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COMPLIMENTARY!

ISSUE 6

2011-2012

Living well and ageing gracefully in a modern society

RUGBY RULES Colin Meads casts his eye over the state of the game

THE METHOD BEHIND HIS MADNESS The secret to Peter Leitch’s success

LOOKING AFTER THE GRANDKIDS

Keith Quinn

What happens when it falls into your hands?

In the box seat Life’s little luxuries

PG 74

Bean machines

PG 69

Homemade pet treats

PG 89

REST HOMES What you should expect and nothing less

A bad sight for sore eyes PG 45

WIN A DESIGNER BRANDS GIFT PACK! SEE PAGE 8 FOR DETAILS

TRAVEL I THE HOME FRONT I TECHNOLOGY I SOCIETY I HEALTH & WELLBEING DOLLARS & SENSE I MOTORING I LIFESTYLES I LIVING OPTIONS


fresh, clean

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estrogen mimicking effects that is linked to obesity, diabetes, breast cancer and hyperactivity. Another two common toxic chemicals present in plastic bottles are antimony and phthalates. Make a change for the better. Buy stainless steel BPA-free SafeBottles and reduce the impact of plastic on the environment and our bodies.


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Contents

INSIDE THIS ISSUE... 10 - 13

FEATURE PROFILE - KEITH QUINN

6

18 - 21

22 - 27

28 - 35

PROFILES

TRAVEL

AROUND THE HOME

Retirement Today

Issue 6

2011 – 2012


Contents

36 - 41

42 - 61

SOCIETY

HEALTH & WELLBEING

62 - 69

70 - 72

DOLLARS & SENSE

MOTORING

73 - 77

78 - 87

88 - 97

LIFESTYLE

LIVING OPTIONS

PETS AT HOME

2011 – 2012

Issue 6

Retirement Today

7


Giveaways

Tell us what

you think & WIN! I would like to see more of the following:

Issue 6: 2011 - 2012 Publisher Gary Collins General Manager Rebecca Harris ADVERTISING Sales Team: Evaon Watkins Beth Christoffersen Clive Greenwood PRODUCTION Production Co-ordinator: Hannah Wright graphics@academy.net.nz Chief Designer: Vanessa Karabassis

I would like to see less of the following:

NEWSROOM Editor: Jonathon Taylor editor@academy.net.nz ADMINISTRATION 47b Birmingham Dr PO Box 1879 Christchurch 8140 New Zealand Phone: 03 961 5050 Fax: 0800 482 7438 www.academy.net.nz

If you’d like to enter the draw to win, please complete the above questions, fill out your details below, pull out this page, and send to: Retirement Today Giveaway PO Box 1879 Christchurch 8140 or fax to 0800 555 054 Please enter me in the draw to win: O Safebottle O Canidae® biscuits for your dog O Designer Brands Giftpack O Canino Toppers Name: Address: Phone: Email: Entries close February 1st 2012

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2011 – 2012

DISCLAIMER: This publication is provided on the basis that A-mark Publishing is not responsible for the results of any actions taken on the basis of information in these articles, nor for any error in or omission from these articles and that the firm is not hereby engaged in rendering advice or services. A-mark Publishing expressly disclaim all and any liability and responsibility to any person in respect of anything and of the consequences of anything done, or omitted to be done by any such a person in reliance, whether wholly or partially upon the whole or any part of the contents of this publication. Contents Copyright 2010 by A-mark Publishing. All rights reserved. No article or advertisement may be reproduced without written permission. * CONDITIONS OF ENTRY: One entry only per person and must be sent on the official entry form or as otherwise stated. Entry is free and open to all residents of New Zealand. All entrants must be over the age of 18, proof of identity and date of birth may be requested. Employees and their immediate families of the promoter and agencies associated with any promotion in this publication are ineligible to enter. Winner(s) will be notified by e-mail/phone. The judges’ decision is final; no correspondence will be entered into. No responsibility is accepted for late, lost or misdirected mail. Prizes are not transferable or redeemable for cash. The winner of the scooter is responsible for ensuring registering and licensing requirements are met, along with meeting inspection and certification standards. The promoter and agencies associated with any promotion in this publication shall not be liable for any loss or damage suffered (including but not limited to direct or consequential loss), or personal injury suffered or sustained, during the course of prize winning use or in connection with any other prizes won. The promoter and agencies associated with any promotion in this publication accept no responsibility for health, luggage, insurances, travel, personal expenses and transfers other than specified. Entries remain the property of the promoter and agencies associated with any promotion in this publication and cannot be returned. The promoter and agencies associated with any promotion in this publication reserves the right to photograph and publish winners. Entries may be used for further marketing purposes by the promoter and agencies associated with any promotion in this publication, but are not made available to any third party.


