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contents November 2021 No. 341

Publishers

Jane Hutchens James Larsen II

Managing Editor Joseph Zyble

Calendar Editor Carrie Usher

Graphic Design Jennifer Bell Knute Olson

Proofreader Laura Kagy

Circulation

Dick Armstrong

Chief Photographer Tom Buchkoe

Marquette Monthly, published by Model Town Publishing, LLC, located at PO Box 109 Gwinn, MI, 49841, is locally and independently owned. Entire contents copyright 2021 by Model Town Publishing. All rights reserved. Permission or use of editorial material in any manner must be obtained in writing from the publishers. Marquette Monthly is published 12 times a year. Subscriptions are $65 per year. Freelance material can be submitted for consideration to editor@ marquettemonthly.com. Events can be submitted to calendar@marquettemonthly.com. Ad inquiries can be sent to jane@marquettemonthly.com or james@ marquettemonthly.com.

(906) 360-2180 www.marquettemonthly.com

About the cover artist This month’s cover artist is Dan Cook, former owner of Cook Sign Service in Marquette. He began painting signs as a 17 year old working at his father’s business. He took over the family business and built up his skills over the years. In retirement, Dan began painting scenes of places along the waterfront he enjoyed in his youth. He realized that not many artists focused on the local harbor areas so he decided he would help others appreciate these scenes through his painting.

4 City Notes Highlights of important happenings in the area 18 On Campus News from U.P. Universities/Colleges 20 Feature Joseph Zyble

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Fringe Folk

New York Times Crossword Puzzle

‘Clue’: The Movie (answers on page 63) 25 At The Table Katherine Larson Beyond The Pie 27 Lookout Point Jackie Stark Just Like Home 30 Lookout Point Joyce Wiswell Water Walkers 32 Back Then Larry Chabot Loret Miller Ruppe 34 Lookout Point Sonny Longtine Solid History 37 Gift of Water Aimee Cree Dunn Timeless Shores 38 Locals Deborah K. Frontier ‘Pottery Peg’ 41 The Arts Ann Dallman Hunting Tale 43 Lookout Point Sandy Bonsall My Mother’s Story 48 Fiction John Smolens The Superior Gatsby, part 3 50 Lookout Point Katherine Larson Holidays Headstart 51 In The Outdoors Scot Stewart Water Wonders 55 Lookout Point SWP Staff Summer Home 57 Lookout Point Jackie Stark Entrepreneurs Wanted 59 Back Then Adam Berger The Vanished 61 Lookout Point Michigan DNR ‘Leaf’ Them Be 62 Back Then Larry Chabot Joe Mack 64 Home Cinema Leonard Heldreth Movie Reviews 65 Poetry Bert Riesterer Leaves 66 Superior Reads Victor Volkman U.P. Colony 67 Out & About Carrie Usher November events and music, art and museum guides 78 Coloring Page The Gathered Earth

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city notes Graveraet named a National Blue Ribbon School

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he U.S. Dept. of Education recently announced that Graveraet Elementary School in Marquette has been designated as an “Exemplary High Performing Schools National Blue Ribbon School” for 2021 by the U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona. Graveraet is one of 325 schools in the nation, one of 13 schools from Michigan, and, to the best of our knowledge, the only school in the Upper Peninsula to be recognized with this prestigious award. Sarah Kemppainen, principal of Graveraet, said, “I am so proud of our entire staff, all our students and families, everyone here at Graveraet Elementary School, because we all have made a conscious effort and priority over the past seven years to focus on what matters most, meeting the needs of the whole child,” said Kemppainen. “When students feel safe, have trust in and with us, and know that there are teachers and staff who genuinely care for and love them, they are able to challenge themselves and grow academically, socially and emotionally.” Interim Superintendent Zack Sedgwick expressed congratulations to the students, staff and families of Graveraet Elementary School for the prestigious honor. “This award is testament to their hard work and dedication and I couldn’t be more proud of their accomplishment!” Sedgwick said.

Houghton, Hancock named Cities of Peace

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n October, Houghton and Hancock became a member of the “International Cities of Peace.” Keweenaw Faiths United, a collaborative of several faith communities in the area, spearheaded the project with the support of both ciies and their rotary clubs, along with endorsements from many residents. The application the organization submitted to Cities of Peace highlighted international students and faculty at both Michigan Tech and Finlandia University; the annual Parade of Nations, Heikinpaiva, and other international events; Hancock’s sister city, Porvoo, Finland; International Neighbors; Rotary Exchange Students and more, as evidence of the diversity of the community. The International Cities of Peace organization is dedicated to building “a global culture of peace” by focusing on the community level. International Cities of Peace describes itself as “an association of citizens, governments and organizations who have established their communities as official Cities of Peace. Every community has a legacy of peace, whether it is by a historical event or by a local peace heroes or groups who have contributed to their citizen’s safety, prosperity and quality of life.” Houghton and Hancock have become the 337th and 338th cities, respectively, from around the world to receive the International Cities of Peace designation. Keweenaw Faiths United was formed in 2019 to respond to rac-

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The neighboring communities of Houghton and Hancock were recently named International Cities of Peace, becoming the 337th and 338th cities to receive the distinction. (Photo by City of Houghton, Creative Commons)


For its 2021 Annual Awards, the Greater Ishpeming-Negaunee Area Chamber of Commerce recognized several area businesses based on their community contributions, actions and involvement in the economic health of the area. Shown are the staff of J-Goods Plumbing and Heating, based in Negaunee, which won the Chamber Member of the Year Award. (GINCC photo)

ism, antisemitism and intolerance. It is an interdenominational group whose mission is described as “a faith-based effort to promote respect for all people in our community.” For more information about International Cities of Peace visit internationalcitiesofpeace.org. For information about Keweenaw Faiths United visit kfaithsu.simplesite.com.

GINCC announces 2021 award winners

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he Greater Ishpeming-Negaunee Area Chamber of Commerce (GINCC) recently announced its Annual Awards for 2021. Winners are nominated by the community and then voted on by the GINCC Board of Directors. Nominations are based on community contributions, actions and involvement in the economic health of the area. This year’s winners are: Business of the Year, U.P. Home Health and Hospice; Organization of the Year, Partridge Creek Farm; Business Persons of the Year, Denise and Ron Johnson; Volunteer of the Year, Dave Dompierre Sr.; Chamber Member of the Year, J-Goods Plumbing and Heating; and Community Booster, W.I.N., Lawn Care and Storage. “There were many nominations submitted this year,” said Bob Hendrickson, executive director of the GINCC. “Many deserving businesses, organizations and people. What it came down to is these awards are given based on a handful of standout reasons, but really, they reflect how dedicated and giving the entire community is to making the West End of Marquette County a great place to live and work.” Award winners were recognized at the GINCC Annual Gala held Oct. 20 at River Rock Lanes and Banquet Center in Ishpeming.

Passengers tested at airport; test site added at mall

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awyer International Airport will continue its partnership with MedNext and HONU Management Group for COVID-19 testing. Testing will continue at the Sawyer International Airport, but will be limited strictly to ticketed passengers or airport credentialed tenants. Vaccinations will also be offered at the testing site to better serve the flying public. The hours for testing and vaccination are Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Appointments or walk-ins are welcome. In addition, MedNext and HONU Management Group will be opening a second testing site in Marquette for the general public. This site is now open at the Westwood Mall and operates Monday through Saturday from 1 to 7 p.m., and on Sundays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Both sites offer rapid testing, providing results within 30 minutes. PCR lab tests are also available with results usually within three days. The testing services at both locations are free of charge. Insurance is accepted but not required. Children under 18 need parental consent. Visit www.solvhealth.com to register for an appointment at Sawyer International Airport, or honumg.info/Westwood for the Westwood Mall location.

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Energy issues among topics of League’s Nov. 3 meeting

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he League of Women Voters of Marquette County will hold its next membership meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 3 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. It will be held in Studio 1 in the lower level of the Peter White Public Library. In addition to the regular league business, members and guests will have the opportunity to learn about the U.P. Energy Task Force created by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer in 2019. Jenn Hill, Marquette city mayor pro tem and a member of the U.P. Energy Task Force, will present the recommendations of the task force and will summarize 10 months of the research, presentations and meetings conducted in the U.P. to find ways to decrease the consequences of a disruption in the availability of propane and to look at alternative energy solutions for Michigan’s northernmost region. The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization that encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy. For more information send an email to dthomsona@gmail.com. All are welcome to attend. Meeting rules require participants to wear masks, be vaccinated against COVID-19, and to use social distancing.

Community art exhibit call for entries ends soon

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he deadline to submit entries to the Copper Country Community Arts Center’s annual community exhibit titled “The Shaft.” The deadline for entries is Tuesday, Nov. 2, at 5 p.m. Now in it’s 27th year, The Shaft is the Hancock-based art center’s longest-running exhibition. The CCCAC notes, “Artists are invited to submit entries with the theme of Copper Country mining history. There are many ways to explore its impact including what is visible, the ruins and rock piles on the landscape and how nature reclaims, as well as surviving architecture distinctive to the area. Equally inspiring is the story of the people who were here, the indigenous who were the earliest miners and the many European immigrants who arrived by ship to work and live in the Copper Country. There are endless ways to tell the story.” Artwork in any medium is welcome. The entry fee is $5 per piece; maximum three pieces.

Certified nurse midwife joins staff of community health center in Hancock

Ashley Chamberlain, a certified nurse midwife, has joined the team of women’s health providers at Upper Great Lakes Hancock Family Health Center. Chamberlain was raised in downstate Oxford, and then relocated to Sault Ste. Marie where she earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree from Lake Superior State University. She then received her Master of Science in Ashley nursing from Frontier Nursing University. Her husChamberlain band, Jesse, is a member of the U.S. Coast Guard which brought the couple to the U.P. Being a certified nurse midwife allows Ashley the opportunity to build relationships, empower women, and provide individualized care. She has special interests in gynecology, prenatal care, labor support, birth, and breastfeeding promotion. “My favorite thing about being a midwife is attending births. I feel honored that I get to be present for such a special moment in a woman’s life,” Chamberlain said. A Norwegian proverb that encapsulates her feelings on birth: “The greatest joy is to become a mother; the second greatest is to be a midwife.” Chamberlain said she is grateful to be joining UGL and looks forward to serving women in the Copper Country. UGL’s Hancock Family Health Center – OB/GYN is located at 500 Campus Drive, Suite 3, in Hancock.

Help offered for addiction’s “affected others”

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ddiction is a disease that impacts everyone around the addicted person. Dial Help is now offering community presentations at businesses, agencies, and other groups in the U.P. through its new Affected Others Program. The goal is to educate friends and family of people with addiction so they better know how to both support their loved one and take care of themselves. “Family and friends of people who struggle with an addiction can be affected in many ways including emotionally, financially, and legally,” said Mandy Daniels, Affected Others coordinator. “This is why it’s so important to provide resources and support to those who are affected by a loved one’s substance use disorder.” The program also offers referral to resources for anyone in the community who is struggling with addiction, or have loved ones with addiction. To schedule a presentation or find a referral, contact Mandy Daniels at (906) 231-0630 or mdaniels@dialhelp.org. Learn more at dialhelp.org/affected-others. The program is funded by Beyond the Save (beyondthesave.org) and NorthCare Network (northcarenetwork.org).

Park pavilion dedicated to local volunteer

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Bradford Veley is a freelance cartoonist, illustrator and farmer in the U.P. Follow him on Facebook, Instagram and at www.bradveley.com.

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he Lake Superior Community Partnership recently assisted the City of Negaunee with a ribbon cutting ceremony to celebrate the completion of the construction of its new pavilion. During the ribbon cutting, the City of Negaunee held a surprise dedication ceremony to dedicate the pavilion to Jim Thomas. Thomas, a native of Negaunee, was instrumental as one of the founding members of the Iron Ore Heritage Trail Authority and its trail system. Planning for the pavilion began in 2012 when the Negaunee Parks and Recreation Committee established a pavilion sub-committee and submitted a grant application for the project in 2017. The City of Negaunee broke ground on the project in the summer of 2019, after the Negaunee City Council voted unanimously to approve a resolution to accept a $291,000 grant from the Michigan DNR Trust Fund. The total cost of the pavilion is $485,100, with the City of Negaunee required to match at $194,100. Other funding was sourced from the Cliffs and Eagle Mine Marquette County Community Fund which donated $70,000, the Iron Ore Heritage Recreation Authority which donated $25,000 and the Negaunee Area Community Fund which donated $8,500. “Jim is the example of what it is to be a community leader. Through his leadership, dedication, and collaboration with others, we have this wonderful trail system today,” said Nate Heffron, Negaunee city manager. The Jim Thomas Pavilion is located in Jackson Mine Park near the Iron Ore Heritage trail spur. It includes a covered recreation area for picnicking and events, restrooms, onsite parking and will eventually include a kitchen.


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At the ribbon-cutting celebration for the dedication of the new pavilion at the Jackson Mine Park in Negaunee, City Manager Nate Heffron (left) shakes hands with Jim Thomas as Negaunee Mayor Jason Wallner looks on. Thomas, a native of Negaunee and a founding member of the Iron Ore heritage Trail Authority, was surprised to learn that the pavilion was dedicated to him. The dedication saw a mix of sunshine and rain showers. (Alastar Dimitrie photos).

U.P. Notable Books Program receives honors

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he U.P. Notable Books initiative by the U.P. Publishers and Authors Association (UPPAA) has received two important recognitions in the past month. The Upper Peninsula Region of Library Cooperation (UPRLC) awarded the U.P. Notable Books Club the distinction of “Program of the Year” at its annual conference, which was held virtually on Sept. 28th. The second distinction awarded to the initiative is its inclusion on the Great Lakes Digital Libraries front page as a curated collection of winning books. Currently, 16 different editions (eBooks and audiobooks) of past U.P. Notable Books winners can be found on the home page. Winners of the first two years of U.P. Notable Books have been asked to donate a single digital copy of their book to this lending library available to anyone in the state of Michigan with a local library card of any kind. The UPPAA expects this curated collection to eventually include all of the 20 past winners and the next batch of 10 to be announced in January 2022. “We have a very strong bias towards inclusion of all the ethnicities and cultures that are in the diverse regions of the U.P.,” said Victor R. Volkman, current UPPAA president. He noted that the club has awarded distinction to Anishinaabe writers Phil Bellfy, author of Three Fires Unity, and Linda LeGarde Grover, who wrote In The Night of Memory. Other books, such as Mary Doria Russel’s Women of the Copper Country, highlight the contributions of Scandinavian immigrants to the rich tapestry of U.P. life. The U.P Notable Books Club is a spinoff of the original U.P. Notable Books list and is the brainchild of Evelyn Gathu, director of the Crystal Falls District Community Library. For more information about the U.P. Notable Books Club visit the site upnotable.com. For information about the UPPAA visit uppaa.org.

Calumet Theatre welcomes new board members

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he Historic Calumet Theatre recently welcomed four new members to its board of directors. The newly elected Calumet Theatre Company Board of Directors members include Bob Wareham, Dan Jamison (write-in candidate), Michele Southerland and Diane St. Amour. Upon welcoming the new board members, Bethany Jones, Calumet Theatre marketing director and acting business director, said, “We want our new board members to know that we recognize that staff rollovers and 18 months of pandemic lockdowns have been detrimental to the healing and regrowth of the theatre’s activities. I’m here to help and to fix as well as improve. The first big show of the season was just this past Saturday (Sept. 25), Boy Band Review, and was a great success. We need to put aside the past and look to the future to get our historic Calumet Theatre back to it’s former glory and hopefully improve it to everyone’s benefit. We hope to see everyone back in our theatre this season.” Following the meeting and election, the board went into executive session to elect new officers. The new Calumet The-

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atre Board of Directors officers are Dan Jamison, president; Michele Southerland, treasurer; and Diane St. Amour, secretary. For more details and additional information contact Bethany Jones, marketing director, at CTmarketingdirector@gmail.com, or call (906) 231-1325.

Online public meeting scheduled for Oct. 28 on minerals exploration request

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he Michigan Department of Natural Resources has scheduled a virtual public meeting on Thursday, Oct. 28, regarding requested mineral rights leases for properties in Menominee County. Great Lakes Exploration, Inc., of Menominee, Michigan, has requested direct, metallic mineral leases for Michigan Department of Natural Resources metallic mineral rights located within Faithorn and Holmes townships in Menominee County. This request contains roughly 1609 acres. If approved, a lease to Great Lakes Exploration, Inc. would grant the exclusive right to explore for the presence of metallic minerals in the described areas. A lease alone does not grant a lessee a right to mine. The informational, (virtual) public meeting regarding the lease application will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. on Oct. 28. Participants will have to sign up online for the GoToWebinar meeting or call into the meeting (audio only) at (562) 2478422. The conference I.D. No. is 643-125-236.

Epps Apothecary to hold grand opening of new location Oct. 29-31

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fter a successful first year, Epps Apothecary is moving to a new, larger location. The new location will be at 110 N Third Street, between Washington and Bluff— not far from its current location. A grand opening is planned for Friday, Oct. 29, to Sunday, Oct. 31. There will be giveaways, free events, food, drink and exciting contests. “I opened Epps Apothecary last year, in between the lockdowns, because I wanted to do something to help revitalize our local economy. I started Epps Apothecary to be a beacon of art, science and Marquette’s strength over adversity,”

said Spencer Epps, 45 year-old artist, owner and Marquette native. Epps noted that the success of the shop now demands an even larger space, hence the need to move. “If you’re expecting the same old shop at a new location, you’re in for a big surprise. The new Epps Apothecary will transport you to the Emerald City, capital of the mythic land of Oz.” A description of items for sale at the shop include “art with soul,” “home goods with swagger,” and “wizardly wonders.” In addition to beautiful art, there is handcrafted jewelry, ancient Japanese tie-dye (Shibori), and high-voltage wood-burning (Lichtenberg burning), a metaphysical books section, a crystal grotto and much more. Patrons can also try their hand at alchemy at the shop’s new alchemy bar “where you can make your own mysterious magical tonics, ablutions and elixirs. Consult the Oracle to divine the true, ancient meaning of your name from the original Phoenician pictographs that eventually evolved into our modern alphabet,” according to a news release from Epps Apothecary. Along with building up the Marquette community, Epps, a trained physician, donates 10 percent of profits to provide food, housing and improved quality of life for the elderly in the community.

Lake Linden Bazaar will features locally made goods and prizes

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Craft and Food Bazaar will be held on Saturday, Nov. 27, at St. Joseph Church in Lake Linden from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The church is located at 701 Calumet Street. Admission is free and lunch will be provided by the Knights of Columbus. Organizer Laura Hamlett said the bazaar has been a tradition in Lake Linden for many years. “It stands out from other craft and food shows because everything offered for sale is made locally, such as stained glass, knitted and sewn items, gift baskets, holiday decor, candles and many types of homemade foods.” The bazaar will include a raffle with prize drawings at 2 p.m. Winners need not be present to receive a prize; however, those who are present will have the opportunity to choose their prize, which will be a locally made product worth $20 or more. Proceeds from the event will help support the many needed repairs at the church. The congregation is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year. Vendor spots are available for $25. For more information about the bazaar contact JimAndLauraYooper@hotmail.com or call 806(yes, 806) 790-7798.

Choral society to present holiday concerts

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Epps Apothecary not only features a new location at 110 Third Street in Marquette, but it also offers new features, including a Wizard of Oz theme. (Epps Apothecary graphic)

he Marquette Choral Society will return to performing this holiday season after a year and a half absence because of COVID. The chorus will present two concerts at St. Peter Cathedral in Marquette featuring the music of John Rutter and Ralph Vaughan Williams. The first will be on Saturday, Dec. 11, at 7:30 p.m., and the second will be held on Sunday, Dec. 12, at 3 p.m. Admission will be by free-will offering. The program will include Ralph Vaughan Williams’s Mass in G Minor and John Rutter’s Gloria. The Marquette Choral Society is a mixed-voice, adult choir of approximately 100 singers from a four-county region in the U.P. The organization strives to engage, enrich and inspire this region through the art of choral music. The ensemble was founded in 1971 by William Dehning and is currently led by musical director Erin Colwitz. For more information visit facebook. com/MarquetteChoralSociety, marquettechoralsociety.org, or email choralsociety906@gmail.com.

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Hunters can now report harvests online

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eer hunting season dates, regulations and more are available in the 2021 Michigan Hunting Digest, available at Michigan.gov/Deer. The archery deer season began Oct. 1 and ends Sunday, Nov. 14. It continues Wednesday, Dec. 1, and ends Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. The firearm deer hunting season is from Monday, Nov. 15, to Tuesday, Nov. 30. The muzzle-loading season is from Friday, Dec. 3, to Sunday, Dec. 12. Check the 2021 Hunting Digest for deer hunting regulations, including information on the types of deer that may be harvested in each season and any antler point restrictions that may be in place. A new feature this year allows hunters to report their deer harvest online. Reporting is optional, but highly encouraged. All data collected helps the DNR manage the deer population in Michigan. Hunters can report their harvests at Michigan.gov/ DNRHarvestReport.

Cougar spotted in Dickinson County

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ildlife biologists with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources have confirmed a trail camera image showing a mountain lion walking through a semiopen area of firs and poplars was taken in September in Dickinson County. “On Sept. 16, a trail camera photo was taken of a cougar in southern Dickinson County,” said Cody Norton, the DNR’s large carnivore specialist. “This is about 50 miles from where a July 20 video was captured in Baraga County.” The photo recently gained news media attention after it was posted on social media. This latest confirmation brings the total number of confirmed cougar reports to 74 in Michigan since 2008. This figure does not necessarily translate to the same number of cougars because a single animal may be included in more than one confirmed report. So far this year, 10 cougar reports have been confirmed in the U.P., including three from Dickinson County, two from Marquette County and one each from Baraga, Delta, Houghton, Luce and Schoolcraft counties. For more information on cougars in Michigan, including a list of the confirmed reports and forms for reporting additional cougar evidence, visit Michigan.gov/

An image of a cougar (also commonly referred to as mountain lions) was captured on a trail cam in Dickinson County Sept. 16. It marked the 74th cougar sighting in the U.P. since 2008, and the 10th this year alone. (Photo courtesy Michigan DNR)

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Cougars.

Ski swap event to be held in Gwinn Nov. 6

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he public is invited to the Superiorland Cross Country Ski Club Ski Swap which will be held on Saturday, Nov. 6, at the Sands Township Hall, located at 987 State Hwy M-553 in Gwinn. The Ski Swap allows skiers to sell their used cross country ski and other winter sports gear and equipment. Part of the proceeds will benefit youth ski programs. The event begins with the drop-off of used gear from 9 to 10:30 a.m. the day of the event. From 10:30 to 11 a.m., club member entry begins. The sale for the general public is held from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Pick up of unsold items will be held from 12:45 to 1:15 p.m. For more information, or to become a member of Superiorland Cross Country Ski Club, visit superiorlandskiclub.com

Homeless-awareness events announced

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he Alger-Marquette Community Planning Group has announced a schedule of activities in recognition of Homeless Awareness Month. The group is comprised of the many area organizations who work together to ensure that homelessness for any individual or family is rare, brief and one time. On Thursday, Nov, 11, there will be a Community Talk Series on Homelessness at the Oredock Brewery beginning at 7 p.m. Next, residents are encouraged to “Walk A Mile In Their Shoes” on Saturday, Nov. 13, at 11 a.m. The event will start at the Lower Harbor and finish at Harlowe Park. “We’re not just raising money to assist the homeless in our community, we’re also trying to raise awareness of a growing national problem,” said Nick Emmendorfer, executive director at Room at The Inn. “In addition to a lack of affordable housing, our community needs to address the underlying causes of homelessness, like mental illness and substance abuse.” While the homeless population in Michigan decreased by an average of more than 20 percent in all regions of the state in 2020, the U.P. saw a slight increase. Most of that statewide decrease was due to COVID-related assistance programs like the Eviction Diversion Program and Covid Emergency Rental Assistance. According to the annual report by the Mich-


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igan Coalition to End Homelessness, the number of people seeking homeless assistance in the U.P. increased by four percent during the year. A critical shortage of affordable housing in the U.P. is the primary reason for that increase. There is a significant array of assistance available to people who are homeless or in danger of becoming homeless. Organizations such as DHHS, Great Lakes Recovery, Superior Housing Solutions, Janzen House, Room at the Inn, Salvation Army, and the Women’s Center are just some of the non-profits providing services. Shelter and housing assistance can be accessed by calling Community Action Alger Marquette by calling (906) 228-6522, ext. 207.

Young artist recognized with City of Marquette Art Award

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atthew Reilly of Marquette Reilly has been working at the carwas the recipient of the toonist craft for a few years. Youth Artist award at the 24th annu“Making drawings is the easiest al City of Marquette Art part of making art,” he said. Awards held at a special “The hard part, at least for event at Marquette Mouncomics, is coming up with tain in September. the ideas for the captions.” Reilly is 13 years old Does the young artist and a 7th-grade student at plan to make a career out of Father Marquette Acadehis work? my in Marquette. “No, I plan to just keep it “I decided to create as a hobby. I do it for fun,” comics by reading carhe said. toons in the Marquette When not working on Matthew Reilly Monthly and The New his hobby, Reilly can be Yorker,” Reilly said. found doing what a lot of other young The Marquette Monthly cartoons people his age do. that inspired him were created by “I like to play board games and Brad Veley of Skandia whose work video games, and spend time with my appears not only in the Marquette friends,” he said. Monthly, but in publications across For more information about the the nation and beyond. Art Awards visit marquettemi.gov.

A Matthew Reilly original cartoon.

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U.P. health centers awarded $1.3 million

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wo health centers in the U.P. were recently awarded $1,303,044 in funding to support their efforts of providing health care. The health centers include Upper Great Lakes Family Health Center, which was awarded $770,000, and Bay Mills Indian Community, which was awarded $533,044. Funding from this program will support health care construction and renovation projects including the purchase of new state-of-the-art equipment. This will help these health centers strengthen primary care services in underserved communities and provide COVID-19 testing, treatment and vaccinations. This funding comes from the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services and was included in the American Rescue Plan. “The nurses, doctors and health care providers in these centers serve individuals and families who often fall through the cracks of our health care system. They are on the front lines of this public health crisis and have been challenged like never before. That’s why securing this funding was such a high priority for me. I’m grateful for their heroic work in keeping Michigan families safe,” said Michigan Sen. Debbie Stabenow. “Community health centers have played a critical role in serving Michiganders throughout the fight to overcome this pandemic, and we must continue to support those efforts,” said Michigan Sen. Gary Peters. “This funding will help community health centers in the U.P. make important upgrades to their facilities to better serve families, including expanding access to COVID-19 testing, treatment and vaccines.”

LaPointe selected to sports commission

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he Great Lakes Sports Commission recently announced that Brigitte LaPointe, chief executive officer of the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC), has been selected to the GLSC board of directors. LaPointe grew up in the KBIC and was named chief executive officer in July of 2021. “We are thrilled to have Brigitte join the board. Her diverse background and leadership in wellness, athletics and recreation is exactly the kind of experience we need for northern Michigan,” said Douglas Luciani, chair of the Great Lakes Sports Commission. Prior to joining KBIC, LaPointe was employed as the director of strategic initiatives for the Upper

Did You Know...

Marquette had a female doctor in the 1800s?

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r. Mary Louis Boyce Markham (1859-1905) was born in Auburn, N.Y., and received her medical degree in 1882. A year later she married Dr. Russell C. Markham and the two of them moved to Marquette. They practiced general medicine and obstetrics, and she specialized in medical exams for insurance applicants. In 1897 they opened the Markham Sanitarium and worked closely together until her untimely death due to typhoid fever followed by a bout of pneumonia. She is buried in Park Cemetery. Submitted by Russell M. Magnaghi, a history professor emeritus of NMU and a U.P. author and historian.

