes pushing the Federal Funds Rate to stand at about two percent. In conjunction with these hikes, the Federal Reserve also announced that they plan to raise the rate four times throughout the year.

U.S. FED FUNDS RATE SOURCE: TRADINGECONOMICS | FEDERAL RESERVE

2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00 0.50

2014

2016

SALES VOLUME B Y B U Y E R T Y P E SOURCE: COSTAR

1% 17% 3% 5% 75%

Private

Private Equity

Private Equity

30 | FALL/WINTER 2018

Private Equity

Private Equity

2018

0

While interest rates are still at record lows in comparison to previous decades, an increase in interest rates could lead to a market slow down. As the two usually go hand in hand, raising interest rates have traditionally correlated with rising cap rates. Put simply, the raise in cap rates will begin to bring down the price of properties. A hike in interest rates makes borrowing money more expensive and investors will be less likely to borrow money at higher rates. For those buyers that are willing to pay the higher rates, it will become harder for them to obtain positive leverage on new acquisitions they are looking to finance. It may take a couple years to feel the full effect of rising interest rates in Los Angeles. Although more unyielding than other more volatile markets across the nation, the Los Angeles and Central Los Angeles markets have already seen a slight pull back begin in 2018.


Note: Since private buyers make up 75 percent of the buying pool in Central Los Angeles, the majority of acquisitions will need to obtain some form of financing to make purchases.

For the first time in six years, rents have stopped climbing upwards and are leveling out at around $1,600 for a one bedroom in Central Los Angeles. Consequently, the

average price per unit has also come down slightly from 2017. At the same time, many new developments and fully renovated units have hit the market in the last couple of years contributing to an increase in rent growth. Although there is a shortage of housing in Los Angeles and the demand for apartments is still high, any additional supply allows tenants to have more options and landlords more control.

5-YEAR TRENDS RENTAL RATES AND OCCUPANCY LEVELS

96.4 %

$1,650

96.2%

$1,600

96.0%

$1,550

95.8%

$1,500

95.6%

$1,450

95.4%

$1,400

95.2%

$1,350

95.0%

$1,300

94.8%

$1,250 20 1 4

20 15 OCCUPANCY RATE

20 16

20 17

Rental Rate

Occupancy Rate

SOURCE: COSTAR

20 18

RENTAL RATE

MATTHEWS™ | 31


THE POSSIBLE REPEAL OF THE COSTA HAWKINS ACT With the possibility of repealing the Costa Hawkins Act in the upcoming fall ballot, investors are holding off before making any purchasing decisions. If passed, the measure would repeal the Costa Hawkins Rental Housing Act that was put in place in 1995 to set limits on the kinds of rent control policies that cities can institute. The repeal would allow the City of Los Angeles to implement rent-control policies on apartments that were previously exempt from rent-control policies, lowering the potential to raise rents and altogether the value of these properties tremendously. Investors who recently invested in Los Angeles multifamily real estate at a premium price in hopes of raising rents and creating

32 | FALL/WINTER 2018

a higher return may have drawn the short end of the stick. Now, investors currently in the market to buy are weary of putting down money on a project where they won’t get a reasonable return. Therefore, unless otherwise incentivized, if the repeal of the Costa Hawkins Act is approved, transaction volume, renovations, and new construction would all drastically come to a slow. Overall, the multifamily real estate market is still sitting at an all-time high in Los Angeles and Central Los Angeles, but many experts believe we are on the precipice of a decline. Los Angeles is hitting a rent ceiling which can already be seen plateauing in the Central Los Angeles market. Investors are making purchases in hopes tthat rental rates will continue to rise, which is contributing to the overall inflated prices we see today.


However, with the possible repeal of the Costa Hawkins Act and rents beginning to plateau, the market will begin to see deflation and prices will start to drop. With leveling rents and higher interest rates, the rate of return declines and the level of risk increases for financers. The current financing landscape is driving lenders to pull back and become more selective on providing capital to the marketplace, slowing down deal velocity and increasing the cost of capital. Even so, the Los Angeles multifamily real estate market will continue to remain one of the safest markets for investors. The City of Los Angeles continues to see steady population growth in an already highly impacted market suffering from a housing shortage. Central Los Angeles’s heavy

density and high percentage of renters will ensure even stronger sustainability for the multifamily market than other areas throughout the region. Because of the crucial demand for rentals and shortage of housing in Los Angeles, Multifamily assets in Los Angeles and Central Los Angeles have proven to be resilient as demonstrated by the markets quick comeback from the recession. As long as this continues, there will always be a strong demand for rentals and multifamily assets will retain value throughout Central Los Angeles and the surrounding neighborhoods.

KYLE MIRRAFATI kyle.mirrafati@matthews.com (310) 295-4269

MATTHEWS™ | 33


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MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 35


36 | FALL/WINTER 2018


MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 37


For today’s consumer, a website’s functionality is as important as the look. Invest in professional web experts who can offer an online experience that is easy and intuitive to navigate. Additionally, make sure that those experts develop a version specifically for the requirements of the mobile phone/tablet environment: 51 percent of internet browsing occurs on mobile devices.

W HAT THEY WANT IS HOW THEY SEARC H Invest in a search optimization expert for your online presence. The process includes:

Optimizing the language of your website, from headlines to body text

Page descriptors

Embedded photo & video descriptors

Search results descriptors

An investment in SEO can pay off quickly. An optimized site is more likely to place high in search ranking on Google and other search engines, meaning a property can enjoy more response from ‘organic’ search traffic and less from investment in AdWords, Facebook ads and other purchased marketing channels. A property can see a rise in search ranking in as little as 90 days. 38 | FALL/WINTER 2018


MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 39


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42 | FALL/WINTER 2018


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HOW CAN AN INVESTOR PARTAKE?

In the case of real estate, developers can establish a Qualified Oppor tunity Fund in order to generate third-par ty investment capital for their projects. Fur thermore, they can use their fund to defer tax on the sale of capital assets. In addition, by investing the gain in a Qualified Oppor tunity Fund, they will be paying less in taxes. To illustrate this point , if an investor puts capital gains generated from the sale of a capital asset into a fund for eight years, with the basis increase and a five percent present value discount to value the deferral, investors will pay only 57 percent of what they other wise would pay in taxes. In the case of a passive investor, the investment into the fund allows deferral of tax payments on recognized gains for up to eight years (the latest date being Dec. 31, 2026) with up to 15 percent gain reduction and the possibility of avoiding any income tax on the Qualified Oppor tunity Zone investment if held for at least 10 years.

INVESTING IN AN OPPORTUNITY FUND VS. A STANDARD STOCK PORTFOLIO SCENARIO: A CAPITAL GAIN OF $100 IS REINVESTED IN 2018

Incentives offered by the opportunity zones program DEFERRAL + additional 5% step-up in basis

DEFERRAL + 10% step-up in basis

DEFERRAL + total 15% step-up in basis + permanent exclusion of O-Fund gains from taxes

After-Tax Value of Investment

$200

+$44

+$15 +$9

$100

$100

$0

5 years

It takes five years for a standard investment to recoup capital gains taxes paid in 2018

$132 $111

The Opportunity Zones program offers the most upside to patient Investors who hold their O-Fund investments for at least 10 years. All else equal, come 2028 an investor will be $44 better off for every $100 of capital gains they rolled over into an O-Fund in 2018 than if they had chosen a more traditional stock portfolio instead. Excess Returns Offered by an O-Fund Investment Standard Portfolio Investment

7 years

Holding Period

10 years

*Note: Assumes long-term federal capital gains tax rate of 23.8%, no state income tax, and annual appreciation of 7% for both the O-Fund and alternative investment SOURCE: ECONOMIC INNOVATION GROUP

46 | FALL/WINTER 2018


In recent repor ts, it is said that this program opens the doors for an approximate $6 trillion oppor tunity. In an analysis of the Federal Reser ve’s of Consumer Finances and Financial accounts of U.S. data, it was found that U.S. households were sitting on $3.8 trillion in unrealized capital gains in stocks and funds at the end of 2017 and U.S. corporations were estimated at holding $2.3 trillion. The pot of potential capital eligible for reinvestment in Oppor tunity Zones totals $6.1 trillion. If only a small por tion of that $6.1 trillion flows into Oppor tunity Zones, this new provision could quickly become the largest federal community development initiative. It is anticipated that the Treasur y will release fur ther guidance on how to establish Oppor tunity Funds, as well as any additional rules investors need to know to get star ted. Depending on how the Treasur y implements these rules for Oppor tunity Zones, this program could be seen as a dynamic tool for gathering capital. Once we have more in depth answers to crucial components of the program, it will be up to the financial sector to set up investment vehicles and create the market for this exciting new asset class.

$3.8 trillion U.S. Households

+

$2.3 trillion U.S. Corporations

= $6.1 trillion Total

in potential capital to be reinvested in Oppor tunity Zones

BRADEN CROCKE T T braden.crockett@matthews.com (214) 692-2040 ANDREW IVANKOVICH andrew.ivankovich@matthews.com (214) 692-2037

MATTHEWS™ | 47


LIST WITH MATTHEWS

TM

TO EXPERIENCE THE DIFFERENCE TODAY.

BETTER

BOLD

ENHANCED

FURTHER

TARGETING

INTERACTION

W W W. M AT T H E W S . C O M 48 | FALL/WINTER 2018

RESULTS

REACH


NATIONAL FOOTPRINT

2,900+

TRANSACTIONS

$13B

OVER IN SALES VOLUME

Our professional team of agents have many years of experience representing the top institutions, developers and private clients in commercial real estate. We hire the best and provide them with top of the line support, systems, and materials – with the goal of exceeding expectations. Our superior targeting creates maximum exposure of the assets we market, ultimately leading to higher net proceeds for our clients.

MATTHEWS™ | 49


IS E-COMMERCE SHAPING THE FUTURE OF

By: Alex Harrold

50 | FALL/WINTER 2018


Through recent years, the industrial sector has gone through some significant changes, primarily due to the rise in e-commerce. For example, companies like Amazon are expecting their goods to be shipped to their customers in two-days or less. As a result, logistics management has become increasingly more important and is being run differently compared to previous years. Logistics professionals can no longer merely go about standard operations, and seasonal peaks are a thing of the past. The race is on to define the future of industrial logistics. MATTHEWS™ | 51


OVERVIEW:

THE GROWING CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MOVEMENT The following report will go in depth on how these three factors are altering the industrial market. 1. Customers are expecting more from online retailers 2. Customer demand is increasing at an accelerated rate 3. New technologies are disrupting the market 52 | FALL/WINTER 2018


1

THE LOGISTICS BATTLE: THE TOP 10 TRENDS THAT WILL IMPACT INDUSTRIAL LOGISTICS

FASTER TURN-AROUND TIMES TO MEET CUSTOMER DEMAND ON LAST-MILE DELIVERIES

2

LOCALIZED WAREHOUSES The high demand is causing a reevaluation of

Following the introduction of Amazon Prime’s

logistics strategies, ultimately affecting where

free two-day shipping, customers now anticipate

warehouses are built and how they are used.

their products to be delivered within 48 hours

Having just a few distribution centers is no longer

or less, with more flexibility, and at little or no

enough to satisfy this increased demand. Instead,

delivery cost.

smaller and more regional centers are needed near customers to fulfill last-mile deliveries.