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2011 – 2012

Issue 6

Retirement Today

9


Feature Profile

In the box seat By Kate Pierson

Former US Chief Justice, Earl Warren once said, “I always turn to the sports section first. The sports section records people’s accomplishments; the front page - nothing but man’s failures”. This is a mantra iconic New Zealand sports commentator Keith Quinn has embraced his whole life. Quinn is man who sees a connection between the existence of sports and the evolution of a more egalitarian playing field, where the common denominator in a sea of cultural difference, is aspiration.

A life less ordinary Keith Quinn is a man who knows what he’s got while he’s got it — a sense of being most spend their whole lives looking to find and feel. His explanation for this deep

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seated appreciation lies in the words of Confucius who Quinn has referenced in the past. “Choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life.” There were times in his life when Quinn didn’t have ‘it’ though; when his relationship with commentary was temporarily severed as he hit one of life’s infamous road bumps. But when his professional calling was taken from him, he sought it back. And, true to his nature, Quinn was never defeated by executive directions that had an impact on his professional path. In fact, he was motivated by the circumstances and dared to try again. “A lot of people tend to think my career has been smooth, but it hasn’t always been. I was stood down twice by TVNZ when the hierarchy of bosses changed. I decided not to give in though. I decided to try harder, practise harder, get fitter and get picked again — just like an All Black that doesn’t get picked for the squad,” he explains.


Feature Profile

Even through the trials, tribulations and moments of ambiguity, it was still obvious this relationship between person and profession was meant to be. “I cannot recall a day in my life that I did not think about sport. Even when I think deeply about my early life experiences, sport was always there — the sports games I attended, the after match functions I attended with my father. Since my career began, I have been paid to think about sport every day of my life.” So follows the collective sigh of wishful aspiration. Because the truth of life is that very few do fulfil their ambitions. Many find themselves restricted by self imposed limitations or find they are paralysed with self doubt. For Quinn however, his longstanding appreciation of sports journalism and relationship with the world was always his driver.

Win, lose or draw Many would agree that there’s something quite nostalgic about Quinn’s voice. No doubt his familiar and quirky expressionism that still fills our airwaves today has the power to draw filed memories of yesteryear to the fore.

Committee’s Sport and Media Trophy presented to him in recognition of his contribution to the promotion of sports and olympism in New Zealand. Beyond the accolades, too many to mention, a defining characteristic of Quinn’s career has been his ability to derive a defining moment, particularly from loss. Even when New Zealand was mourning a lost test match, or it was evident a great New Zealand hope at the Olympics wouldn’t be mounting the podium, Quinn says he has always been able to find appreciation in the preservation of a moment through expression. “Like putters in golf and batters in cricket, I like to pre-think and visualise the move — and in my case, the headline,” he explains. As a master of wordsmithery, Quinn has an archive of expressions, both brainstormed and borrowed, stored in his memory bank. He remembers with succinct clarity his commentary during Australia’s victory over the All Blacks in the 2003 World Cup semifinal when he recited William Shakespeare. “I said, ‘if you have tears, be prepared to shed them now.’ This was an appropriate way to end this broadcast and that satisfied me.” (Continued on next page)

Quinn’s got an encyclopedic knowledge of sport that defies the capacity of the human memory. His finesse for facts comes down to his complete enmeshment in the profession he chose and his absorption of everything it had to offer. He has documented some of the greatest moments in sporting history. Quinn’s first radio commentary was on radio in 1971 and television in 1973. Since 1988, he has been to the Hong Kong Sevens 19 times and has attended all six Rugby World Cups, nine Commonwealth Games, three Paralympic Games and the Olympic Games eight times. In 1997, during the Queen’s Birthday Honours, Quinn was made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit (MNZM) for services to sports journalism and in 2005 he received the International Olympic

Prestigious prize Keith Quinn holds on to the William Webb Ellis Cup, the most prestigious prize in international rugby, awarded to the Rugby World Cup winner.

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Feature Profile

(From previous page)

It seems the eternally relevant Shakespearean rhetoric spoke to the crowd too. “No one said anything to me about this quote until the following Monday when Professor Roger Robertson sent me a message.” It seems the professor lived up to his moniker the ‘running professor’ as he revealed to Quinn he had done just that. “He told me he had raced into his literacy class on the Monday and told the students that I had used it,” Quinn says with flattered amusement. Having known just what to say and when to say it for many years, there’s only been one time Quinn’s been genuinely lost for words. It was the 1995 Rugby World Cup semifinal in South Africa, the All Blacks versus England, and a young Jonah Lomu delivered a one man demolition job so scintillating it’s still replayed today. Part of the picture is Quinn’s dialogue — a piece of iconic commentary in itself — “New Zealand maintaining possession… wide to Lomu… he’s got the bounce… he’s handed off his opposite. Lomu… oh… oh!”