Peninsula Health Plan in Marquette for six years. She attended Finlandia University to study physical therapy and played for the women’s basketball team. Following her passion for health and wellness, LaPointe also served on the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board of Marquette County, the Lake Superior Community Partnership Economic Development Board, coached basketball for LevelUP Express Basketball and Marquette Public School and was appointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness, Health & Sports.

Course offered for caregivers of those with dementia

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he U.P. Commission for Area Progress (UPCAP) is offering a three-part online dementia training series, “Developing Dementia Dexterity,” for caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia. Each class is an hour long and will be held on consecutive Wednesdays beginning at 11 a.m. The “Dementia Overview for Family and Friends” training will start the series on Dec. 1. This class provides information about dementia as a disease,

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how the disease affects more than just memory, the role of confusion, and communication skills, as well as providing strategies and techniques useful for daily interaction with individuals living with dementia. “Planning Activities for Persons with Dementia” is on Dec. 8. It will provide information on engaging activities and assisting individuals with dementia in a way that promotes contented involvement, as well as strategies and techniques useful for planning daily activities. “Understanding Behavior and Support Needs of Persons with Dementia” will be held Dec. 15. Information on certain behaviors, potential triggers and strategies useful for dementia caregivers will be provided in this one-hour online class, as well as techniques useful for providing daily support and identifying triggers leading to potentially challenging behaviors. Whether you are a seasoned dementia caregiver, family, or friend, this online training series provides a better understanding of dementia and the impact it has on the person with the disease, how to connect with individuals with dementia through activities, and behaviors and the support needs of persons with dementia. There is no charge to attend any of the Dementia Series but you must have online access and an email address to attend. Register for each class separately. Registration ends on Sunday, Nov. 28. To register, visit www.upcap.org or call 2-1-1 Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for assistance.

U.P. Health System-Marquette welcomes back new COO

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.P. Health System-Marquette announced that it is pleased to welcome back Tonya Darner, MBA, who was appointed to serve as chief operating officer to improve clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction while managing operations. Darner previously managed the development and operations of several specialties at U.P. Health System-Marquette. She returns to Marquette from Wausau, Wis., where she served as the chief operating officer for Aspirus Wausau Hospital. Darner is a proven leader with 25 years of experience in medical practice management and healthcare administration. She has successfully overseen the operations of complex clinical teams, budgets, and overall care for large volumes of patients. A veteran of the U.S. Air Force, Tonya served on active duty for 20 years. There, she managed medical care units and eventually became the 4th Medical Operations Squadron superintendent. After retiring from the miliTonya Darner tary, Tonya moved to Marquette and oversaw operations for several medical practices in the area. Darner said she and her husband made the decision to move to Marquette well before they retired from the military. “We love the area and community, we have family here, and Marquette is where we’ve always wanted to live,” she said. For more information about U.P. Health System-Marquette, visit www.mgh.org.

UPHP again ranked top Medicaid plan

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pper Peninsula Health Plan is again one of the nation’s best Medicaid health plans, according to a recent national rating of health plans by the National Committee for Quality Assurance Insurance Plan Ratings. The health plan ranks in the top 20 among Medicaid managed-care plans in the U.S., and is the top-rated Medicaid plan in Michigan, earning a 4.5 out of 5 rating. NCQA rated more than 1,000 health insurance plans based on patient experience, prevention, and treatment. This rating system emphasizes the quality of care patients receive, how happy patients are with their care, and health plans’ efforts to keep improving. “We are so proud to be receiving this honor again from NCQA. Our staff and network of providers work diligently every day to ensure our members are healthy and receiving the best care possible,” said Melissa Holmquist, chief executive officer of UPHP. “Being a local health plan that exclusively serves residents of the Upper Peninsula, our membership is made up of our family, friends, and neighbors, and because of that, we take more of a personal responsibility for their health and satisfaction. I think that is reflected in these scores each year, and is why we continue to do so well.” The complete Medicaid health plan rankings are available at reportcards.ncqa.org/health-plans. Rankings for Medicare and private plans are also available.

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U.P. blood-shortage continues

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he U.P. Regional Blood Center is still experiencing a critical need for B Positive, O Positive, A Negative, O Negative, AB Negative and B Negative blood types. The U.P. Regional Blood Center has collection sites in Marquette, Hancock and Escanaba and is the primary supplier of blood to 13 U.P. hospitals. Visit the blood center’s Facebook page at UPRBC906 or the website www.mgh.org/blood for more information. For hours and scheduling please call Marquette at (906) 449-1450, Hancock at (906) 483-1392, and Escanaba at (906) 786-8420. All blood donations will stay and be used in the U.P.

Sail On Singers part of Giving Tuesday event

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he Hiawatha Music Co-op (HMC) is proud to be partnering with Sail On Singers for this year’s Giving Tuesday, a global generosity movement that celebrates all acts of giving. On Tuesday, Nov. 30, the HMC will host the Sail On Singers from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. as a part of their continuing series, “Live At The Fold.” The Sail On Singers are part of a national group called the Threshold Choir, a 501(C)3 organization whose mission is singing for those at the thresholds of life and whose vision is a world where all at life’s thresholds may be honored with compassion shared through song. The Sail On Singers will begin the evening with a brief overview of their “work” within our community, sing a few songs for us and then lead attendees in song. The goal of the Sail on Singers is to bring ease and comfort to those at the thresholds of living and dying. A calm and focused presence at the bedside, with gentle voices, simple songs, and sincere kindness, can be soothing and reassuring to clients, family, and caregivers alike. They choose songs to respond to the client’s musical taste, spiritual direction, and current receptivity. Because their songs are not religiously oriented, the Sail On Singers singing is appropriate for those who are deeply spiritual, whether religious or not. Anyone interested in joining the Sail on Singers, or to request singers for a loved one, should contact Corinne Rockow at corinnerockow@yahoo.com. In addition to a $100 donation from the Hiawatha Music Co-op, all donations received for this Giving Tuesday “Live At The Fold” event will benefit Trillium House. This event will be held by candlelight outside the Hiawatha Music Co-op’s “The Fold” at 1015 N Third St. as a continued Covid-19 precaution.

Late fall market to start Nov. 6 with indoor/outdoor shopping

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he Late Fall Downtown Marquette Farmers Market kicks off Saturday, Nov. 6, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Marquette Commons, and will run weekly until Dec. 18. This late-season market is an opportunity for shoppers to stock up on holiday gifts and continue to purchase fresh, locally grown food. The regular Saturday Morning outdoor season finale will be Saturday, Oct. 30 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. To celebrate a great season, the DMFM will host a

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PAUL F. BLEWETT LEGACY FUNDS DISTRIBUTE OVER $75,000 Recently, a total of $76,192.65 was distributed from the Paul F. Blewett Legacy Funds, which were established at the Community Foundation of Marquette County in 2010 to provide support to multiple local and regional organizations that Paul cared most about. Following the wishes of the donor, the fund supported 18 organizations this year, including: Bethany Lutheran Church, Michigan Education Association, National Education Association Foundation, National Planned Parenthood, Ishpeming High School, Ishpeming Skiers Training Facilities, Inc., Bark River Harris School District, The American Civil Liberties Union, WNMU FM 90 Radio, National Public Radio, American Cancer Society, National Alzheimer’s Association, American Heart Association, American Diabetes Association, Fortune Lake Lutheran Camp, Salvation Army & Salvation Army – Ishpeming, and American Red Cross. For more information regarding this fund, please visit www.cfofmc.org. “Fortune Lake Lutheran Camp is honored to receive money through the disbursement from the Paul F. Blewett Fund through the Community Foundation of Marquette County. Amanda Rasner, camp director at Fortune Lake Lutheran Camp, said the funds will help support a Young Adult Retreat in February 2022 at Fortune Lake. “The main hurdle for hosting this event had been funding, as young adults may not have the financial resources to attend a full weekend retreat, she said. “With the reception of the Blewett funds, this hurdle has been removed, and we can continue to prepare for what we hope will be a first annual retreat.” The money will provide sponsorships for up to 23 young adults.Born in Ishpeming in 1940, Paul Blewett enjoyed a nearly 43-year career as a math teacher at Bark River-Harris High School. He also gave back as a volunteer and officer in many different education associations, most notably as a member of the Board of Directors for the Michigan Education Association for 24 years. He died in 2009, leaving behind his legacy of giving back to the community and organizations he loved and respected. (Photo of young adult summer staff at Fortune Lake Lutheran Camp provided by Amanda Rasner, camp director.)

trick-or-treat at the market. Shoppers are encouraged to dress up and grab tricks, treats, and maybe some vegetables from participating market vendors. All ages are welcome. The Late Fall Market will be both indoors and outdoors for the 2021 season. All shoppers who choose to shop at the indoor market are required to wear a face mask. The market will continue to accept a wide array of food assistance programs. More information about accepted forms of payment can be found on the market’s website at mqtfarmersmarket.com/paymentoptions.

cant investment milestones enabling companies to grow and excel in Michigan. Llamasoft won the Exit of the Year Award, being recognized for being funded by Michigan investors and achieving a successful acquisition or exit. Toby Brzoznowski, founder of Llamasoft, is from Iron County. The Renaissance UnDemoDay won the Community Impact Award, recognizing organizations, events, or individuals that create meaningful, effective connections necessary to build Michigan’s entrepreneurial economy. The event is facilitated by a Marquette native.

U.P. wins at Venture Capital Association annual awards

First case of feline COVID-19 discovered in Michigan

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ichigan Venture Capital Association hosted its 2021 Annual Awards Dinner in Dearborn recently to recognize capital events fueling the growth of Michigan’s companies. Three of the four awardees have strong U.P. ties. Orbion Space Technology, located in Houghton, won the Financing of the Year Award. The award recognizes the signifi-

November 2021

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n October, the Michigan Dept. of Agriculture and Rural Development confirmed SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19 in humans) in a domestic shorthair cat from Ingham County. While a number of pets have tested positive for the virus worldwide, this is the first case in Michigan. The cat had close contact with its owners, who were


confirmed to have COVID-19 about a week before the cat became ill. The cat was tested after it began to sneeze and has since recovered. “Given the other reported cases of SARS-CoV-2 being found in pets throughout the world, this detection is not unexpected,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Nora Wineland. “The cases in animals generally have involved direct contact with an owner or caretaker who was ill or tested positive for COVID-19.” There is no evidence to suggesting animals are playing a significant role in the transmission of the virus to humans and that the possibility is very low. Signs of SARS-CoV-2 in animals can include fever, sneezing, coughing, nasal discharge, eye discharge, vomiting, and/or diarrhea. If you think your pet is sick with the virus or if you have concerns about your pet’s health, please contact your veterinarian. A veterinarian will need to obtain approval to test animals for SARS-CoV-2 from MDARD by calling 800-292-3939.

Residents encouraged to get influenza vaccine

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he Michigan Dept. of Health and Human Services is urging Michiganders to get their flu vaccine as soon as possible to protect themselves and their communities from flu especially while continuing to battle COVID-19. Getting a flu vaccine is critical this season because flu viruses and the virus that causes COVID-19 will likely be spreading simultaneously. Importantly, residents are able to get their COVID-19 vaccine at the same time as their flu vaccine. According to the CDC, those who are at higher risk for contracting flu are also at a higher risk for contracting COVID-19. The department notes that vaccinations for both COVID-19 and the flu are safe, effective strategies to protect individuals and communities from illness. Each year flu vaccination reduces the burden of influenza significantly in the United States preventing millions of illnesses and thousands of hospitalizations and deaths.

Firewood permits extended to end of year

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he Hiawatha National Forest is extending free personal use firewood cutting permits across the Forest until Dec. 31, 2021. “As a continued public benefit during this difficult time, the Hiawatha National Forest has extended free personal use firewood permits,” said Mary Moore, forest supervisor. “The forest service is working to bring the issuing of firewood permits online as well, hopefully in 2022.” Prior to this extension, free personal use firewood permits were scheduled to expire on October 31. Such permits will now automatically extend to the new date, with no need to obtain a new permit. To purchase a permit during this time of social distancing, a personal use firewood permit will be issued upon request by calling one of the district offices: Munising District (906) 387-2512; Rapid River/Manistique Districts (906) 474-6442; St. Ignace (906) 643-7900. Please have the following information on hand to obtain a permit: full name, phone number, driver’s license or other identification number and expiration date, address, and license plate number. Standing dead and down trees may be gathered for firewood. Further guidelines for cutting will be provided with the permit. This authority applies only to non-commercial firewood cutting on Hiawatha National Forest system lands.

Input sought on firewood quarantine proposal

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he Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development is proposing an exterior firewood quarantine to prevent the introduction of unwanted plant pests and diseases. Public comments on the proposal are due by Friday, Nov. 19. Under the proposed exterior firewood quarantine: all firewood shipped into Michigan would have to be certified as heat treated at a temperature of 140 degrees F. (60 degrees C.) for at least 60 minutes; kiln-dried lumber and wood chips smaller than one inch would be exempt; logs or wood shipped from out-of-state sources directly to mills and other facilities for immediate processing would also be exempt; mills that sell or distribute slab wood as a byproduct of the operation where the wood came from out-of-state sources could do so under a compliance agreement with MDARD. Submit comments to Mike Bryan, MDARD export and compliance specialist by emailing BryanM@Michigan.gov. More information is available at Michigan.gov/Invasives and on MDARD’s plant pest quarantine webpage.

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on campus HOMELANDS SIGN NMU acknowledges campus built upon ancestral indigenous lands By Kristi Evans

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orthern Michigan University honored Indigenous Peoples’ Day Oct. 11 with an unveiling ceremony for a new sign on the academic mall acknowledging that the campus is located on the ancestral homelands of the Anishinaabe Three Fires Confederacy. The event included songs by the Morning Thunder Drum, speakers and a group procession to the Center for Native American Studies’ fire site near Whitman Hall.The Native American Student Association selected “A Day of Healing and On Indigenous Peoples’ Day, Oct. 11, NMU held a ceremony Celebration” as the theme of this year’s event. NASA President unveiling a new sign that recognizes that the campus is loBazile Panek said it falls in the midst of the continuing cated on the ancestral homelands of the Anishinaabe Three pandemic, as “American Indians and Alaska Natives are dying Fires Confederacy. (NMU phtoto) of COVID-19 at much higher rates and at younger ages than wrote. “Getting to today has been a journey that has taken a lot any other group.” of time, patience and work on behalf of many people.” Grace Challier, a Center for Native American Studies Dan Truckey of the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center faculty member, has taught a course on the history of Indian chaired the committee responsible for installing the land boarding schools for the past 14 years. She read a relevant acknowledgment sign. short essay titled “In Defiance” by NMU student Shelby “One thing I was told right off the bat was that a sign was Boggs, a double major in Native American studies and social not enough because that in itself was a sign of colonization; work.“The United States has committed 500 years of genocide we needed something more lasting and meaningful,” against the Indigenous people of Turtle Island in an attempt to Truckey said. “In addition to the sign, there is going to be an further the capitalization of the land,” Boggs wrote. interpretive walk in this forest area directly behind it. This is “The most insidious act of genocide was that of the Indian the remnant of a forest that once stretched throughout this boarding school system, which operated for nearly 100 whole area. We thought, how fitting would it be for this forest years through both governmental and church oversight. The to have a new life, where it actually serves as an interpretation main advantage for the dominant society to operate these of the Anishinaabe people and the things they value in their institutions was gaining control over Indigenous people lives. For that reason, we chose this location for the sign as an through systematic dehumanization and traumatization. entryway into the forest and trail.” Nevertheless, in spite of 500 years of genocide and forced NMU student Reese Carter, an illustration and Native assimilation, Indigenous people and culture prevail.” American studies major, designed the multi-language sign Professor Martin Reinhardt of the Center for Native that reads, “Northern Michigan University is located on American Studies read comments from NMU Interim the ancestral homelands of the Anishinaabe Three Fires President Kerri Schuiling, who was unable to attend because of a flight cancellation. “In spite of the atrocities Indigenous Confederacy. Gichi-namebini Ziibing is the traditional name peoples suffered and endured, it is our Native American of Marquette.” Kristi Evans is the news director for the NMU office for communities that have consistently taught us the importance of News and Media Relations. leaving the world in a better place than we found it,” Schuiling

Finlandia offering students free META mental health services

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inlandia University has begun offering META Teletherapy to students. All Finlandia University students will have free access to META’s mobile app. Students can connect to a national network of licensed counselors and therapists for chat, voice, and video sessions. Students download the app, choose a provider, and receive counseling through the privacy and convenience of their smart phones. The platform provides students the freedom to choose a therapist who’s a good fit, and the ability to reach them

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quickly and easily. Students attending online, out-of-state, and in-person will have equivalent access to mental health counseling services. A limited number of counseling sessions with META providers will be paid for by Finlandia University. META providers also accept insurance co-pay and out-of-pocket payments. Leading Finlandia’s partnership with META is Rev. Sarah Semmler Smith, Finlandia’s campus pastor. “Part of Finlandia’s mission is to support the whole person toward a whole life. This partnership with META arises

from the need to provide easier access to a broader variety of mental health providers to our students. META is an extension of the in person, on-site care we strive to provide our students every day,” Semmler Smith said. Since the COVID pandemic, student engagement on META has increased dramatically. Providers on META’s marketplace are available days, evenings, and weekends all year long to fit a flexible student schedule. For more information visit www. finlandia.edu


DRIVING SNOW

MTU team works to teach self-driving vehicles to navigate in snowy weather By Allison Mills

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obody likes driving in a blizzard, including autonomous vehicles. A major challenge for autonomous vehicles is navigating bad weather. Snow confounds crucial sensor data that helps a vehicle gauge depth, find obstacles and keep on the correct side of the yellow line, assuming it is visible. In two papers presented at the SPIE Defense + Commercial Sensing 2021 symposium, researchers from MTU discussed solutions for snowy scenarios that could help bring selfdriving options to snowy cities like Chicago, Detroit, Minneapolis and Toronto. Automakers and research universities are still tweaking self-driving technology and algorithms. Occasionally accidents occur, either due to a misjudgment by the car’s artificial intelligence (AI) or a human driver’s misuse of self-driving features. Fisheye cameras widen the view while other cameras act much like the human eye. Infrared picks up heat signatures. Radar can see through the fog and rain. Light detection and ranging (lidar) pierces through the dark and weaves a neon tapestry of laser beam threads. “Every sensor has limitations, and every sensor covers another one’s back,” said Nathir Rawashdeh, assistant professor of computing in Michigan Tech’s College of Computing and one of the study’s lead researchers. He works on bringing the sensors’ data together through an AI process called sensor fusion. “Sensor fusion uses multiple sensors of different modalities to understand a scene,” he said. “You cannot exhaustively program for every detail when the inputs have difficult patterns. That’s why we need AI.” Rawashdeh’s Michigan Tech collaborators include Nader Abu-Alrub, his doctoral student in electrical and computer engineering, and Jeremy Bos, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, along with master’s degree students and graduates from Bos’s lab: Akhil Kurup, Derek Chopp and Zach Jeffries. Most autonomous sensors and self-driving algorithms are being developed in sunny, clear landscapes. Bos’ lab began collecting local data in a Michigan Tech autonomous vehicle (safely driven by a human) during heavy snowfall. Rawashdeh’s team, notably Abu-Alrub, poured over more than 1,000 frames of lidar, radar and image data from snowy roads in Germany and Norway to start teaching their AI program what snow looks like and how to see past it.“All snow is not created equal,” Bos said, pointing

Sensors blocked by salt, ice, etc. are an obstacle a team at MTU is working on to help autonomous vehicles operate in bad weather. (Pexels photo by Pixabay)

out that the variety of snow makes sensor detection a challenge. Rawashdeh added that pre-processing the data and ensuring accurate labeling is an important step to ensure accuracy and safety. Still, clear vehicle sensors do not always agree. Bos mentioned an example of discovering a deer while cleaning up locally gathered data. Lidar said that blob was nothing (30 percent chance of an obstacle), the camera saw it like a sleepy human at the wheel (50 percent chance), and the infrared sensor shouted WHOA! (90 percent sure that is a deer). Getting the sensors and their risk assessments to learn from each other is like the Indian parable of three blind men who find an elephant: each touches a different part of the elephant — the creature’s ear, trunk and leg — and comes to a different conclusion about what kind of animal it is. Using sensor fusion, Rawashdeh and Bos want autonomous sensors to collectively figure out the answer — be it elephant, deer or snowbank. As Bos puts it, “Rather than strictly voting, by using sensor fusion we will come up with a new estimate.”While navigating a Keweenaw blizzard is a ways out for autonomous vehicles, their sensors can get better at learning about bad weather and, with advances like sensor fusion, will be able to drive safely on snowy roads one day. Allison Mills is the director of research news for the MTU Office for Marketing and Communications. Edited for space, visit mtu.edu/news for the complete story.

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feature

The Fall Phantasm featured costumes, dancing, story telling, games and other activities, food and refreshments. Hundreds attended the fundraising event, which was organized by the recently formed Marquette Fringe organization, was held at Lakenenland Sculpture Park near Marquette Oct. 2. (Joseph Zyble photo)

Group strives to bring something different to the arts By Joseph Zyble

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here are “the arts,” a term that evokes customary forms of human creative expression—dance, orchestra, live theatre, painting and so forth—but there are also other forms of art. Some of these other art forms are considered experimental, experiential, edgy, unexpected, and even yetto-be discovered. This less common side of artistic expression is where the recently founded Marquette Fringe plans to concentrate … and proliferate. Mike Bradford could be considered the protagonist in the effort to create Marquette Fringe and he now serves as its president. Bradford, whose always had a great appreciation for the arts, said he felt compelled to try to add something to the art scene that existed in the area. “I was already very impressed with the arts community here. For a city of 22,000 and a county of 66,000, I could not believe the level of artists and talent that resided here,” he said. Bradford, who is the event-market manager at Travel Marquette, got an idea from a co-worker, Susan Estler, director of the agency, who suggested

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Streaking in Tongues, the experimental father/son music project consisting of dad Ronnie and son Elliott Ferguson, were among the performers at the Fall Phantasm event. (Alex Cowles photo)

he consider looking into a “fringe festival.” It was something Bradford had never heard of. Fringe Festivals trace their origin to 1947 when several theatre companies showed up uninvited to

November 2021

the very first Edinburgh International Festival in Scotland. Denied entrance, the uninvited troupes held their performances on the outskirts of the festival. A local journalist who was impressed with the artists wrote about how they performed “round the fringe” of the official festival. The uninvited performers began referring to themselves as “fringe adjuncts,” and a movement was born. “When I found out what a Fringe Festival was it just seemed perfect. I gathered a bunch of great people and together we were able to create Marquette Fringe,” he said. The effort began in November of 2019 and by April 2020 Marquette Fringe was formally established as non-profit organization. Marquette Fringe’s ultimate goal is produce a full-fledged Marquette Fringe Festival. Fringe festivals, which are held in communities around the world, have many things in common: they’re easy for anyone to participate in; they offer a variety of performing arts; they’re uncensored— some may be family-friendly while other may be


A screen-printing t-shirt booth staffed by a lion was among the many attractions at the Fall Phantasm. (Joseph Zyble photo)

bawdy or burlesque; they provide original art; performances tend to be brief (an hour or less); and the sets and technical requirements are minimal. In the spirit of the festivals, Bradford said everyone is welcome to join and participate in Marquette Fringe. Mike Bradford “If you wanted to sing, if you want to dance, if you want to direct or work on back-end things like engineering, production design, marketing—really any aspect

that goes into these efforts—you’re more than welcome to hop in,” he said. One thing that sets fringe art apart from traditional art is that fringe art is always original. “We want people to be on the fringe, to experiment, to try something new. This extends to our slogan, ‘Far North of Ordinary.’ We don’t want to put on things people have seen before,” Bradford said. If there is an antagonist in the Marquette Fringe effort, it is the pandemic that began to sweep the nation just as the group was preparing to liftoff. While putting on a festival remains the ultimate goal, the organization has had to be patient and start with smaller

The Fall Phantasm offered participants of the former Marquette Spectacle the chance to continue the artistic performances that were an important part of it. Marquette Spectacle was an outdoor, artistic celebration that was held each year near Halloween for many years. It was discontinued after the 2019 event. (Alex Cowles photo)

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venues. The restrictions and uncertainties wrought by the pandemic required Marquette Fringe to wait a year before it could offer its first event. Even so, that event was limited to a digital production. “Glimpses of Elsewhere,” Marquette Fringe’s inaugural event, was launched online April 10 this year. The video presentation, which can still be viewed on YouTube, features an eclectic variety of short artistic presentations strung together through a narrative about an otherworldly mothman looking for something inspirational to view while quarantining. “We were really pleased with how many submissions we had,” Bradford said. “We had some that were dance, Claymation, music, all forms of art that people were able to create during the pandemic, either in their homes or around their communities. It An inviting fire pit provided a pleasant place to sit and enjoy the festivities during the evening at the Fall was very impressive.” Phantasm, which has held at Lakenenland Sculpture Park on Oct. 2. (Joseph Zyble photo) Next, Marquette Fringe participated in the City of And what else does the future hold? Marquette’s annual Art Week in late June by offer- throughout the event, adding an otherworldly feel “Honestly, with how much creativity there is in ing artistic activities at their Reconnect at the Lower to the evening. After dark, the mix of light and shadthis community, it’s almost impossible to know how Harbor events. ows created by a large bonfire in the center of the “We had some performances, both musical and venue, along with the frenetic flickering and flash- many events we’ll offer and what they’ll look like in dance, happening on the grounds. But also we ing of stage lights accompanying DJ-provided tech- the future,” Bradford said. In addition to producing public art, Marquette worked with local organizations like Hiawatha Mu- no music, added to the unconventional milieu. Fringe hopes to help create a network for the art sic Co-op to have some workshops, mostly geared Marquette Fringe was able to incorporate eleto youth, to get ments of the former Marquette community, bringing together people from all asthem painting, Spectacle into the Fall Phan- pects of the arts in order to promote collaborative building, making tasm. Marquette Spectacle was efforts to enable artistic ideas to become reality. “Fringe is hoping to be that platform to build music and just a public, outdoor event featurkind of getting ing costumed performers and these connections, give people this freedom, push more engaged,” performances, that was held in the narrative in the community, and then to expose Bradford said. the city near Halloween; the last the community to what these people have created,” he said. More recentone was in 2019. Joining Marquette Fringe is as easy as going only, Marquette “The Marquette Spectacle Fringe held its had been going on for almost line to the group’s Facebook, Instagram or website third event in a decade, so Fringe gave them and filling out the online interest form. There is no the form of the a new home this year and they membership fee. “Fill out the form. Get involved in any capacity in Fall Phantasm, were a big partner for us at the which was held —Mike Bradford Fall Phantasm,” Bradford said. anything you want, whether it’s performative or to at Lakenenland Bradford noted that the Fall volunteer, or just to be kept in the loop about what’s Sculpture Park Phantasm, which was a fund- going on,” Bradford said. About the author: Joseph Zyble is a troll who hasn’t near Marquette Oct. 2. raiser whose proceeds will go toward producing a The Fall Phantasm, described as “a night of il- Fringe Festival, was very successful with more than lived beneath the bridge for 30-some-odd years. He lusion,” included music, theatrical performances, 200 people present at any given time during the five- is married to the lovely Melanie and they have two cats together. Oh yeah, and some grown-up kids, and dancing, activities such as glow-costume making, hour event. “A Fringe Festival will always be our flagship event. a big, yellow dog they frequently wind up babysitting games, campfire stories, and a variety of vendors. A troupe dressed in colorful costumes described However, after the success of the Fall Phantasm we’re (dogsitting?) too. MM as “fantasy creatures” circulated among the crowd also considering bringing that back next October.”