A new logistics protocol needs to be put into place to meet the demanded turn-around time. Industrial companies need to adapt to the changing market proactively. Logistics will need to work faster, harder, and with fewer resources to meet demand and stay competitive. This increased pressure on industrial logistics is not only aimed towards filling new orders and adhering to the latest regulations but also managing the increased influx of returns. Many online retailers are now offering customers the option to “buy and try” a product. This means that if a customer is not satisfied with a product, they can return it at no cost. Manufacturing is also becoming progressively customized, which means that the logistics industry must figure out how to get these personalized goods to the customer within the same time frame, and at the same cost as noncustomized goods. With customers expecting

Last-mile delivery is any movement of freight or product between a distribution center to the end customer. The customer could be a retail store, a restaurant, a rural home, a high rise, or a carrier designated pickup station, such as a specified UPS store or Amazon locker. Last-mile delivery is all that is seen, but not thought of in the daily urban or suburban space. Considerations for last-mile delivery has become widely popular as it is relied upon by various stakeholders in the supply chain, and is supplying the end customer with the experience. The firstmile and last-mile of delivery are both important but, the need for a middle-mile is essential. Freight brokers and third-party logistics are optimizing the middle-mile supply chain by consolidating shipments to satisfy delivery expectations.

faster time-to-market, reduced defect rates,

One strategy for minimizing the cost of delivery

and customized products, the industry is under

is moving less inventory using the just-in-time

pressure to deliver better services at a lower

model, a supply chain management system that

cost than ever before.

is designed to reduce carrying costs. It aligns raw material orders from suppliers directly with production schedules, requiring retailers to forecast demand accurately. MATTHEWS™ | 53


3

INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS The focus of last-mile delivery is to deliver items

4

SHOPPING SEASONS WILL BLUR Sales are no longer a rare occurrence, and they

to the end user as fast as possible. However, the

happen every-day, in-store and online. Logistics

main obstacle hindering the speed of last-mile

entities will face the pressure of moving more

delivery is infrastructure. Retailers must begin to

product on a regular basis while also providing

prepare their transportation networks for traffic

superior customer service. The lines between peak

fluctuations caused by the expected growth in

holiday seasons and traditional shopping will blur.

online sales. The Trump administration is already coming up with solutions and has been heavily investing in the nation’s transportation systems. This will make it easier and faster to travel, decreasing the cost of transportation. Truck drivers will no longer need to frequently stop, risk damaging tires or deal with congestion, lowering the overall shipping costs because the product will be moved more easily.

5

ONLINE INTERACTIONS Social media, news, events, and weather will all impact the reevaluation of the logistics strategy. In today’s day and age, where the population is increasingly online, retailers aim to create a seamless brand experience for the customer across personalized marketing. This includes the physical store, the digital experience, and the payment options, all driven by a robust and coherent brand. Advancements in technologies that enable the ability to search for all opportunities and threats will instantly be the foundation of utilizing big data for decision-making throughout 2018 and into 2019.

6

STANDARDIZATION OF VARIABLE LOGISTICS OPERATIONS Customers will want to have options even if the best shipping option is available. Some customers will want two-day shipping while others will want three-day shipping and ship-to-store options. This trend is primarily due to increased package theft, and the burden of ensuring the package is shipped when the customer is readily available upon arrival. Logistics experts will have to implement mechanisms that will provide customers with the options to select a delivery that best fits into their schedule.

54 | FALL/WINTER 2018


7

BRICK-AND-MORTAR REMAIN A CONTRIBUTING FACTOR For some time now, it has been said that brick and

As a result, product inventory will no longer be

mortar businesses are slowly dying and the future

stored in a single location, and varying product

rests in online shopping. However, this doesn’t

availability is necessary to meet in-store and online

seem to be the case. As we have seen, in-store

demand. Channel boundaries are blurring, and a

purchases remain strong as customers engage in

uniform shipping standard must be allocated. When

the in-store shopping experience.

a customer is looking at a product in-store, they also expect to see that same product online and

The key success factor for retailers is to adapt

vice versa. Additionally, the customer expects to be

to the latest technology and present a more

able to order a product online with in-store pickup.

personalized shopping experience for customers.

There must be inventory wherever the customer

It is crucial that retailers continue to ask

decides to shop.

customers what they want as their needs change over time. MATTHEWS™ | 55


8

IMPROVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH THIRD-PARTY LOGISTICS

10

NEW TECHNOLOGIES As with any industry that is changing, the primary

To stay competitive, logistics providers will

factor that will affect growth is the adaptability

increasingly improve strategic partnerships to

to technology. The ability to adapt and utilize

ensure adherence to customer expectations.

technology will be a significant priority in the mix

The collaboration and standardization between

of top logistic trends in the next five years.

logistics partners would increase efficiency and offer more convenient services.

Technology trends include data analytics, automation, and the physical internet. To keep

However, in specific logistics sectors, there

up with customer demands, companies must

are substantial benefits to having more

leverage this technology. Logistics professionals

consolidation, not less. Also, companies are

must consider and evaluate the utilization of

wary of delegating out the crucial last-mile of

new technologies outside of their traditional

the journey to an operator that may not reflect

technology partners. Technology will provide an

expected service levels.

overall improvement, and streamline delivery of

9

product to meet customer demands.

INCREASED TRANSPARENCY

Innovation is Key! As logistics technology expands

Customers don’t just want to know where

to keep up with the increased demand, it is

products come from, they want to know where

imperative to know which technologies can make

they are made, how they are moved, who put

or break success as we come to the end of 2018

the products together and what their wages

and go into 2019.

are, whether people are treated fairly, where the

The i ndustry has never had access to so much data!

materials come from and if they are sustainable – and every other question you can think of. By utilizing data analytics and social supply chains, customers will be able to know all the touch points of their product, bringing about a sense of predictability and traceability. With increased transparency, customers will be more inclined to purchase products online.

Logistics is facing an era of unprecedented change as digitization takes hold and customer’s expectations evolve. The industrial sector is becoming an increasingly competitive environment and with this brings higher expectations. As a result, industrial operating models and profitability are under strain.

56 | FALL/WINTER 2018


TOP 8 LOGISTIC CHALLENGES

2 FUEL CO S T

5

3

B U S I N ES S P R O CES S I M P R OV E M E N T S

6

D R I V E R S H O R TAG E & R E T E N T IO N

4 I M P R OV E D C U S TO M E R S E R V I CE

7 G OV E R N M E N T R E G U L AT IO N S

E N V I R O N M E N TA L I S S U ES

EC O N O M Y

8 T EC H N O LO G Y S T R AT E G Y & I M P L E M E N TAT IO N

Smart warehousing solutions will become essential to overcome these logistic challenges. Transportation costs and adopting innovations and technology advances remain the top challenges as they cut into the budget. Other challenges include new entrants into the market. Over the next couple of years, it is essential that logistics and the industrial industry overall become aligned with customer demand. The needs of customers won’t stop growing, and e-commerce is expected to rise by 9.3 percent annually over the next five years to top $523 billion, according to NAIOP. Now more than ever, it is critical for industrial sites to gear up and prepare for the influx of service demands. For more information on the industrial sector and how to prepare for the future, please reach out to a Matthews™industrial specialist. Alex Harrold alex.harrold@matthews.com (310) 919-5790 MATTHEWS™ | 57


s e l e g n A s o L in

58 | FALL/WINTER 2018


L

os Angeles is infamous for having one of the least affordable housing markets in the country. In the third quarter of 2017, Los Angeles was named the least affordable city in the nation in relation to average income according to the National Association of Home Builders. Prices in rent and the cost of a mortgage drastically outpace income growth throughout the city. According to a report by Apartment Lists, more than half of renters in Los Angeles are spending approximately 30 percent of their income on housing. And, of that number, roughly half -nearly one-third of the city’s renters- are severely costburdened, and spend almost 50 percent of their income on rent. As a result, this has greatly depressed other types of economic growth in the city.

MATTHEWS™ | 59


RENTS & VACANCIES

between 2014 and 2016. However, for the past five years, current market conditions have held vacancy around four percent. This low vacancy rate gives Los Angeles the right footing to handle the incoming influx of new apartments in the next couple of years.

Faced with the unprecedented housing crisis, affordability in Los Angeles continues to be a hotly debated topic. Compared to last year, rents in Los Angeles grew 1.6 percent according to Apartment List’s rent report. This percentage is below California’s average of 2.1 percent.

VACANCY RATE IN LOS ANGELES

Multiple reports show that rents are expected to increase over $2,200 per month in 2018, a 6.3 percent increase from 2017, and up to $2,373 by 2019. Average rental prices have gone up 23 percent in five years across all of Los Angeles. Although still expensive, rent hasn’t increased a considerable amount in 2018. Based on CoStar data, the median rental price has remained consistent compared to last year. Across Los Angeles, the cost of a one-bedroom in Q3 2018 stands at $1,619. Twobedrooms are listed for $1,975, and three-bedrooms are listed for $2,288, on average.

source: Costar 4.6% 4.4% 4.2% 4.0% 3.8% 3.6% 3.4% ‘15 Q3

‘16 Q3

‘17 Q1

‘17 Q3

‘18 Q1

‘18 Q3

VACANCY RATE IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES

asking rent per unit by bedroom

source: Costar

source: Costar

14%

$2,400

12%

$2,200

10%

$2,000

8%

$1,800

6%

$1,600

4% 2% 0% 2017 Q3

ST UDIO

2017 Q4

1 BE D

2018 Q1

2 BE D

2018 Q2

2018 Q3

3 BE D

Some of the highest rents in the Los Angeles market can be found Downtown, where rents are approximately eight percent higher than the rest of the market. The price of a one-bedroom is currently $1,916, a twobedroom is $2,383, and a three-bedroom is $3,172. Not only is Downtown Los Angeles known for having the highest rent, but it also has the highest vacancy rate. At around 4 percent, Downtown Los Angeles has the highest vacancy rate in all of Los Angeles County. Following closely behind, vacancy is also tight in MidWilshire and Hollywood, where availability is limited and average rent increased to $2,435 per month over the last year. According to CoStar, the apartment vacancy rate reached an all-time high of 12.4 percent in September 2015 in Downtown Los Angeles. A direct result of nearly 8,000 apartment units being delivered to the market 60 | FALL/WINTER 2018

2013

2015

2014

2016

2017

2018

development in los angeles

Employment figures anticipate an estimated 53,000 new workers to enter the Los Angeles workforce in 2018, a 1.2 percent increase from 2017. Of course, with any growing population, more housing is necessary to cater the influx of people. According to a study by the National Multifamily Housing Council, the Los Angeles metro area will need 164,000 units by 2030 to keep up with the growing population.

L.A. APARTMENT CONSTRUCTION IS PEAKING source: Costar

15K 10K 5K 0 11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

-5K

# of u nit s

$1,400 $1,200

‘16 Q1


In 2018 alone, 12,600 apartment units are expected to hit the market. CoStar identified 27,234 units currently under construction, the first wave of as many as 30,000 apartment units that are expected to hit the market in the next three years. This will be the heaviest period in multifamily construction in Los Angeles since the early 90’s, and it will grow inventory approximately 11.2 percent, raising vacancy to 5.2 percent. Currently, Downtown’s construction activity remains around three times the submarket’s long-term average.