Synergy Born in Te Kuiti and raised in Wellington, Quinn’s synergistic relationship with his parents laid the foundations for who he is today. Quinn’s father, an engineer from Canada, was a raconteur who wrote coaching manuals and held softball fundraising dinners. His influence on Quinn in his life and after his death has been profound. Quinn’s relationship with his father proves that the presence of a role model you can see and touch doesn’t define you, it’s the characteristics you inherit from them and the feelings and memories you preserve of them, that do. “I didn’t get to know my father well as he passed away when I was only eight, but I know I am just like him. I think about him every day and he has been a big inspiration to me,” Quinn says.

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Behind every great man, there is a great woman and Quinn’s late mother played that role. In the absence of their father, she raised her boys to embrace independence. “After my father passed away, my mother flung herself into raising five sons as a widow. Her life was devoted to raising us and she made sure we knew we did not have to follow conventional lines. She told us we didn’t have to become teachers, bankers, lawyers or doctors.” A unanimous nod of gratitude to Quinn’s mother from the film, language and civic sectors will no doubt follow this revelation, as three of Quinn’s brothers, with their mother’s blessing, pursued respected careers in film making, Asian language studies and the police force. Quinn’s fourth brother passed away in his thirties, but became a poet and writer before then.

‘Pal’ in this household The ironic thing about being a ‘household name’, is that in the egalitarian climate of their own household, the owner of this revered name is, well, just like any other inhabitant of that domain.

The Te Kuiti connection... Quinn’s latest book, his thirteenth, was released in early September. Titled The A-Z of Meads, it is “a collection of stories, exaggerated stories, facts and fallacies about Sir Colin Meads”, says Quinn.


Feature Profile

“I’ve always felt an affinity with Meads who came from the same place as me and is arguably the greatest figure in world rugby. He talks in a manner that is nostalgic and does this in a Kiwi way. Meads is a great example of good living.”

Captured in caricature The accomplished commentator has been captured in action by Murray Webb, one of New Zealand’s most respected caricature artists. Webb’s artwork featured on the cover of Quinn’s Quirks, Keith Quinn’s 2007 book.

In Quinn’s case, in his own household, he’s simply ‘Pal’, offered in affection by his wife Anne, ‘Dad’ to his kids and humorously, ‘Grumpy’ to his grandkids, which he loves for its bewilderment factor when friends hear it. Refreshingly, Quinn’s family’s nonchalance to his public status is just the way he likes it. “My family are not greatly impressed by my status and I love them even more for that. Instead of saying ‘good commentary dad’, they’ll say to me it was a good game.” Not driven by the promise of verbal or tangible decorations of honour, but the nobility of the profession, Quinn is self-effacing by nature and his frequent introduction of the word ‘modest’ when contextualising his success is representative of this. But as humble as Quinn is about his own success, is as commendatory as he is of other achievers. Throughout his career Quinn has lent his narrative skills to multiple books, his most recent released in early September. Titled The A-Z of Meads, this is Quinn’s 13th book. “It’s a collection of stories, exaggerated stories, facts and fallacies about Sir Colin Meads,” he reveals.

So how does Quinn define living? “Well, every New Year’s eve when we gather as a family and share our New Year’s resolutions, I say the same thing. ‘I have no regrets and I’ll never look back — but next year I’ll be even more magnanimous than this year’.” And, in keeping with his no regrets policy for his life, Quinn concedes he’s only ever toyed fleetingly with ‘what if’ scenarios about his career. He has, at one time or another contemplated what may have transpired had he lent his voice to a neighbouring nation and its sports domain. “I’ve had a hint that people offshore have a regard for what I’ve done,” he says. But after marrying at a young age, his three beloved children Rowan, Bennett and Shelley followed in quick succession and Quinn found his calling here in New Zealand. “My family has kept me grounded and balanced in my life and I’ve been a full time Kiwi,” he says with sincere satisfaction. Needless to say, there will be plenty who will be glad he stayed. None more so than the little boy from South Canterbury who grew up to be award-winning writer and broadcaster, Mike Yardley. At 12 or 13 years old, Yardley wrote Quinn a letter asking for his advice on how he could pursue and realise his own ambitions, to which Quinn replied with some words of wisdom. Years later, during an awards ceremony, Yardley stood before an audience that included Quinn, who had also won a sports journalism prize the same night, with his trophy in one hand and Quinn’s letter in the other. This was a true testament that words have power. But of course, Quinn has known that his whole life. He was born to write and lives to commentate.