A Fringe Festival will always be our flagship event. However, after the success of the Fall Phantasm we’re also considering bringing that back next October.”

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‘CLUE’: The Movie

No. 1024

Reprinted from the New York Times By Brandon Koppy/Edited by Will Shortz

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73 Perfectly comfortable 75 1930s migrant to California 76 Spirits 77 Sesh on Reddit 80 Speed reader? 81 Gave, as gossip 83 Trimmed parts of green beans 84 A Man for All Seasons 87 Matricidal figure of Greek myth 89 Golden-rule word 90 Spanish ‘‘Listen!’’ 91 Dostoyevsky’s Prince Myshkin, so the book title declares 93 Cause for switching positions 97 Scent of a Woman 104 ‘‘____ you decent?’’ 105 ____ Toy Barn (‘‘Toy Story 2’’ locale) 106 Small things that you pluck 107 Breakout band for Harry Styles and Zayn Malik, familiarly 108 Overlie 111 Mad magazine cartoonist Drucker 112 Get the juices flowing? 113 Wayne’s World 114 Space Jam 118 Gene variant 119 Denominator in the velocity formula 120 Beam for train tracks 121 Fragrant ring 122 Candy with the slogan ‘‘Not sorry’’ 123 Skosh 124 Main artery 125 Panic button, of a sort 1 Pet that should come with a lint roller? 2 Given that 3 Exasperated parent’s retort 4 Flue-like 5 Confucian philosophy 6 Singer Rita 7 ‘‘Floating terror’’ of the sea

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1 Syllables when you forget the words 4 The universe has an estimated 1,082 of them 9 ‘‘A mouse!’’ 12 Beyoncé chart-topper ‘‘Single ____ (Put a Ring on It)’’ 18 Simile center 19 ____ Lawrence College 20 Magazine co-founded in 1945 by Hélène Gordon Lazareff 22 Similar-sounding phrase, such as ‘‘I scream’’ for ‘‘ice cream’’ 23 Field of Dreams 26 Guys and Dolls 27 Lucrative and undemanding 28 Ingredient in a McDonald’s McFlurry 29 Seasonal winds 31 Fictional brand of rocket-powered roller skates 32 ‘‘Cross my heart!’’ 35 Fam girl 36 Sounds of doubt 38 Star Trek 40 Woodworker’s tool 42 Some tourist spots in San Francisco 43 Tax pro, for short 45 Ancient work that describes the sacred tree Yggdrasil 46 Trendy home gym purchase 50 Top Gun 55 Baseball family name much seen in crosswords 56 Jerkface 59 Tightly affixed 60 Parrot’s sound 61 Insurance department 63 ‘‘____ for me, thanks’’ 64 Big no-nos 66 Letters From Iwo Jima 67 The Imitation Game 69 The Fifth Element

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8 Many social media users 9 Donkey with a pinnedon tail 10 Two in a million? 11 ‘‘The Kiss’’ painter 12 Successfully uses a password 13 Melodious 14 Place to develop one’s chops 15 Innate 16 Part of a makeup test? 17 Texting tech, briefly 21 ‘‘____ es!’’ (‘‘That’s right!’’: Sp.) 24 ‘‘Clueless’’ protagonist 25 Accept eagerly, with ‘‘at’’ 30 Org. with an annual Codebreaker Challenge 32 Double-crossed and half-baked 33 Embarrassing public episode 34 Restless desire 37 Luxurious 39 Product for one who wonders, ‘‘Am I expecting?’’ 40 Increased into something much more valuable 41 Spy novelist Deighton 44 Weave off the shoulder? 46 Get ready for vacation 47 Civil rights activist Baker 48 It may be forgiven 49 Mystic’s board 50 4x World Series winner Martinez 51 [more info below] 52 Ice cream containers 53 ____ compensation (subject of modern debate)

Answer Key To check your answers, see Page 63. No cheating!

54 Spanish marinade 57 Drawer of shorts, e.g. 58 Cutthroat mentality 62 Cardinal’s hat, in Britain 65 Tender areas 67 Pop in the fridge 68 Hershey’s chocolateand-toffee bar 70 Diatribe 71 Quaint sign word 72 Noun-making suffix 74 Fumble for words 76 Dodos 77 City that replaced Lagos as Nigeria’s capital 78 Cameo 79 Predatory insect living in woodpiles 82 French fabric 85 Caramel or hot fudge, basically 86 Euphemistic exclamation 88 Ike’s domain in W.W.II 91 Reason the physicist stayed in bed? 92 ‘‘The Shape of Water’’ director 94 Natasha ____, Boris’s partner against Rocky and Bullwinkle 95 Some water-park rides 96 Olympics symbol for Madrid’s country 98 Sang along when you forgot the words 99 Ingredient in healing gel 100 Latte art medium 101 Arch support 102 Bill killers 103 Utopian 106 Like a birthday cake, pre-party 109 ‘‘____ All That’’ (1999 film) 110 Frequently, quaintly 112 Lugosi of horror films 113 Fish with an elongated jaw 115 Singer Sumac 116 Describe in a negative way 117 Toke


at the table

BEYOND THE PIE

Squash-based alternatives to the traditional holiday dessert Story and photos by Katherine Larson

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hanksgiving dinner can be deeply intimidating. Some of us fear the turkey. Some of us fear the gravy. Me, I’m intimidated by pies—my dough can be so tough that I once broke a rolling pin over it. So as I started to contemplate this year’s feast, I decided to explore some possibilities beyond the pie. And, because our local winter squash are so glorious this time of year, I focused on squash. My first effort was the most prosaic: a tasty spice cake made by incorporating mashed roasted butternut squash into the batter along with cinnamon, cardamom, allspice, nutmeg, cloves, and freshly ground black pepper. This autumnal mixture fills your kitchen with good smells and, eventually, your plate with good flavors. It is, however, more like a tea cake than the crescendo of an annual feast. It was time to challenge myself. I also wanted to open things up for the gluten-intolerant. Could I manage a suitable non-pie dessert that used squash, omitted gluten, and conveyed a properly festive atmosphere? The answer was a resounding yes.

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A flourless, cream-covered chocolate cake, topped with flavored bites of butternut squash, is a delicious change of pace to pumpkin pie.

Imagine a decadent flourless chocolate cake, slathered with crème frâiche or sour cream and then covered with bites of butternut squash that had been simmered with maple syrup and cin-

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namon… It’s actually even better than it sounds. And it’s mostly make-ahead! And no pie dough! I started with a favorite flourless chocolate cake—favorite because it’s

comparatively easy and tastes utterly decadent. Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit, and prepare a nineinch springform pan: cut out a circle of parchment paper to match the pan’s inner bottom, rub the bottom and sides of the pan with butter, press the parchment paper down over the buttered bottom and then butter the paper itself, and finally shake cocoa powder over the buttered surfaces. (Not just any cocoa powder; use “special dark 100 percent cacao, dutch process.” It’s right there on the grocery shelf next to the milky variety, and it provides a wonderfully smooth and mellow flavor.) Set the pan aside. Next, the batter: melt a stick—half a cup—of unsalted butter in a small pot, then stir in eight ounces of bittersweet chocolate chips. When the chocolate is all melted, stir in a tablespoon of brandy, rum, or scotch, then set the pot aside to cool. In the meantime, separate six eggs: the yolks into a large bowl, the whites into a medium bowl. Add half a cup of sugar to the yolks along with a pinch


Tradition calls for disks of squash in this Persian dessert, but it’s much easier to cut half-circles.

of salt and whisk it all up together until it’s smooth. Stir in the chocolate-butter mixture and set that large bowl aside. With an electric mixer or a robust arm, beat the egg whites until they reach a soft peak. Sprinkle in another couple of tablespoons of sugar, and then beat until the peaks are stiff. Now comes the implausible part: you’re going to fold those stiff egg whites gently into the chocolate mixture. At first it seems like it will never work. The textures are too different, and there’s just so much egg white, and you don’t want to bash down all that wonderful airiness…Just when you’re about to give up and curse me, though, it all comes together. Use your spatula to pour it into the prepared springform pan and smooth the top, then pop it into the oven. After 35 minutes, it should be done; you can check by poking a toothpick into the center and seeing whether it emerges with just a few (or no) crumbs. Take it out of the oven and let the cake rest in its pan for 20 minutes, then use the handy springform feature to release the pan’s sides and the now-gooey parchment paper to lift the cake off the pan’s bottom and onto a rack to cool. Don’t worry if the cake is much flatter than when it came out of the oven; that’s perfectly normal. After the cake is completely cool, wrap it well and refrigerate it for at least three hours or overnight to solidify. See what I mean about make-ahead? But there’s no squash yet! That will come with the topping, which should also be made ahead. Peel and seed one pound of butternut squash and cut it into half-inch chunks. Sprinkle them lightly with salt. Then, into your biggest frying pan, put half a cup of maple syrup, two tablespoons of honey, one cinnamon stick broken in half, a pinch of ground cloves, and either one vanilla bean split lengthwise or one tablespoon vanilla extract—the real stuff, not artificial. Bring it to a simmer. Add the squash chunks, patting them down into one layer so that each morsel of squash gets properly infused with the sugary goodness, and let it all sim-

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mer down to a syrupy consistency. I’ve had this take ten minutes and I’ve had it take fifteen; just keep an eye on it, because you don’t want it to burn. When it’s all good, turn off the heat and let it all cool down to room temperature. Remember to remove the cinnamon stick and vanilla bean when they’re cool enough to handle. Make the rest of your Thanksgiving dinner; give thanks; eat it; enjoy the people you’re with; and finally—cake time! Take the now-firm cake out of the fridge and swab its top with a layer of crème frâiche (pricy but delectable) or sour cream (a great economical substitute if you buy the probiotic kind that has no thickeners). Spoon the squash and its syrup over the top. Pause for a moment to admire your creation, and then serve. When I made this for friends, there was a long, deeply appreciative silence before the exclamations came. Delicious, and quite sophisticated in flavor. So we’ve enjoyed a simple squash cake, and we’ve

Candied rose petals or violets would make this Persian dessert even more enticing.

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enjoyed a chocolate-squash extravaganza. How about if we want to push boundaries even further? As I pursued my researches for this article, I encountered references to a Persian dish called Deser-e Kadoo Halvaie, and was intrigued: the flavors looked enticing, and it was even easier to make than the other two dishes. Moreover, thanks to the generosity of Amir Afshar, I had some superb Iranian saffron in the cupboard. So I peeled the long neck of a butternut squash, cut it into half-inch-thick slices, then sprinkled some salt on them. In that same large frying pan, I sautéed the slices in a little butter for about five minutes, then poured over them a simple syrup of half a cup each of sugar and water, plus a teaspoon of saffron, crushed and dissolved in a couple of tablespoons of hot water. Twenty or thirty minutes of simmering later, the squash was tender and had completely absorbed the saffrony syrup. While it cooled, I roasted some pistachio nuts and some walnuts. Once the slices were arranged on a platter, I sprinkled the nuts quite lavishly over them, then set everything aside till we were ready to taste. Nervous about whether American palates would be ready to embrace squash—just squash, on its own— for dessert, I brought the platter to our neighborhood block party for reactions. The consensus delighted me: again, delicious! My neighbors suggested that it would be best served individually plated, with a small cup of espresso on the side, and perhaps some decoration on top to underscore the dessert-y nature of the dish. They came up with a variety of creative ideas: candied rose petals (very Persian), candied violets, a curl of dark chocolate… All of these ideas work, and all make this special dish even more special. I may never make a pie again.

About the author: Katherine Larson is a writer, teacher, and former lawyer, with a special passion for food justice. MM


lookout point

JUST LIKE HOME

By Jackie Stark

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he Beacon House was born, as most things are, out of necessity. And though its original location on Third Street in Marquette served the community well for nearly 18 years, when U.P. Health System-Marquette moved to its new location along the US-41 highway in Marquette, it felt like the right time to also move the Beacon House. Situated a stone’s throw from the new U.P. Health System-Marquette facility, the brand new Beacon House is as intentional a space as they come. “This is designed to be everything that we think anyone could possibly need,” said Mary Dowling, CEO of the Steve Mariuc-

ci Family Beacon House. “Just leave no stone unturned for loving and supporting and caring, and that’s what’s so magical. Guests will enter the building into a large reception area with huge, vaulted ceilings, plenty of natural light, and a desk manned by a volunteer ready to help them check in. Natural light is a theme throughout the building, with plenty of windows providing much needed warmth during what is likely to be a stressful time in the life of the facilities’ guests. Since the Beacon House’s inception, it has been a haven for those undergoing medical treatment and their families, providing more than 324,000 overnight stays, and saving families from across the Upper Peninsula more than

$64 million in lodging and meals. And all those stays provided plenty of insight into how to make the Beacon House better in every way – from accommodations to services. With construction delayed –as most things were–by the COVID-19 pandemic, Dowling said the extra time was used to home in on the best possible design for the new facility. “COVID put us all back–no one was giving money, people didn’t know if they were going to build anything,” Dowling said. “We poured through the plans and we said, ‘What else, what else, what else?’ We used every minute of COVID to improve it even more.” The new space provides 22 guest rooms, including two extended-stay rooms, a space dedicated to November 2021

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cancer patients undergoing treatment, a wig salon, multiple community spaces (including a game room for kids), a house kitchen and a commercial kitchen. Dowling said chefs had requested to donate their services at the former location, but she had to turn them down because then it did not have a commercial kitchen that met county health department codes. With the new space, that’s no longer an issue. “I’m getting certified so I can actually cook for our guest too, because that’s my love language,” Dowling said. “I can’t always fix their financial woes or things like that, but when they’re here, I’m gonna make ’em eat. I just love that part.” The house kitchen is also located directly next to the game room, so while parents are cooking a meal in the kitchen, they can still be near their kids—an improvement over the old space, where the playroom was located down the hall from the kitchen. “You can be here, preparing the meals, watching your kids and you’ve got the secure feel-

ing that, ‘I can put my eyeballs on them right now,’ and they can just play happily because they know Mom is right there making them something to eat,” Dowling said. Included in the design are several communal areas for people to be together, and other quieter, more reflective areas, like the chapel, which will include 20-foot ceilings and a locally commissioned cross, which will be made from five different types of wood. A large porch on the main floor and deck on the second floor will also provide a space for guests to relax outdoors, taking in a beautiful view of the city “The best I could do for them at the old Beacon house was a bench between a dumpster and a gas station,” Dowling said. “This is what I wished I could have given them –a place to sit with a rocking chair, a place to look and think and be.” According to information provided by the Beacon House, most stays are cardiovascular-related, followed by Neuro/Brain/Spine conditions, orthopedics/surgery, and ICU or emergency situations.

Rendering of the kitchen and dining area.

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Construction continues as project nears completion.

Also included in that list are stays in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), the only facility of its kind in the entire Upper Peninsula. Which means any newborn born in the Upper Peninsula with serious medical problems will end up in Marquette. “That is one of the most important things in the world to me,” Dowling said, “is to keep babies and mothers together.” Another important mission of the Beacon House is acting as an information center for its guests, helping bridge the gap of communication between families and the medical staff caring for their loved ones. “We’re facilitators,” Dowling said. “The whole reason we’re here is to make sure everybody has everything they need … If there’s something that’s a barrier, like bad communication, then we’ll help fix that, to whatever level.” That goes for everyone on the staff at the Beacon House. “Our entire team is a support team, not matter what our job here is,” Dowling said. “I raise money and I run everything, but my No. 1 job is to be right down there as soon as somebody needs some help. And that’s what we do.” As Dowling walked through the

building, still under construction at the time, pointing out the new features, and the things they improved upon with the new design, her excitement was contagious. Her passion for her work, and for the mission of the Beacon House, was abundantly clear as she discussed each detail of the new space. “The intention is so pure – there’s no hidden agendas here,” she said. “We’re just folks who, all of us, have personally experienced something where someone was very kind to us, and we want to pay that back. “And we also believe that our hospital is a pretty special place, and a lot of people in the U.P. need it. If we can break that barrier to getting there down, call us. We’re there.” A ribbon cutting ceremony for the new space is slated to take place on December 15, with the first guest of the Steve Mariucci Family Beacon House to walk through its doors just after Christmas. For more information on the Beacon House’s mission, or on how to donate, visit upbeaconhouse.org. About the author: Jackie Stark has lived in the UP since she was 11. An avid reader, she also loves gardening and has been talking about learning to play the guitar for 14 years. MM November 2021

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lookout point

Water walkers are shown near Houghton traveling south along US 41 on Sunday evening, Oct. 10. (Theresa Pitts photo)

WATER WALKERS 90-mile ceremonial trek taken to protect, celebrate the living water By Joyce Wiswell

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rowing up on Torch Lake, the body of water in Houghton County fouled by some 200 tons of copper mill stamp sands, taught Theresa Pitts to never take water for granted. “We knew from childhood that it was off limits – no wading, no swimming, no eating the fish that came out of it. It was a very sick lake,” she said. “I remember being in school in Lake Linden and looking out the window on a beautiful spring day and the feeling of wishing it was different.” That experience inspired Pitts, a member of the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC), to become involved with the People of the Heart Water Walkers, which recently held their third annual Water Walk to honor Nibi, the Ojibwe word for water. Water Walkers trekked nearly 90

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miles from the Copper Harbor Lighthouse to the Sandpoint Lighthouse in Baraga, part of what’s known as the 1842 ceded territory, from October 9-11. They began at sunrise and walked into the late afternoon each day. Rather than a march, the walk is a ceremony conducted through Anishinaabe (the original peoples of North America) protocol that celebrates water as an essential, living entity. Along the way, Anishinaabekweg (Anishinaabe women) took turns carrying water in a special copper vessel taken from Gichigami (Lake Superior) in Copper Harbor, finally pouring it into the Keweenaw Bay in Baraga at the walk’s conclusion. The idea is to move continuously, like water, and offer prayers and songs to the water spirits along the way.


Water walker Florine Chosa crosses the Portage Lift Bridge carrying Nibi (water). Mike Rodriguez carries the Eagle Staff. (Terri Denomie photo)

Co-leader Kathleen Smith and son Jacob Smith approach the end of the three-day journey. (Terri Denomie photo)

Women wore long skirts to show respect for their grandmothers, Mother Earth and themselves, and those on their moon (menstruating) did not carry the water as they were considered to be already in ceremony. Men wore long pants as a sign of respect and carried an eagle staff for protection. Mike Rodriguez, the primary eagle staff carrier, walked virtually the entire route. “There were up to 20 in attendance at any given time,” Pitts reported, “and there were many friendly horns tooting in support and donations offered from passing cars.” One of the original members of the Water Walk movement is the late Pauline Knapp-Spruce of the KBIC. A 17-mile walk on the Keweenaw Bay is held in her honor each July during the week of the KBIC powwow. For the past three years, KBIC members Terri Denomie and Kathleen Smith have led the Keweenaw walk after learning the protocol from Grandmother Josephine Mandamin of Wiikwemkoong First Nation in Ontario, and the Three Fires Midewiwin Lodge. Mandamin, who was an origi-

A group of water walkers is shown walking on highway M 26 in Hancock. The towers of the Portage Lake Lift Bridge are seen in the background. (Donica Hope Dravillas photo)

nal member of the water protectors movement and founder of the Mother Earth Water Walkers, walked the perimeter of Lake Superior in 2003 praying and carrying a bucket of water to raise awareness for the need to protect the waters from pollution. People of all colors, faiths and philosophies were encouraged to join any or all of the route. “It is really nice to have people walk with us. We value everyone and want everyone to experience it,” said Pitts, who walked about eight miles of the route on Sunday, October 10. “The vessel-carrying is a little nerve wracking because you don’t want to spill it,” she added. “It’s really different when you carry it. When you’re walking with the group you feel free to talk and be social, but when you carry the vessel it’s … I don’t know, there is almost a reverence to it as you focus on prayer.” In order to keep moving continuously, just like water, walkers handed out explanatory brochures to curious passersby. They used ones left over from last year rather than waste the resources to print new ones. Partici-

pants were told to bring drinking water in a reusable container (no bottled water) and moleskin for blisters, and drugs and alcohol were banned. The walk concluded on the late afternoon on October 11, Indigenous Peoples’ Day, with a final feast provided by the Cultural Committee of KBIC. Besides KBIC, walk sponsors included the Indigenous Peoples’ Day Campaign of Upper Michigan, the Western Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Region and the Michigan Tech Writing Center. “Water is life-giving and as we give life through water, we take on the protection and care of the water of Mother Earth as well. This is not a new philosophy, though this protection of water by Anishinaabekweg through Water Walks is perhaps a relatively new way of doing that work,” Pitts said. “We want everyone to be aware of the importance and value of water. It is a living thing so treat it as such. You can pray for the water just as you can pray for your family members.” About the author: Joyce Wiswell is a freelance writer and editor in Hancock. MM

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back then A Yooper to the rescue Story by Larry Chabot Sketch by Mike McKinney

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he Heiress Who Saved The Peace Corps.” That’s how the prestigious New York Times described the late Loret Ruppe, a U.P. resident with worldwide influence. Loret Miller Ruppe was born in Milwaukee in 1936. Her great-grandfather, Frederick Miller, founded the Miller Brewing Company, and her father – also named Frederick – headed the company for many years. He was an All-American football player and team captain at Notre Dame and later served as a volunteer, unpaid coach for Notre Dame and the Green Bay Packers. Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, Notre Dame’s president, said that Miller was the only volunteer coach the school ever had. Miller, age 48 and the father of eight, his 20-year-old son Fred Jr., and two brothers who were Miller pilots, died in a plane crash in Milwaukee in 1954. Over 3,000 people attended the funeral. Loret, only 18 at the time, left Marymount college in New York after the funeral to help her mother. Years later, she was invited back to the school to receive an honorary degree for her many achievements. In 1957, Loret married Phil Ruppe, one-time president of the Bosch Brewery, moved to Houghton where she raised five daughters and was active in United Way and the hospital guild. According to the Escanaba Daily Press, she was longtime resident and civic leader in Houghton, where the Ruppes had an apartment on Douglass Avenue. In 1966, her husband was elected to the first of six terms in the U.S. Congress. Loret was active in his campaigns, later serving as Michigan campaign manager of George H.W. Bush’s primary campaign and was busy in the Reagan-Bush campaign that year. She was a member of the Electoral College, which formally certifies a president’s election. While in Washington as a Congressional wife, Loret was president of a club for wives of congressmen, government officials, and foreign diplomats. As a Republican and frequent world traveler, in addition to having two sisters and a cousin serving overseas, Loret was an ideal candidate for a position in the incoming Reagan administration. So on Feb. 15, 1980, President Reagan selected her as director of the Peace Corps, a Unit-

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A sketch of Loret Ruppe as director of the Peace Corps.

ed States government program to provide technical assistance, helped Americans better understand cultures, and help others better understand American culture. While awaiting Senate confirmation, she served as a volunteer in the corps. After unanimous approval by the U.S. Senate, she was sworn in by Vice President George H.W. Bush with her husband Phil holding the Bible. When visiting the White House to meet with Reagan, she was made to wait 45 minutes before the president’s Peace Corps liaison let her in. He startled Loret by telling her that he didn’t believe in the corps and that he wanted to see it abolished. Loret would be seeking another liaison. Once in office, she promised to keep the corps non-partisan, and said that “it must always signify Americans pulling together for peace.” In early 1985, Loret made a plea on national television for 600 volunteers for what was a shrinking base of workers for African duty, Her plea resulted in more than 7,000 people contacting the agency, enabling her to serve seven more countries. She herself visited over 60 countries across the world to check on progress. When he saw her in action, R. Sargent Shriver, first director of the Peace Corps under President Kennedy (his brother-in-law), said “Without her, the agency would have been ‘blown out of existence.’’ Some referred to her as the corps’ “greatest director.’’ She was the longest-serving director in the agency’s history, and according to the The New York Times, she restored much of its initial vitality. Its volunteer force,


once as high was 15,000 members, had shrunk to 5,000 people and a smaller budget as it went through seven directors in the seven directors in the previous ten years. She brought in candidates who knew forestry, wildlife management, and sanitation systems. She also began working directly with colleges and universities. It wasn’t all pain-free. Ruppe took hits from several sources over her decisions. The Washington Post noted that she had been “belted around” in a campaign of character assassination. One complaint was that she kept on for 10 months a former official who was trashing the president. And she was called “an uppity woman, making trouble instead of staying home and helping her husband in his campaign for the Senate.” After eight years at the agency, Ruppe was named U.S. ambassador to Norway by President George H. W. Bush and served for four years. The Ruppes and Bushes were also social friends. A unique honor was bestowed on her in 1985 when she was named a Michiganian of the Year along with Michigan football coach Bo Schembechler and Detroit Piston star Isaiah Thomas. Another unusual and firsttime occasion was when her daughter Loret, Jr., served the corps in Nepal as a bridge engineer. As for her credentials as a U.P. woman, Loret had married a Yooper and moved to Houghton with him. She was also a frequent camper at the family lodge on Craig Lake in Baraga County. The family would fly into

Marquette County Airport and travel by car to the site. Now Craig Lake State Park, and the most remote park in Michigan. It held six lakes, three of which were named for Miller children Craig, Teddy, and Clair. Another lake was named High Life in recognition of one of Miller Brewing’s most popular beers. The cabins built by the Millers are still in use by the state. On August 7, 1996, Loret Ruppe died of ovarian cancer, survived by her husband and five daughters. Senator Chris Dodd, a former corps volunteer in the Dominican Republic, paid tribute to her on the Senate floor. Several universities, including Michigan Technological University, granted her honorary degrees or endowed scholarships in her name. The Peace Corps is one of the organizations with such an award. Her successor, Mark Gearan, summed it up with this eulogy: “The entire Peace Corps family mourns the loss of Loret Ruppe, who was the driving force behind the agency’s revitalization.” Thus she is known as the heiress who saved the Peace Corps. About the author: Larry Chabot, an Ontonagon native, worked his way through Georgetown University and was then employed at White Pine Copper Company for 32 years, before moving to Marquette with his wife, Betty. He is a freelance writer who has written for several publications, including over 150 articles for Marquette Monthly. MM

Peace Corps Director Loret Miller Ruppe pins a Peace Corps pin on President Ronald Reagan’s lapel at a meeting in the Oval Office in 1981. (Photo by Jack Kightlinger, Wikimedia Commons)

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lookout point

The Marquette County Courthouse, built in 1904 with Marquette sandstone, is an iconic Romanesque Revival building that in 1958 was site of the filming of the blockbuster movie, “Anatomy of a Murder” that starred Jimmy Stewart, Lee Remick, George C. Scott and Ben Gazzara.