Much of this construction is concentrated Downtown, where it is easier to build than in other parts of Los Angeles. Downtown development is showing signs of creeping into Mid-Wilshire, Burbank/Glendale/ Pasadena, and Marina Del Rey submarkets. Approximately 41 percent of these new apartments are being completed on the West side stretching from Silicon Beach to the 101 freeway downtown.

MAP OF DEVELOPMENT TAKING PLACE IN LOS ANGELES source: Costar

ZOOMED VIEW OF DOWNTOWN

LOS ANGELES

re c e n t ly f i n i s h e d pro j e c t s

pr o j ec ts u n der c o n stru c ti o n

pla n n ed pr o j ec ts

MATTHEWS™ | 61


However, despite having more inventory on the market, it will not necessarily improve Los Angeles’ affordability because only a small share of residents will be able to afford these highly priced luxury units. Los Angeles is already struggling to digest some of the units that have been brought to the market due to the mismatch of renter base to the type and price of apartments. The question then becomes, why are developers only bringing luxury apartments to the market? The answer, in a very competitive, expensive, and lengthy development process, the higher priced units reduce the developer’s risk. These above market rents cover the cost of upscale and costly amenities, allowing developers to hit pro forma numbers. Developers are strategically trying to target new products towards the luxury end of the price spectrum to receive profit back on their investments. And, as higher-paying professionals move to Los Angeles, the demand for luxury apartments has increased slightly. Seeing that the region can absorb at least some of the luxury apartments has restored confidence in developers who will be delivering a steady flow of apartments in the upcoming years. However, the problem remains that despite this small demand, approximately 75 to 80 percent of the new apartment supply in this cycle will be luxury or upscale. Soon, high rise apartments and luxury condos are expected to cover the downtown skyline. Apartment projects are becoming nearly impossible to build. According to the Associated General Contractors of America, contractors are expected to pay four to five percent more in 2018 compared to 2017 for construction materials, services, subcontracting, and leasing.

62 | FALL/WINTER 2018

Here are some major problems impacting development in Los Angeles: HIGH DEMAND AND PRICE FOR MATERIALS AND SERVICES Prices for materials like lumber and steel have increased substantially over the past year which has imposed a significant burden on developers. High demand for these materials has also pushed prices higher, placing more strain on developers. Additionally, construction workers have become increasingly harder to find, so the cost of labor has increased to attract more workers. SHORTAGE OF TRUCK TRANSPORTATION A lack of truck transportation is causing back up in product resulting in retailers having to pay hefty amounts to get to the front of the line. Many factors have contributed to this shortage including high freight volumes, retailers replenishing stock faster, and increased cargo shipping by manufactures. According to the federal reserve, in December 2017, industrial production had the most significant year-over-year gain since 2010. INTENSE COMPETITION AMONG DEVELOPERS AND INVESTORS Developers are competing with each other for premium build sites, materials and labor to complete their multifamily projects. This rampant competition has also lead to an amenities race among developers, who are trying to lure in residents by pushing the limits on modern living, trying to beat out neighboring multifamily developments.


REGULATORY ISSUES, CODE COMPLIANCE AND PERMITTING More than two-thirds of the cities and countries in California’s coastal metros have adopted policies that curb housing growth, according to the Legislative Analyst’s Office. It has been noted that some cities cap the number of homes that can be built each year and place limits on building heights and densities. The slow, complex permitting process has become increasingly difficult and added additional costs to the developer’s bottom line. Development fees are almost three to four times more compared to the rest of the country. Additionally, it takes nearly seven months in California to obtain a building permit, compared to the average four months in other U.S. states. This has slowed the progress down tremendously at a time when units need to be delivered to the market to meet demand. LENDER SCRUTINY Although banks love multifamily deals, bankers are becoming more selective. With record prices, cap rate compression, and increase rents, bank lenders are beginning to pull back on multifamily lending. While there is still demand for the right deals, investors are finding higher leverage requirements and more scrutiny. INCREASINGLY DIFFICULT APARTMENT DESIGNS Customers are expecting modern designs, high-end amenities, top-of-the-line technology, and expensive materials inside the units. These demands are affecting how a building is developed due to materials, services, and more importantly the cost. Officials are discussing ways to bring more affordable housing to the market, but developers are having a difficult time delivering products at an affordable price point. Consequently, occupancy levels have dropped, operators and developers are offering incentives to lure in residents, and the cost of rents have decreased in an effort to generate demand.

los angeles Metro’s Ranked by one bedroom rent Source: Zumper

sta te medi a n

Medi a n 1 B R R en t

Santa Monica Los Angeles Glendale Pasadena Burbank Culver City Santa Clarita Santa Ana Anaheim Alhambra Torrance West Covina Lakewood Norwalk Downey Inglewood Hawthorne Whittier Pomona Baldwin Park Lynwood Beliflower $4,500

$4,000

$3,500

$3,000

$2,500

$2,000

$1,500

$1,000

$500

$0

Occupancy has fallen as much as 2.5 points from year-end 2016, and vacancy is decreasing in surrounding submarkets as people try to find more affordable housing.

With more high rent units available in the city, owners of existing lower priced apartments are using this opportunity to increase their rents as well. The highend units are ultimately pushing out people who cannot afford the premium rent into Class B and C properties. Owners of these properties are taking advantage and quickly making moves to bump rents to a “sweet spot” which is higher than previous rent averages, but still lower than Class A assets. This is a vicious cycle which is driving rents higher and higher. Currently, renter demand holds Class C vacancy below three percent, above the average rent growth. Soon, renters will have very few options when it comes to finding an affordable apartment complex.

MATTHEWS™ | 63


los angeles median 1-bedroom rent (summer 2018) Source: Zumper | CoStar

$600 - $1,199

$1,200 - $1,799

$1,800 - $2,399

what’s to come

$2,400 - $2,999

$3,000 - $3,599

With any market bull run comes a corrective phase where values decrease and/or consolidate for periods of time. Many factors have affected market valuations, especially in commercial real estate. One of the most talked about topics is the tax reform.

rather locate their businesses in cities where they can find highly skilled labor, like downtown Los Angeles. Lower income residents will stay, as they don’t pay much in taxes, and have fewer options to move when it comes to affordable neighborhoods in Los Angeles.

Many economists and real estate experts have suggested that the tax reform will cause a flight of high net worth individuals out of California, especially those along the coast who have higher property values. If this is true, the increased construction of apartments in Los Angeles could potentially hinder out-of-state moves and become increasingly popular to those who are paying high property taxes along the coast.

The tax reform will mainly impact the commercial side, but even then, companies are chasing the skilled labor group. It is important for a Californian investor to realize that there are other pockets and cities out of state with similar characteristics to the Los Angeles Metro area. For example, Dallas, TX is becoming increasingly popular for Californian investors who are looking to invest in multifamily. Job growth and population growth in Dallas are increasing, which as a result has had a positive effect on multifamily investment. According to a report by Texas Association of Realtors, in 2015, 553,032 people migrated to Texas from out of state, an increase of 2.8 percent year-over-year.

Those that disagree say that the benefits to companies will offset the increased costs. People and their migration tendencies will make location decisions that are not primarily driven by tax considerations but 64 | FALL/WINTER 2018


INVESTMENT TRENDS

It is still uncertain how the construction in Los Angeles will affect the multifamily market, but one thing we know is that Los Angeles will not see a decrease in rents or vacancy until the market adjusts to a supply and demand equilibrium. Recently, we have seen investors migrate towards nontraditional places, where they can find higher yields and are still within the borders of an employment hub. Renter demand for Class C apartments has also fueled investors desire for older assets.

Los Angeles multifamily development is incredibly robust. Soaring rents are continuing to encourage new development, especially Downtown, as investors look to satisfy the demand of young, affluent workers in this region. There is concern surrounding the costly oversupply and has people questioning how much longer this boom can continue? However, even with all the activity, Los Angeles is still extremely undersupplied, especially when it comes to affordable housing.

michael astorian

michael.astorian@matthews.com 818.923.6123

MATTHEWS™ | 65


â„¢


OUR TENANT REPRESENTATION SERVICES INCLUDE: Strategically identifying and touring potential neighborhoods or markets beneficial to the tenant’s business

Leveraging traditional and modern sales techniques to uncover off market opportunities

Preparing and negotiating offers on behalf of the tenant

Providing access to a network of professionals including contractors, attorneys, architects, and consultants to assist the tenant across all facets of the expansion process

Providing a detailed market analysis including area demographics, lease comparables, and more


THE KNOWN UNKNOWN OF

COSTA HAWKINS HOW

WILL

THE

REPEAL

AFFECT

MULTIFAMILY

IN

CALIFORNIA

By: David Harrington & Daniel Withers In November 2018, California residents are expected to vote on Proposition 10, a statewide Affordable Housing Act which would repeal the Costa Hawkins Rental Housing Act and give cities the ability to impose rent-control policies. Costa Hawkins was put into place in 1995 in an effort to place limits on rent control ordinances by regulating the type of rent control rules that cities can implement. Proponents say Proposition 10 will fix California’s housing crisis but, opponents say it will do the exact opposite. The following article will go into how the repeal of Costa Hawkins came to be, what’s currently happening in the market, and the possible implications of Proposition 10.

68 | FALL/WINTER 2018


EFFORTS TO REPEAL COSTA HAWKINS

In California alone, 200,000 housing units are needed per year to keep up with rising demand, though

As a result of high rents and a shortage of affordable

approximately 80,000 units are being built annually

housing, the Affordable Housing Bond Act was

according to a statewide poll conducted last year by

introduced to the California assembly committee on

state housing officials.

February 17th, 2017. If passed, it will repeal Costa Hawkins and allow cities to implement rent control on all

While repealing Costa Hawkins and expanding

property types. It will free local governments to expand

rent control might seem like an obvious solution,

rent regulations however they wish, permitting them to

there are many negative side effects of Proposition

extend rent regulations to single-family homes, duplexes,

10, including:

condominiums, and any buildings built after 1995. •

to all units, new or old

However, the bill was put on hold after landlords protested vigorously until October 2017 when tenant advocate groups proposed a ballot initiative (Proposition

committee announced that they rejected the Affordable

Worsening the Californian housing crisis by reducing the supply of rental housing and driving up costs

10) that would repeal Costa Hawkins without the help of the state. On January 11th, 2018 the California assembly

Allowing Los Angeles officials to apply rent control

Providing limited affordable apartment units that will benefit tenants

Housing Bond Act. •

Deteriorating the quality of buildings

Limiting an owners ability to maintain properties

qualify Proposition 10 for the November 2018 ballot.

Dramatically slowing construction of new units

WHY IS IT BEING REPEALED?

The repeal of Costa Hawkins will not fix the

On June 15th, supporters of rent control options from cities across California announced that they had gathered enough signatures, approximately 408,000, to

According to supporters of Proposition 10, California’s

housing crisis.

infamous homeless and affordable housing crisis is a result of Costa Hawkins and the limits it places on the

Research demonstrates that mandating artificial prices

cities abilities to address the housing crisis. However, if

for rental units reduces the supply and drives up costs

passed, Proposition 10 stands as a threat to all renters

because it isn’t economically feasible to construct.

and property owners.

Additionally, it creates an economic disadvantage to lowincome families who need affordable housing the most.