2011 – 2012

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Advertorial

Have you ever asked yourself... • Is there more cancer around these days? • Why are there more pregnancy issues, infertility, or miscarriages? • Why do more kids have ADHD now? • Is male sexual dysfunction more prevalent now? • What damage are we doing to our planet by using plastic? • What’s causing the early onset of female puberty? In this article you may find some answers

What is BPA (Bisphenol A)? BPA is widely used to make polycarbonate plastics such as those in baby bottles, water bottles and compact disc cases and is an ingredient in the resins used to line food cans. The chemical has been shown to leach into food or water. To see a complete definition of BPA, please go to www.safebottles.co.nz. The following is a direct quote from Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ). As you will see they acknowledge that BPA and other chemicals do leach into food and liquid. However, they also say that it’s not proven to be harmful and doesn’t cause cancer. “In some circumstances, chemicals in food packaging can migrate into the food product and vice versa, depending on the nature of the packaging and the food contained within.” Food Standards Australia New Zealand “The most toxic chemical known to man.” Dr Frederick Vom Saal - Professor of Biological Sciences

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The following are quotes relating to BPA and chemicals found in plastic water bottles. Taylor suggests that when pregnant women are exposed to the oestrogen mimicking properties found in BPA, it can impact the reproductive tract development and the future fertility of female foetuses. In essence this research shows that BPA may prevent the embryo from attaching to the uterus for further development. In men the oestrogen mimicking effects of BPA have been known to block some of the more important effects that testosterone has on sexual functioning. Those who were exposed to BPA were four times more likely than those who were not exposed to report some sort of sexual dysfunction. Associate Professor of Department of Reproductive Sciences - Yale Like BPA, these chemicals leach into the water more quickly when the plastic is heated, so don’t leave these water bottles in a hot car or out in the sun. A potentially deadly toxin is being absorbed into bottled mineral water from their plastic containers. And the longer the water is stored, the levels of poison increase, research reveals. Jo Knowsley There are over 200 independent scientists, not in conflict financially with this chemical (BPA), saying we find it relating to obesity, prostate cancer, breast cancer, diabetes, brain disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, liver disease, ovarian disease, disease of the uterus, low sperm count for men and the list goes on. David Gutierrez Natural News


Advertorial

Environmental Health Perspectives found that detectable levels of BPA leached into liquids at room temperature. This means just having your plastic water bottle sitting on your desk can be potentially harmful. The best thing to do is to avoid plastic altogether. C W Randolph, MD

Plastic and our planet

The latest study showed that women with a history of miscarriages were found to have higher levels of BPA in their bodies. The women who had miscarriages were found to have BPA levels on average about three times higher than women who had successfully given birth. David Steinman

• We spend, on average, $588 per person on bottles yearly

There are enough warning signs to show the need to act sooner rather than later. There are growing concerns about bottled water in particular in plastic bottles.

• Every second approximately 1500 bottles are disposed of

The safest option is stainless steel. Breastchek.co.nz The National Toxicology Program of the National Institutes of Health concluded that there is “some concern” that BPA may cause problems in foetuses, babies and children, including breast or prostate cancer early onset of female puberty, attention deficit disorder and other problems of the reproductive and neurological systems. David Gutierrez Bisphenol A is such a dangerous chemical that I have no doubt it will one day be banned from all food and beverage products. Frederick vom Saal High concentrations of antimony can cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. Evidenced by the recent study which was also highlighted here at Natural News where 90% of cord blood from babies was found to contain BPA.2. Aaron Turpen To see each of the quotes in full and the source please go to www.safebottles.co.nz

The following are some startling facts that I guarantee will change your way of thinking and hopefully your actions. They’ve changed mine. • On average people use 168 plastic bottles each per year

• It takes 700 years before plastic bottles start to decompose and can take up to 1000 years to fully decompose • Approximately 78% of plastic bottles aren’t recycled in NZ

• 60 million plastic water bottles are used each day in the US alone, 30 million in Europe, more than 100 million worldwide • It takes 3-5 litres of water to make 1 empty plastic bottle • Plastic bottles use 26 billion litres of oil to produce each year. That’s enough to run 100,000 cars per year • The water industry uses a further 1.7 billion litres of oil in distributing the water bottles around the USA alone • 2,500,000 tons of carbon dioxide is produced in the manufacturing of plastic bottles each year • United Nations Environment Programme estimates that in every square mile of the sea worldwide, there’s 46,000 pieces of plastic • 80% of all rubbish in the ocean comes from activities from the land, 20% from the activities at sea • Algalita Marine Research Foundation (AMRF) recently did a study of 660 fish that shows on average each fish contained more than 2 pieces of plastic. One fish had 26 particles (Continued on next page)

2011 – 2012

Issue 6

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Advertorial

So why buy stainless steel (From previous page)

• The AMRF estimates as much as 1 million pieces of plastic in 1 square km in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

if you’re not already convinced?

• There’s an area estimated to be the size of Texas (some say twice the size) in the Pacific Ocean known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch that is a swirling mass of plastic trash

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• 70% of the marine litter that enters the sea ends up on the seabed • It’s expected that in 2010, for every single person on this planet we’ll use 100 pounds of plastic, most of which will take 1000 years to decompose • Plastics are like diamonds they really are forever. Visit www.safebottles.co.nz for references and more facts.