SOLID HISTORY

U.P. communities rebuilt using sandstone after devastating fires Story and photos by Sonny Longtine

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ire! In the later years of the 19th century, no other word could instill more fear into the hearts of residents by the shores of the world’s largest fresh-water lake in the cities of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Devastating fires had razed entire business districts in Marquette in 1868, Hancock in 1869, and Red Jacket (Calumet) in 1870. The fire in Marquette alone destroyed more than 100 buildings. The small Upper Peninsula towns were devastated by the fires. It became imperative that wood structures be replaced with either brick or stone­ —anything not so easily combustible—and sandstone became that replacement. Lake Superior sandstone was highly prized for its beauty and toughness; it was well suited to rebuilding Upper

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Peninsula towns. The great fires also led many towns to adopt fire codes and to acquire adequate firefighting equipment. Lake Superior sandstone was quarried in three primary locations: Marquette and Jacobsville in the Upper Peninsula and Bayfield, Wis. Although there were more than 70 sites in the Lake Superior region that quarried sandstone, most did not compare with the volume produced by these three. The sandstone quarried in Marquette was called brownstone because of its brown-purple hue, while the sandstone quarried in Jacobsville was called redstone, again because of its coloration. Bayfield primarily produced redstone, although colors ranged from pink to light brown. Marquette sandstone was extracted from a quarry close to Lake Superior

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in South Marquette, while the Copper Country sandstone was quarried at Jacobsville, a small location in the southeast corner of the Keweenaw Peninsula and near the Portage Canal. The highly sought sandstone was shipped to the Midwest cities of Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Chicago, and Detroit, and to other points south. Chicago’s Tribune Building, the Germania Bank in St. Paul, and the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York, all prestigious and well-known buildings, are among hundreds of structures that were built with Lake Superior sandstone. Its quality and durability was nationally recognized. The burly stone was not only aesthetically pleasing but also fire resistant. Sandstone can endure temperatures up to 800 degrees before it will crack or crumble. Granite and limestone cannot endure exceedingly

high temperatures as sandstone can. In the Upper Peninsula where 80 degrees is considered a heat wave, but where fires had ravaged towns, there was little hesitation in using the sandstone. Sandstone can not only withstand extreme temperature changes, but is able to retain solar heat in the winter. Not only was sandstone easily obtainable but there was a ready workforce in the Upper Peninsula to process it. It was ordained for greatness as it became the material used in many of the peninsula’s finest courthouses, commercial buildings, and homes. The demand for sturdy and sizable buildings was also driven by the prosperity created by burgeoning iron ore and copper mining in the peninsula in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Money was now available for


imposing buildings, and community movers and shakers wanted buildings that would make a statement about the excellence of their town. The hard-wearing Upper Peninsula sandstone was utilized in Richardson Romanesque, Italianate, and Gothic architectures. Numerous historic sandstone structures across the peninsula have been torn down in the last five decades; fortunately, however, many still remain. From 1880 to 1910, sandstone was a central building material in Upper Michigan. Sandstone was quarried in several different ways: dimension stone, ton stone, or rubble stone. The most costly and the one that many builders preferred was dimension stone. This stone was removed from a quarry in blocks that measured eight feet by four feet by two feet. Contractors then cut the stone to the shape and size that was required for a specific building. Rubble stone was the by-product of dimension stone and was used for cribs, breakwaters, and building foundations. It was the cheapest sandstone and the least desirable, although it often served well on given projects. When not used for these projects it was often discarded. Quarrying stone by the ton was another method. It was shipped to builders in large uncut chunks and sold by weight. In 1873, the Erickson Manufacturing Company in Marquette installed rock saws that could cut the stone into different sizes and shapes. Previously all sandstone was shipped in the rough; now it could be cut into square and rectangular blocks. Windowsills

St Paul’s Episcopal Church on E. Ridge Street in Marquette, designed by local architect C.F. Struck, was built in 1875. The Romanesque Revival edifice was constructed with native sandstone and has an impervious slate roof.

were one of the most common cut blocks. Sandstone hardens after being removed from the quarry. Once the stone is exposed to air, the water in the sandstone is drawn to the surface and the mineral residue (a clay-like substance) in the water is deposited on the stone’s surface. During the drying cycle, the residue serves as a bonding and hardening agent, making the stone extremely durable. In testimony to its durability, there are many sandstone structures still in use in the Upper Peninsula more than 100 years old. A reporter for the Marquette Mining Journal in 1871 extolled the virtues of Marquette sandstone. Proudly

The Phelps Richardsonian Romanesques Revival house on E. Ridge Street was built in 1892. The sandstone dwelling was a wedding gift from William Fitch to his Daughter Mary who married Peter White Phelps.

he said, “The stone of Marquette… remains intact in places amid the hottest heat…” Marquette sandstone has a purplish brown color that many consider aesthetically superior. It also appears as though drops of rain are embedded in its surface. Prices for sandstone were a bargain when compared to today’s building materials. Marquette sandstone sold for $1.30 a cubic yard, while Jacobsville sold for $1.20 a cubic yard. Although most sandstone in the U.P. was quarried in Marquette and Jacobsville, there were more than 15 companies that extracted the stone in Marquette County. The Marquette Brownstone Company became the primary producer in the county. Today, the former quarry site in South Marquette has a condominium development that surrounds the now water-filled quarry pit. Much to the delight of the condominium owners, it serves as a private swimming pool. Sandstone fell out of favor after the first decade of the twentieth century and was replaced with the preferred lighter-colored granite and Bedford limestone. In 1904, Peter White Public Library in Marquette became one of the early buildings in Marquette to adopt the up-and-coming limestone (1904). Other contributing factors to the demise of sandstone was the depression of l893 and the increased use of artificial stone that was cheaper and more accessible. The Columbia Exposition in

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Chicago in 1900 was another force that initiated sandstone’s demise. The Exposition was called the “Great White Way,” and its use of the light-colored granite and limestone ushered in the new material of choice, and sent the colorful sandstone into near oblivion. Along with the rise of Philadelphia hard-pressed brick as another good building choice, sandstone continued its downward spiral. When a sandstone building caught fire, most often the interior was gutted and the sandstone carcass remained. These buildings could be rebuilt when the existing sandstone walls were intact; St. Peter Cathedral in Marquette is a good example. When the cathedral was gutted by fire in 1935, the sandstone walls weathered the fire and an even grander cathedral was built. The fire originated in the basement when a coal bin spontaneously combusted. Other sandstone buildings in Marquette were torn down to make parking lots. The Marquette Beauty Academy and the Nester School, both on Bluff Street in Marquette are sites where blacktop replaced historic structures. The most egregious tear-down, however, was when Northern Michigan University (NMU), ripped out three historic sandstone buildings that were built at the beginning of the 20th century. Kaye Hall, Peter White Hall, and Longyear Hall were unceremoniously demolished when university officials decided they needed a larger and more modern administrative building. In 1975, concerned local citizens banded together in an attempt to save Kaye Hall, the parapeted central building with a marble staircase in a threestory atrium. Their effort failed.

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In place of the historic buildings, a six-story, box behemoth was erected. Universities like Notre Dame and Michigan State University went to great lengths to preserve their historic buildings. The only NMU buildings left after the demolition were those built after 1950. A visitor to the campus would not have any idea that the university’s inception was 1899. With no one quarrying sandstone for decades in the Lake Superior region, the supply for restoration projects is limited, and stone masons who work with sandstone are few and

Stone mason Dave Holsworth of Republic is one of a few area masons who work with sandstone. He crafted a large fireplace out of sandstone at the John Jilbert residence near Marquette recently.

far between. Dave Holsworth, a 54-year-old, skilled stone mason from Republic, Michigan, is one of the few left who still works with sandstone. His most recent sandstone renovation project was at the home of Marquette entrepreneur John Jilbert, who owns a classy log and sandstone house on the city’s outskirts. Holsworth built a massive sandstone fireplace for the Jilbert house. “I like working with sandstone,” Holsworth said. “It’s lightweight and sets up quickly, just what you want. A hard

stone like granite is more difficult to work with. In addition to building the fireplace, Holsworth repaired or replaced sandstone that was used throughout the house. Holsworth commented, “Sandstone is one of the better stones to work with, it’s a soft stone, easy to chisel; it carves easily.” Holsworth also repointed (placing wet mortar into joints in repairing old masonry) the Jilbert sandstone dairy building located in Marquette. “Keeping sandstone moist when you’re repointing is a must,” said Holsworth, “otherwise it dries out too quickly and crumbles.” Holsworth pointed out, “It’s really hard to find sandstone anymore. I was lucky in the Jilbert project that there was a huge pile of sandstone at the house site that was left over from a 1930s county park project.” Many of the pieces Holsworth used were large and needing trimming. He said, “I had to use a masonry saw to cut them down before I could chisel them to fit.” Jilbert was fortunate to find Holsworth to complete the masonry work on his rustic but elegant home. Astonishingly, the Upper Peninsula radically benefited from the 1860s fires that destroyed major portions of several U.P. cities. These fires led to a sandstone building boom that resulted in long-lasting, functional structures that are still in use today. They enhance the U.P. with a stylish elegance that “yoopers” can unabashedly embrace. About the author: Sonny Longtine is a Marquette resident who has published eight books on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. For more than three decades he taught American history and government in Michigan schools. MM

November 2021


gift of water Timeless shores By Aimée Cree Dunn

B

orderlands exist where water meets the worlds of earth and sky. In these interstitial spaces, time itself feels permeable between what was, is and could be. Over two hundred years ago on a sandy Lake Superior beach not far from AuTrain, this merging of eras occurred in a literal sense. That evening, the remains of a late summer storm still stirred the surface of the lake. The weather had waylaid the Cass Expedition, a group of American explorers assessing the mineral and forest “resources” of Anishinaabe territory. To pass the time, an Anishinaabe man from nearby Gichi-minising (Grand Island) was invited to their campfire to tell the powerful history of his pacifist people and the broader Anishinaabe nation. The stormy lake had stalled the expedition, time enough to hear the deeper story of the land. Undaunted by this history lesson, however, the next morning they set forth again to lay the groundwork for the coming centuries’ land theft and environmental exploitation. They were colonizers—for them, industrial “progress” was inevitable. Anishinaabeg Akiing, the land of the Anishinaabeg, was destined to give way. The same waters that lapped the shores that turbulent summer evening today still susurrate the sands there, tumbling similar pebbles to shore, enveloping the same sandstone boulders and rocky outcrops. Those waters continue to tell a long and ancient story. Despite our era’s appropriation of waters for industry and recreational tourism, the older story remains, biding its time. Perhaps more than anywhere else, proximity to a body of water enables us to sense the past. Waters unhindered by colonization and development offer a gateway through time. Their wildness untethers us from this industrial moment.

Such freeing can come, say, while walking a trail along a bog lake in the Ottawa. My toes squishing in the cool softness of sphagnum moss, spruce darkly edging the scarlet horizon, I embrace the age-old knowledge the waters hold. For millennia, wolves traversed this trail under similar sunset skies. Geese flew overhead, the glint of moonlight on bog waters a navigational guide. Cranberries ripened in mats of moss, red berries dipped in boggy dew, prized by gatherers who sweetened the berry sauce with maple sugar cubes back home. Or it comes at the site where people lived in a summer village on the northern shores of Lake Michigan 3,000 years ago. Old growth maple sheltered them. An ancient cedar forest, topping a towering limestone bluff rimmed by crystal blue waters of the great lake below, offered them life-giving medicine. This release into the past can be found as well at a wilderness waterfall near Rock River Canyon. Deep in a forest glen, its woodland pool dotted with the golden leaves of sugar maple, older memories are held in the mossy nooks for those willing to listen. Recent phys-

Water Saving Tips

• Waters poisoned by industry, wild fisheries have collapsed. It is time to decolonize our land with a gradual return to a de-industrialized, bio-regional economy. It is also time to decolonize our hearts and minds by prioritizing the well-being of all relations.

ics posits that all of time happens in a single moment. As I crunch chips and sip soda on the edges of that wildwood pool, does another trout roast over a fire built with bow-and-drill as wild rice boils in a birchbark makuk? The magic of water can make me believe so. Water offers a spiritual gateway to the Time Before All This: waters were healthy, fish were abundant, forests crept down to shade the winding stream. The wildness of water stretches beyond our human grasp. This very wildness allows us to escape the present moment, to sense that which makes the land, indeed our very souls, whole once more. On the shores of Lake Superior, pines on dunes behind me, the past is almost palpable. Grandfather rocks hold secrets of ancient times. Waves lap at the sand of millennia past when others too dipped their toes in the icy waters, family and community just beyond the pine-laden rise. I can almost smell woodsmoke and venison. Someone is singing a song. A seagull soars freely overhead. Laughter trickles down the dune. Water carries the sound, rippling echoes into the present day. A new yet ancient tide stretches toward the shore, ready to be reborn. Contributor’s note: Born on the northern shores of Odaawaa-gichigami (Lake Michigan), Aimée Cree Dunn has lived all her life in the rural wilds of the northern Great Lakes. She teaches at NMU’s Center for Native American Studies and blogs at wildwoodnotes.com. “The Gift of Water” columns are offered by the Northern Great Lakes Water Stewards and the Cedar Tree Institute, joined in an interfaith effort to help preserve, protect, and sanctify the waters of the Upper Peninsula. MM

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lookout point

Peggy Eberwein is shown with some of her wares she sells at summertime arts and crafts shows in the U.P.

POTTERY PEG

Surgery helped artist overcome severe arthritis, return to wheel Story and photos by Deborah K. Frontiera

W

hen one is a vendor at art and craft shows all over the U.P., one meets a lot of interesting artists. Peggy Eberwein is one of those people. She and her husband lived much of their careers in Texas, but Peggy migrates to the North Country every summer to stay in a cabin built by her grandfather, becoming an “honorary Yooper.” Peg’s interest in pottery began while working with intellectually disabled students at a state school in San Antonio, where kids did ceramics with molds. She got the idea to mix clay and have the students work with that. The students would often mix the glazes­—dip from one color into another without letting it dry—and end up with a “mish-mosh” of colors, but the results were pretty interesting.

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She took some of the pieces to sell at a Starving Artists Festival where she met a potter and decided she wanted to try that. She and her husband took pottery production classes at San Antonio College. In just two weeks, they were hooked, spending nights and weekends for four years honing their art, much of it through trial and error. Their instructors would often respond to questions about wheelthrowing, hand building, or what kind of glaze to use with, “Try it and see.” That was back in 1986. If at that time someone had told Peg that she would make a living with pottery, she would have said they were crazy, figuring it would only be a hobby. When they went to their first show on their own, they made $110 and thought, “Wow!” Starting small, they continued


Pinecones and needles, chickadees, maple leaves and thimbleberries are some of the local images that Peggy Eberwein incorporates into pottery that she makes and sells at craft shows.

to grow to the point where they were doing 35 or more shows per year, and were totally self-employed. Peg’s unique designs are inspired by wildlife and nature. She started with a simple “bluebonnet” design (think lupine) painting the flowers and adding a clear glaze. But she quickly became bored with only that and began adding other wildflowers and pine cones. For Michigan, adding chickadees was the next natural thing to do. Then a friend in Copper Harbor asked for thimbleberries. She made some plates with a thimbleberry design but had trouble getting the leaves right. Then she experimented with pressing thimbleberry leaves into the clay and painting the imprint of the leaves before adding berries and the glaze. But she had to pick the leaves while in the Marquette or Keweenaw areas and then be without more for months. Then one day while walking around her summer home, she found a patch of thimbleberries right there! Then the real challenges began. Some of the shows she regularly did throughout the south during the cold months closed down. It seemed people didn’t want whole sets of hand-made pottery where each piece—while following the same general pattern— was unique. Not when they could get an entire set of dishes at a department or discount store for the

A close-up view of a plate that Peggy Erberwein made on her pottery wheel and hand-painted.

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price of one piece of hand-crafted pottery. What hit even harder was the pain of goutinduced arthritis. Gout crystals began to form in her thumb joints—so essential to a potter—which were not going to dissolve. Livable at first, it grew worse and worse. She tried wearing special gloves, but the pain increased. Any work on her potter’s wheel left her in agony. In December of 2017, she finally decided to “just do it” and have surgery to remove the crystals. Her right thumb was done in January of 2018 and the left in March that same year. “The scar looks like a Y. There is a stainless steel rod from top of my thumb down. The surgeon cleaned out the crystals and abnormal growth from the arthritis, and filled in the void with donated cadaver bones. It looked pretty ugly for a while but it worked,” she said. Several months of physical therapy followed, during which Peg had to constantly message the affected areas to help regenerate the nerves. During those months that she could not work at her art, she felt as if part of her soul was gone. Her constant massaging, the other PT work and her persistence paid off. By July of 2018, she was back at her wheel, renewing her spirit. Her thumbs are “back to normal” now except for the fact that they are good rain predictors, aching when a low pressure system is on the way. She’s also found that avoiding certain foods helps the whole gout problem. Every vegetable with bright colors: beats, spinach, kale, chard, and all berries contribute to gout. She has found she can tolerate some of those berries in a “smoothie” with yogurt or bananas to ease the color problem and drinks gallons of lemon water. Peg is back to her “old self ” making pottery with her nature designs and adding that comfortable little

November 2021

“thumb tab” of clay to the top of mug handles. She stated that the final lump of clay at the top of that mug handle not only makes the mug easier to grip and hold comfortably, but also adds strength to the joint between the mug and the handle. This writer just loves the way a mug feels in her hand with that thumb tab she’s never seen on other mugs—handmade or store-bought. Peg and her husband are now in their “golden

What hit even harder was the pain of gout-induced arthritis ... Livable at first, it grew worse and worse. She tried wearing special gloves, but the pain increased. Any work on her potter’s wheel left her in agony. years” and have cut back a lot on the number of shows they do, down to about five in the North Country and three or four in the South during the late fall. While her husband still mixes the glazes, Peg does most of the work, her wheels turning in the South and the North, keeping her “hands in the mud” and doing what she loves. Look for “Pottery Peg’s” booth at The Outback in Marquette each year in late July, at the Eagle Harbor Art Show the second weekend of August. About the author: Deborah K. Frontiera lives in the Calumet area. Three of her books have been award winners. She has published fiction, nonfiction, poetry and children’s books. Frontiera is on the board of the U.P. Publishers and Authors Association. For more information, visit her website: authorsden. com/deborahkfrontiera. MM


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the arts

a pired by Tale Ins ca A Tall of Ameri e Corner than Lif Larger

Daniels By Jeff

es rick Min d by Pat Directe

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4, 5, 6, 7Sunday 2 p.m. November & & Saturday 7 p.m. y Thursday, Frida ams Theatre Herbert L. Willi te Campus Marinet UW-Green Bay, te, WI 54143 Street, Marinet 750 W. Bay Shore

Tickets On Sale

ay u/theatre-on-the-b www.uwgb.ed

Tom & Sandy Kuber the Title Sponsors of Continuing Supported by Above n Bay Division ities d by the UW-Gree and youth opportun Bay is sponsore ent, offering adults Theatre on the Community Engagemns. Education and theatrical productio to participate in

Travis Meyers plays the role of the buckless Reuben Soady in the U.P. hunting fable, “Escanaba in da Moonlight.” It has been 20 years since the theatrical release of the Jeff Daniels film.

HUNTING TALE

‘Escanaba in da Moonlight’ will be performed live on stage Story and photos by Ann Dallman

I

t will soon be that time of year when hunters once again head to the woods in pursuit of that big buck. Coinciding with camp season will be Theatre On the Bay’s production of “Escanaba in da Moonlight,” with performances scheduled Thursday, Nov. 4, through Sunday, Nov. 7. Evening shows are at 7 p.m., and a 2 p.m. matinee will be held Sunday. All times local. Theatre on the Bay is located on the Marinette campus of UW-Green Bay. The 2001 movie of the same name was written, directed and starred in by Michigan native Jeff Daniels. The production is directed by Patrick Mines with Linda Hornick, program spec-

ialist for the Office of Continuing Education at the Marinette campus as producer. “We purchased the script in spring of 2020 and this play was set to be part of the lineup for our 54th season, which was halted when the pandemic hit. The shows fell off one by one. We’ve now started the theater back up. One of the reasons we chose this play was for its small cast of six. “Things are different during COVID. This play has a manageable cast size, as we didn’t know what this point in time would be like. “Escanaba in Da Moonlight” is a comedy, very funny and something we can all relate to. People need a good laugh,” Mines said. “It’s

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(From left) Travis Meyer, Tristan Schuh (back), Joshua Stuck and Chris Mayse are shown rehearsing a scene from “Escanaba in da’ Moonlight” in which the characters are thrown about when an explosion rocks the Soady Deer Camp.

just what the doctor ordered. Folks can forget about their problems and they’re going to have a good time watching it.” Another plus? The show uses Upper Peninsula language and slang. “It’s a hunting story taking place during the first night at deer camp. All of the guys are excited to shoot a deer and one of them needs to finally shoot a buck,” Mines said. The story centers on Reuben, eldest member of the Soady family, and his quest to shoot a deer. He’s never claimed a deer kill and for this reason believes he’s been cursed. He also believes he must break the curse by breaking from tradition. “One of our strengths is the Joshua LaLonde, our set designer. He’s toured the world working on sets and has designed sets for Disney. He has recreated a hunting camp. The play takes place entirely in the deer shack. And the props are very fitting, as they transform the stage to the back 40.” The production has encountered some roadblocks due to lingering effects of the pandemic. “We had a hard time getting folks in for auditions. Some just weren’t ready to make that jump, but we’ve worked around it and we have a great cast,” Mines explained. As a producer, Hornick explained that she’d gone from Plan A to Plan Z. “There are protocols to be followed when any entity puts on events for the public. It will be different as everything has changed during the past months,” she said. “The Chancellor has instituted a mask mandate for all campuses that we will follow. Socially distant seating options will be available. The actors wear masks at rehearsal. During the performances the actors are allowed to be on stage without masks. And we will have sanitary stations available as well.” Performances will last about two hours which Mines described as being short for a play. Another change? There will be no intermission. He added that

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his cast is creative and intent on making this a fun adventure for all attending. “I love how it develops organically, it’s always developing. The story is still relevant. It centers on changing traditions because they’re not working anymore. It’s set in November 1989 but it could have taken place yesterday,” Mines added. The story centers on hunting and its traditions set in the Escanaba area. Mines first directed children’s theater at TOB starting in 2015 including a fall and winter production and “the big summer musical.” Among his directing credits are: “The Hobbit,” “Secret Garden,” “Disney’s Aladdin JR,” and “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.” He’s acted in TOB performances “off and on” since 1992. This will be his fifth time as show director. Hornick became TOB’s producer July last year when those responsibilities were placed within the Outreach part of the Division of Continuing Education. “Escanaba in da Moonlight” cast members include Joshua Stuck as Albert Soady; Travis Meyer as Reuben Soady; Tristan Schuh as Remnar Soady; Patrick Mines as Jimmer; Chris Mayse as Ranger Tom, and Brittany Welch as Wolf Moon Dance. Crew members include: Chris Weber, Lighting Designer and Sound Tech; Annais Mines, Costumer, and James Porras II, Stage Manager. Theatre on the Bay is located in the Theater Building at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Marinette Campus, Bay Shore Drive, Marinette. For ticket information visit uwgb. edu/marinette. Further questions can be directed to Linda Hornick, at hornick@ uwgb.edu or by calling (715) 504-3351. About the author: Ann Dallman has lifelong roots in the U.P. Her first middle-grade novel, “Cady and the Bear Necklace,” which was published in 2019, has won several awards. For more information visit anndallman.com. MM

November 2021


lookout point

My mother’s story is my story PROLOGUE:

I

t was 2005 when my third grade class was creating the blue and white chairs for Finnfest, the gathering of people of Finnish descent in Marquette, Michigan. Each student was decoupaging pictures of their family history on their chair. I was doing the same. I was thinking about the women in my family. My great-great grandmother lived her entire life in Finland and I knew her married name was Maria Parkilla. Her daughter and my great-grandmother was Pauliina Parkkila. I decided to write her name on the top of my chair. She came to America as a young mother with two children. The next name I put on my chair was my grandmother, Christina Nyman. She was one of the two children that came to America with Pauliina. Following Christina’s name, I wrote my mother’s name, Vivian Maki. She was born in Eben, Michigan and Finnish was her first language. Next, I wrote the name of Vivian’s daughter, me, Sandy Carlson. And the last name I put on the chair was my daughter, Leigh Bonsall. Five names were spread across the top of my chair and the stories of these women were in my head. Many times I wrote bits and pieces of their lives, but never finished. Finally, I wrote the narrative poem that follows. The narrative ends with a special zig and zag to two special girls, the daughters of my son Brian. They were not yet born when the Finnish chair was created. The story ends with them, or maybe it’s actually where the story begins as we continue into future generations. The following was written as a tribute to my mom, Vivian, who has an amazing story. She was able to hear the narrative read on a Thanksgiving Eve the year before she passed at age 95. My audience was Leigh, my own daughter.

By Sandy Bonsall

Pauliina, Adolf and Christina get on the wagon carrying all their belongings, heading to the Steamer traveling to America, to Oskar. Maria stands watching.

M

y mother’s story is my story my daughter’s and all the grandmothers and granddaughters backwards to Finland, and forward to America. In the 1850s there lives a woman in Finland Maria Parkkila with her husband Mats in the north, close to the Arctic Circle not too far from Oulu and Kajanni in a little town called Parkkila. There are forests and lakes dark winters and all day summer sun farming, berry picking, canning saunas on Saturdays music from accordions and weaving the rag rugs. Famine comes bowls, candle holders, silverware, anything that can be carried south is taken and sold for food Hunger. Russians pressure, wanting to control conscripting Finnish men for the armies that were not theirs. Unease, distrust, worry. Maria has babies as many as she can to help with the farm, to make life easier. Her mother is the midwife and is there at Pauliina’s birth. The year is 1863. Maria watches as Pauliina falls in love with a man, Oskar Nyman from Haapajarvi, the next town over. They marry in the Lutheran church shaped like a cross sitting along a river. The year is 1883.

A photo of Oskar Nyman in Finl and in the 1890s.

young ones restless. Posters appear showing steamers going to America. Oskar has no land makes shoes, repairs shoes, works on his sewing machine learning a trade that is not enough. Pauliina has one baby Adolf, 1885 and another Christina, 1893. Maria, her mother, is the midwife doing what her own mother and mothers before her had done. Oskar leaves for America, Pauliina lives with his family, lots of letters two years of waiting. Finally he says, come. Maria knows she will never see her daughter again. She prepares a wake, a funeral wake, a family gathering to say good bye.

Land getting scarce, Russians at the border

The wagon pulls away. Pauliina becomes a dot and disappears as does Adolf and Christina. Together in America, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, a family of four. Frank and Matt are born, Pauliina delivers with no midwife, no Maria, by herself, alone. But Massachusetts is not to be their home. Further west they move together, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan not too far from Marquette and Munising close to Lake Superior in a little town called Eben where everyone speaks Finnish. There are forests and lakes dark winters and long summer sun, farming, berry picking, canning saunas on Saturdays music from accordions weaving the rag rugs. Pauliina has more babies Selma, Anna, Tom, and Charles to help with the farm to hunt for food to can and preserve to do the work. Church on Sunday The family is Lutheran,

Scenes of life in Finland show farmers using a horse-drawn rake to gather cut hay to rake into piles to dry, and a woman is shown presenting a bull at a fair. (The two images from Finland, circa 1899, by I.K. Inha courtesy of the Finnish Museum of Photography. Photos of the authors relatives provided by the author)

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People hearing of his cures come for treatments. The smell of Michaelbalm, a man sitting backwards on a chair finding the cords, working them out using a book brought from Finland. Christina’s sister rents the family a house with bedrooms for all, indoor plumbing and electricity. Vivian loves it.

Wedding photo of Christina and Arthur Maki.

Apostolic. Oskar is a lay minister, White Finns they are called.

But not to be. Arthur is proud moves them to “the shack,” an old homestead with a well, an outhouse, a woodstove an upstairs for the boys one bedroom downstairs Vivian shares with her parents.

There are Red Finns, too, those that do not believe are not Lutheran. In Finland rebelled against a church that held so much power over their lives.

Vivian cries. Christina cooks meals on the wood stove washes clothes in a tub cuts rags to weave rugs picks berries to can grows the vegetables and preserves the meat hunted by the sons.

Socialists, the Finns that begin the co-ops stand up to unfairness in the mines start the Unions, Red Finns.

Christina secretly baptizes her babies, Arthur binge drinks. She leaves for Detroit to live with her sons working in the car factories.

Christina grows begins work at a lumber camp helping in the kitchen and there meets Arthur, Arthur Maki a Red Finn, not a White. Pauliina watches as Christina marries Arthur not in a church, a dog is in their wedding picture. Does she wonder what life Christina will have?