The overarching problem California’s current apartment

According to a 2015 report by The Economist, those

market faces is an imbalance of supply and demand.

living in rent-controlled units in New York have higher

Using simple economics, rents and housing prices are

median incomes than those in market-rate apartments.

high because the demand for affordable housing far

This is primarily due to wealthier people being in a

exceeds the supply. There is simply just not enough

better position to track down and secure rent-stabilized

housing to keep up with the demand of the millions of

apartments. Furthermore, expanding rent control would

people who want to live in California, in proximity to their

not only place an immediate halt on construction, but it

jobs, without spending half of their income.

would also discourage future development.

MATTHEWS™ | 69


( S o u r c e : C l a r u s M a r ke t M e t r i c s )

(Source: RentJungle.com)

LOCATION

MEDIAN HOME PRICES

AVG. MONTHLY APARTMENT RENT

Berkeley

$1,290,000

$3,179

Beverly Hills

$3,885,000

$3,213

East Palo Alto

$917,500

$2,058

Hayward

$650,000

$2,226

Los Angeles

$899,000

$2,964

Los Gatos

$1,900,000

$2,686

Oakland

$785,000

$2,790

San Francisco

$1,463,000

$3,803

San Jose

$998,000

$2,853

Santa Monica

$2,510,000

$3,276

Thousand Oaks

$795,000

$2,289

West Hollywood

$1,825,000

$2,677

WHAT’S CURRENTLY HAPPENING IN THE MULTIFAMILY MARKET? The potential repeal is imprinting

the hottest apartment markets of

Due to the uncertainty in California,

fear in multifamily owners. Owners

all time by selling their asset. Those

multifamily investors are moving

are currently experiencing

that are taking a “wait-and-see”

their equity to other parts of the

substantial increases in overall

approach are holding off on selling

country. Markets like Las Vegas,

costs to operate their building.

or buying due to such uncertainty

Dallas/Fort-Worth, Denver, Phoenix,

Utility, labor, maintenance, and

and waiting to establish a clear and

and the Pacific Northwest are

material costs have increased

confident plan of action.

all gaining traction in multifamily

drastically over the last 18 months.

investments. This investment shift

With these rising costs and the Costa

Research from Real Capital

is a concern for California, as it

Hawkins repeal in the forefront,

Analytics shows that there was a

will weaken California’s economy

many owners are evaluating their

22 percent increase, approximately

and its ability to attract talented

current position. Owners are taking

$4.8 billion, in multifamily sales

employees. Companies and the

two different approaches, some are

during the first quarter of 2018

multifamily market follow people,

watching diligently, and others are

compared to the same quarter last

and if people have to move because

narrowing their portfolio in an effort

year. In Santa Monica, for example,

they cannot afford living expenses,

to get ahead.

the number of properties on the

companies will follow suit. If California

market is at the highest level in 20

does not have a housing supply

Aside from the Costa Hawkins

years. This same data also reveals

that is affordable, people won’t be

repeal, increase in labor, a robust

that prices have risen eight percent,

able to accept jobs and companies

soft-story retrofit environment, and

demonstrating healthy demand

won’t want to stay.

rising interest rates are prompting

despite the potential repeal.

owners to take advantage of one of

70 | FALL/WINTER 2018


WHAT INITIALLY LED TO COSTA HAWKINS IN 1995? Beginning in the late 1970s, real

During 1978, Proposition 13 was

Angeles officials were unable

estate values and surging interest

approved and passed by voters

to expand rent control to newer

rates made single-family homes

which reduced property taxes by

buildings, and placed a cap of three

in California unaffordable to the

about 57 percent. Many voters

to eight percent on yearly rent

point where numerous residents

thought that this would lower

increases on buildings built prior

started moving into apartments. As

landlord property taxes, and they

to October 1st, 1978. For buildings

a result, the supply of apartments

would, in effect lower the rents.

constructed after October 1st, 1978,

became limited, and rental rates for

However, few landlords reduced

landlords could set their own rental

multifamily accelerated at a

their rents. In response to tenant

rates and change them after the

high pace.

pressures, the Los Angeles City

term of the lease. By 1988, fourteen

Council responded to the shortage

cities had adopted full rent control

A majority of multifamily owners

of decent affordable housing

laws—including Los Angeles, San

were suffering financially, as

options for tenants by placing a

Francisco, San Jose, and Oakland.

apartment buildings became

freeze on rents for six months.

dilapidated due to deferred

During these six months, the

As Californian cities began adopting

maintenance. Rent control laws

city council worked on the Rent

rent control laws, Costa Hawkins

thrived while at the same time driving

Stabilization Ordinance.

was put into place in 1995 to reign in

owners out of business, creating a

rent control in five California cities—

decaying housing stock, drastically

This ordinance officially passed

Berkeley, Santa Monica, Cotati, East

reduced housing supply, and

in 1979, and prevented cities

Palo Alto, and West Hollywood.

multiplying rental rates even further.

from updating ordinances, so Los

The Costa Hawkins Rental Housing Act gave landlords the right to do the following:

Increase the rent to market

Exempt certain types of buildings

Prevent cities from establishing

rate on a unit once a tenant

from rent control including single-

rent control or capping rents

moves out

family dwellings, granny flats,

on units constructed after

and condominiums

February 1995

The Costa Hawkins act was amended in 2002 to allow owners the ability to obtain a new certificate of occupancy after a condo conversion even without them selling any of the converted units. However, under this act, the rental units do not become exempt from rent control.

MATTHEWS™ | 71


TIMEL I NE

COSTA HAWKINS HOW

CAME TO BE

JANUARY 11TH, 2018

Committee rejected the Affordable Housing Bond Act

1979

Rent Stabilization Ordinance Passed

LATE 1970s

Real estate values increased & vacancy decreased

1972

The city of Berkeley passed the first Californian rent control ordinance

JUNE 1978 Proposition 13 was approved & passed

AUGUST 1978 A six-month freeze was placed on rents

72 | FALL/WINTER 2018

1988

14 cities adopted rent control laws

1995

Costa Hawkins Rental Housing Act became a law

2002

Costa Hawkins was amended

FEBRUARY 17TH, 2017

Affordable Housing Bond Act introduced

OCTOBER 23RD, 2018

Coalition for Affordable Housing, Sponsored by AIDS Healthcare Foundation and ACCE Action proposed the ballot initiative - Proposition 10

JUNE 15TH, 2018

Coalition for Affordable Housing, Sponsored by AIDS Healthcare Foundation and ACCE Action collected required signatures to place Proposition 10 on the ballot

NOVEMBER 6TH, 2018 Voters will vote on Proposition 10


IF REPEALED, WHAT EFFECT WILL IT HAVE ON… TENANTS

DEVELOPERS

There may be short-term effects of skyrocketing

In the last 24 months, alone, construction costs

rents on the properties without current rent control

have increased 25 percent, and it doesn’t seem to

mechanisms in place. Especially for newer construction,

be slowing down. Therefore, developers will begin to

the repeal will cause high rents and fewer affordable

hold off on bidding on land to build new developments

apartment options. In the long term, properties will

because it will be financially unattainable, further

begin to deteriorate and supply will become limited.

worsening the affordable housing crisis. The supply of

Additionally, only the very few who are fortunate enough

rental housing will be reduced, creating more pressure

to obtain a rent-controlled unit will benefit.

for renters to find affordable housing. Unless the government funds developments, makes the permit process less burdensome or implements rent legislation,

INVESTORS Property owners will be forced out of business

developers will not be able to cover the costs and make a reasonable profit.

because they will no longer be able to maintain their properties adequately. According to one estimate, property values could decline 10 to 30 percent. Owners will not be able to afford repairs and maintenance, not

GOVERNMENT Without vacancy decontrol afforded under Costa Hawkins, municipalities can control the rental

to mention the city-imposed mandates such as reducing

marketplace in its entirety. Cities will have greater

seismic vulnerability. Owners will see profits deteriorate

flexibility when it comes to setting rent control policies,

as overall costs to operate increase and rents decrease.

and it will give them essential tools for protecting

It is anticipated that local municipalities will implement

affordable housing.

stricter code enforcement guidelines for owners to oblige by, preventing owners from maximizing profits for investment. Additionally, individuals or corporations who are considering investing in buildings with newer units will no longer receive the protection from rent control for new construction further discouraging investment in new units. No legislation can persuade people to invest in money-losing enterprises.

MATTHEWS™ | 73


THE BATTLE IS ONLY BEGINNING On January 11th, 2018 the California Democratic Party voted overwhelmingly to endorse Proposition 10. These voters are historically known to be more emotional, and approximately 65 percent of those attending the polls in November 2018 will be non-republication voters. It is also important to note that 60 to 62 percent of these votes own homes, rather than rent apartments. However, numerous groups have joined together to oppose Proposition 10. These groups include California Rental Housing Association, California Apartment Association, and more than a dozen other housing groups.

TOTAL CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTION FOR PROPOSITION 10

IN OPPOSITION OF

IN SUPPORT OF

REPEALING COSTA HAWKINS California Rental Housing Association Total Reported Contributions as of 9/22/18: $100,000

Californians for Affordable Housing, No on Proposition 10, Sponsored by the California Rental Housing Association Total Reported Contributions as of 9/22/18: $33,161,258.60

REPEALING COSTA HAWKINS Yes on 10 (Coalition for Affordable Housing), Sponsored by AIDS Healthcare Foundation and ACCE Action

Total Reported Contributions as of 9/22/18: $13,727,960.90

Make Housing Affordable- Yes on Prop. 10 Total Reported Contributions as of 9/22/18: $613,915.71

No on Prop 10- A Flawed Initiative that will Make the Housing Crisis Worse a Coalition of Housing Advocates, Renters, Large and Small Businesses, Taxpayer Groups, and Veterans Total Reported Contributions as of 9/22/18: $13,366,825.30

Californians For Affordable Housing, No On Proposition 10, Sponsored By The California Rental Housing Association Total Reported Contributions as of 9/22/18: $275,790.22

SOURCE: BALLOTPEDIA

74 | FALL/WINTER 2018


It’s more about just checking a yes or no on the ballot in November. There are a lot of other underlying housing issues that need to be addressed, including affordable housing. Even with the repeal of Costa Hawkins, the affordability issue isn’t going to go away. The repeal will bring long-term ramifications that will include a lot less construction, investment and a

DAVID HARRINGTON david.harrington@matthews.com (310) 295-1170

decrease in the value of real estate. Common ground must be found. The challenge is to overcome the current barriers—whether regulatory, political, economic, or cultural—to unlock supply and build much-needed housing.

DANIEL WITHERS daniel.withers@matthews.com (818) 923-6107

If you have any questions about Costa-Hawkins or the future of your investment property, please reach out to a Matthews™ multifamily specialist.

MATTHEWS™ | 75


76 | FALL/WINTER 2018

â„¢


5-STAR

MAINTENANCE TEAM

A Crucial Component for Property Management BY: TIM WOODS

Before online payments and resident portals, the leasing office was guaranteed to see residents at least twelve times a year, specifically when rent was due. Today, the leasing office is seeing residents far less, and maintenance technicians are engaging with residents more. The introduction of technology has increased the importance of a highliy skilled maintenance team and made their role crucial to successful property management. Becoming a key player in the day-to-day management of a property makes personality skills just as necessary as the technical abilities of a maintenance technician.

A maintenance team can either systemically enhance or quickly collapse the infrastructure and reputation of a property. Therefore, having a high performing maintenance team can improve residents’ living experience leading to higher resident retention and renewals. However, most properties are short-staffed on maintenance and are getting further and further behind on property upkeep. It is imperative to have a maintenance team that can stay ahead of property functionality and resident work requests through effective communication.