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Call 0800 777 444 or go to our website www.safebottles.co.nz to order your safebottle today


Bottled water costs more than $3.50 per litre. Petrol costs approx $1.70 per litre. Tap water is FREE It takes approximately 4 litres of water to make just 1 plastic bottle. Worldwide that’s 272 BILLION litres of water wasted per year just to make the EMPTY bottles! On average we each use 168 plastic bottles per year costing more than $580. Your health can be damaged by toxic chemicals such as Bisphenol-A (BPA) and other chemicals which can be leached from bottled water. BPA intake can also cause Cancerous Cells in your body. The environment is tainted by the Production, Transportation, Packaging and Disposal of plastic water bottles. 100 MILLION plastic water bottles are used each day. 86% of those bottles AREN’T recycled. In New Zealand it’s 78%. The United Nations Environment Programme estimates there are 46,000 pieces of FLOATING plastic in every square mile of the ocean. However 70% of all plastic actually sits on the ocean floor! They also estimate more than 1 MILLION birds and 100,000 mammals die every year from plastics - by poisoning, entanglement

and choking. 40% of Albatross chicks die from their mothers feeding them plastic. And ironically we’re poisoning ourselves, as when fish ingest it, the plastic goes through the complete cycle of the food chain. Do you keep bottled water in your car? You thought it was convenient, didn’t you? But consider this... The heat in your car on the plastic bottle can cause it to leach out chemicals that can lead to BREAST and other types of CANCERS.

And even though you might not keep it in the car, do you know what extreme temperatures it has been though BEFORE you bought it? Stored in warehouses where temperatures vary from -3C to 29C

Transported in trucks where temperatures vary from 37C to 65C

Loaded and unloaded where temperatures vary from 7C to 37C

Distributed to stores where temperatures vary from 12C to 37C

Finally to you.

2011 – 2012

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Profiles

The behind his madness

By Melinda Collins

“It was a great big bloody accident,” the Mad Butcher says of his success. “But it’s quite the fairytale story really.” As summations go, it’s not far off the mark. Peter Leitch left school at 15 with no qualifications and what would now be classified as dyslexic. More than half a century later his persona is one of the most recognisable in the country, he is renowned for his philanthrophy and home-spun philosophy, and he’s scooped up a knighthood along the way. It has been quite a journey from 1959 when, in his last year at Wellington Technical College; his form teacher summed him up as having a promising future as a “reliable worker”. After six months as the local postie, he jumped at the chance to work as a butcher’s boy for Charlie Yeoman at his shop in Seatoun. “When you don’t have great results from school, there are not a great number of jobs you can choose from. You couldn’t be too fussy — you really had to take what came along. “At first I chose to be a butcher for no reason other than to make a living.” And other than one incident, there was no doubting he was good. He was breaking down a beast when he stabbed himself in the thigh, the razor sharp boning knife flashing within an inch of his groin. “To be blunt, I nearly cut my dick off.” But on most days breaking down a carcass was a task in which he took pride. “It’s really an art, not many people recognise that. Prime Minister John Key and Sir Peter Leitch at the Mad Butcher and Suburban Newspapers Community Trust charity night where they raised $200,000 for the national burns unit.

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If you get it wrong, you’ll lose money on the carcass, so someone who can work quickly and cleanly is very valuable. I got a lot of pleasure in the work.” In 1964 he moved to Auckland, in 1965 he married and in 1967 he bought a business. Janice and Peter used to cruise around Auckland at the weekends in their first car, a 1950 Morris Minor. “We’d look at the odd butcher’s shop and on one particular day we saw a shop on Rosella Road in Mangere East that was for sale. It was closed but the owner was there with the land agent.” Long story short, Peter says, the owner financed them into the business. “We got the shop set up and called it Rosella Meats, because it was on Rosella Road — a very creative bit of thinking, that.” In the late 1970s Peter noticed supermarkets were increasingly moving into the meat trade and he feared independent butchers like himself would be put out of business. Expansion was the only option. “The Rosella Road shop was never going to be a humdinger because it was in a side street. I battled on but it didn’t go that good. I had to work at night and from a very early hour in the morning to pay the rent.” A shop on Massey Road, where the Mad Butcher is still based today, was vacant. When the new Rosella Road landlord put the rent up to an unaffordable rate, Peter moved on. This is when he learned his biggest lesson. “You can try as hard as you like, but if you don’t have the right position, you’re wasting your time. Business lesson two was loyalty. “I thought my customers would follow me around but they didn’t.

2011 – 2012


Profiles

I had to build a whole new base of customers. That was a learning curve — that people won’t automatically be loyal to you.”