She babysits so the wives of her sons can work. Cars become warplanes and the women become Rosie the Riveters working where men once were, now all gone to war. But Arthur comes to Detroit promises to do better no binges and Christina returns to Eben and her life.

Christina and Arthur begin on a farm near Pauliina and Oskar not too far from Marquette and Munising in Eben, Eben Junction. Finnish is their language. There are forests and lakes dark winters and long summer sun farming, berry picking, canning saunas on Saturdays music from accordions weaving the rag rugs. Christina has babies as many as she can Charles, Reno, Frank, Leonard. Her mother, Pauliina, is the midwife and is there at Vivian’s birth, 1924. The Great Depression, the farm is lost. Arthur drinks, goes on binges works at a bar, gives massages.

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Christina and Vivian Maki.


Vivian grows with heartache and shame wearing old boots, embarrassed in school hating “the shack,” quitting home ec. No teacher is visiting her house. Vivian at 17 meets Rudy at the Blue Moon, a handsome man a way out. It’s not long before she finds herself living in Negaunee pregnant and married. Christina gives her daughter a twenty dollar bill to keep, to save just in case. Vivian puts it in her bra. Vivian has Gary, her son in a hospital, 1942. She protects him as she lives the wife of a miner, a drinking miner on Ann Street. On Gary’s third birthday when Rudy does not return from a drinking binge, she takes her twenty dollars, buys a train ticket to Menominee. She sits on the train holding her son against her, sees her husband

looking not for her, but another friend. She holds her breath and he goes by.

Her name in the paper a hole in one, a featured bowler on Green Bay TV.

Her life begins in Menominee living with two women and their three-year-old sons, husbands gone to war. She never talks of her early years, just says Menominee is where her life began.

She finishes her high school degree. Gets a license to sell real estate. Works in an office of one of the factories. Raises her two kids.

Vivian needs to work, finds a factory and sprays furniture. Her friend babysits her little boy. When Jim, James Carlson comes into her life, she tells him You don’t want to date me and he says I know all about you. So it begins, they marry in 1949. Jim adopts Gary. Jim, Vivian, and Gary in the U.P. of Michigan not far from Green Bay on Lake Michigan in Menominee, a family, English is the language they speak. Jim works in a factory. Vivian becomes pregnant. They buy a little house. Sandra, always known as Sandy, is born in a hospital, 1951.

Jim and Vivian Carlson with son Gary and newborn Sandy.

There are forests and lakes dark winters and long summer sun, but for Vivian no farming, berry picking, canning or saunas on Saturdays no music from accordions or weaving the rag rugs. Instead an entrepreneur owning a bowling alley, eventually a bar together with Jim, leaving the factories behind. A champion she becomes a bowler and a golfer.

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The 1950s Leave it to Beaver a mom home, a dad working. War jobs all gone, but Sandy’s mom works no Leave it to Beaver for her. The 1960s Assassinations Kennedy and King, the Vietnam War. High school is for boys no sports for girls. Sandy accepts and wishes she was a boy. The family is Lutheran not Apostolic like Pauliina and Oskar, but the branch from Jim’s family, Swedish. Vivian kinda believes.

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Each afternoon with Leigh on her hip, off to the courthouse to watch the trial of a teacher who protested nuclear weapons at Sawyer Air Force Base just down the road from them.

Jim feels guilty owning a bar. Sandy finds her way to church not as a family, but on her own. In the winter months Christina, now Grandma Maki, comes and lives in Menominee. She enjoys doing dishes watches Edge of Night bakes cardamom rolls sits with Sandy, cat in her lap dog at her feet. Vivian watches as Sandy grows, graduates high school and heads to Northern Michigan University to become a teacher and as Jim says to find a good man for a husband. Sandy has a boyfriend in college a bowler, a golfer and Finnish, too. This one mom loves, but Sandy marries Dave, Dave Bonsall the good man her dad wanted her to find. They live in the north, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan not too far from Negaunee and Eben close to Lake Superior in a town called Marquette. The year is 1974. Eventually, two boys Brian David and Scott James in 1978 and 1982. Two is good expensive to have three… a girl arrives, Leigh Christina, 1985. Sandy is 34. There are forests and lakes dark winters and long summer sun memories of farming, berry picking and canning saunas on Saturdays music from accordians weaving the rag rugs all in the past, stories now told. Sandy teaches elementary school, Dave works at NMU. The boys play hockey, Leigh tags along. Hockey rinks are a second home,

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Dave, Brian, Leigh, Sandy and Scott Bonsall.

a sports family on the go. The family attends Mass all five together, important to Sandy. She is Catholic like Dave a faith from his dad, the son of an Irish Catholic immigrant woman. Sandy’s days are filled with lessons to plan papers to correct meals to make laundry to do a house to clean, the three kids and all their needs. Dave is on his own.

WAND is big Women’s Action for Nuclear Disarmament. A couple hundred women trying to save their children, calling legislators standing in the streets demanding an end to these weapons.

There are some forests and lakes dark winters and long summer sun but gone the farming, berry picking, canning no saunas on Saturdays or music from accordions and weaving the rag rugs is not even a memory. Michigan football parties and studying friends in the dorm, the sorority new worlds opening, possibilites.

Reagan complies and Gorbachev, too a treaty in Iceland is signed, a start, a beginning.

Home for the summer, an internship in the Governor’s office, spending a week with Jennifer Granholm touring the Upper Peninsula. Leigh sees up close a woman, a leader, a lawyer.

Sandy coaches Leigh softball and soccer Leigh tells her mom sorry, don’t want to hurt your feelings, but no hockey for me as her brothers skate on the rink outside.

Graduation comes a career in law calls a surprise but Leigh says Remember the courtroom, the protests you took me to, Mom? That was the start.

Leigh dances tap and jazz, wins the middle school talent show, dreams of Broadway and Hollywood, a possible star, convincing all her future is there.

Chicago, Loyola three years classes, moot court, law clerking a lawyer, she becomes Hinshaw Culbertson her place now.

No bowling and golf for Sandy a disappointment to her mom. Sandy inherits Christina’s loom and dreams of making the rugs her grandma once did. She picks berries for jam has saunas in the gym and smiles to see her cousin playing the accordion on Facebook.

First Lady Hillary Clinton speaks 50 miles away. Dad and his office invited so Leigh and her mom go, too, and listen. A woman, a lawyer planting an idea.

Sandy stays home a year when each baby comes, no pay, but the job saved. Leigh turning one Sandy returns to work half time a kindergarten class.

High School comes good grades, good student. Northern Michigan looms tuition provided the sensible choice, but the University of Michigan sends a fat packet.

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Leigh says yes and is gone.

She meets Ted, engaged to be married. Decides not now, not ready not for her, Says no. On her own, the 15th floor an apartment all hers, a life she is loving. She is 33. Leigh in Chicago, the year 2018 concrete and tall buildings a river winds through them close to Lake Michigan not too far from Marquette and Eben, a day’s drive away.


Six generations from Maria who lived in a little town called Parrkila to Leigh who lives in the big city of Chicago. Six women Sisu, strong and determined. Backwards to Finland and forward to America, there is more to this story. A zig and a zag through Brian, a son, two beautiful girls Madeline Christine and Georgia James, Eleven and three.

Madeline, a lover of sports runs so fast plays soccer, basketball and baseball, too. Living what her grandma never even dreamed, but always wanted. Georgia, copies big sister hangs with her mom. What is her future where will she go, what stories are waiting to be told?

FOUR GENERATIONS From left: Family members Sandy

Carlson Bonsall,

Vivian Maki Carl-

son, Leigh, Madeline, and Georgia

Bonsall represent four generations

of women born in

America with roots in Finland.

EPILOGUE

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y rough draft was done and I was able to read it to my family ... As I reread a letter that my grandmother, Christina Nyman Maki, had signed, one that was confirming the birth of her younger brother, Matt, I realized her mother, Pauliina Parkkila Nyman, had been totally alone with no doctor or midwife to deliver Matt. The family was living in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, after having just immigrated to the United States. They moved to Eben Junction, Michigan soon after the birth of Matt and I can’t help but think Pauliina wanted to be nestled into a community of Finnish people. That’s what Eben was. Another moment was when I was writing captions next to the pictures I included at the end of the narrative. I decided that on the last picture of my mom, I would write her entire name. She had two middle names and I had thought that was a curious thing. I typed her name out: Vivian Maria Pauliina Maki Carlson. Maria and Pauliina popped out at me. I got the chills. I pictured Pauliina who was a midwife delivering Christiana’s baby girl, her first girl after four sons. Christina wanted her mother’s name, Pauliina as a middle name. Then, I realized Pauliina wanted her mother’s name, Maria, as a middle name. Pauliina had not seen her mother for many years at that point and would never see her again. Our family did not know the name of Pauliina’s mother until my son Scott was in Finland in a hockey tournament with Marquette’s sister city Kajaani. My mom and I drove to Haapajarvi to see the town that Pauliina and Christina left. A librarian there looked up the names of Pauliina’s parents and her husband Oskar’s parents. It had been lost to us that Maria was Pauliina’s mother’s name. What a special name my mom was given. I must also add that as I read this narrative to my family, my son Scott said he felt bad for me, that I had no sports in my growing up years. However, I eventually found sports. In my 20s I was able to play softball, then in my 50s did bike and nordic ski races, and now in my 60s play a lot of pickleball. We tease my mom about her bowling and golf trophies, but I must admit, I, too, have a spot for my trophies. Daughter like mother.

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fiction

The Superior Gatsby (part III)

By John Smolens Americans, while occasionally willing to be serfs, have always been obstinate about being peasantry. —F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

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he first law Gatsby learned from Dan Cody was: people will do anything for money. When his employer and mentor said anything, he gave the word a deliciously sinister twist, as though proffering Eden’s forbidden fruit. As the evening light bathed the Lower Harbor in supple autumnal hues, Gatsby sat in the Duesenberg, thinking about Cody’s first law as he waited for darkness to engulf the ore dock and the trestle, which bore trainloads of cargo to and from its summit. Tucked in the breast pocket of his blue blazer was the note that Lila Banks had left under the Duesy’s windshield wiper: Meet me beneath the trestle 9:00 tonight. He watched a boy scurry along Lakeshore Boulevard, a burlap sack filled with clinking bottles slung over his shoulder. Earlier in the day, while reclining in a barber’s chair with hot lather coating his face, Gatsby had observed this boy as he entered the shop. Every harbor town on the Lakes had kids like him, and Gatsby could not lose sight of the fact that he was once one of them. “Lost John,” the barber said. “Back again?” “Empties, sir?” The lad spoke with the feigned innocence that belies devious intent. The barber, a rotund fellow with a waxed mustache, removed three hair tonic bottles from his cabinet and deposited them in the boy’s open sack. “You rinse them out good, eh?” he said as he ran the straightedge down Gatsby’s cheek. “Don’t want my whiskey tasting like pomade.” “No, sir!” Lost John said as he fled through the shop door. Now Gatsby watched the boy, weighed down by his cache, enter the tailor shop in the shadow of the ore dock. Moments after he disappeared inside, a man emerged wearing a wool overcoat, far too heavy for this mild September evening. The tailor would fill the bottles with contraband hooch delivered to Marquette by Cody’s yacht Toulomee and then sew them into the lining of customers’ overcoats. Here was Cody’s law at work: the boy earning pennies for his collection of empty bottles, the tailor earning dollars for filling the bottles with Canadian hooch. The line ran from the Bronfman family in Canada, to the rum runners who worked the border along the St. Mary’s River, to U.S. customs officials who then sold the confiscated booze to Cody, who then distributed the contraband to ports on the Great Lakes. Everybody got a cut of the action. There are no peasants in America, only serfs who willingly serve their master Mammon. Lost John, lugging his sack of bottles, understood that it was necessary to do anything to get in the game. And because he understood this one principle, the boy had potential. One day, he too could be sitting in a fine automobile waiting to meet a woman in a fur coat that would conceal wads of pilfered cash. • At nightfall Gatsby left the Duesy and walked toward the trestle. There, beneath the intricate network of timbers, he found Lila, reclining against a weathered beam. Her eyes closed, she appeared to be asleep, but then she whispered, “The dream is finished.” She spoke with effort, her husky voice reduced to smoke.

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“The dream? You and I cruising the Caribbean in Cody’s yacht, Tuukka’s money in our hold?” “A lovely thought…but dreams come at a price.” “The price is loyalty,” Gatsby said. “After we set sail, you want me to dispatch Cody overboard. That is a heavy price.” She seemed not to comprehend what he was saying as she raised a hand to his face, her fingers touching his shaved cheek. “Loyalty and love, the two greatest obstacles to dreams. All you need is conviction.” Lila’s fur coat fell open, and Gatsby leaned down expecting to see wads of cash, but her sequined dress was stained around a pearl-colored handle. “Please…take it out.” “Emmet Jones did this? And he has Tuukka’s money?” “You have much to learn. Please.” Gatsby took hold of the knife handle, which trembled as she exhaled. As he drew the blade out, her body went rigid, and then she slumped against the timber, leaving only the lilting music of water lapping against the base of the ore dock—until Gatsby heard footsteps behind him. He turned, knife extended, to confront Lost John, empty burlap bag draped over his shoulder. The boy halted, gazing at the knife—not with fear but the rarest form of approbation. “It’s not what you think…” Gatsby said. “I didn’t…” He dropped the knife and began to walk, his shoes slipping on the wet sand, and when he emerged from beneath the trestle he began to run. • It wasn’t until he was rowing the dinghy across the harbor that he became aware of the blood. His hands, his white duck trousers, his double-breasted blazer—all smeared with blood. Tuolomee lay ahead at anchor, her lights shimmering on the glassine water. Dan Cody would expect him to deliver Lila…and the money. He could make up a story. James Gatz was good at that. He could say both he and Lila had been assaulted by Tuukka Hautamaki, a marplot bent on thwarting their designs. He could tell Cody it was Tuukka’s man Emmet Jones who had wielded a knife. He could look Dan Cody in the eye and tell him she

This is the third installment of a multi-part series written by John Smolens. The conclusion will appear in the December 2021 edition of MM.

was dead, murdered beneath the ore dock trestle. That part was true—and the most convincing lies are always those that are sheathed in the truth. Gatsby considered the blood on his hands and trousers. The evidence could be diluted, soaked with lake water, but the fabric would never be the same. Like loyalty. Once he had entertained Lila’s idea about throwing Cody overboard into Lake Superior, the stain would always remain in the fabric of his mind. It would haunt him; color his every thought, his every decision. When you relinquish loyalty to others, you have no choice but to become your own man. An animal, bent on survival. Gatsby stood up in the dinghy and plunged headfirst into the water. The cold was a shock. His clothing clutched at his limbs as he pulled himself to the surface. If he were truly loyal, he might just let the current take him, carry him out into the infinite depths of Lake Superior. He would have the satisfaction of being remembered by Dan Cody as the handsome young man who was truly loyal. What was it worth, to be remembered well? Was it worth giving your life? Was that the true value of a life, how it is remembered? The cold water caused his breathing to become labored. The Tuolomee’s crew joked that the only reason to wear a life jacket while cruising Lake Superior was so the body might be found. But he would most likely not be found. His body would descend into the dark, frigid depths, where he might not decompose but remain forever. Forever remembered as the loyal young man who would bestow his smile like a gift. About the author: John Smolens, NMU professor emeritus, has published 12 books, including Cold, Out, Fire Point, The School Master’s Daughter, Quarantine, and Wolf ’s Mouth, a Michigan Notable Book selection. In 2010 he received the Michigan Author Award from the Michigan Library Association. His most recent novel is Day of Days. MM

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lookout point HOLIDAYS HEADSTART

Day set as reminder to clean fridge ahead of Thanksgiving Story by Katherine Larson

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re our calendars all marked for November 15? The excitement builds … almost there, then the eve, then it finally arrives: National Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day! (What? You thought I meant deer hunting?) Okay, maybe that feels like a bit of a letdown. But it’s really a thing, and an important one. It’s also well-timed; for those who plan on making a Thanksgiving feast, starting out with a clean and relatively empty refrigerator makes Turkey Day much easier. So put on some lively music to work by, roll up your sleeves, and get ready to dig in. I like to have a garbage bag and compost pail nearby, because I know I’m going to discard things. I also like to have the sink and the dishwasher empty, because if I dump out the contents of jars I’ll rinse them and wash them for next year’s canning. And I like to have a cooler at hand, ready to receive refrigerator items that need to keep cool while I work. It’s time to get the vacuum cleaner out of the basement, too. The first thing to do is to take everything out of the fridge. Yes, everything. Freezer too, while you’re at it. Put the milk in the cooler, but jam jars will do just fine on the countertop while you clean. As you take each item out, look at it. Be ruthless: will you really eat up that half-jar of pickles dating from 2017? Even if your best friend made them? Honestly, if they’re four years old you know the answer: toss it. (Or, rather, discard the pickles, let the juice run down the drain, and put the empty jar in the dishwasher.) Once everything is out, turn the music up louder. It’s time to take out all the shelves, drawers, and related doohickeys. They all get washed—there’s that handy sink again—with hot soapy water. So does the inside of both refrigerator and freezer, including all those fancy pockets in the door and, importantly, the seal around the door. While you’re at it, it’s a good idea to swab down the doors on the outside along with their handles. (I’m always astonished at how grubby mine get.) While everything is drying, it’s time to clean the coils. The job is unlovely, but it prolongs the life of the fridge and reduces the energy bill, so it’s worth it. First find them: older models have exposed coils mounted on the back of the refrigerator, while with newer appliances the coils are at the bottom behind a toe space panel or at the back behind a rear access panel. Then, using a crevice or upholstery tool, vacuum the coils themselves plus the areas above and below them. If you’re feeling ambitious, shove

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Foods kept in a refrigerator or freezer have a limited storage life. Above is a partial list of the Cold Food Storage Chart offered by the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. For the complete list, go to FoodSafety.gov and click on the Food Safety Charts link for a downloadable PDF.

a duster or refrigerator coil brush between the coils, and clean whatever dust, hair, and dirt might still be clinging to the coils, with your vacuum positioned under the brush to catch falling debris. While you’re at it, vacuum the floor under and behind the fridge, too. By now the inside of the fridge will have dried, and you can put back the portion of the contents that survived your purge. If your jars and cans and

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leftover containers are like mine, they might have gotten a little sticky sitting on the previously uncleaned shelves, and a good wipe will improve matters. So too will be a rearrangement that prioritizes using up what’s already in there. After all, in just a week or two, here comes a turkey! Katherine Larson is a writer, teacher, and former lawyer, with a special passion for food justice.

MM


in the outdoors

Along with the ice reflecting off the frost and ice covering trees and bushes, a mist can be seen rising from the Driggs River near Seney.

WATER WONDERS

No matter its form, there’s great beauty in our most abundant resource Story and photos by Scot Stewart

“If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water.”

— Loren Eiseley, from the essay “The Flow of the River”

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he changing seasons play a magical part in our lives and the life of water. The two are so wrapped together we hardly recognize how close we are to it. For the obvious parts, the drinking, washing and cooking, most of us take water for granted unless it runs low or out or is poisoned – by lead or other substances. We find enamoring words to describe it in our everyday talk – sprinkles, mist, flurries, showers; phrases too – the smell of rain,the gurgle of a stream, the tinkle of ice in the lake. The secret part water plays in our lives though, is often a bit harder to flesh out. It surrounds us all the time, in one form or another. We inhale it and exhale it. We are blessed to

be surrounded by the Great Lakes, the best in the world. But it is found in so many other places, in the spring and fall, as the temperatures rise and fall, where water takes amazing turns to delight, educate, and thrill us.

“Its (water) substance reaches everywhere, touches the past and prepares the future, moves under the poles and wanders thinly in the heights of air. It can assume forms of exquisite perfection like a snowflake, or strip the living into a single shining bone cast up by the sea. “ – Loren Eiseley

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A thick summer frost forms on tamarack needles.

he changing seasons provide the opportunity to see water in all its guises­—gas, liquid and solid—and sometimes all at once. In the first really, really cold snap in the Upper Peninsula, when the temperature is -15, there may be some skims of ice bobbing on the gentle waves of Lake Superior as a mysterious cloud of vapor rises from the much warmer water of the lake. It is miraculous to see all three states at one time! But there is so much more to witness of the forms water shows us in northern Michigan. The best

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Motorists on M 28 can easily view Scott Falls in Alger County near AuTrain.

times are those when the temperature is changing around that magic temperature, the freezing point. It is then that snow, frost, and ice make their appearances. Frost is probably the most ephemeral form of water or water crystals. In the Upper Peninsula, the chances of seeing good frost mornings are not great, especially close to the Great Lakes. In the highlands of Marquette, Iron and Baraga Counties it does drop below freezing more often in the spring and fall, providing more mornings to create frost magic. Frost occurs when ground temperatures drop to 32 degrees (0 Celsius) before the air above does, and moisture in the air condenses and freezes on the surface of leaves, blades of grass and other surfaces. If the cooling process is slow, the crystals of frost will be larger and more spectacular. If the nighttime

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temperatures drop precipitously, the frost becomes just a dusting. The trick to frost though, is getting out just at sunrise when the early morning light glistens in the crystals and it is not warm enough yet to melt the frost. Weather watchers check on the nighttime temperatures before bedtime and note the time of the sunrise. Then it is out in the morning to find spots where the temperature has dropped just the right amount and there is no wind. Sometimes the moments to see the frost are extremely brief, and those out enjoying the show have to move from place to place and find newly exposed frosty places in sunlight. Meadows along the tree line can be some of the best places to start. Frost can occur in late winter when a stretch of unseasonably warm weather comes along, increasing the humid-


Mist rises above a bog early in the morning in Luce County. A large percentage of the county is considered wetlands.

ity. If the evening temps drop really slowly, a fairyland of crystal-covered branches can ensue. In a small bog in Chippewa County, a January morning turned into such a scene for birders looking for roosting owls. No owls, but great scenes in the bog! And that is what makes water so wonderful. It may not be the target for the hiker, birder, walker, or driver, but it can still be the highlight of the day. On a warmer night in fall, frost may not occur; there may be just the wetness of dewdrops developing heavily on the tips of grass blades and aster leaves. A true miracle is the process of guttation, a plant-caused event that looks like dew but is the result of water in

the ground, not in the air. As plants draw water up their roots, pressure builds in the plants forcing the water up to the leaf tips. If there is an excess of water, the water continues out of the leaves through small structures called hydrathodes. A tiny row of droplets can appear along the top of leaves and is often most visible on plants like strawberries and clover. “Once in a lifetime, one escapes the actual confines of the flesh. Once in a lifetime, if one is lucky, one so merges with sunlight and air and running water that whole eons, the eons that mountains and deserts know, might pass within a single afternoon without discomfort. The mind has sunk away

A black oak leaf is stuck to the swirled patterns in the ice atop a frozen pond.

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into its beginnings among old roots and the obscure tricklings and stir inanimate things.” - Loren Eiseley

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here is something primeval about walking along a river, stream or even a small rivulet. The gurgle or murmur of running water can drown out the sounds of cars, machinery, and voices and create an other-worldly place. Small delights, like the trill of a winter wren, the drip of a small seep into a creek, or a buzzing cicada can come alive and take the explorer away from the land of man. Waterfalls may be the ultimate escape, as the sounds literally drown out every other sound, and the sight of the falling water mesmerizes just about anyone. Even single drops of water can become lenses, magnifiers, and minuscule sparkles of sunlight. Whether dew drops or raindrops, small spheres of water on plant and other surfaces create a myriad of sparkles in the early morning light or after a midday storm. A closer look will reveal the droplets act like magnifying glasses on leaf surfaces, magnifying the veins beneath the droplet. From a side view, viewers may see a reflection of the sun and a reverse view of the landscape behind them. On a warm, humid day, a microscopic invertebrate may take up a short-term life swimming around in the bubble of water. “… from the beginning, it was the snowflakes that fascinated me most”. — Wilson Alwyn Bentley

Pictured are numerous paths of frozen bubble trails among the deep cracks on the ice that formed on Marquette’s lower harbor last winter.

A muskrat swims across a pond at Park Cemetery in Marquette.

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s temperatures begin to drop in the fall, water is ready to take on plenty of new forms. Upper atmosphere air dropping below water’s freezing point may begin to create crystals of H2O and their weight can put them into freefall. No one knew the nuances of snowflakes better than Wilson “Snowflake” Bentley (See snowflakebentley.com). His book, “Snowflakes in Photographs,” first published in 1931, is an amazing array of more than 2,200 photographs of individual snowflakes, depicted with amazing sharpness for the time, and his equipment was adapted to specifically show the detail in each flake. For those who wonder if there are two snowflakes alike, this may help to

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As the sun sets, a chunk of Lake Superior ice sparkles and reflects the remains of the day.

November 2021

reveal just how intricate snowflake designs are and how difficult it would be to copy all the details of a single flake. Colder temperatures turn on the ice machines. A walk along a bubbling creek in November before the first snow, when the overnight temps drop into the teens, is sure to create some icicles along the water’s edge where it splashed up on overhanging branches and sticks pushed up along the banks. Slow freezes can help ice slowly grow inward from a puddle or pond edge and slowly close in toward the middle if it gets cold enough. The concentric rings will tell the story of the nighttime temperatures, with narrow rings formed when the temperatures dropped quickly and wide rings when the temps dropped slowly. Ice on Lake Superior is a different matter altogether. In milder years, no ice may develop until January or February, and it may extend out only a short way. Thin ice may be at the mercy of storms and big waves, and may be tossed up into volcano-like cones of ice along the shores of bays. In colder winters, sheet ice may form well out into the lake. Last winter, the ice got to be more than a foot thick in the Lower Harbor of Marquette during a cold, quiet period, forming a great sheet of very smooth ice all the way to the breakwater. Pressure cracks slowly developed, creating some beautiful patterns in the ice, accompanied by bubbles trapped alongside them. With the snow covering them though, some photographers turned to snow shoveling Lake Superior to find the cracks. It was as though the lake was not happy to be so covered, and its groans eventually led to explosive cracks and a breakup. With the weather and temperature changes coming at unexpected times these days there are no sure ways to know what to expect on a walk to a favorite pond, a busy creek or just through the woods after a storm. There are plenty of discoveries to make looking for the magic of water and all the wondrous effects it can have on body and soul.. About the author: Scot Stewart has lived in Marquette long enough to be considered a true Yooper even though he was born in Illinois. He is a teacher and loves to be outdoors photographing and enjoying nature. MM


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Great Lakes Climate Corps member Logan Turner shows volunteers the proper way to transplant milkweed for pollinators.