MATTHEWS™ | 77


What to look for in an excellent maintenance team In today’s market, there are historically low

Year-over-year, employment in installation,

unemployment rates making it a challenging

maintenance and repair is growing at two percent.

environment for recruiting. The number one open position at a multifamily property is a maintenance technician. However, these skilled positions are becoming harder to fill as the nation’s job growth revolves around more lucrative positions, according to June’s U.S. Department of Labor job report. Additionally, the apartment industry is facing fierce competition from the construction industry for maintenance technicians. Construction jobs have accelerated over the years and are hiring people whose skill sets overlap with what the apartment industry is looking for in a maintenance technician.

78 | FALL/WINTER 2018

When finding a maintenance technician for your property, it is essential to know your property’s needs and prepare for the interview. Property management needs to make educated decisions when filling these positions due to the interpersonal relationship between maintenance and residents. A resident is more likely to put a face with a community through contact with maintenance technicians rather than the leasing office. Therefore, maintenance technicians need to be on top of their game at all times and understand the role that they play in the community.


5 ways an excellent maintenance team can improve a resident’s living experience 1. STANDARDIZATION

An excellent maintenance team can streamline the parts and products used throughout each unit and the property. Saving both time and money, this will lead to a simplified service process and quicker resolution of maintenance issues and repairs.

2. INSTILL CONFIDENCE IN RESIDENTS

It is important that the maintenance team has clean uniforms, and shows confidence, professionalism, and expertise. This outward appearance will secure residents confidence in the ability of both the technicians and the management company.

3. INCREASE COMMUNICATION WITHIN THE COMMUNITY

The most impressive maintenance teams consider themselves part of the leasing team. Everyone in the community must work together to create a great living environment. When residents feel comfortable with the staff in the community, they are more likely to express their concerns. It is important that maintenance technicians are able to communicate with residents to get the job done, especially when it’s resident error, a friendly and respectful maintenance technician will help keep residents happy.

4. EDUCATE RESIDENTS

Short videos of maintenance technicians correctly operating appliances in the units will further connect residents with the property’s maintenance technicians while also reducing service requests.

5. PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE

Long-term effectiveness is linked to effort. Proactively working to upkeep the community, not only ensures that systems are functioning correctly but also mitigates risk factors. An excellent maintenance team will do more than what is listed on the service ticket. For example, checking the standard safety features and asking residents what else can be done each time they are on a maintenance call or enter a unit. Often, they will find and correct unknown issues, taking every opportunity to fix the small problems before they become large-scale risks. Putting in the effort now will save time in the future.

MATTHEWS™ | 79


Tips for hiring a great maintenance team member •

Ask plenty of questions about their skills. A candidate, in addition to their mastery of technical skills, should also be competent and effective in their regular habits.

Understand the basic certifications. It might be beneficial to bring in a professional who understands these certifications and can ask specific qualification questions to make sure the candidate has the necessary certifications to mitigate risk and insurance issues that arise from unskilled workers.

Have the candidate complete a personality test. This test will help to determine if the candidate is a good communicator.

Make sure the candidate is knowledgeable on recent innovations in apartment living. They should be willing to learn and be able to adapt to a changing environment.

Are they familiar with using technology? It is necessary that they be familiar with cell phones, facilities applications, and online reporting.

Provide a maintenance test. A hands-on maintenance test will reveal their knowledge base.

Walk through the property and a vacant unit. The candidate should have a complete understanding of the properties needs before they are offered a job. They should be familiar with the systems in place and how to navigate unit features.

• •

Check vendor references. It is important to get independent insight into the applicant’s reputation in the community.

80 | FALL/WINTER 2018


How to retain an exceptional maintenance team TRAINING ON NEW PROCESSES

TEAM ORIENTED EVENTS

Highly effective maintenance teams should

An event hosted by the apartment complex is a

continue to learn more effective methods even after

great way to let residents mingle with technicians

they are hired. The ability to continue sharpening

in a casual atmosphere. These type of events

their skills and keeping up with the latest regulations

will allow the tenants to share their thoughts,

and processes is vital to the community’s safety

communicate common service requests, and

and efficiency. Additionally, it provides them with the

provide tips on how residents can run their

opportunity to grow professionally.

apartments more efficiently.

CROSS TRAIN OFFICES

COMMUNICATION

Educate office staff and maintenance technicians

It is the job of the property manager to make sure

on the roles individuals play throughout the

that the employees feel part of a larger team and

property. Invite the office staff to spend a day

are confident that communication is a two-way

shadowing a maintenance technician, and vice

street. The maintenance team doesn’t want to feel

versa. This activity will help the office staff to better

like they are taking orders and need to understand

understand what the technicians need in order to

the impactful role they play in the overall reputation

complete the job right the first time around. There

of the community. Having regular meetings will

needs to be good communication between offices.

help increase team mentality. When teams work

For example, if the office staff understands that

together, they are able to build a community by

the more information residents can provide about

doing what is needed when it is required.

a maintenance problem, the better educated the maintenance team is to assist and correct the

MENTORSHIP

problem. It also teaches the right language for

Having a great team manager will motivate the

the office staff and maintenance technicians to

team. The maintenance team manager should have

use around residents, so there is a clear line of

the ability to mentor his crew and the community to

communication. Cross-training further improves

make them feel like they are part of a team. Regular

resident confidence in management’s ability to

rewards and recognition programs can also go a

resolve issues efficiently and effectively.

long way towards making a maintenance technician feel appreciated.

REFERRAL BONUS Properties always need more maintenance

ORGANIZATION

technicians. Consider offering a referral bonus to

Documentation should be well organized which will

technicians and office staff. People want to work

allow maintenance technicians to balance an ever-

with people who are high-quality performers, have

changing workload and finalize tasks in an orderly

good work experience, and contribute to a positive

fashion. The maintenance team manager should

work atmosphere.

also report to management regularly to make sure the team is completing all necessary forms and keeping up with their digital reporting. MATTHEWS™ | 81


In an industry that is continually renewing and upgrading itself, it is necessary to make sure that the resident’s needs are being met. By retaining high-performing maintenance technicians, the residents will feel confident that they are being taken care of. If you have any questions regarding how to manage and enhance your maintenance team, please reach out to one of our property management specialists. Tim Woods tim.woods@matthews.com (310) 919-5725

82 | FALL/WINTER 2018


MATTHEWS™ | 83


84 | FALL/WINTER 2018


MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 85


Completed

27

3,164

Under Construction

27

2,498

Plan Check

6

848

Immediate Consideration

20

2,659

Future Consideration

22

1,209

102

10,378

86 | FALL/WINTER 2018


MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 87


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MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 89


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MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 91


THE EXTENDED 1031 EXCHANGE PROCESS

An Improved Alternative Method to a Traditional Exchange

By: Daniel withers & David harrington

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MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 93


94 | FALL/WINTER 2018


1

2

3

4

MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 95


96 | FALL/WINTER 2018


Healthcare in real Estate

LEGISLATIONS MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 97


98 | FALL/WINTER 2018


MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 99


100 | FALL/WINTER 2018


TM

MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 101


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MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 103


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LOW Rent-To-Sales Ratio

HIGHER Security

HIGHER Poperty Value

HIGH Rent-To-Sales Ratio

LOWER Security

LOWER Poperty Value

MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 105


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MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 107


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MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 109


S O U R C E : Z I L L O W A N A LY S I S O F U S C E N S U S B U R E A U

110 | FALL/WINTER 2018


In 1993, multifamily accounted for 7 percent of new residential construction spending, but that share has increased by more than 2.5 times, to 18 percent in 2017. This increase is partially attributable to the nation’s growing share of renters. As reported by the U.S. Census Bureau, between 2005 to 2016, 91 percent of all newly constructed households were renters, and renters currently occupy 87 percent of the units in multifamily properties.

The construction itself creates jobs and injects money which can be a boom for the local economy.

In 2017, annual spending on new multifamily construction totaled $62.6 billion; this amount is 3.8 times the amount spent in the post-recession trough of 2010, and it is just 2.6 percent shy of the pre-recession peak of 2006. In contrast, single family construction has failed to recover to the same extent, with real spending still at less than half its peak level.

The addition of new units to the housing supply serves to meet the need for housing, which helps keep rent growth in check

MATTHEWS™ | 111


T O P 2 0 U S M E T R O S B Y P R O J E C T E D A PA R T M E N T D E L I V E R I E S I N 2 0 1 8

S O U R C E : YA R D I M AT R I X

19,948

NE W YORK , NY 17,132

DALLAS-FORT WORTH, TX 15,187

DENVER, CO 11,449

LOS ANGELES, C A

10,713

C H I C AG O, I L

10,302

PHOENIX, AZ

9,790

MIAMI, FL AT L A N TA , G A

9,547

WA S H I N G TO N , D C

9,516 8,837

AUSTIN, T X

8,614

S E AT T L E , W A

7,646

HOUSTON, T X NASHVILLE, TN

6,684

S A N F R A N C I S CO, C A

6,647

CHARLOT TE, NC

5,169

BOSTON, MA

5,004

P O R T L A N D, O R SAN JOSE, CA P H I L A D E L P H I A , PA TA M PA , F L

After peaking in 2017, apartment demand was expected to finally slowdown in 2018. However, demand in 2018 grew faster than expected, as developers started to build thousands of new apartments. Once again, apartment rent growth is on the rise, increasing average apartments rents to 2.9 percent, according to RealPage. Rents are growing as developers begin to open new luxury, class A, apartments. An immense amount of supply is still underway, especially in areas where the population and employment is growing. Throughout the nation, markets with high levels of multifamily construction have seen larger population growth, increasing employment, and strong rental rate increases despite the growth in total number of units. Texas, in general, is experiencing both population and employment growth, two fundamentals that go hand-inhand. A lot of this growth is happening with the “Texas Triangle,” which has shown a great amount of economic growth in the last decade. The Texas Triangle, is defined as the three corners Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio, and the area between. Currently, the triangle is comprised of 17 million people over 58,000 square miles, and by 2025, that number is expected to be over 30 million people. 112 | FALL/WINTER 2018

4,804 4,533 4,368 4,176

THE TEXAS TRIANGLE

FORT WORTH

DALLAS

AUSTIN

SAN ANTONIO

HOUSTON

The Dallas-Fort Worth and Austin-Round Rock metro areas are two key examples of the immense growth multifamily starts can bring to an economy. Matthews™ looks at the economic growth these areas have experienced and why multifamily investors should keep their eyes on these booming areas for investment.


FA S T E S T G R O W I N G C I T Y I N T H E U . S .

# 1 F O R R E A L E S TAT E I N V E S T M E N T S I N EMERGING TRENDS SURVEY

9TH LAR GEST CIT Y IN THE U.S.

10TH BEST PLACE FOR BUSINESS AND CAREERS

The DFW region’s attractive quality of life, strong regional and state economy, low cost of living, skilled labor force, pro-business mindset, and absence of corporate and personal income taxes all contribute to the thriving Dallas-Fort Worth area.