Building a brand He called the new shop Rosella Meats, just like the old one. “I didn’t really know what a brand was in those days.” At Massey Road he utilised the side of the building for advertising specials and bargains. “It absolutely proved to me how important a good buy was. There was a dramatic difference if we had a red hot special. “That was when I learned how much position matters, because I went from making a living to making money.” In 1979 he started developing what would be a long association with radio and while no other butchery was doing the radio thing, he became a brand. A Maori “fella” walked into the local one time and said “there’s that f***ing mad butcher.” The slogan became ‘Rosella Meats, home of the Mad Butcher,’ before becoming simply The Mad Butcher. “Where people get it wrong is that I’m not a shithot businessman. “If I was, I’d be a millionaire. I’m not poor but I’m not rich either. I was a very good butcher. That’s what I’d like to say.” But it was a lot of hard work. “I was very lucky I had a very supportive wife.” Plus, for 25 years, the responsibility for the books lay on Janice’s shoulders.

women in his life are daughters Julie and Angela. Julie’s partner Mike Morton purchased the company in 2007 and continues to build the Mad Butcher empire. He continues to hire Peter as his brand manager, so his raspy voice still rings out on radios across the nation. “The Mad Butcher has become folklore. It’s been a humbling journey, to be fair. I look up to the likes of Michael Hill. I was never a sharp businessman, I was just a good butcher.” Yes, despite building one of New Zealand’s most successful brands, Sir Peter Leitch has never moderated his colourful language. He concedes that he’s not a corporate high flyer; seemingly relishing the fact. “I’m not Michael Fay, but you’ve got to take every race for what it is.“ I doubt that any of the big businessmen have had the fun building their business that I’ve had. “I’ve enjoyed my sporting contacts, plus I’ve done a lot in the community. I think it’s pretty rare for a businessman to do what I’ve done, which is to get into the other things. Most people are so focused on getting their business up and running that they don’t have the time for anything else. “People ask me if I had a vision when I got my first butcher’s shop. No, I didn’t have a vision. I could get up now and say I did — pretend I was Martin Luther King and say ‘I have a dream,’ but that’s bullshit. “I went into a butcher’s shop and all I wanted to do was pay the rent and survive. That was it, I didn’t set out to build a big brand, but that was what happened.”

Good advice But she’s not the only woman who he credits his success to. His mother had some advice for her son when he entered the business — to always treat others as he would want to be treated. “It’s a simple principle, but that’s what I’ve always done.”

Copies of Sir Peter Leitch’s book “What a Ride Mate,” by Phil Gifford, are available by posting a cheque for $30 to Peter at PO Box 54295, The Marina, Manukau, Auckland 2144 or emailing pcleitch@xtra.co.nz

Famous almost as much for his philanthropy, it’s a well known fact money has never been the driving force behind the business. The two other

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Profiles

Rugby Rules By Melinda Collins

If the classic Kiwi bloke had a face, it’s Sir Colin Meads. It is not however, this title or any other he dwells on. “Just stick with Colin,” he replies in his gruff voice. He’s felt that way ever since he accepted his knighthood in 2009.

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We like ‘em tough in our little corner of the world. At 1.92cm tall and tipping the scales at 100kg, Meads was no bigger than his fellow rugby comrades — it was in recognition of an overall physical presence that he scored the nickname Pinetree. But then it was suggested by a rugby writer in 1969 that his legs were “the greatest since Betty Grable’s”.

captain on four occasions. However, Meads’ career was never about the stats.

Meads played 133 games for the All Blacks between 1957 and 1971. In his 55 test matches he scored seven tries and was

It was in South Africa, 1970. “I went to the sideline,” Meads says. “The doc said it was a pinched nerve.

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Meads epitomised mind over matter; the strength of character and force of will that distinguished him as the player he was and the player he is remembered as. It is perhaps best outlined by recounting when he broke his arm mid-game and played on.


Profiles

I knew it was more than that but I wasn’t leaving the bloody game for a pinched nerve.”

famous forward in world rugby throughout the 1960s”.

I’m not convinced the explanation demolishes the legend of the toughest bloke in rugby. “I was quite upset about it and I wanted to get back out there and sock it to them sort of thing.”

For many New Zealanders Meads symbolises a bygone era of New Zealand society and rugby.

At the end of the match Meads was heard muttering, “at least we won the bloody game”. Meads’ time was before rugby went pro. So are they just as hard? It’s not comparable, Meads says. “I think they’re just as hard. They play a different game now and they put in some huge tackles and that’s hard on the players, both sides. The halfbacks and first-five-eights all have to be part of the machine that puts players on the ground. “It’s a lot harder game than what we used to play.” Quite simply, the game has evolved in the professional era. “We used to relax after every game we played, whether we were on tour or not, and not worry about the next game until the next day. The All Blacks were just never allowed to relax and that was the problem. “That’s what professional rugby does, puts pressure on people and I guess you could say, it can be too much pressure.”