SUMMER HOME

GLCC, volunteers work to restore habitat for dwindling pollinators Story and photos by SWP staff

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here is a magical place in the Upper Peninsula where each fall, thousands of monarch butterflies gather together before crossing the open waters of Lake Michigan on their annual migration to the mountains of Mexico. This autumn spectacle occurs over the course of several weeks in the Hiawatha National Forest at the southern tip of the Stonington Peninsula at a place called Peninsula Point. If you’re lucky enough to arrive when all the conditions are just right—sunny day, light northerly breeze, low humidity, etc.—you will witness one of the planet’s most amazing migrations. The National Forest in cooperation with the Superior Watershed Partnership, Great Lakes Climate Corps and committed volunteers have been working diligently for many years to provide the best possible habitat conditions for monarchs that visit Peninsula Point. This work has included removing acres of non-native, invasive plants species and handplanting more than 100,000 native plants, mainly milkweed plants. Milkweed is practically the only plant that monarchs will eat, and it is also the only plant that monarchs will lay their eggs on. Sadly, monarch butterflies, and other important pollinators such as bees, have experienced dramatic population declines in recent years due to a variety of factors including loss of habitat, development pressure, pesticide use, herbicide use and climate change. Tragically, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFW) recently listed 23 species as officially extinct and has classified the monarch as a candidate species for potential listing under the Endangered Species Act. The good news is that in the eastern United States, and especially in the Upper Peninsula, there are glimmers of hope for the embattled monarch butterfly and other pollinators. Over the last decade the SWP has made a concerted effort to collaborate with local, state, federal and tribal partners to improve habitat for pollinators all across the Upper Peninsula; not just Peninsula Point. The Great Lakes Climate Corps has completed pollinator habitat restoration projects in all fifteen counties of the UP. But the GLCC doesn’t always do this sweaty, back-breaking work alone as they often enlist the help of a wide range of enthusiastic volunteers including K-12 and college students, local residents, area visitors, senior citizens, church groups and community organizations. The GLCC and volunteers have worked to improve pollinator habitat in local

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The cover of the field report about efforts to restore habitat for pollinators in the Hiawatha National Forest features scores of butterflies gathering on trees.

communities, on state lands, both National Forests (Hiawatha and Ottawa), Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore and with all five Native American tribes in the Upper Peninsula. To date hundreds of acres have been cleared of competing invasive plants and thousands of native plants (mostly milkweed) have been transplanted. The SWP has also given away millions of free milkweed seeds to regional schools and community groups including mailing free seed packets to area homes and businesses. Residents and visitors will likely notice there are more milkweed plants than there used to be in backyards, in schoolyards, along trails, along roads, along rivers and along the Great Lakes shorelines (Superior, Michigan and Huron). All totaled, these efforts have improved pollinator habitat across the Upper Peninsula and are directly benefitting monarchs coming from Canada and other distant places on their way to Peninsula Point and beyond. The poet and ecologist Gary Snyder once wrote that it will take real work to confront the problems facing us. Anyone who would like to help with the real work of habitat restoration, pollution prevention and climate adaptation is invited to join Superior Watershed Partnership, Great Lakes Climate Corps and project partners who will be hosting more volunteer events in 2022. Learn more about efforts to restore and preserve local natural habitats, and how to get involved at www.superiorwatersheds.org

Near the Lake Superior shoreline in Marquette, young students from Sandy Knoll Elementary School are shown among the volunteers working with the Great Lakes Climate Corps to remove invasive species and replace them with native plants that promote a healthier pollinator habitat.

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lookout point

ENTREPRENEURS WANTED

Grant provides local opportunities By Jackie Stark

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ntrepreneurs looking Northern Michigan University, to start a company InvestUP, and Innovation Shore without having to leave Angel Network (ISAN) for the the Upper Peninsula will soon grant’s vision, and also regularly find themselves with new receives support from local opportunities for investment, and state partners including thanks to a three-year, $611,000 Accelerate UP, Lake Superior Capital Challenge Grant, offered Community Partnership, through the U.S. Economic the Central Upper Peninsula Development Administration’s Planning & Development Build to Scale program. Regional Commission, the “The real way I think we’re Superior Watershed Partnership going to build our local economy and Land Conservancy, is through new business, new Michigan Economic start-ups, especially in the high- Development Corporation, tech space,” said Joe Theil, CEO and the City of Marquette. of Innovate Marquette, which “We are thrilled to learn Innovate worked with the Center on Rural Marquette has won a Build to Innovation to apply for the grant. Scale Capital Challenge grant,” “I think we’re going t o said Leah Taylor, CORI’s head of create a lot more jobs in that model I think we’re going to than we would in trying to attract large create a lot more jobs organizations here.” in that model than we The grant will go a long way in helping new start- would in trying to attract ups get off the ground, as large organizations here. it will be used to create a new professional investment digital economy consulting, program that will help provide in the release. “It takes vision the funding start-ups need. and leadership to bring together According to an Innovate disparate assets and partners Marquette press release, Innovate into a cohesive ecosystem Marquette worked with the Center for the Upper Peninsula.” on Rural Innovation (CORI) With the $611,911 provided to apply for the grant as part of by the Capital Challenge grant CORI’s 2021 Rural Innovation and matching funds, Innovate Initiative, a technical assistance Marquette plans to use the program empowering rural new resources for the Make communities to create inclusive it Marquette Start to Scale digital economies that support (Marquette STS) project, which scalable entrepreneurship and will leverage educational, tech job creation. Innovate economic development and Marquette partnered with capital investor partnerships.

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Together, with local partners, Marquette STS will educate local angel investors about scalable tech investment opportunities and connect to state, regional and national venture capital (VC) networks. Marquette STS outputs and outcomes include the following: • Support 30 scalable tech startups with the support of $5,000 to $30,000 each of financial assistance for services from crowdfunding members. • Engage 50 new angel investors to provide $750,000 in seed funding and sponsor 15 startups through acceleration. • Cultivate 25 new VC firms to invest $1.5 million to $5 million in scalable tech startups in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. The project is also designed to be 100 percent sustainable after the proposed three-year project timeline. Thiel said the program will allow new companies to find the funding they need, without having to rely on family and friends. “It’s a platform that allows us to reach out to community members across the U.P., state, and internationally–for people associated with the U.P. who want to help early-stage companies get off the ground,” he said. In short, the program will build a professional funding organization that will be effective for businesses from start to scale. As entrepreneurs come into the program, they’ll be able to get the resources they need to build out professional business plans, pitches, and long-term plans to help investors feel less worried about the risk involved. “You really have to de-risk the idea or de-risk the company and show really clear guidelines on long-term planning, putting professional performance together, business plans, pitch videos or actual pitches with the client,” Thiel said. “This program does that. It really is a process for entrepreneurs to inject capital throughout their path, and it also gives us a really great professional organization to prepare them for investment.” Thiel said the program is modeled after 58

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other, successful entrepreneurial programs, making it less risky than a brand new model that wasn’t tried and true. “Once the steam roller starts going and you’ve got deals flowing through, businesses coming in, launching out and getting investment, it continues to build all the time,” Thiel said. “Honestly, this is an ability for us to be very competitive with other organizations who have done similar things. The concept we’re promoting isn’t a new concept. This has been done by many successful organizations.” Though Innovate Marquette was the grant recipient, Thiel said many other local economic development organizations played a key role in preparing the grant, including the Northern Michigan University Foundation, Invest UP, the Lake Superior Community Partnership, the Innovation Shore Angel Network, and the Central Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Regional Commission, to name a few. “We’ve aligned as an innovative ecosystem, and we’re collaborating on everything that we do so that we can put all of our efforts toward the same goal,” Thiel said. “That’s been something that I think has been really needed and I think all of us in the innovation ecosystem recognize that this is the way we should be doing things.” Another major benefit to the grant is the visibility it will afford Marquette in the future, as local economic development agencies seek to further their work through grant funding. “This is a very long, arduous process and a very competitive grant, one which very few people got. I really want to commend our local economic development ecosystem for being supportive and helping us write the grant,” Thiel said. “This is a really, really big win for the U.P. for visibility at the federal level. These federal grants come out every year and we’ve never gotten one on this scale. This also builds momentum and visibility at the federal level.” The successful grant application isn’t just helpful in that it’s getting Marquette’s name into the world of high-level grant funding – it can also help act as a template of sorts for additional grant applications. “A lot of the language in this grant can be used in other grants,” Thiel said. “It was a huge effort locally, working with CORI, and we’re super excited to be able to share this with the community and build on this.” For more information on Innovate Marquette, visit innovatemarquette. org. About the author: Jackie Stark has lived in the UP since she was 11. An avid reader, she also loves gardening and has been talking about learning to play the guitar for 14 years. MM


back then

THE VANISHED

An ancient people, recorded here by explorers in 1600s, are gone By Adam Berger

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elatively little is known about the history of the Noquet, a Native people that once lived between Lake Michigan and Lake Superior. Information about this group is sparse and contradictory. The Noquet are alternatively presented as a vanished tribe or a subgroup of Ojibwe. Both assertions have merit, but in more complicated ways than might first be assumed. Early sources describe the Noquet as a small group separate from but allied with their Ojibwe and Menominee neighbors in the 1600s. All three spoke related Algonquian languages. The Noquet language was closest to Menominee. As part of the wider Anishinaabe culture along with the Odawa and Potawatomi, Ojibwe tradition foregrounds the fact that they came to the Great Lakes from the northeast Atlantic coast, around the Gulf of St. Lawrence. This gradual movement of Anishinaabe people began by 900 CE. Large Ojibwe populations were present in the Lake Superior region by the time of first contact with the French in the early 1600s. In contrast, the Menominee, who are not Anishinaabe, identify with the ancient copper mining inhabitants of the Upper Peninsula, were present in their Great Lakes territory for 1,000 years before European contact, and possibly have been in Michigan and Wisconsin for 5,000 years. The Noquet presence in the Upper Peninsula also seems to have predated the arrival of significant Anishinaabe populations. Jesuit missionary Claude Dablon (1618-1697) described the Noquet as original inhabitants of the southern shore of Lake Superior. The word Noquet lives on in Upper Peninsula place names and local culture. One ancient name for the Dead River in Marquette County was the Noquemanon River, the word meaning ‘the berry patch of the Noquet.’

A map dated 1838 shows two bays located along the southern shore of what’s known today as Delta County that were named for the Noquet people. Likewise, Bay de Noc Community College, established in 1962 in Escanaba, also incorporated the name of the area’s early inhabitants. (Map image from the Michigan State University Library collection).

An illustration page from W.B. Hinsdale’s book, “Primitive Man in Michigan,” published by the Ann Arbor University Press in 1925, features a reproduction of the cave drawing known as “The Spider Man,” which was is believed to have been drawn by the Noquet. It is one of four pictographs located in a cave on Burnt Bluff near Fayette in the Garden Peninsula. The other two illustrations on the page are of unrelated Native American artifacts discovered at sites in southern Michigan. (Public domain page digitized by Google.)

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Native people in the northern Great Lakes traditionally moved throughout the year to take advantage of seasonal food resources. The Noquet probably lived along the southern shore of Lake Superior in the summer, harvesting blueberries as a dietary staple. The far more numerous Ojibwe seem to have recognized the Noquet right to make use of territory in the area of the Dead River for this purpose. A nonprofit organization founded in 2001 called Noquemanon Trail Network (NTN) maintains an extensive, popular non-motorized trail complex in the central Upper Peninsula. The group hosts an annual ski race called the Noquemanon Ski Marathon, colloquially shortened to the Noque. The race has gained national prestige, drawing racers from all over the United States. Few participants know the deeper origin of the event’s name. The names of Big Bay de Noc and Little Bay de Noc in Delta County,

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Michigan also derive from the word Noquet. This part of the southern Upper Peninsula of Michigan north of Green Bay was considered the homeland of the Noquet people by French missionaries and explorers. A trail network between Little Bay de Noc and the shore of Lake Superior near Grand Island allowed the Noquet to move between their winter and summer territories. They also periodically inhabited islands at the mouth of Green Bay, sometimes known as the Noquet Islands, the largest of which is Washington Island. By the 1650s, these islands were dominated by the Potawatomi, one of the three main branches of Anishinaabe. The Burnt Bluff Cultural Site, a series of rock shelters and caves with ancient pictographs along Lake Michigan near Fayette in Delta County, is arguably the most notable archaeological feature within the territory associated with the Noquet. Unfortunately for our understanding of this site, generations of curious spelunkers have badly damaged the pictographs. Part of Fayette Historic State Park, this intriguing archaeological site is now closed to the public. The most impressive feature of the Burnt Bluff complex, Spider Cave or Spider Man Cave, named for a distinctive pictograph, is considered to have been the site of magical rituals during the Middle Woodland period, dating back to about 2,400 years before present, or around 600 CE. While we do not know who painted the pictographs at Burnt Bluff or performed rituals at Spider Man Cave, it was possibly used by ancestors of the Noquet people French explorers and priests encountered in the 1600s. Some scholars think Spider Man Cave was used as a site for the performance of rituals associated with the Midewiwin or Grand Medicine Society, a spiritual movement that spread among various Native peoples of the Great Lakes. Members of secret Midewiwin societies were initiated in a series of ceremonies and traditional teachings. Noquet involvement in Midewiwin rites would have given them a meaningful religious connection with their Ojibwe neighbors. Noquet and Ojibwe cultures seem to have shared another important feature. The word Noquet meant something akin to ‘bear’s foot,’ a term associated with the Ojibwe Bear clan.

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The annual Noquemanon Ski Marathon, which has been held for the past 20 years, and the entire Noquemanon Ski Trail Network, which consists of many miles of trails between Big Bay and Munising, get their name from the tribe that once lived in this area. (Tom Buchkoe photo)

Many Algonquian-speaking cultures divided society into clans, called doodem as a singular noun in the Ojibwe language, each represented by an animal, bird, fish, or mythical creature. It may be that the Noquet had a similar clan system to that of the Ojibwe, and that the Bear clan was prominent in Noquet society. Clans tended to perform specific rituals, potentially giving Ojibwe and Noquet Bear clan members a sense of shared identity. By the first decades of the 1700s, the Noquet population was greatly reduced, perhaps due to disease or war. By the time Jesuit Pierre Francois Charlevoix (1682-1761) visited the Great Lakes in 1721, only a few Noquet families remained. The Noquet are normally thought to have been absorbed by either the Menominee or the Ojibwe. The reality is that some Noquet people married into Menominee families, and others merged with Ojibwe families. Wisconsin-based trader Augustin

Grignon (1780-1860), grandson of famous French and Odawa military officer Charles Michel de Langlade (1729-1801) and husband to a French and Menominee wife, insisted that the Noquet were part of Menominee society. Grignon was correct, at least in a sense. By his time, Noquet remaining in the Lake Michigan area had married into Menominee families, neighbors who shared a similar language and history.

... By the time Jesuit Pierre Francois Charlevoix (16821761) visited the Great Lakes in 1721, only a few Noquet families remained.

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However, Noquet people living along Lake Superior married into Ojibwe families, who possibly had similar clan structures and religious beliefs. As Marquette author Tyler Tichelaar pointed out in his 2020 book Kawbawgam, Mah-je-ge-zhik (died circa 1857) and Madosh (circa

1800-1880), central Upper Peninsula Ojibwe leaders around the time of American settlement, were descended from Noquet ancestors. It is important to keep memory of the Noquet alive. Future research into this nearly forgotten cultural group may reveal details about how patterns of intermarriage and assimilation shaped Native identities during the large historical migration from the Atlantic coast to the Great Lakes. As the Noquet case seems to indicate, cultural factors such as mutual language intelligibility, shared participation in regional religious movements, and similar clan structures allowed numerically smaller groups to merge into larger societies. This may argue in favor of foregrounding specific family histories in understanding the Native past of the Great Lakes. About the author: Adam Berger holds a Ph.D in social anthropology, an MA in educational psychology, and has professional experience in the nonprofit field. Keenly interested in Upper Peninsula local history and ecology, Adam believes that teaching younger generations about the land and its past is the way to protect our unique region. MM


lookout point

‘LEAF’ THEM BE? Now that the fall color season is passed and the leaves have fallen, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources offers a few suggestions for what to do with them...

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‘LEAF’ THEM BE

hat’s the easiest way to deal with fallen leaves? Just leave them alone – they’ll benefit wildlife and save you time and energy. If you’re worried about getting the stink eye from neighbors, you can assure them that the leaf layer is a critical part of the ecosystem. Salamanders, chipmunks, wood frogs, box turtles, toads, insects and other wildlife live in the leaf layer of the forest. Many important pollinators like moths and butterflies overwinter in fallen leaves. If you’d like to move fallen leaves off your lawn, you can rake them into garden beds (free mulch!) where they will insulate perennials and keep soil in place during storms. Alternately, shred them with a lawn mower and let them become natural fertilizer for the yard.

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MAKE GARDEN GOLD

nother way to take care of fallen leaves is to collect them in a compost bin and let nature do the rest. They’ll break down into rich soil that plants love. If you have the space, you can also rake them directly into a vegetable patch and till them under in the spring. A guide published by the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy, “Home composting: Reap a heap of benefits” describes how to build and maintain a compost bin. BURN RESPONSIBLY f you choose to burn leaves, there are some important tips for this disposal method. Before burning, remember to check for a burn permit to see if conditions are safe for burning, and know your local fire ordinances. Visit Michigan.gov/BurnPermit or call 866-922-BURN to find out whether burning is allowed. “When burning, always have a water source nearby and never leave a fire unattended, even for a moment,” said Paul Rogers, DNR fire prevention specialist. “Debris burning is the No. 1 cause of wildfire in Michigan.” It’s okay to burn natural materials such as leaves, branches and logs. It’s not legal to burn plastic or other trash. Questions about burning? Visit Michigan. gov/BurnPermit or contact Paul Rogers at 616-260-8406.

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JOE MACK

back then

The unforgettable, long-serving state senator from Ironwood Story by Larry Chabot • Sketch by Mike McKinney

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he one and only Joe Mack has been dead for over 16 years but is still a powerful presence to friend and foe. Among Michigan politicians, there were none like Joe Mack, before or since. He loved the political arena and its controversies, except the one that drove him from office. Say what you will, Mack fought hard for his people in the 38th senatorial district, which spans most of the U.P. His battles against the bureaucracy, his quotes and his coats are things of legend. There are many Joe Mack stories. Here is mine, an event on a road running past a new White Pine Copper Company mine shaft in Ontonagon County. White Pine was one of the U.P.’s largest employers, with over 3,000 workers and 1,200 vendors. The new shaft was at the bend in the Tolfree Road, five miles east of the main plant. One of the state’s worst, it had countless ruts, potholes, and little mini-creeks covered with wooden planks. Some ruts were so grotesque they could spin you in another direction. The Tolfree was a worthy candidate for the Ugly Road Hall of Fame. The previous year, as local officials were seeking funds to rebuild the equally rotten road between Ontonagon and Greenland, Gov. George Romney made a local visit. What timing! The governor was driven at high speed down that route, bouncing and skidding enough to sell him. Mission accomplished: a rebuild was authorized. Joe Mack watched and remembered. He would try that some day, and the day came when he was asked to help repair the miserable Tolfree. At his invitation, two planeloads of legislators and staff flew to Ontonagon. We had two cars waiting. Sen. Mack took me aside and said, “We’ll divide them up. I’ll lead and you follow. When we hit the Tolfree, I’ll hit every rut and pothole, and you do the same.” The farther we went, the worse it got, careening over the planks, ruts, and holes. As if on cue, Mack’s vehicle blew a tire and skidded sideways. We stood in ankle-deep mud in the middle of nowhere, staring at the flat, saying nothing. Finally, Mack suggested that maybe we should fix the road. After all, hundreds of miners would soon be using it. A bill was introduced and sailed through the legislature. The bill unleashed a barrage of criticism against spending state money on a private road to benefit one company. Actually, countered fellow legislator Russell Hellman, the Tolfree was a public road, which just happened to pass by the shaft. Besides, he argued, the state built a private road into a Flint automobile plant. The issue reached the state supreme court, which approved the legislation. Mack said it was “the hardest fight I ever experienced.” He suggested that the county get and bank the money – which they did – and use the interest of $67,000 to buy new equipment. A year later at a road dedication banquet, Mack got a thunderous ovation. The senator had come from a mining family of 10 kids, learned steel fabrication, and worked on the Manhattan Project (atomic bomb) in World War II. He joined the Merchant Marine and shipped to sea in a convoy heading

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for the war zones. When his ship docked in Newfoundland, he was secretly escorted off the vessel for return to Allis Chalmers Company in Milwaukee, where he was classified as an essential employee in the war effort. According to his son Gary, Mack “worked all day, every day” as a welder, taking only three weeks off to hunt and fish. He once coveted a fishing lake owned by the University of Notre Dame which was off-limits to anglers. At his request, a senate colleague introduced a bill guaranteeing public access to every Michigan lake, and soon Joe was dipping a line in Notre Dame waters. His widow Pam (who died in 2020) was full of stories. Coming from the ‘sticks,’ Mack figured downstate legislators expected him to show up in jeans and a lumberjack shirt. So he began wearing the most outlandish sports coats. Worn with his trademark dark glasses (the sun’s glare hurt his eyes), the coats were as famous as he was. The family inherited samples, and many were given to constituents. Pam described his techniques. “He would study laws and how they affected the U.P. Other members would come to him with legal questions. He took committee assignments that no one else wanted, and made them important. Once, a downstate city wanted a junior college, so Joe drafted a bill that made his hometown of Ironwood the only eligible place for the school. In return for changing the bill, he negotiated benefits for the U.P. Mack owned an Ironwood restaurant and part-owned a bowling alley. He lost two runs for Congress but won a state house seat in 1960, was re-elected in 1962, and was elected a state senator in 1964. He focused on the economy, outdoor recreation, natural resources, and individual rights. Son Gary recalls campaigning for his dad armed with a batch of election posters, a stapler, ladder and rake (handy for pulling down opponents’ signs). Journalists knew how he fought for his constituents. Rick Pluta of Michigan Public Radio wrote that Mack

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“was well known in the Capitol because he was such a character. He was very good at tucking in [budget items] that helped the western U.P. There hasn’t been anyone like him with such an outsized personality.” His ability to “bring home the bacon” meant a lot to voters. His feuds with the media, bureaucrats, and environmentalists were well-known. “The Detroit News” wrote that he regarded newspapermen “as a homeowner did termites.” In his 30 years in office, he held only two news conferences. One downstate paper tailed him, taped phone calls, then attacked him. Mack sued for libel and won; he took no money, only a retraction. He figured that every negative article in the “Detroit Free Press” was worth another thousand votes. When asked his opinion of the backpackers roaming the U.P., he coined his most famous quote: “They arrive with a five dollar bill and one pair of underwear and don’t change either one.” Joe Mack, Dominic Jacobetti of Negaunee, and Russell Hellman of Dollar Bay were known as the “U.P. Mafia” for their ability to bring lots of tax money to their districts. They were also called, said Gary, the poster boys for the need for term limits. Storm clouds, though, were forming over Joe Mack, triggered by a casino flap. To stymie the campaign for gambling in the Detroit area, he submitted a bill permitting casinos at least 600 miles from Detroit, which confined them to Gogebic County. The bill lost. He told me that, shortly after the casino flap, he was charged with misuse of his mileage allowance. Following heart surgeries in 1979, he wintered in Florida, applying his Ironwood-Lansing mileage allotment to his airfares. “Until the casino incident, no one questioned this,” he said. “Then I’m told that, to collect mileage, I must leave from my district, not from any other location.” Mack resigned from the Senate in 1990 under an agreement with the attorney general to accept a misdemeanor plea, pay a


$100 fine, and return some mileage money. He was allowed his pension. Son Gary said it was later revealed that 17 other legislators had done the same mileage thing without being charged. With his senate career over, Mack returned to Ironwood with his wife Pam. (His first wife, Marian, had died in a traffic accident). They kept busy following their eight grandchildren through high school, college, and into the job market. After a long and truly colorful career, he died in 2005 at age 85. A senate resolution “mourned his death with utmost sorrow. He exemplified the heart and soul of the Upper Peninsula…Joe Mack had ‘Sisu.’ He will be missed.” Some thought this gesture was too little, too late. His memory lives on with family and constituents, the media who covered him, and with Senator Ed McBroom, who serves Mack’s old district in the legislature. The Mack family gave McBroom a giant sculpture of the U.P., which Mack had gotten from Michigan Tech. “Like this giant sculpture,” McBroom said, “Senator Mack was larger than life and represented his constituents with passion and dedication on issues critical to the U.P. He earned the deep and sincere gratitude of the working men and women of the U.P.” Gary Mack, who lives with his wife Sara in Spring Lake, was an official at Grand Valley State University. His brother Dennis lives in Grand Rapids; his daughter is an engineer at the Eagle Mine near Big Bay.

There was never a doubt where Joe Mack stood: in the doorway, between his people and his enemies. “People called me from all over,” he said. “If their own senator couldn’t get something done, they often called me, because I wasn’t afraid of the DNR or anybody else. My people live off the land. Without mining and lumbering, we’d be dead. If you haven’t lived in the U.P., grubbed in the U.P., or been unemployed in the U.P., don’t tell me how to solve the U.P.’s problems.” Pam Mack said Joe “was a great husband, father, and grandfather, a single dad who raised his sons after his wife’s death. He loved his constituents, and knew their names. He even learned Finnish for campaigning in the Copper Country. If he knew someone needed, say, a load of wood, he would get it from somewhere. He’d stop at nursing homes and talk with everyone. If he passed a picnic, he’d go over and shake hands and ask if they needed any help. He wanted everyone to call him Joe – except in Lansing, where he chose to be called Senator out of respect for the office.” “He was born in Ironwood, lived in Ironwood, and died in Ironwood,” said Pam. “His home, his people, and his heart are here. It was my pleasure to be by his side.” About the author: Larry Chabot is a freelance writer who has written for several publications, including over 150 articles for Marquette Monthly. MM

Answers to the New York Times crossword puzzle located on page 24. L A P C A T

A S S U C H

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A T O M S S A R A H C H O A N A H Y O R E I S W E R E D C A R P I E R S O T O N U M E A N I M S N O J I S I M A T H O M E R A D A R G E W A T C O O Y O F F E R A L S U S T U P O N H A M F L E L E T I S E S T

L E A P T I N O

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E K L L E S I S M O I T T P C P A H I R G L T A S A Y K I E O L D R I D A N E L E L O R T E T O I R A O

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S M S S W A N K

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V E T O E S

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home cinema

After a woman loses everything, she hits the road in search of seasonal work in the 2020 film “Nomadland.” Frances McDormand, playing the central character, Fern, won best actress, Chloe Zhao won best director and the film won best picture in the 2020 Academy Awards. (Searchlight Pictures photo)

Films look at American experiences, now and back then Reviews by Leonard Heldreth Two films and two video series are offered this month. NOMADLAND ased on Jessica Bruder’s book Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century, the award-winning film Nomadland follows the adventures of Fern (Frances McDormand) as she copes with the loss of her husband, her job, and the town where she lived for years. When the U.S. Gypsum plant in Empire, Nev., closes in 2011, the town ceases to exist–even its ZIP code disappears. Fern decides to sell or store her belongings and sets out on the road looking for seasonal work, which she first finds at an Amazon warehouse. Don’t expect Nomadland to follow a conventionally scripted narrative–like Fern it wanders about, backtracks, visits the same areas more than once, and eventually passes back through the deserted town of Empire. Along the way Fern meets a number of interesting people, several of whom play themselves. There’s Linda May (playing a fictionalized version of herself), who encourages Fern to visit a site in Arizona where Bob Wells (playing himself) provides a support location and teaches survival skills to people living on the road–those who are “houseless” as

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opposed to “homeless.” When Fern has a flat tire, she asks for help from a nearby camper named Swankie (again, an actual nomad). Swankie tells her she has to plan better for such emergencies, but then confesses she has terminal cancer. With only a few months to live, Swankie wants to see as much of the world and to have as good a time as possible until the end. The actor David Strathairn plays a character named David in a supporting role. When David visits his family, they invite him to move into the guest house for the winter, and he invites Fern to move in also, but during the night she slips away and drives off. When her van breaks down and she has to borrow money from her sister, the sister also invites her to stay, but Fern declines– apparently the desire to be on her own is not a recent development with Fern, as conversations with her sister imply. Fern takes jobs as a camp host at the Cedar Pass Campground in Badlands National Park, at Wall Drug in South Dakota, and at a sugar beet processing plant. When she returns to the Wells site in Arizona, she finds out that Swankie has died, and she joins in a memorial ceremony where they all throw rocks into a fire. She and David share memories of their families. David tells her that nomads don’t say “Goodbye” when they leave; they say “See ya down the road.”