A FAVORABLE BUSINESS CLIMATE Home to over 22 companies on the Forbes 500 list, DFW has added over 122,000 jobs in the last year experiencing a growth rate of 3.4 percent with over 334 jobs per day. In the most recent data released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, among the 12 largest metropolitan areas in the country, Dallas ranks second in the number of jobs added over the year and ranks third in the annual rate of job growth. 2 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 8 P E R C E N TA G E C H A N G E

Ranked as one of the top 20 place to live by U.S. News, Dallas-Fort Worth is leading the nation in population growth having over 7.4 million people. Home to a surplus of Fortune 500 companies, four times more restaurants per capita than New York City, and the most shops per capita in the world, this bolstering metro has grown to match the size of Seattle throughout the last seven years. According to the Dallas Regional Chamber, more than 780,000 residents were added from 2010 to 2016. In 2016, over 390 people were added per day to the DFW area in 2016 with 40 percent of that growth due to natural increase and 60 percent from net migration. It is estimated that 10,6676,844 residents will live in the DFW region by 2040.

EMPLOYMENT GR OW TH

SOURCE: BUREAU OF LABOR NE W YORK DALLAS-FORT WORTH LOS ANGELES HOUSTON PHOENIX AT L A N TA SAN FRANCISCO WA S H I N G TO N D C CHICAGO MIAMI PHILADELPHIA BOSTON

MATTHEWS™ | 113


U N E M P L O Y M E N T R AT E

U N I T E D S TAT E S

SOURCE: BUREAU OF LABOR

TEXAS

FORT WORTH

DALLAS

PERCENT 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

The unemployment rate in DFW remains well below the national average of 3.5 percent, near historical lows not consistently seen since the high-tech boom of the 1990’s. With this low rate, it’s no wonder young professionals are flocking to this area for job opportunities. DFW is home to more than 100,000 businesses and 1,500 corporate headquarters — ranking 4th in Fortune 500 corporate headquarters and responsible for producing about onethird of all goods and services in Texas.

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

DE VELOPMENT PIPELINE

AS OF JUNE 2018 S O U R C E : YA R D I M AT R I X

PROSPECTIVE 53,965 UNITS

40.1%

134,554 T O TA L

UNDER CONSTRUC TION 43,731 UNITS

DFW MULTIFAMILY: BOOMING IS AN UNDERSTATEMENT

32.5%

With the prosperous business and job opportunity climate in DFW creating a steep increase in renters, there’s no surprise in the increased development and construction of multifamily housing in the area. With more than 17,000 new multifamily units projected to come online by the end of 2018, DFW is the second top multifamily market in the nation behind New York City in terms of apartment supply. Outpacing metros like Denver, Los Angeles, and Chicago.

PLANNED 36,858 UNITS

Just recently, Dallas-Fort Worth topped the annual Emerging Trends in Real Estate markets ranking on desirability in real estate investment for the second time in three years, helped by the metropolitan area’s affordability, available workforce, quality of life, emergence as a distribution hub and its focus on job growth. Dallas-Fort Worth has ranked among the top 5 markets six times in the past decade in the survey, which is conducted in a partnership between professional services firm PwC and the Urban Land Institute, a nonprofit research group focused on land use issues. 114 | FALL/WINTER 2018

27.4%

TOP 5 SUBMARKE TS WITH MOST NEW UNITS IN PIPELINE

SOURCE: ALN

FRISCO/THE COLONY/LIT TLE ELM

9,878

4,645 M C K I N N E Y / A L L E N / FA I R V I E W 3,931 U P T O W N / D O W N T O W N / PA R K C I T I E S 3,897 DOWNTOWN/ THE CEDARS/DEEP ELLUM 3,284 R O C K WA L L / R O W L E T T / S A C H S E / M U R P H Y


With its vibrant business climate and quality of life, Austin has obtained a substantial amount of accolades: #1

#1

BEST PLACE TO LIVE

U . S . C I T Y AT T R A C T I N G T H E MOST WORKERS

#2

IN FORBES’ ANNUAL R A N K I N G O F A M E R I C A’ S B E S T CITIES FOR JOBS

#9

BEST-PERFORMING CITY IN ANNUAL ASSESSMENT OF W H E R E A M E R I C A’ S J O B S A R E C R E AT E D & S U S TA I N E D

#3

BEST ECONOMY OUT OF THE 40 BIGGEST CITIES IN THE U.S.

Austin is the country’s 11th largest city with all the positive attributes of a smaller town.

QUALIT Y H E A LT H C A R E

SILICON HILLS Like Dallas, Austin’s expansion is paced by strong population growth. Last year, the metro area had the strongest population increase and rate of domestic inmigration of any in the country with a population over a million. This population growth has translated into many things, particularly in retail sales, construction jobs, financial services and trade, helping boost a diverse job climate. Economists predict the Austin metro area will add 62,500 residents this year and another 65,000 residents in 2019, raising the region’s population from 2.1 million in 2017 to 2.24 million in 2019. The unemployment rate in Austin and the surrounding area is lower than the national average, and the average income is slightly above the national average as well. Austin will add 29,800 jobs in 2018 and 31,200 jobs in 2019 Many major employers have added to the population growth seen in Austin. Oracle, for example, unveiled its new Austin campus as a sales innovation customer experience hub to support increasing demand for Oracle Cloud and attract top talent. The Austin complex features a 560,000-SF facility and spans 40 acres of Lady Bird Lake waterfront property that could ultimately support a workforce of up to 10,000. Plans filed by Oracle in April will add an additional 420,000 SF that could house a couple thousand workers on top of the 3,000 already filling up the campus’ first phase.

LOW CRIME R AT E S

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

O U T S TA N D I N G SCHOOLS

LOW COST OF LIVING

MATTHEWS™ | 115


MULTIFAMILY CONSTRUCTION As one of the cities with the most robust apartment construction in the country, Austin is adding an impressive number of 5,758 new apartments by the end of 2018. As a result of the 19% increase in apartment construction, rents in the area have gone up by a shy 0.2% in the last year. The sizeable supply of apartments is pushing landlords to offer concessions such as months of free rent. It’s no secret that it is getting more and more expensive to build new apartment units. However, in comparison to other states with large metropolitan areas, it is much easier build in states like Texas that don’t have long a permitting process or strict regulations. In Los Angeles, for example, it could take over a year to get a permit compared to the average three month permitting process in the Austin metro.

DE VELOPMENT PIPELINE

AS OF JUNE 2018 S O U R C E : YA R D I M AT R I X

PROSPECTIVE 32,646 UNITS

45.9%

71,075 T O TA L

UNDER CONSTRUC TION 19,441 UNITS

27.4% PLANNED 18,988 UNITS

26.7%

AUSTIN ME TRO

2018’S HOT TEST MARKETS F O R N E W A PA R T M E N T S S O U R C E : YA R D I M AT R I X

AUSTIN - 5,758 ROUND ROCK - 796 PFLUGER VILLE - 721 LEANDER - 478 C E D A R PA R K - 7 6 0

116 | FALL/WINTER 2018

20 17

20 15

20 13

AUSTIN

20 11

20 07

20 05

20 03

N AT I O N A L

20 09

U N E M P L O Y M E N T R AT E

SOURCE: BUREAU OF LABOR


The renter-age population is increasing/growing

Overall, the long term demand for rentals is likely to remain high for a variety of demographic and social reasons:

The renter-age population is increasing/growing There is demand from retirees downsizing from single family homes

Dallas-Fort Worth and Austin-Round Rock are not only the best cities for jobs and business relocations, but some of the best markets for real estate investments. Multifamily investors should keep their eyes on these active Texas markets as we will continue to see healthy activity.

DANNY MCQUAID

D A N I E L . M C Q U A I D @ M AT T H E W S . C O M (214) 932-1284

CRAIG IRVIN

C R A I G . I R V I N @ M AT T H E W S . C O M (512) 817-4975

MATTHEWS™ | 117


MATTHEWS

TM

AWARDS & RECOGNITIONS

WW W .| M A T T H E W2018 S.COM 118 FALL/WINTER


TOP INFLUENCERS IN RETAIL

CRE’S BEST PLACES TO WORK

REAL ESTATE FORUM

REAL ESTATE FORUM

POWER BROKER AWARD - LOS ANGELES

POWER BROKER AWARD - DALLAS

COSTAR

COSTAR

TOP BROKERAGE FIRM

CRE’S BEST BOSSES

NREI

REAL ESTATE FORUM

TOP INVESTMENT SALES BROKERS REAL ESTATE FORUM

MATTHEWS™ | 119


5

Industrial property types to know

Th e i n du s t r i a l s e c t or h a s be e n p re v iously ove rlooke d b y inve st ors, b ut w it h t he sky rocketing gro w th w e ’v e s e e n i n e - c om m e rc e in t he last d e cad e , ind ust rial prope rt ie s are now a ho t c o mmo di ty . A c c o rd i n g t o R e a l Ca pi t al A naly t ics, inve st m e nt act ivit y is at a re cord hig h lev el. Th e $18. 2 bi l li on i n d e a l v ol um e s e e n in Q 2’18 is t he st ronge st Q 2 for d e al volum e in histo ry. In du s tr i a l va c a n c y i s c ur re n t l y t ra c k i ng at it s low e st le ve l of t he past 30 y e ars and is now a full 300 bps be l ow t h e 10-y e ar hist orical ave rage of 8. 3 pe rce nt .

B y : J o h n n y D u n n & Ky l e r B e a n 120 | FALL/WINTER 2018


Demand for industrial space continues to rise with an immense amount of foreign and domestic capital still looking to buy into this growing sector. As e-commerce continues to play an important role for retailers, industrial will continue to be sought out and be vital for business operations. Investors should pay attention to the benefits of this asset class, as industrial properties typically contain:

L O N G-T E R M T E N AN T S

HIGHER YIELDS

RELATIVELY LOW

LONG TERM SECURITY WITH THE

MAINTENANCE

ABILITY TO RE-TENANT SHOULD THE OCCUPYING TENANT EXIT

MOST ACTIVE INDUSTRIAL MARKETS H1’ 18 2013

2017

H1’18

MARKET

1

1

1

Los Angeles

SALES VOLUME

3

2

2

Chicago

2

3

3

Dallas

5

7

4

Inland Empire

13

5

NYC Boroughs

6

6

6

San Jose

8

7

Atlanta

4

5

8

No NJ

1%

1,985 1,679

7 12

YOY 2,049

32% -1%

1,455

43%

1,107

54%

1,077

-5%

1,036

-10%

955

-30%

835

11

17

9

Phoenix

17

14

10

East Bay

793

10

16

11

Seattle

785

9

10

12

Orange Co

780

27

20

13

Denver

730

8

9

14

Houston

703

43

27

15

Columbus

698

71% 41% 28% -6% 39% -23% 87%

15

15

16

Boston

652

36

11

17

Las Vegas

609

22

29

18

San Francisco

586

18

18

19

Miami/Dade Co

565

23

19

20

Baltimore

546

40%

518

42%

19

24

21

Philadelphia

40

49

22

Austin

501

20

4

23

DC VA burbs

485

50

47

24

Jacksonville

479

26

26

25

Minneapolis

477

-3% 167% 107% -1%

136% 0% 212% 59%

MARKETS IN ORANGE DENOTE RECORD HIGH H1 VOLUME IN H1’18 SOURCE: REAL CAPITAL ANAYTICS

Without increased construction in the industrial space, market fundamentals such as rents and occupancy rates will only rise on the basis of square footage demand predictions for the rest of 2018 and all of 2019, according to a forecast report by NAIOP. The bulk of economic indicators are showing positive rent growth which will continue to increase in the next year and a half, if not beyond.