Creating a winning culture Winning and winning consistently is something that doesn’t happen all by itself; it requires constant attention, no matter how much raw talent is sprinkled through a team. He says it’s easy to get overconfident when we’re playing weaker teams; the secret is to play our best every time. “We can’t take the lesser teams lightly. We’ve got to make sure we come out all guns firing for every game.” In 1999 he was named New Zealand’s Player of the Century and the International Rugby Hall of Fame rated him “the most

So how is he filling his days now? “I’m retired, sort of. Well, I’m meant to be retired.” The day after we talk he’s heading to Wales as the guest of the Welsh Rugby Union, he’s there for a couple of weeks. “I do quite a bit of public speaking around New Zealand. Here, there and everywhere; whenever someone requests me to speak at a function for them.” When he’s not out motivating people with his public speaking, he’s out in the garden. “I’m trying to be a top gardener, but you go away for a few days you’ve got to get somebody to water your garden, its worse than having pets,” he laughs. It’s been a long and fascinating journey, so what’s been the best part? “The best part has been the comradeship. With rugby in those days we had huge friendships, not only with your own team, but the players you played against. That was the greatest part of our rugby careers. “We never had World Cups and these sorts of things the modern player has and I’d have just loved to have played in a World Cup like they have these days. “It would have been a tremendous thrill and that’s one of the greatest things that’s happened to rugby.” But the greatest day was when he was selected as one of the famed ABs. “The wife might get a bit upset that I don’t say it was our wedding day or something like that,” he laughs. “But the greatest day of my life was the day I became an All Black.”

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Retire Happy in one of our ‘kiwi as’ villages Private Life Care residents enjoy a great lifestyle in a relaxed atmosphere with services and facilities of the very highest standard. Visit www.villages.co.nz for village details or call one of our sales consultants today.

Call Linda on (09) 426-3111

Call Kay on (09) 627-9174

Call Kerensa on (09) 299-9676

Retire Happy in Private Life Care village. Visit www.villages.co.nz


Travel

Destinations Bora Bora Marara Beach & Private Island

Having your own private island is perhaps the ultimate indulgence. However for corporate incentive and conference groups, or those simply planning a group escape, it’s not beyond reach. Bora Bora is one of the South Pacific’s most spectacular retreats, often called the most beautiful island in the world, encircled by a protective necklace of coral and boasting 360 degree panoramic views. Sofitel Bora Bora Marara Beach & Private Island features its own private island or ‘motu’, just 150 metres long and 70 metres wide and available for three night private bookings from November 1 to May 31 until 2013.

Kimi Ora Spa Resort You can have your slice of paradise at Kimi Ora Spa Resort this summer. You can also have your Christmas cake and eat it too, because Kimi Ora is a revitalisation for mind and greedy bodies. Nestled at the top of the South Island, the clean, green accommodation and health spa is perched above Kaiteriteri beach and takes the meaning of relaxation to a whole new level — literally. There’s even a rock grotto. With an infrared sauna, steam room, indoor and outdoor pools, a vegetarian restaurant and organic beers, wine and juices on tap, we’ve got a feeling you’ll never want to leave. Available: Visit www.kimiora.com for more information.

RRP: From $258 per person per night (accommodation only) Available: Book at www.sofitel-frenchpolynesia.com

Uzbekistan & Turkmenistan Bet you didn’t see that coming! But if you’ve been to London, done Paris and are looking for something a bit more exotic for your holiday snaps, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan won’t let you down. World Expeditions offers a two week tour which explores these ancient countries, taking tourists along the Silk Road. Visiting the cities built and destroyed by infamous figures such as Gengis Khan and Timur Lane will open your eyes to the

rich history of Central Asia. Plenty of bazaars, museums, mosques, tombs, palaces and medressas fill the itinerary of this life-changing trip. RRP: $3990 (not including flights) Available: visit www.worldexpeditions.co.nz

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journey Where the

becomes a destination

Interislander travels between the North and South Islands of New Zealand and is one of the most spectacular three hour cruises in the world. As you travel on Interislander, take a stroll on the decks, enjoy a meal, a drink or even catch the latest movie releases. Or of course, you could just take in the breathtaking view. To book today, visit www.interislander.co.nz, see your nearest travel agent or call 0800 802 802.


Travel

“...one of the

most beautiful

ferry rides in the world” Wine Spectator Magazine, USA

Kaitaki Plus Lounge

Interislander operates three ships, the Kaitaki, Arahura and Aratere, for you and your vehicle. With up to 11 sailings a day, you’ll always have a wide choice of travel times. Apart from the fantastic views, Interislander gives you plenty to see and do on board and the friendly staff are committed to making your journey enjoyable. With a range of cafes and bars onboard, you can enjoy some of New Zealand’s renowned wines and beers, have an award-winning coffee and a light snack or hearty meal. Kaitaki Plus, Interislander’s premium lounge onboard Kaitaki is without question the most luxurious way to cross Cook Strait. A Kaitaki Plus ticket allows passengers to access a private lounge which includes free internet access, Sky TV, newspapers and magazines, complimentary beer, wine, tea, coffee and finger food.