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In the last scene Fern returns to the town of Empire to pick up the items she left there in storage and revisits the house where she used to live. The doors are unlocked and open, and Fern goes through the back door, climbs over the fence that separates the yard from the mountains, and strikes off across the desert like one of the tumbleweeds that go blowing by. Nomadland was nominated for six Academy Awards and won three–Best Picture, Best Director (Chloé Zhao), and best actress (Frances McDormand–her third Oscar as best actress). It also won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and various other international awards. ONE NIGHT IN MIAMI ased on a 2013 stage play of the same name by Kemp Powers, One Night in Miami is a fictionalized account of the 1964 meeting of Malcolm X, Muhammad Ali, Jim Brown, and Sam Cooke in a room at the Hampton House. They are celebrating Ali’s surprise title win over Sonny Liston and pondering what comes next in the lives of these four famous Black men. The film is a look behind the scenes at the affection and conflict between these four friends and at the pressures on Black men to create an identity that advances racial causes while yet enabling them to

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be honest with themselves and to enjoy life. As Ossie Davis sums it up in Purlie Victorious, “Being Black can be a lot of fun when ain’t nobody lookin’.” The film opens with short vignette that sets the stage for each man in 1963. Cassius Clay (Eli Goree) concludes a bout with Henry Cooper at London’s Wembley Stadium and nearly loses. Sam Cooke (Leslie Odom Jr.) is challenged by the cold reception he receives from an all-white audience at New York’s Copacabana. Jim Brown (Aldis Hodge) stops in Georgia to visit Mr. Carlton (Beau Bridges), an old family friend who is white, and is reminded by him that black people (Carlton uses the “N” word) aren’t allowed in the main house. Malcolm X (Kingsley Ben-Adir) returns home to discuss with his wife Betty his plan of leaving the Nation of Islam. The scene then shifts to Miami for Clay’s title fight with Sonny Liston on February 25, 1964. Brown is a ringside commentator, Cooke and X are guests of Clay. After Clay’s win, X invites the other three to a celebration party at his hotel room, but what he really wants is to discuss how these four famous men can use their fame to advance Black causes in ways that he sees as appropriate. The four have different plans for the future, both individually and for the Black power movement. X


and Cooke argue over Cooke’s success and the type of songs he writes and preforms. Clay announces his intention to change his name and join the Nation of Islam, and Brown announces he plans to retire from the NFL and go into film acting. As the men try to deal with these interactions, the press tracks them down and the “party” comes to an end. In future months Clay officially changes his name and joins Islam; X’s house is firebombed, but he manages to finish his autobiography; Brown retires from the NFL and goes into films; and Cooke performs his new protest song, “A Change is Gonna Come,” on the Tonight show. A title card at the end of the film quotes Malcolm X from a February 19, 1965 speech about the inevitability of martyrs; he is shot in a Harlem ballroom two days later. Sam Cooke is killed in a Los Angeles motel within a year. Regina King made her directing debut with this film; Leslie Odom Jr. was nominated for Best Supporting Actor, and Kemp Powers was nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay. Short Takes on Extended Productions During the Covid lock-downs, many of us who were looking for entertainment started watching streaming video, and over the next few months I’ll indicate some series that I enjoyed. Fortunately, most of them are available from Netflix, Amazon Prime or one of the other streaming services. Some may be available on dvd. BOSCH or those who enjoy well-done police procedure shows, Bosch should fill the bill. Based on the novels of Michael Connelly, it stars Titus Welliver as Los Angeles Police Department homicide detective Hieronymus “Harry” Bosch, a former Army Special Forces operative and a veteran of the first Gulf War and Afghanistan. The series extends over seven seasons with most crimes being dealt with in one or two episodes, but Bosch’s mother was killed before the series starts, and his search for her murderer extends through most of the rest of the series. Continuing characters include Jamie Hector as Detective Jerry Edgar, Bosch’s partner; Amy Aquino as Lieutenant Grace Billets, Bosch’s immediate superior and friend; Lance Reddick as Chief of Police Irvin Irving; Sarah Clarke as Eleanor Wish, Harry’s ex-wife who is a former FBI Agent turned professional poker player; Madison Lintz as “Maddie” Bosch, Harry’s daughter; and Mimi Rogers as Honey “Money” Chandler, a civil rights attorney. The pacing, critical for police procedures, is well handled; the plotting is convoluted enough to keep the viewer’s attention without becoming impossible to follow; and the acting is solid. Bosch has a cynical, old-warrior outlook on life; even though he tries to follow the rules, he’s not about to let a criminal get away on a technicality if he can help it. The seventh and last season is being broadcast on Amazon Prime this fall, but rumor is that Bosch will retire from the LAPD and go to work for “Money” Chandler as a private investigator in a new series with much the same cast and crew. If so, I’ll be watching.

F

LUCIFER The basic premise of Lucifer is that the Devil, known as Lucifer Morningstar (Tom Ellis), has become bored with being Lord of Hell, so he moves to Los Angeles and opens a high class night club called Lux. When a friend is killed in a gangland shooting, Lucifer goes after the killer and becomes involved with LAPD homicide detective Chloe Decker (Lauren German). Intrigued by Decker’s immunity to his supernatural charms and by the process of solving crimes, Lucifer becomes a consultant to the LAPD. The series then deals (generally) with solving one major crime per episode while developing the Lucifer-Decker connection. The series ran for a total of three seasons on Fox and three seasons on Netflix. As with any series, the quality is uneven, and the crime plots are sometimes transparent, but Ellis and the writers keep it afloat with tongue-incheek humor. Other characters that appear as the series progresses are the gorgeous demon Mazikeen (Lesley-Ann Brandt), who assists Lucifer and bartends at Lux; Lucifer’s elder brother, the archangel Amenadiel (D. B. Woodside); Eve (yes, that Eve); Lillith (Adam’s first wife); the archangel Michael; and even God himself, who doesn’t look at all like Michaelangelo’s version. Human characters include Rachael Harris as Dr. Linda Martin, Lucifer’s Stanford-educated psychotherapist; Kevin Alejandro as Detective Daniel Espinoza, an LAPD homicide detective and Chloe’s ex-husband; and Ella Lopez (Aimee Garcia), a forensic scientist for the LAPD. Tom Ellis is excellent as Lucifer, and the series frequently pokes fun at itself, as in one film noir episode shot in black and white. Most of the episodes are amusing and have a devil-may-care attitude. (All films reviewed are available as streaming video or as DVDs from local stores.) About the author: Leonard Heldreth became interested in films in high school and worked as a movie projectionist in undergraduate and graduate school. His short “Cinema Comment” aired for some years on WNMU-FM. In 1987 he started writing reviews for the Marquette Monthly. He taught English and film studies at NMU for over 30 years.) MM

poetry An excerpt from Maiden Voyage

LEAVES By Bert Riesterer

When it comes to trees most admire trunk and limbs. I go for the leaves. Lose them to mots and beetles, the mighty frame notwithstanding, serious damage has been done. A few can with difficulty make a new set but never as lush and vigorous. Most simply die. It’s not the dark and heavy pith of things so arduously extracted by philosophers and scientists. It’s what is joyously put forth numberless insatiable ephemeral to revel in the light.

A native of Detroit, Bert Riesterer (1935-2018) taught both European Intellectual and German History at Indiana University, finding his true calling when he retired to Marquette, MI. The awe-inspiring experience of raw, untamed stretches of the Lake Superior shore and surrounding woods was truly transformative for him, the culmination of a lifelong spiritual journey from philosophy to poetry. He was also an avid gardener all his life. Editor’s Note: Maiden Voyage is available for $15 at Snowbound Books and the Marquette Regional History Center. It can also be purchased by mail for $19 by sending a check made out to Richard Rastall and mailed to 2100 M-28 E, Marquette, MI 49855.

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superior reads New book follows the trail of money out of the U.P.

Review by Victor Volkman

U.P. COLONY: THE STORY OF RESOURCE EXPLOITATION IN UPPER MICHIGAN -- FOCUS ON SAULT SAINTE MARIE INDUSTRIES By Phil Bellfy

H

Published by Ziibi Press

ave you ever wondered how Michigan’s Upper Peninsula was full of natural resources and yet many of it’s people live in poverty even deeper than that found in Appalachia? Growing up, I assumed that the loggers and miners who lived in the U.P. harvested as much as they could, spent the money wildly, and had nothing left for themselves. The real answer is far more nuanced than that and a comprehensive macroeconomic analysis will show the real culprits, as Phil Bellfy points out in “U.P. Colony: The Story of Resource Exploitation in Upper Michigan -Focus on Sault Sainte Marie Industries”. This is the first new book from Sault Ste. Marie’s Ziibi Press in almost a decade and it was definitely worth the wait. Phil Bellfy deftly cuts through centuries of whitewashing to get to the real reasons why after $6 billion of extraction of lumber, copper, and iron ore, the people of this region are sunk in poverty and despair. U.P. Colony points out out the true impact of capitalism in the era of “Robber Barons.” Was the U.P. colonized by external forces, and how would we ever be able to measure that? Bellfy takes the clever tack of comparing the “two Soos” on either side of the St. Marys River. In comparing the American and Canadian Sault Sainte Marie, you can get a realistic apples-to-apples comparison of economic development and ruin. First, let’s take a look at the radical notion that the U.P. was an “internal colony” of the United States. What does this mean in real terms that we could measure concretely? It turns out that Mexican sociologist Pablo Gonzales-Casanova (1922 - ) developed a six-point theory of internal colonization that can serve as a yardstick. To qualify as an internal colony, Gonazales-Casanova suggests the following qualities can be evaluated: 1. The economy of the internal colony is structured to complement that of the colonial center 2. The “development” is tied to one predominant sector 3. The monopoly structure is controlled by one colonial center 4. There exists an obvious disparity in the standards of living between colony and center; 5. There exists a repressive conflict-resolution structure 6. There is a tendency for existing inequalities to increase over time. Although I won’t attempt to address the many interesting nuances of Bellfy’s thesis in this space, it is worth pointing out some easy matches with the internal colony theory. In terms of the first point, analysis of imports and exports to the U.P. shows an overwhelming trade deficit. Almost none of the lumber, iron, and copper extracted from the U.P. has

ever stayed there. Although you probably know there aren’t any iron ore smelting plants north of Detroit, you may be surprised to learn that the U.P. keeps almost none of the timber harvested for its own internal use. Belfy writes: In fact, during the height of the lumbering boom from 1880 to 1890 Michigan shipped four and one-half times as much lumber as it consumed. Yet by 1912, Michigan was a net importer of lumber (Sparhawk and Brush, 1929). Perhaps the biggest revelation to me was Bellfy’s discovery of the “one colonial center” that masterminded the exploitation of the U.P.’s abundant resources of timber, iron ore, and copper. Belfy writes: “The 1840’s ‘copper rush’ to the U.P. was the first major mining boom of the United States. By 1846 about one thousand mining permits had been issued by the government for exploration and mining on government land. But without land ownership, the miners were reluctant to make capital investments and to do much actual mining, many preferring instead to speculate on the permit sale market. Consequently, little ore was mined and the U.S. government collected very little in royalties. In May, 1846, therefore, the government stopped selling permits, and later that year began selling the land outright. Capitalists from the East, notably Boston, soon became the leading investors in the U.P. copper country (Gates, 1951).” This is evidenced most directly in the Calumet & Hecla Company, which as many yoopers know, was the predominant force in the Copper Country mining operations. But you probably didn’t know that that by 1884, Calumet and Hecla had become the sole selling agent for all Michigan copper, and together with three other mines (all Boston companies also), produced 71 percent of the copper mined in Michigan. Boston capitalists used the U.P.’s copper resources as their private ATM, siphoning money as fast they could while doing almost nothing to build the infrastructure of the U.P. itself. I’m sure the low wages paid to immigrants were an important factor in this equation as well. Anyway, all of the money earned was either paid out in dividends to investors or to develop new mines in places as far away as Africa and South America. Locally owned and operated mines in the U.P. never amounted to more than 2 percent of the mining production. There’s much more to be learned by studying Phil Bellfy’s “U.P. Colony” to learn about the post-war history of the Soo and the many attempts to start or restart industrial operations in the past 60-plus years. Get a copy of “U.P. Colony” from your local library or bookseller and decide for yourself how the U.P. came to be in the social and economic state of being we’re facing in 2021. About the author: Victor R. Volkman is a graduate of Michigan Technological University (class of ’86) and is the current president of the U.P. Publishers and Authors Association (UPPAA). He is senior editor at Modern History Press, publisher of the U.P. Reader.

Send book review suggestions to victor@LHPress.com. Books submitted for review can be sent to: MM Book Reviews, 5145 Pontiac Trail, Ann Arbor, MI 48105.

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MM


Out & About Out & About is a free listing of Upper Peninsula events. Events included must cost $25 or less (except fundraisers). All events are free and in Eastern time unless noted. We print information sent to us by a wide variety of people and organizations. It pays to double check the date, time, place and cost before heading out. Due to changing event requirements, please call ahead to ask about safety precautions, or bring a mask to events, as many events require masks regardless of vaccination status.

Send your December events by Wednesday, November 10 to: calendar@marquettemonthly.com Marquette Monthly P.O. Box 109 Gwinn, MI 49841 phone: (906) 360-2180

Index on the town ……………68 art galleries …………70-71 musuems …………….…72 support groups …………77

Trick-or-Treating | October 31 | Various Cities

end of october events 27 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 8:24 a.m.; sunset 6:43 p.m.

Gwinn

• Halloween Evening Story Time. Families are invited for a Halloweenthemed story. 6 p.m. Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Ishpeming

• Voices in Motion: Annie. Members of Westwood High School’s Voices in Motion will perform. $5. 7 p.m. Auditorium, Westwood High School, 300 S. Westwood Dr.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club Session Two. The group will read Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White. Masks required. Online registration required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required. Online registration required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St.

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on the town

Zoe Speaks| November 4| Hiawatha Music Co-op, Marquette

Gwinn

• Hideaway Bar. - Mondays: The Hideaway All-Stars. 7 p.m. 741 M-35. (906) 346-3178.

Hancock

• Orpheum Theater. - Friday, October 29: Uncle Pete’s All Star BBQ Blues Band. - Saturday, November 6: HAP Trick and JazzTec. $15. - Friday, the 12th: Buffalo Galaxy. $10. - Saturday, the 27th: Sycamore Smith, Roger and the Horribles, and No Cause for Alarm. All shows, doors open at 7 p.m. Shows begin at 8 p.m. unless noted. 426 Quincy St. (906) 482-5100.

Marquette

• Flanigan’s. - Tuesday through Thursday: Karaoke. 9:30 p.m. (906) 226-4323. • More Than Beginning Photography. Learn digital camera, photographic techniques and composition. Register by the 20th. NCLL members, $6; nonmembers, $10. TIME. Room 404A, Cohodas Hall, NMU. (906) 225-1004. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. Room 311, NMU Library. (906) 227-2648 or nkupper@nmu.edu

Negaunee

• Registration Deadline: What’s New in Recycling Glass in Marquette County. See Wednesday November 3.

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Cover charge on weekends only. 429 W. Washington St. (906) 228-8865. • Hiawatha Music Co-op. - Thursday, November 4: Zoe Speaks, 6:30 p.m. - Tuesday, the 30th: Sail on Singers, 7:30 p.m. Suggested donation, $5 to $10. 1015 N. Third St. (906) 226-8575. • Northland Pub. - Thursday, November 4: Troy Graham. - Friday, the 5th: Derrell Syria Project. - Friday, the 12th: Derrell Syria Project. - Thursday, the 18th: Troy Graham. Music starts at 8 p.m. Inside the Landmark Inn. 230 N. Front St. (906) 315-8107. • Ore Dock Brewing Company. - Friday, October 29: Raveyard. - Saturday, the 30th: Brothers Quinn. 7 p.m. - Saturday, the 30th: Blanco Suave. 10 p.m. - Sunday, the 31st: Brothers Quinn

28 THURSDAY

sunrise 8:25 a.m.; sunset 6:42 p.m.

Ishpeming

• NEA Big Read: Beverly Matherne. Poet Beverly Matherne will give a poetry reading and presentation on the removal history of Acadian people. 7 p.m. Joy Center, 1492 Southwood Dr. (906) 2264323. • Voices in Motion: Annie. Members of Westwood High School’s Voices in Motion will perform. $5. 7 p.m. Auditorium, Westwood High School, 300 S. Westwood Dr.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

Halloween Special. 7 p.m. - Friday, November 12: The Wallens. - Saturday, the 13th: Steve Leaf. 8 - Friday, the 19th and Saturday, the 20th: The Go Rounds with special guest M Sord. All shows are free and begin at 8 p.m. unless noted. 114 W. Spring St. (906) 228-8888. • Superior Culture. - Thursday, October 28: Martin Manderfield. 7 to 9 p.m. - Friday, the 29th: The Kitchen Single. 8 to 10 p.m. - Saturday, the 30th: Waxy Motion and Rat King Cult. $3. 7 to midnight. - Friday, November 5: Troy Graham. 9 to 11 p.m. - Thursday, the 18th: Electric Words and Music. 7 to 10 p.m. - Saturday, the 27th: i.am.james. 9 p.m. 717 Third Street. superiorculturemqt.com MM • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Registration Deadline: Greeting Cards 101. See Thursday the 4th.

29 FRIDAY

sunrise 8:27 a.m.; sunset 6:40 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 180 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Houghton • Black (& Gold) Tuesday…no, Friday. The Huskies Pep Band will perform. Youth, $5; adults, $13. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. rozsa.mtu.edu • The Rocky Horror Picture Show. The


1975 film will be shown. Youth, $5; adults, $15. Pre-show, 10 p.m. Film, 11 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. rozsa.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 17-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required for all participants ages 5 and older; masks encouraged for those younger than 5. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Grand Opening: Welcome to Oz. Celebrate the new location with giveaways, events, food, drinks and more. 10:00 a.m. to 6 p.m. Epps Apothecary, 110 N. Third St. (906) 250-3497.

30 SATURDAY

sunrise 8:28 a.m.; sunset 6:38 p.m.

Curtis

• Movie Night. The film Young Frankenstein will be shown. Prices vary, 7 p.m. Pine Performance Center, N9224 Saw-wa-Quato St. (906) 586-9974 or ericksoncenter.org

Marquette

• Chess Club. Youth age 7 to 12 are invited for chess. Masks required. 2 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Sober Dance Party. This familyfriendly dance will feature music by Double Trouble and an outdoor fire pit. 7 to 10 p.m. Marquette Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 1510 M-28 East. • Campus Cinema. The film The Conjuring 3: The Devil Made Me Do It will be shown. 7 p.m. Room 1100, Jamrich Hall, NMU. NMU students, free; nonstudents, $1. 7 p.m. Room 1100 Jamrich Hall, NMU. nmu.edu • Grand Opening: Welcome to Oz. Celebrate the new location with giveaways, events, food, drinks and more. 10:00 a.m. to 6 p.m. Epps Apothecary, 110 N. Third St. (906) 250-3497.

Rock

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more. Youth two and younger, free; others, $10.50. 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

31 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:30 a.m.; sunset 6:37 p.m.

Little Lake

Halloween

• Trunk and Treat. 5 to 7 p.m. Little Lake Chapel, 17961 E. M-35.

Marquette

• Grand Opening: Welcome to Oz. Celebrate the new location with giveaways, events, food, drinks and more. 10:00 a.m. to 6 p.m. Epps Apothecary, 110 N. Third St. (906) 250-3497.

Rock

• Hayes Corn Maze. Adventure through the corn maze, rope maze, pumpkin patch and more. Youth two and younger, free; others, $10.50. 12:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. 3474 St. Nicholas Rd. (906) 359-4825 or hayescornmaze.com

Various Cities • Trick-or-Treating. Times vary.

november events 01 MONDAY

sunrise 8:31 a.m.; sunset 6:35 p.m.

Marquette • Marquette Poets Circle Workshop. Bring copies of a poem, short prose or lyrics to share. 6:30 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (517) 410-3368. • NCLL Winter Kick-Off. Bring your own chair and enjoy a bonfire, music and hot chocolate or coffee. 6:30 p.m. Pavilion, Rippling River Campground, 4321 M-553 (906) 361-5370. • Marquette Poets Circle Open Mic. All are welcome to share poems, a short prose or songs. 7 p.m. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (517) 4103368. • NEA Big Read: Professor Amber Morseau Keynote Address. Amber Morseau, director of the Center for Native American Studies at NMU, will present Worldviews through Art Expression: Women Reconnecting Us to Our Home and Ancestors. Masks required. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322. • Registration Deadline: Diamond Painting Class and Project. See Monday the 8th.

02 TUESDAY

sunrise 8:32 a.m.; sunset 6:34 p.m.

Baraga

• Application Drive. Job-seekers are invited to learn about open positions in the area. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Conference Room, Baraga County Chamber of Commerce, 1 N. Main St. (906) 280-0216.

Marquette

• Genealogy Help. Bring your family documents and work with an experienced genealogist to uncover your family history. Masks required. 10 a.m. to noon. Heritage Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4311. • What’s Up? Astronomy Series. Scott Stobbelaar of the Marquette Astronomical Society will discuss what can be seen in the U.P. skies. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl. info for Zoom link • Registration Deadline: Superior Gems – Kayaking the Apostle Islands. See Tuesday the 9th.

03 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 8:34 a.m.; sunset 6:32 p.m.

Marquette

• Homeschool Chapter Book Club. The group will read Charlotte’s Web by E.B.

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art galleries Calumet

• Calumet Art Center. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., 57055 Fifth St. (906) 934-2228. • Copper Country Associated Artist. Works by members and workshop participants in watercolor and oil, drawings, photography, sculpture, quilting, wood, textile, clay, glass and other media. Thursday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 205 Fifth St. (906) 337-1252 or ccaartists.org • Gallery on 5th. Works by local and regional artists. Days and hours vary. 109 Fifth St. (906) 369-0094.

Copper Harbor

• EarthWorks Gallery. Featuring Lake Superior-inspired photography by Steve Brimm. Daily, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. 216 First St. (910) 319-1650.

Escanaba

• East Ludington Art Gallery. Works by local artists. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1007 Ludington St. (906) 786-0300 or eastludingtongallery.com • William Bonifas Fine Arts Gallery. - Northern Exposure XXVIII, an annual exhibit featuring contemporary artwork created by U.P. artists, will be on display November 11 through December 30. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3p.m. 700 First Avenue South. (906) 786-3833 or bonifasarts.org

Hancock

• Finlandia University Gallery. - Into Another World, featuring works by Gerald Matthew Immonen, will be on display through November 29. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m. 435 Quincy St. (906) 487-7500. • Kerredge Gallery. -The Shaft, a community exhibit on mining history, will be on display November 4 to 20. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts Center, 126 Quincy St. (906)4822333 or coppercountryarts.com • Youth Gallery. Featuring works by local students. Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Arts Center, 126 Quincy St. (906) 482-2333 or coppercountryarts.com

Houghton

• A-Space Gallery. - HYPERCONNECTION, featuring works by Tiffany Lange, will be

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Cynthia Cote| Untitled| DeVos Art Museum

on display through November 7. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturdays, 1 to 8 p.m. Rozsa Center, 1400 Townsend Dr. mtu.edu/rozsa

Marquette

• Art—U.P. Style. Art by Carol Papaleo, works by local artists, gifts, classes and more. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. 130 W. Washington St. (906) 225-1993. • DeVos Art Museum. - Regional Perspectives by Women Artists, featuring works in various media from the dawn of the 20th century to present, will be on display. - Still, an installation of drawings and objects by Cynthia Cote, will be on display through December 11. Monday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Corner of Seventh and Tracy streets. NMU. (906) 227-1481 or nmu.edu/devos • Graci Gallery. Works by regional and national artists. Featuring fine craft, contemporary art, and jewelry. Thursday and Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday,

11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday, by appointment or chance. 555 E Michigan Street. gracigallery.com • Huron Mountain Club Gallery. - Sunrise Art Exhibition, featuring works by local artists inspired by Joy Harjo’s An American Sunrise, will be on display through October 31. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • Lake Superior Photo and Gallery. The studio features landscape photographic art by Shawn Malone, including naturescapes of the Lake Superior region. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 211 S. Front St. (906) 2283686 or lakesuperiorphoto.com • Lake Superior Art Association Deo Gallery. Works by local and regional artists. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • Peter White Public Library Reception Area Gallery. Works by local (continued on page 81) 71)


art galleries and regional artists. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 228-0472. • The Gallery: A Marquette Artist Collective Project. Works by local and regional artists. Monday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 1 to 4 p.m. Suite U7,130 W. Washington St. mqtartistcollective@.org • The Studio Gallery at Presque Isle. Works by local and internationally acclaimed artists. Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 2905 Lakeshore Blvd. (906) 360-4453. • Wintergreen Hill Gallery and Gifts. - Works by Bill Irving, will be on display through November 19. Also featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 810

N.

Third

St.

(906)

273-1374.

• Zero Degrees Artist Gallery. Welcoming new artists with works in oils, watercolors, mixed media, jewelry, photography, metals, woods, recycled and fiber arts and much more. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 525 N, Third St. (906) 228-3058 or zerodegreesgallery.org

Munising

• U.P.-Scale Art. Featuring works by local and regional artists. Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 109 W. Superior Ave. (906) 387-3300.

Rapid River

• The adhocWORKshop. Owner Ritch Branstrom creates sculptures with found objects inspired by the land in which the objects were found. By appointment or chance. 10495 South Main Street. (906) 339-1572 or adhocworkshop.com MM

(continued from page 70) White. Activities will include cooking, science and art. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Outword. LGBTQIA youth and allied students in grades 7 to 12 are invited. Masks required. 4 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • League of Women’s Voters Membership Meeting. New members welcome. A member of the U.P. Energy Task Force will summarize 10 months of research and their recommendations. 6 p.m. Studio 1, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 225-9103. • Authors Reading Virtually. Poet Beth Roberts will read from her new poetry collection Like You. 7 p.m. via Zoom. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. Room 311, NMU Library. (906) 227-2648 or nkupper@nmu.edu • NMU Faculty Jazz Trio Concert. 7:30 p.m. Reynolds Recital Hall, NMU. nmu.edu Registration Deadline: City Street and Sidewalk Cleaning Equipment Tour. See Wednesday the 10th.

Negaunee

• What’s New in Recycling Glass in Marquette County. Learn about recycling glass in Marquette County, and get answers to your recycling questions. Register by October 27. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. 2 p.m. Negaunee Township Hall, 42 M-35. (906) 228-8051.

04 THURSDAY

sunrise 8:35 a.m.; sunset 6:31 p.m.

Houghton • 41 North Film Festival. This festival will showcase award-winning independent films and filmmakers. Masks required. 5 and 7 p.m. Rozsa Center, MTU. 41northfilmfest.mtu.edu

Ishpeming

• NEA Big Read: Marty Achatz Hybrid Poetry Workshop. U.P. Poet Laureate Marty Achatz will conduct the workshop with prompts focused on honoring your ancestors. Masks required. 7 p.m. The Joy Center, 1492 Southwood Drive. (906) 2264322.