MATTHEWS™ | 121


CONSTRUCTION IS BACK IN FULL FORCE BTS AND SPEC BULK-REGIONAL RBA UNDER CONSTRUCTION

300

96%

270

95%

240

86

210 180 150

80 105

84

89

88

62 75

39

90

36 17

23

139 139 111

4

82 61

07

109

84

123

93% 152

79

08

09

54

44

3

3

36

35

3

3

3

4

41

40

40

41

10

11

PRELEASE

3

4

48

47

50

58

68

90%

73

89%

33 171

21

9 69

12 AVAILABLE

84

78

86

102 105

92% 91%

44

22

14

11

110 104

30 0

23

23

120 122

94% 102

73

65

47

61

120 60

93

88

97

94

88

116

125

118

106

120 127

141

171

185 190 189 180

152

163

OCCUPANCY (%)

MILLIONS OF SQUARE FEET UNDER CONSTRUCTION

SOURCE: COSTAR

88% 148 126

87% 86%

59

85% 13

14

15

16

17

18

84%

CURRENT OCCUPANCY RATE

INDUSTRIAL SALES VOLUME SOURCE: COSTAR

18 16 SALES VOLUME, MILLIONS

14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 01

02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 INFILL/LOCAL SALES VOLUMES

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

BULK/REGIONAL SALES VOLUME

With the excitement and interest of industrial assets, Matthewsâ„¢ breaks down the different types of properties in this sector and what particular selection might be best for investors. 122 | FALL/WINTER 2018


1

Warehouses & Distribution Centers

While typically clumped together, warehouse and

through, both warehouse and distribution

distribution centers are quite different in terms

center buildings are designed with high ceiling

of use. Warehouses are used for storing products

clearances, sometimes reaching up to 60 feet

while distribution centers, in addition to storing

high, to facilitate specialized racking and material

products, also offer additional services, such as

handling equipment. Many buildings also have a

order-fulfilment, cross docking, and packaging.

section quartered off for office space.

Since online retail orders are usually shipped

Ideally, warehouses and distribution centers are

from a distribution center to their destination,

located near major transportation routes, such

distribution centers are considered the bridge

as railways and freeways. Although warehouses

between a supplier and customer. They don’t

within the “last mile” are becoming increasingly

store products for as long as warehouses do

popular due to the large demand in online retail,

and as a result, distribution centers have a

t he y are t y pically locat e d w he re land is cheap .

higher flow velocity. To better accommodate the

Most of t he t op w are house and d ist rib ut io n

higher velocity of order processing, warehouse

ce nt e rs in t he count ry are locat e d in t he

management, transportation and distribution

Mid w e st , spe cif ically in O klahom a, Ne b raska,

centers are more likely to be equipped with

Missouri, and I ow a.

sophisticated technology and state-of-the-art management systems.

In recent years, e-commerce has served as an explosive catalyst in the heightened demand for

When it comes to their physical build, both

warehouse and distribution centers across the

warehouses and distribution centers are uniquely

country. According to CoStar, current vacancy

designed to store and distribute items, and

rates across the country are at all-time lows,

share many similarities. Both warehouse and

demand is superseding supply, and rents have

distribution centers are generally single-storied

been on the climb. Many experts believe that the

buildings known to range anywhere from 5,000

rise in online purchases brought on by the growth

square feet to 500,000 square feet depending on

in e-commerce is the beginning of a trend that

their tenant and location. Along with large truck

the industry will see continue for years to come.

doors, numerous loading docks, and parking lots large enough for semi-trucks to maneuver

ASKING RENT PER SF

SOURCE: COSTAR

SOURCE: COSTAR

180

12%

160

11%

$8.50

140

10%

$8.00

120

9%

100

8%

$7.50

80

7%

60

6%

40

5%

$6.00

20

4%

$5.50

0

3%

$5.00

2013

2014

2015

ABSORPTION

2016 DELIVERIES

2017

2018

VACANCY

ABSORPTION & DELIVERIES IN MILLIONS

ABSORPTION, DELIVERIES, VACANCY

$7.00 $6.50

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

VACANCY

MATTHEWS™ | 123


2

Refrigeration & Cold Storage Buildings

Used as distribution centers for cold

Just as e-commerce has spurred

food products such as meat, produce,

a large demand in warehouses,

frozen meals, and dairy products,

it has also increased demand for

refrigeration and cold storage

refrigeration and cold storage

buildings are often classified under

facilities. According to a study by

the same umbrella as warehouses

Nielsen in 2015, 25 percent of online

and distribution centers in the

respondents said that they have

logistics industry. In commercial real

purchased groceries online, and 55

estate though, refrigeration and cold

percent said that they are willing

storage buildings are their own animal

to purchase groceries online in the

due to the unique requirements of

future. Another study done by Statista

the building.

found that in 2017, the online food and beverage segment had a year-on-

The specialized industrial buildings

year revenue growth of 18 percent.

offer large capacity cooler and freezer rooms. The large cooler rooms

To accommodate the growing impact

must stay regulated at 34 degrees

of e-commerce, more cold storage

Fahrenheit while freezers are expected

facilities are being built near ports,

to range from -10 to zero degrees

key border crossings, trade gate-

Fahrenheit. It is vital that refrigerators

ways and anywhere where people are

and building equipment operate

consolidated. In logistics, the longer

properly, or a facility may run the

a majority of product can be stored

risk of damaging goods. Because of

and transported together with like

this, it can cost double the amount to

products, the greater the cost benefit.

build a refrigeration and cold storage

This applies to both import and export

building than a regular warehouse or

focused facilities.

distribution center. In the same way that e-commerce As for construction, refrigeration and

is expected to raise demand for

cold storage buildings can be found

warehouse and distribution space,

as large single story high ceiling

experts expect the demand for online

buildings or multi-level vertical

grocery shopping to rise as well.

buildings on small plots of land. Fully

Therefore, there will continue to be a

automated high-rise buildings are

strong rising demand for refrigerated

becoming more and more popular

and cold storage buildings, especially

in this sector due to land prices

in densely populated areas. As space

and space constraints. The vertically

is limited in densely populated areas,

designed buildings can not only operate

the vertically designed cold storage

in denser areas, but they are also more

facilities are expected to continue

energy efficient as heat infiltration is

growing in popularity as well.

greatest through the floor and roof.

124 | FALL/WINTER 2018


SOURCE: COSTAR

16

14%

14

13%

12

12%

10

11%

8

10%

6

9%

4

8%

2

7%

0

2013

2014

2015

ABSORPTION

2016

2017

DELIVERIES

VACANCY

ABSORPTION & DELIVERIES IN MILLIONS

ABSORPTION, DELIVERIES, VACANCY

6%

2018 VACANCY

ASKING RENT PER SF SOURCE: COSTAR

$6.40 $6.20 $6.00 $5.80 $5.60 $5.40 $5.20 $5.00 $4.80

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 125


3

Telecom & Data Housing Centers

Telecom and data housing centers, also known

Tenants are always looking for a way to be

as switching centers, cyber centers, and

more efficient. Recently, several technological

web hosting facilities, are highly specialized

innovations have been introduced that may

industrial buildings used to centralize an

impact the way data centers are designed. One

organization’s IT operations and equipment,

type of technology gaining traction is called

which includes storing, managing and

all-flash, which is replacing rows and rows of

disseminating a company’s data. They are

spinning disks, creating a far more efficient

home to a network’s most critical information

solution to design challenges. By 2021, Gartner

and can be vital to the existence of companies.

predicts that 50 percent of data centers will use

Data must be made accessible to networks

this technology. The new technology also saves

24/7, so security and reliability are top

on power and cooling.

priorities for tenants. Buildings with new and efficient cooling and Data centers typically range in size from 50,000

power capabilities are in demand. It is estimated

to 180,000 square feet and must be equipped

that power costs for a telecom and data

and strategically designed to hold large

housing center are increasing by 10 percent a

computer servers, storage hardware, cables,

year, so the adoption of liquid based cooling is

racks, and security firewalls. This equipment

becoming popular.

is extremely heavy, expensive and sensitive to temperature and humidity. Consequently, it is

Edge data centers have become increasingly

imperative that supporting infrastructure be up

more popular in the past year, which are

to par at all times. Floors must be reinforced to

described as microgrid data centers that literally

support the weight of the equipment, computer

extend the edge of the internet by building in

room air conditioners and HVAC systems and

tier-two markets. Data centers have traditionally

exhausts need to be maintained properly.

been built in core markets and hubs in places

These buildings consume enormous amounts of

such as New York, North Virginia, Dallas, or

energy and rely heavily on uninterruptable power

Silicon Valley. On the contrary, edge data center

sources to ensure that they never lose power.

companies are looking to build and occupy hubs in places that don’t have data centers but where

Security is also a key factor for telecom

the bandwidth is in demand. To demonstrate

and data centers, and biometrics and video

how fast the concept is expanding, a two-year-

surveillance systems must be installed.

old company, EdgeConneX, went from zero

Depending on the level of security needed

hubs to over two dozen and is continuing to

by different networks, more precautions may

expand today.

be required. While the volume and velocity of data increases, Due to the massive amounts of power supply

and companies become more and more reliant

necessary to support telecom and data housing

on storing data, the demand for data centers

centers, they must be located close to major

is expected to grow. The types of data center

communications and power lines. Many data

in demand will begin to change though as

centers are located in California, Texas, Florida,

microgrids gain traction and tenants look to

Virginia, and Georgia. Massive new facilities

inhabit more efficiently designed buildings to

are being built in New Mexico, Nevada, Iowa,

maximize space and save on high energy bills.

and Washington.

126 | FALL/WINTER 2018


SOURCE: COSTAR

14

18%

12

16%

10

14%

8

12%

6

10%

4

8%

2

6%

0

2013

2014

2015

ABSORPTION

2016

2017

DELIVERIES

2018

VACANCY

ABSORPTION & DELIVERIES IN MILLIONS

ABSORPTION, DELIVERIES, VACANCY

4%

VACANCY

ASKING RENT PER SF SOURCE: COSTAR

$10 $9

$8 $7

$6

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 127


4

Flex & Heavy Equipment Rental Buildings

Flex buildings, short for “flexible” buildings cover an array of property types. The term is often used to describe an industrial building that combines one or more uses in a single facility. Flex buildings have a smaller amount of square footage, but have a high amount of office space to accommodate small businesses. These buildings generally accommodate small businesses that rely heavily on online sales or do not need as much exposure to heavy retail street traffic. Types of flex buildings include: •

Light Manufacturing

Office Space

Research & Development

Showroom Retail Sales

Warehouse & Distribution Use

Heavy Equipment Rental locations and demand have been increasing across the country. The growth has mainly been driven by companies’ desires to increase their bottom line. In many instances, it makes sense financially for companies to rent out equipment need for a job, rather than owning and storing their own machinery. Equipment Rental companies therefore need to be located in all major markets to provide convenient service to their customers. They require sites with: Grade-level doors Retail frontage Warehouse storage space Large acreage to display their equipment Due to these unique needs, they typically pay higher rents than similar size warehouse buildings.