Marquette

• Vinyl Record Show. New and used vinyl records, CDs, posters, cassettes, book and t-shirts will be available. Noon to 11 p.m. Community Room, Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. • Greeting Cards 101. Learn how to make four greeting cards. Instruction by Julie Higbie and Judi Mouser. Materials provided. Register by October 28. NCLL members, $8; nonmembers, $15. 1 p.m. Harlow Farms Community Center, corner of Wilson and Horizon streets. • Disney’s Descendants The Musical. Members of the Superior Area Youth Theatre will perform. Youth and students, $9; adults, $15. 7 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. • NEA Big Read: Marty Achatz Hybrid Poetry Workshop Via Zoom. U.P. Poet Laureate Marty Achatz will conduct the workshop with prompts focused on honoring your ancestors. 7 p.m. Zoom link available at pwpl.info • MSHS Musical: Catch Me if You Can. Students from Marquette Senior High School will perform. 7:30 p.m. $12. Kaufman Auditorium, 611 N. Front St. nmu.edu/tickets

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museums

K.I. Sawyer Heritage Air Museum, K.I. Sawyer

Big Bay • Big Bay Lighthouse. The grounds of the 1896 lighthouse are open year-round. 3 Lighthouse Rd. (906) 345-9957. Calumet • International Frisbee Hall of Fame and Museum. Learn about the history of Guts Frisbee. Days and hours vary. Open when events are held. Second floor ballroom, Calumet Colosseum, Red Jacket Rd. (906) 2817625. Hancock • Quincy Mine Hoist and Underground Mine. There are two options for touring the site. On both the surface tour and the full tour, visitors will see the museum, inside the No. 2 Shaft House and the Nordberg Steam Hoist and ride the cog rail tram car to the mine entrance. On the full tour, visitors will take a tractor-pulled wagon into the mine, seven levels underground. Prices, days and hours vary. (906) 482-3101 or quincymine.com Houghton • A.E. Seaman Mineral Museum. View the largest collection of minerals from the Great Lakes region and the world’s finest collection of Michigan minerals. Exhibits educate visitors on how minerals are formed, fluorescent minerals and minerals from around the world. Prices vary. Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1404 E. Sharon Ave. (906) 4872572 or museum.mtu.edu • Carnegie Museum. Features rotating displays of local history, natural science and culture. The Science Center is dedicated to interactive exhibits about science for kids. Thursdays, noon to 5

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p.m. 105 Huron St. (906) 482-7140 or carnegiekeweenaw.org • MTU Archives and Copper Country Historical Collections. Features a variety of historical memorabilia, highlighting life in the Copper Country. Open by appointment. Lower level of the J.R. Van Pelt Library, MTU. (906) 4873209. Ishpeming • Ishpeming Area Historical Society Museum. New exhibits include a military exhibit and artifacts from the Elson Estate. Donations appreciated. Days and hours vary. Gossard Building, Suite 303, 308 Cleveland Ave. ishpeminghistory.org • U.S. National Ski Hall & Snowboard Hall of Fame & Museum. The museum features more than 300 Hall of Fame inductees, presented in photographs and biographies, and displays and exhibits of skiing history and equipment, an extensive library, video show, gift shop, special events and more. By appointment only. US-41 and Third St. (906) 485-6323 skihall.com K.I. Sawyer • K.I. Sawyer Heritage Air Museum. The museum promotes and preserves the aviation history the air base brought to the area. Air Force-related materials are on display, including photographs, flags, medals and more. Donations appreciated. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. 402 Third St. (906) 362-3531 or kishamuseum.org Marquette • Beaumier Upper Peninsula Heritage Center. - The Seventh Fire: A Decolonizing Experience, a multimedia exhibit, will be on display through April 9.Three separate collections focus on cultural artifacts relating to ethnic, religious and social diversity in the U.P. Mon-

day through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. NMU, corner of Seventh Street and Tracy Avenue. (906) 227-3212 or nmu.edu/beaumier • Marquette Regional History Center. - The Story Behind Their Clothes, featuring wedding gowns, dresses, hats, baby bonnets and other articles of clothing, will be on display through January 8, 2022. - The museum includes interactive displays as well as regional history exhibits. Students, $3; seniors, $6; adults, $7. Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum. A variety of interactive exhibits offer learning through investigation and creativity. By appointment. 123 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 226-3911 or upchildrenmuseum.org Munising • Alger County Historical Society Heritage Center. Exhibits include the Grand Island Recreation Area, Munising Woodenware Company, barn building, homemaking, sauna and more. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. 1496 Washington St. (906) 3874308. Negaunee • Michigan Iron Industry Museum. In the forested ravines of the Marquette Iron Range, the museum overlooks the Carp River and the site of the first iron forge in the Lake Superior region. Museum exhibits, audio-visual programs and outdoor interpretive paths depict the large-scale capital and human investment that made Michigan an industrial leader. The museum is one of 10 museums and historic sites administered by the Michigan Historical Center. Daily, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 73 Forge Rd. (906) 475-7857. MM


Munising

• Ellen Airgood Author Talk and Book Signing. Ellen Airgood will discuss and sign copies of her book Tin Camp Road. 6 p.m. Suite A, Munising School Public Library, 810 M-28 West. (906) 387-2125.

05 FRIDAY

sunrise 8:37 a.m.; sunset 6:29 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Houghton

• 41 North Film Festival. This festival will showcase award-winning independent films and filmmakers. Masks required. Films begin at 3 p.m. Rozsa Center, MTU. 41northfilmfest.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Sonderegger21 Challenges. This symposium will cover contemporary and historical issues about the Upper Peninsula. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Northern Center, NMU. nmu.edu/beaumier • Vinyl Record Show. New and used vinyl records, CDs, posters, cassettes, book and t-shirts will be available. Noon to 11 p.m. Community Room, Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. • Brits and Brews. Bands will perform music from the 1960s-1970s British Invasion era. Proceeds benefit Music for All Kids. 5 to 10 p.m. Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. • Disney’s Descendants The Musical. Members of the Superior Area Youth Theatre will perform. Youth and students, $9; adults, $15. 7 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. • MSHS Musical: Catch Me if You Can. Students from Marquette Senior High School will perform. 7:30 p.m. $12. Kaufman Auditorium, 611 N. Front St. nmu.edu/tickets

06 SATURDAY

sunrise 8:38 a.m.; sunset 6:28 p.m.

Escanaba • Holiday Art Fair. Shop for art from local artists, along with bake sale items. An art raffle also will be held. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Bonifas Arts Center, 700 First Avenue South. (906) 786-3833 or bonifasarts.org

Houghton

• 41 North Film Festival. This festival will showcase award-winning independent films and filmmakers. Masks required. Films begin at noon. Rozsa Center, MTU. 41northfilmfest.mtu.edu

Ishpeming • Tween Book Club—Zoom. The group will discuss War and Mille McGonigle by Karen Cushman and Three Times Lucky by Sheila Turnage. Copies available at the library. 12:30 p.m. via Zoom. Email njohnson@uproc.lib.mi.us for Zoom information.

Marquette

• Late Fall Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Masks required for the indoor market. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • St. Michael’s Fall Bazaar. This bazaar will feature a variety of booths, raffles and soups for purchase. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. St. Michael’s Church, corner of Kaye Avenue and Hebard Court. • Zoe Speaks Workshops. Suggested donation, $5 to $10. Guitar, 10 a.m. Fiddle, 11 a.m. Flatfoot dancing, noon. Hiawatha Music Co-op, 1015 N. Third St. (906) 2268575. • Vinyl Record Show. New and used vinyl records, CDs, posters, cassettes, book and t-shirts will be available. Noon to 11 p.m. Community Room, Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. • Disney’s Descendants The Musical –

Vinyl Record Show | November 4 to 7 | Marquette

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Sensory Friendly Performance. Members of the Superior Area Youth Theatre will perform. Lights will dimmed and quiet and activity areas will be available. Youth and students, $9; adults, $15. 1 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. • Self Defense and Weapons Workshop. Learn self-defense techniques during this 2-hour workshop. Free for those age 14 to 17; $10 for others. 1:30 p.m. Marquette YMCA, 1420 Pine St. • NMU Percussion Ensemble Concert. 3 p.m. Reynolds Recital Hall, NMU. nmu. edu • Brits and Brews. Bands will perform music from the 1960s-1970s British Invasion era. Proceeds benefit JJ Packs. 5 to 10 p.m. Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. • Hiawatha Music Co-op Annual Members Meeting. Current and future members are invited. The night will include a social hour, food, drinks, and a business meeting, and end with a concert by the Appalachian band Zoe Speaks. Members, 5 p.m. Business meeting open to all, 6:30 p.m. Concert open to all, 7:30 p.m. Barrel + Beam, 260 Northwoods Rd. (906) 226-8575. • Disney’s Descendants The Musical. Members of the Superior Area Youth Theatre will perform. Youth and students, $9; adults, $15. 7 p.m. Forest Roberts Theatre, NMU. • MSHS Musical: Catch Me if You Can. Students from Marquette Senior High School will perform. 7:30 p.m. $12. Kaufman Auditorium, 611 N. Front St. nmu.edu/tickets

Michigamme

• Holiday Market. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Michigamme Township Community Building, 202 W. Main St.

Sands

• Cross Country Ski Swap . Shop for used cross country skis, and winter sports gear. Proceeds benefit the Superiorland Ski Club youth programs. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sands Township Hall, 987 M-553. superiorlandskiclub.com

07 SUNDAY

sunrise 7:40 a.m.; sunset 5:27 p.m.

Daylight Saving Time Ends Houghton • 41 North Film Festival. This festival will showcase award-winning independent films and filmmakers. Masks required. Films begin at 12:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, MTU. 41northfilmfest.mtu.edu

Marquette

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• Vinyl Record Show. New and used vinyl records, CDs, posters, cassettes, book and t-shirts will be available. Noon to 11 p.m. Community Room, Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 W. Spring St. • Slow Fiddle Jam. Learn traditional fiddle tunes at a slow pace. 1:30 p.m. Hiawatha Music Co-op, 1015 N. Third St. (906) 226-8575. • Old Timey Jam. Bring your own instruments to this old time, folk and traditional acoustic jam session. 3 p.m.Hiawatha Music Co-op, 1015 N. Third

St. (906) 226-8575.

08 MONDAY

sunrise 7:41 a.m.; sunset 5:25 p.m.

Marquette

• Zoom Storytime. Enjoy stories for newborns to age 6 during this online event. 9:30 a.m. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Diamond Painting Class and Project. Diamond painting is a form of mosaic art. Learn to apply the resins onto a pre-glued canvas to complete the painting. Materials provided. Register by the 1st. NCLL members, $18; nonmembers, $25. 1 p.m. 703 Chippewa Square. (906) 228-8051. • NEA Big Read: Dr. Amy Hamilton Keynote Address. Dr. Amy Hamilton, professor and Native American literature specialist, will present Climate and American Indian Literature. Masks required. 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4322.

09 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:43 a.m.; sunset 5:24 p.m.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Tasty Reads Book Group. The group will discuss Kitchen Front by Jennifer Ryan. Masks required. Noon. Shiras Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Muggles for Potter. Youth in grades 2 and 3 are invited for Mandrake potting. Masks required. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Superior Gems – Kayaking the Apostle Islands. Frida Waara will discuss the National Parks of the Lake Superior Foundation and her recent kayak trip at the Apostle Islands. Register by the 2nd. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. 6:30 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2288051. • Registration Deadline: Harlow Lake Hike. See Tuesday the 16th.

10 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 7:44 a.m.; sunset 5:23 p.m.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 20-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • City Street and Sidewalk Cleaning Equipment Tour. See the equipment that


clears the 200 miles of roads, sidewalks and bike paths in Marquette. Register by the 3rd. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. 10 a.m. City Public Works, 1100 Wright St. (906) 343-6609. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club. The group will read Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White. Activities will include cooking, science and art. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Junior Teen Advisory Board. Students in grades 5 to 8 are invited to meet new people, plan events and gain volunteer experience. Masks required. 4:15 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4321. • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. Room 311, NMU Library. (906) 227-2648 or nkupper@nmu.edu • NEA Big Read: Dr. Martin Reinhardt Keynote Address. Dr. Martin Reinhardt from NMU’s Center of Native American Studies will discuss the removal histories of Indigenous people from their original lands. 7 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-4321.

11 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:46 a.m.; sunset 5:22 p.m.

Houghton

• McArdle Theatre: The Arsonists. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. McArdle Theatre, MTU. (906) 487-2073 or events.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • NEA Big Read: Building Bridges– Native American Storytelling. Youth are invited for an afternoon of reading and activities about Native American Storytelling. Masks required. 2:30 to 6:30 p.m. U.P. Children’s Museum, 123 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 226-4323. • Second Thursday Creativity Series: Thanks, Thanks and More Thanks! Thanksgiving-themed activities and crafts for children will be available. 2:30 to 6 p.m. Courtyard, U.P. Children’s Museum, 123 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 226-3911 or upchildrensmuseum.org • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • STEM Preschool Storytime. Preschool-age children and an adult will learn about the states of water and explore with hand-on activities. Masks required. Online registration required. 6:15 p.m.

Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Registration Deadline: Marquette County 2040 Plan. See Thursday the 18th.

Siril Concert Series - Janet Hopkins| November 12| Marquette

12 FRIDAY

sunrise 7:47 a.m.; sunset 5:20 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Houghton

• McArdle Theatre: The Arsonists. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. McArdle Theatre, MTU. (906) 487-2073 or events.mtu.edu

Marquette • Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 20-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Superior Arts Youth Theatre Tech and Design Workshop Series: Stage Makeup Youth in grades 6 to 12 are invited to learn basic makeup for stage performances. $15. 5 to 7 p.m. Marquette Hope Connection Center, address. saytheater.org • Siril Concert Series—Janet Hopkins. Janet Hopkins, a renowned dramatic mezzo-soprano, and a 16-year veteran of the New York Metropolitan Opera will perform. Youth and NMU students, free; adults, $12. 7:30 p.m. Reynolds Recital Hall, NMU. nmu.edu/tickets

13 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:48 a.m.; sunset 5:19 p.m.

Houghton

• Anchorage World Premiere. The Abarukas Dance Company will perform.. Youth, $10; adults, $20. 7:30 p.m. Rozsa Center, MTU. (906) 487-2073 or events. mtu.edu • McArdle Theatre: The Arsonists. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. McArdle Theatre, MTU. (906) 487-2073 or events.mtu.edu

L’Anse

• Onagomingkway Chapter of NSDAR Meeting. Attendees should bring a sack lunch. Meeting may be on Zoom, if necessary. Noon to 3 p.m. 13294 Shore Drive. 226-7836.

Marquette • Late Fall Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Masks required for the indoor market. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • St. Louis Fall Bazaar. This bazaar will feature a variety of vendors, a bake sale, Rada knives, jewelry, local crafts and more Lunch is available for $10. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. St. Louis the King, 264 Silver Creek Rd. (906) 249-1438. • Holiday Art Sale. Shop for items from

more than 25 artists. $2. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • NEA Big Read: Harmonies and Harjo. NMU faculty and students will provide music that reflects Joy Harjo’s poetry as local poets will read Harjo’s words from An American Sunrise. Masks required. 11 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264322. • Chess Club. Youth age 7 to 12 are invited for chess. Masks required. 2 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

Skandia

• Turkey Dinner. Enjoy a turkey dinner. Take-out is available. Proceeds benefit scholarships, youth development and the Victory Food Pantry. 4 to 7 p.m. Youth 5 and younger, free; 6 to 12, $5; 13 and older, $10. West Branch Township Hall, 1016 CR545.

14 SUNDAY

sunrise 7:50 a.m.; sunset 5:18 p.m.

Marquette

• NMU Choral Ensembles Concert. 3 p.m. St. Peter Cathedral, 311 W. Baraga Ave. nmu.edu

November 2021

• Old Timey Jam. Bring your own instruments to this old time, folk and traditional acoustic jam session. 3 p.m.Hiawatha Music Co-op, 1015 N. Third St. (906) 226-8575.

15 MONDAY

sunrise 7:51 a.m.; sunset 5:17 p.m.

Marquette

• Zoom Storytime. Enjoy stories for newborns to age 6 during this online event. 9:30 a.m. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • NEA Big Read: Jay Harjo Capstone Party and Virtual Reading. Tribal progressive band Waa we ye yaa will perform a concert, and Jay Harjo will read from An American Sunrise. Masks required. Concert, 6 p.m. Reading, 7 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

16 TUESDAY

sunrise 7:53 a.m.; sunset 5:16 p.m.

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Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Harlow Lake Hike. The group will hike 2-miles along Harlow Lake. Wear appropriate hiking gear. Register by the 9th. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. 2 p.m. Cabins 4 and 5 parking area, Harlow Lake, off of CR-550. (906) 345-9295. • Dumbledore’s Army. Students in grades 4 to 6 are invited for Harry Potter crafts, including Mandrake planting. Masks required. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Registration Deadline: Marquette Senior Theatre. See Monday the 22nd.

17 WEDNESDAY

18 THURSDAY

sunrise 7:56 a.m.; sunset 5:14 p.m.

Houghton • McArdle Theatre: The Arsonists. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. McArdle Theatre, MTU. (906) 487-2073 or events.mtu.edu

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Marquette County 2040 Plan. Learn about the 10 goals of the 2040 Plan regarding housing, employment, education, community services and assets. Register by the 11th. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. 1 p.m. Harlow Farms Community Center, corner of Wilson and Horizon streets. (906) 361-5370.

Houghton

19 FRIDAY

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 20-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks required. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323.

sunrise 7:57 a.m.; sunset 5:13 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m.

Houghton • McArdle Theatre: The Arsonists. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. McArdle Theatre, MTU. (906) 487-2073 or events.mtu.edu

Ishpeming

• Wreath Making with Shailah. Adults are invited to make a holiday wreath. Register by the 5th. 2 p.m. Ishpeming Carnegie Public Library, 318 N. Main St. (906) 486-4381.

Marquette

20 SATURDAY

• McArdle Theatre: The Arsonists. Youth, $5; adults, $15. 7:30 p.m. McArdle Theatre, MTU. (906) 487-2073 or events.mtu.edu

sunrise 7:58 a.m.; sunset 5:12 p.m.

Hancock

Marquette

• The Buellwood Weavers and Fiber Arts Guild Monthly Meeting. Dawn Anderson will lead an eco-dye workshop where participants will make paper cards using natural dye materials. Masks are required at the Jutila Center. Members, free; nonmembers, $10. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fiber Arts Studio, Jutila Center, 200 Michigan St. jegale@att.net

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 20-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Homeschool Chapter Book Club. The group will read Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White. Activities will include cooking, science and art. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323. • Homeschool Storybook Club. Students age 5 to 7 are invited to listen to stories and complete crafts based off the book. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Metis Fiddler Jamie Fox Workshop. 1 p.m. Hiawatha Music Co-op, 1015 N. Third St. (906) 226-8575. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Teen Advisory Board. Students in grade 9 to 12 are invited to meet new people, plan activities and gain volunteer experience. Masks required. 4 p.m. Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • La Table Française. French speakers of all abilities are invited for informal conversation and discussions. 7 p.m. Room 311, NMU Library. (906) 227-2648 or nkupper@nmu.edu • Metis Fiddler Jamie Fox Jam Session. 7 p.m. Hiawatha Music Co-op, 1015 N. Third St. (906) 226-8575. • NMU Jazz Ensembles Concert. 7:30 p.m. Reynolds Recital Hall, NMU. nmu.edu

Marquette Monthly

Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Wreath Making| November 19| Ishpeming

sunrise 7:54 a.m.; sunset 5:15 p.m.

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• NMU Orchestra Concert. 3 p.m. Reynolds Recital Hall, NMU. nmu.edu • Ladies Night Out. 4 to 8 p.m. Downtown. downtownmqt.org • Afterschool Camp Vibes. Schoolaged youth are invited for group games, activities and crafts. Masks required. 4:30 p.m. Youth Services, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • The Harlow Diaries. Learn about the diaries of Olive, Ellen and Amos Harlow, and their early days of settlement in Marquette. $5. 6:30 p.m. Marquette Regional History Center, 145 W. Spring St. (906) 226-3571 or marquettehistory.org • Metis Concert. Students, $5; adults, $10. 7:30 p.m. Whitman Hall, NMU. (906) 226-8575.

Marquette

• Late Fall Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Masks required for the indoor market. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com

21 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:00 a.m.; sunset 5:11 p.m.

Marquette

• Slow Fiddle Jam. Learn traditional fiddle tunes at a slow pace. 1:30 p.m. Hiawatha Music Co-op, 1015 N. Third St. (906) 226-8575. • Old Timey Jam. Bring your own instruments to this old time, folk and traditional acoustic jam session. 3 p.m.Hiawatha Music Co-op, 1015 N. Third St. (906) 226-8575.

22 MONDAY

sunrise 8:01 a.m.; sunset 5:10 p.m.

Marquette

November 2021

• Zoom Storytime. Enjoy stories for newborns to age 6 during this online event. 9:30 a.m. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Marquette Senior Theatre. Learn about acting. Local theater performances


support groups • Alano Club. Twelve-step recovery meetings daily. Monday through Saturday, noon and 8 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. 1202 S. Front St., Southgate Plaza, Marquette. • Al-Anon Family Groups. A fellowship offering strength and hope for friends and families of problem drinkers. al-alon.org or (888) 4252666. • Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings throughout Marquette County, open daily, at many locations and times. Twenty-four-hour answering service, 249-4430 or aa-marquettecounty.org • ALZConnected. This is a free, online community for everyone affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other memory loss diseases. alzconnected.org • American Legacy Foundation. Smoking quit line for expectant mothers and cessation information for women. (800) 668-8278. • Amputee Social Group. This peer support group is for amputees, friends and families to share resources, life experiences and create relationships. November 9. 6 p.m. SAIL, 1200 Wright St. (906) 273-2444. • Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Checks. Cholesterol and behind the scenes roles of theater production. Register by the 16th. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. 4 p.m. Marquette Arts and Culture Center, lower level, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906)226-8347. • PWPL Kindness Club. Participate in activities that encourage health habits, both mentally and physically. Masks required. Online registration required. 4:30 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Global Geeks Book Club. The group will discuss Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata. Masks required. 6 p.m. Dandelion Cottage Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264312.

23 TUESDAY

sunrise 8:02 a.m.; sunset 5:09 p.m.

checks are $5. Call for Marquette County schedule. (906) 225-4545. • Caregiver Support Group— Marquette. All caregivers are welcome. November 18. 2 p.m. Mill Creek Community Center, 1600 Mill Creek Court. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Divorce Care—Ishpeming. This non-denominational group is for people who are separated or divorced. New members are welcome. Tuesdays, 6 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. (906) 475-6032 or northiron. church • Grief Share—Ishpeming. This nondenominational group is for people dealing with grief and loss. Mondays, 2:30 p.m. Northiron Church, 910 Palms Ave. (906) 475-6032 or northiron.church • Grief Support Group—Gwinn. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. November 10. 2 p.m. Forsyth Senior Center, 165 Maple St. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Grief Support Group—Marquette. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief required. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Creative Movement. Youth age 3 to 5 will explore dance and rhythm while developing large and fine motor skills, coordination and imagination. Masks required. 2 p.m. Community Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

25 THURSDAY

sunrise 8:05 a.m.; sunset 5:08 p.m.

Thanksgiving Ishpeming

• Ishpe Turkey Trot. Walk or run this 5k course. Proceeds benefit Hematite Power Packs. $15. 9 a.m. Ishpeming High School parking lot, address. ishpeturkey.com

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Registration Deadline: Fishing 101. See Tuesday the 30th.

24 WEDNESDAY

sunrise 8:04 a.m.; sunset 5:09 p.m.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 20-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks

26 FRIDAY

sunrise 8:06 a.m.; sunset 5:07 p.m.

Gwinn

• Story Time. Youth are invited for stories, crafts and snacks. 10:30 a.m. Forsyth Township Library, 14 W. Flint St. (906) 346-3433.

Marquette

• Wonder Babies. Newborns to age 20-months with an adult are invited for songs, rhymes and stories. Masks required. Online registration required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Outback Holiday Art Sale. Shop for items from more than 30 vendors. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Masonic Ballroom, 130 W. Washington St. outbackartfair.com • LEGO Club. Meet other LEGO enthusiasts and build LEGO projects using the library’s LEGO blocks. Masks

counseling is available. November 17. 5:30 p.m. Lake Superior Hospice, 914 W. Baraga Ave. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • Grief Support Group—Negaunee. People dealing with grief and loss are encouraged to attend. Individual grief counseling is available. November 18. 3 p.m. Negaunee Senior Center, 410 Jackson St. (906) 225-7760 or lakesuperiorhospice.org • iCanQuit. Smokers are invited to learn more about quitting with the help of a quitting coach. (800) 4807848. • Michigan Tobacco Quit Line. This free quit smoking coaching hotline provides callers with a personal health coach. (800) 784-8669. • National Alliance on Mental Illness—Support Group. Individuals living with mental illness and friends or families living with an individual with mental illness are welcome for Zoom meetings. November 8 and 18. 7 p.m. Call (906) 360-7107 or email ckbertucci58@charter.net for Zoom invitation. • Nicotine Anonymous. (415 7500328 or www.nicotine-anonymous.org • Sexual Health and Addiction required. 4 p.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 2264323.

27 SATURDAY

sunrise 7:29 a.m.; sunset 5:06 p.m.

Curtis

• Holiday Gala: Deck the Walls. Shop for holiday-themed items, bid on silent auction items and sample appetizers at this annual fundraiser for the Erickson Center for the Arts. $20. 5 p.m. Chamberlin’s Ole Forest Inn, N9450 Manistique Lakes Road. (906) 586-9974 or mynorthtickets.com

Lake Linden • Craft and Food Bazaar. Shop for locally made holiday gifts. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. St. Joseph Catholic Church, 701 Calumet St. (906) 790-7798.

Marquette

• Late Fall Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Masks required for the indoor market. Marquette Commons, 112 S. Third St. mqtfarmersmarket.com • Outback Holiday Art Sale. Shop for items from more than 30 vendors. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Masonic Ballroom, 130 W. Washington St. outbackartfair.com • Marquette Music Hall of Fame Inductions. 6 to 11 p.m. Masonic Ballroom, 130 W. Washington St.

28 SUNDAY

sunrise 8:09 a.m.; sunset 5:06 p.m.

Marquette

• Old Timey Jam. Bring your own instruments to this old time, folk and traditional acoustic jam session. 3 p.m.Hiawatha Music Co-op, 1015 N. Third

November 2021

Therapy Group. Call Great Lakes Recovery Centers for more details. Dates, times and locations vary. (906) 228-9696. • SMART Recovery—Calumet. A self-help group for alcohol and substance abuse and other addictive behaviors. Mondays, 7 p.m. Copper Country Mental Health, 56938 Calumet Avenue. smartrecovery.org • SMART Recovery — Hancock. Thursdays, 7 p.m. Basement Conference Room, Old Main Building, Finlandia University, 601 Quincy St. smartrecovery.org • SMART Recovery — Marquette. Mondays, Noon. Zoom meeting. Visit smartrecovery.com for Zoom link. • Take Off Pounds Sensibly. This is a non-commercial weight-control support group. Various places and times throughout the U.P. (800) 9328677 or TOPS.org • Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Supplemental Food Program. Clinics include nutritional counseling and coupon pick-up. Appointments required. Call for Marquette County schedule. mqthealth.org or (906) 4757846. MM St. (906) 226-8575.

29 MONDAY

sunrise 8:10 a.m.; sunset 5:05 p.m.

Marquette

• Zoom Storytime. Enjoy stories for newborns to age 6 during this online event. 9:30 a.m. Visit pwpl.info for Zoom link • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323.

30 TUESDAY

sunrise 8:11 a.m.; sunset 5:05 p.m.

Marquette

• Toddler Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-plays and activities for youth ages 18 to 36-months with an adult. Masks required. 9:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Preschool Storytime. Stories, songs, rhymes, crafts and school-readiness activities for preschool-aged children with an adult. Masks required. 10:45 a.m. Great Room, Peter White Public Library, 217 N. Front St. (906) 226-4323. • Marquette Ukulele Group. Bring your own ukulele. All skill levels welcome. 6 p.m.Hiawatha Music Co-op, 1015 N. Third St. (906) 226-8575. • Fishing 101. Nick Symon will discuss fishing techniques, guidelines and equipment. Register by the 23rd. NCLL members, $3; nonmembers, $10. 6:30 p.m. Superior Outfitters, 209 S. Front St. (906) 228-8051. MM

Marquette Monthly

77


This coloring page from Colors of Marquette , Michigan Volume 3 is courtesy of The Gathered Earth, located in downtown Marquette.

November 2021

Marquette Monthly

78


November 2021

Marquette Monthly

79