128 | FALL/WINTER 2018


SOURCE: COSTAR

70

13%

60

12%

50

11%

40

10%

30

9%

20

8%

10

7%

0

2013

2014

2015

ABSORPTION

2016

2017

DELIVERIES

VACANCY

ABSORPTION & DELIVERIES IN MILLIONS

ABSORPTION, DELIVERIES, VACANCY

6%

2018 VACANCY

ASKING RENT PER SF SOURCE: COSTAR

$15 $14 $13 $12 $11 $10 $9

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 129


Freight &

Manufacturing

Building

Manufacturing facilities are designed to house specialized equipment used addition to providing three-phase high capacity, electric power, these industrial properties may include heavy ductwork, pressurized air or water lines, buss exhaust systems, floor drains, storage tanks and cranes. According to the Institute for Supply Management, the overall manufacturing sector has grown for 22 months, registering one of the longest sustained growth periods for

ABSORPTION, DELIVERIES, VACANCY SOURCE: COSTAR

70

11%

60

10%

50

9%

40

8%

30

7%

20

6%

10

5%

0

2013

2014

2015

ABSORPTION

some time in the U.S. Growth in this

2016

2017

DELIVERIES

2018

4%

VACANCY

area benefits light manufacturing, assembly and even large-scale factories, and it also supports other components of the manufacturing supply chain such as warehousing and transportation.

ASKING RENT PER SF

Freight sites are used to distribute products for retailers and major companies. These site are located in Industrial corridors or near major highways and interstates for a same day delivery. Freight sites are industrial warehouses ranging anywhere from a few 1,000 SF all the way up to larger facilities in the 100,000 SF plus range. Freight sites are comprised of large truck courts with dock high doors to give 18 wheeler trucks the ability to pick up products and deliver. Major Freight Tenants include FedEx Freight, DHL, and Amazon. These buildings play an important role for retailers and businesses as the need for same day delivery has increased with the presence of online shopping.

130 | FALL/WINTER 2018

SOURCE: COSTAR

$8.00 $7.50 $7.00 $6.50 $6.00 $5.50

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

VACANCY

ducts, high capacity ventilation and

ABSORPTION & DELIVERIES IN MILLIONS

to produce goods or materials. In


What to Expect

As we see the demand for industrial space continue to increase from both investors and companies, there is a strong forecast of rent growth and increased asset value. Industrial properties are one that are not only the desired e-commerce proof investment, but actually grow as e-commerce expands. The need for more industrial facilities by companies who focus on online sales has driven this sector to be one of the fastest growing for real estate investors, all while providing a higher average yield than retail real estate offerings.

For more information on the industrial market, contact a Matthews™ specialist.

JOHNNY DUNN johnny.dunn@matthews.com (214) 692-2114

K Y L ER BEA N kyler.bean@matthews.com (214) 692-2192

MATTHEWS™ | 131


“It was a great pleasure to have worked with Matthews Multifamily agents. They presented a well thought out marketing strategy and an excellent financial analysis, all of which, contributed to ultimately earning our business over numerous other firms we interviewed. Their deep-rooted knowledge of the market, professionalism, and assertiveness achieved a sales price we thought was improbable. We cannot begin to express our gratitude for their diligence, hard work, and patience in getting us a great deal and putting us in an ideal 1031 exchange property.â€? - M A T T H E W S™ P R I V A T E C L I E N T

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CALIFORNIA MULTIFAMILY DEBT MARKET: Financing options for the current climate By: Hugh Seifert & Brian Krebs Barrington Capital Corporation

As we approach the fourth quarter of 2018, the recent interest rate hikes are beginning to impact the landscape of commercial real estate finance. Rather than waiting for the next cycle of buying opportunity, many investors in the California market still seek to acquire multifamily properties under current market conditions, particularly when there is an opportunity for value to be added. The question for these investors is: What financing options are available to make their money work in the best way possible? Th is ar t icle exp lo res the benefits and con st rain t s o f three p rima ry fina nc i ng o pt i o ns an in ve st or ca n co nsider when util i zi ng d e bt f or an ac quisitio n.

134 | FALL/WINTER 2018


MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 135


1. PERMANENT DEBT Over the course of the current cycle, permanent debt has made up a clear majority of multifamily financing across all markets. Specifically in Southern California, household name banks have become the most popular and sought-after apartment lenders. By offering aggressive rates and minimal cost, these banks have gained a loyal client base over the years. However, we are beginning to see a change. Although many of the larger banks are still extremely active, they are facing increased competition. As Treasury rates have started to move, regional and community banks are getting more creative by cutting spreads, limiting prepayment penalties, and minimizing bank fees. Yet even with these more creative approaches, based on the battle between rising interest rates and historically low cap rates, permanent debt is not as appealing, nor as workable, as it historically has been based.

136 | FALL/WINTER 2018

The fact is that with rising interest rates, many buyers are finding that it is nearly impossible to secure significant leverage on any acquisition utilizing permanent debt. Because most of the deals that are worth buying today are properties that have significant upside, this translates to rents that are clearly under market or investments that are mismanaged in some form. As cap rates continue to trend between the mid three and four percent range, permanent debt leverage becomes virtually unattainable from lenders with interest rates in the mid four percent that require a minimum 1.15x debt service coverage ratio measured on the current and historical income of the property. The result that we are seeing is loan-to-value ratios restricted to 40 to 50 percent of the purchase price – which, in turn, is causing buyers to seek alternate lending sources that will make the acquisition financially palatable.


2. BRIDGE DEBT Bridge lenders offer an attractive option when compared to conventional financing sources. Bridge debt allows a borrower to attain significant leverage, and while interest rates may be higher, it is common with bridge loans that the term will consist of interest only payments. A typical bridge product for California multifamily will have a loan term of 6 to 36 months with a floating interest rate ranging between 5.5 to 6.5 percent. To qualify, lenders will want to see that both the buyer and contractor on the deal have significant experience in this type of project. On the plus side, in addition to payments calculated on an interest-only basis, the debt-service coverage ratios are typically less than 1.0x based on the current property income. Rather than look to current financials, lenders consider the proforma net operating income while sizing to a 1.20x to 1.30x debt service coverage ratio. The origination fee for this type of financing range anywhere from 1.5 to 3.0 points to the lender.

Bridge loans are typically scheduled on a loan-to-cost basis at a maximum of 80 percent loan-to-cost or 75 percent loan-tovalue – based upon stabilized income. The benefit of being able to use the loan-tocost method is that investors can potentially achieve loan proceeds greater than the acquisition price of the property. While that sounds hard to believe, the catch is that the borrower will not get it all at once. Instead, the lender will release funds for the acquisition and then hold back funds to allow a buyer to make improvements over a defined period. This type of financing is ideal for a property that has light to medium rehab needs where the borrower can renovate the units in phases while increasing rents and maintaining a habitable and operational environment for the tenants. Alternately, if the property is in need of major rehab or is completely vacant, buyers will need to turn to alternative sources.

MATTHEWS™ | 137


3. PRIVATE MONEY Enter private money – an entirely different animal that is often a complete unknown to most conventional multifamily investors. Terms for a private money loan are typically 12 to 36 months, floating interest rates ranging from 8.5 to 11.5 percent, with loanto-cost up to 85 percent and two to four percent origination fees, depending on the borrower’s level of experience and financial wherewithal. In addition to the high loan-to-cost ratio, another benefit of private money is that there is typically no debt-service requirement. This allows a buyer to clear all tenants out of a building without having to worry about a requirement for maintaining steady income they would incur with many bridge lenders. There are many debt funds and family offices that offer private money, and terms

138 | FALL/WINTER 2018

are typically determined by the borrower’s experience, financial strength, and credit. Although it may sound like private money would be the last option when considering how to finance an acquisition, the benefits of private money can outweigh the higher rates. For example, closing timelines can be as short as ten days, and borrowers can achieve a high-leverage loan, even with a poor credit history. Private money loans are typically used strategically by borrowers wishing to maximize leverage, completely renovate a building, and replace the debt with permanent financing or sell the building as soon as the project is complete.


The debt financing landscape for the commercial real estate market has evolved. Although banks are somewhat more cautious in the lending process, they are still actively originating loans. Here’s a quick breakdown of the terms associated with the three financing options discussed. Permanent Debt

Bridge Debt

Private Money

36+ Months

6-36 Months

12-48 Months

Amortization

30 years/Interest Only

Interest Only

Interest Only

Max LTV/LTC

75% LTV

75% LTV or 80% LTC

85% LTC

4.25%-5.00%

5.50%-6.50%

8.00%-12.00%

1.15x

1.0x (interest reserve required if below 1.0x)

None

Term

Rate Min DSCR

In summary, as the market continues the move and buyers seek alternative ways to finance their multifamily assets, mortgage brokers will play an integral role by effectively adding value to the process. Having experience with alternative types of financing is crucial to success, and investors will find it to their benefit, more now than ever, to reach out to professionals that understand the lending industry and can guide their clients to successful solutions. HUGH SEIFERT

BRIAN KREBS

Associate hugh.seifert@barringtoncapcorp.com 949.873.0271

Managing Director brian.krebs@barringtoncapcorp.com 949.777.5988

MATTHEWS™ | 139


Certainty of Execution

When an opportunity arises, you need the right partnership to experience real results. Customized capital placement solutions. Rooted capital sources. Secure financing. Our trusted advisors provide innovative financial plans with the most aggressive terms across all asset classes. Maintain control over your ventures and experience Barrington Capital’s power of certainty.

97%

FUNDING RATE

140 | FALL/WINTER 2018


Recently Funded DOLLAR STORE PORTFOLIO

YORBA LINDA, CA

Loan Amount: $3,770,000 LTV: 60% Amortization: 25 Years Term: 10 Years Interest Rate: 5.25%

Loan Amount: $24,750,000 LTV: 75% Amortization: 30 Years Term: 10 Years Interest Rate: 5.01%

EAST SIDE APARTMENTS

MUNGER AVENUE APARTMENTS

DALLAS, TX

DALLAS, TX

Loan Amount: $1,260,000 LTV: 70% Amortization: 30 Years Term: 7 Years Interest Rate: 4.50%

Loan Amount: $1,350,000 LTV: 75% Amortization: 30 Years Term: 7 Years Interest Rate: 4.38%

COMMODORE PLAZA

BUFFALO WILD WINGS

GULFPORT, MS

TYLER, TX

Loan Amount: $1,935,000 LTV: 65% Amortization: Interest Only Term: 1 Year Interest Rate: 8.75%

Loan Amount: $1,890,000 LTV: 70% Amortization: 25 Years Term: 10 Years Interest Rate: 5.25%

SAN BENITO APARTMENTS

POST OAK HEAVEN APARTMENTS

DALLAS, TX

EULESS, TX

Loan Amount: $1,015,000 LTV: 55% Amortization: 30 Years Term: 20 Years Interest Rate: 4.00%

Loan Amount: $1,550,000 LTV: 55% Amortization: 30 Years Term: 7 Years Interest Rate: 4.67%

FRESENIUS

REPRESENTATIVE PHOTO

SAVI RANCH CENTER

TEXAS

SHOPPES AT GLOUCESTER

KNOXVILLE, TN

GLOUCESTER, VA

Loan Amount: $2,180,000 LTV: 65% Amortization: 25 Years Term: 10 Years Interest Rate: 5.01%

Loan Amount: $3,745,000 LTV: 72% Amortization: Interest Only Term: 1 Year Interest Rate: 8.95%

Ref inancing | Acquisition Financing | Equity Placement W W W . B A R R I N G T O N C A P C O R P. C O M MATTHEWSâ„¢ | 141


Profile for Matthews Real Estate Investment Services

Matthews™ Fall/Winter 2018 Publication  

Matthews™ Fall/Winter 2018 Publication