You can upgrade to Kaitaki Plus for only $45 at the Wellington or Picton Terminals or onboard at the shop. Alternatively, Kaitaki Plus can be purchased as an upgrade fare when making your Interislander booking. Taking a vehicle with Interislander is as easy as parking in a car park building - just drive on and drive off. As well as the travel convenience of taking a vehicle between the two islands, passengers with vehicles do not have any luggage restrictions. Combining spectacular scenery and great service, it is easy to see why Interislander has been described “as one of the most beautiful ferry rides in the world” by Wine Spectator Magazine, USA. Make sure you take advantage of Interislander’s great senior discounts.

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Travel

A Manhattan By Bridget Gourlay

New York City. Those three words conjure up images of a breathtaking skyline, the Empire State Building and the Sex and the City girls strutting along Fifth Avenue in five hundred dollar high heels. But, as I found out, it’s the neighbourhoods that really give this immigrant city its charm. Take Chinatown and Little Italy, which stand side by side. Both have been home to immigrants for decades, and both were relatively untouched by the police, left to the ruling clans to organise everything from business to law and order. I was there on Christmas Day. Little Italy was the most ridiculously over-decorated place I’ve ever seen. Enormous wreaths covered every door and each restaurant was resplendent in red, gold and holly. All the restaurants and apartments were firmly shut up, as everyone was at mass, but peeking in the windows you could see six foot tall angel statues and nativity scenes crammed in every corner inside. But cross the road into Chinatown and it’s like entering another world. Despite the below freezing temperatures, in the shopping district middle aged Chinese ladies cry over and over again ‘Want purse, Ma’am? Chanel, good prices,’ as I walk by. An inner city park is filled with elderly men playing mah-jong and practising Tai-Chi. All the shops have Chinese letters in large print, with the occasional sloppy translation into English below it. It’s hard to believe you’re in the West, let alone in an English-speaking country, until you hear

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the thick Manhattan accents of the Chinese faces clearly born and bred in America. But the Chinatown/Little Italy area is also home to pockets of other ethnicities. Within a twenty minute walk, my friend and I gawked at a perfectly preserved 19th century synagogue, a Ukrainian Church, a Filipino Church, a couple of Buddhist temples and finally an ugly 1960s building, containing the bizarrely named ‘Beth Israel Chinese Church of God’. If there is such a thing as a Chinese Jewish Christian, they could only exist in New York. The infamous immigrant slums of the 18th and 19th centuries, where large families festered in small apartments, were pulled down years ago, but stark images of their lives can be seen at the Museum of New York. You’ve got to wonder how desperate the starvation was in Ireland or how cruel the pogroms of Russia for so many to sail miles and miles to live in dire poverty half a world away. But they did. And many continue to. Illegal Mexican immigrants are everywhere in the city, I am told by a fiery Catholic peace worker. Although not as prevalent as the southern border states, they are often the kitchen hands in restaurants, the sign-holders on the streets, or the rubbish-collectors and street cleaners during the night. They don’t earn minimum wage, he tells me. They often have to pay their employer from their measly salary to live in whatever flea-infested accommodation he provides.


Travel

Today’s immigrants and refugees are largely from Africa, Asia and Central and Southern America, and they have gone about creating ethnic enclaves just as vibrant as the waves of immigrants before them. Like Le Petit Senegal, in Harlem. It’s home to the recent and increasing waves of people escaping the war torn region, opening West African shops, restaurants and cafes. Throughout the block, it’s possible to hear French and see people wearing warm duffel coats over their brightly coloured African dresses. But the neighbourhoods aren’t just shaped by ethnicity. Soho and Tribeca offer Bohemian delights. The wrought iron former factories and workshops were abandoned until the 1970s when they were turned into lofts by artists. Today it keeps its alternative feel, with little boutiques, art galleries and restaurants, but is really now a shopping mecca. Expensive labels such as Prada and Marc Jacobs as well as chain stores like H&M occupy multi-storey shops in Soho. Tribeca is no longer a haven for poor artists, these rescued lofts with their wide windows and natural light attract only the commercially successful - as the rents are some of the priciest in Manhattan. Greenwich Village faces a similar problem. A century ago it was the Bohemian capital and in the 50s, home to the Beat Generation. Today this part of New York has rents so high only the very rich can live there, but still has an artistic and liberal feel. It’s the home of many theatres, a vibrant music scene, the NYU’s main campus, and the Gay District. An afternoon can easily be spent walking along St Christopher Street, resplendent in rainbow flags, checking out little bookshops before choosing one of the cozy and hip cafes to relax over a coffee in. Another neighbourhood well worth exploring is the Upper East Side. Home to some of the richest people on earth, these beautiful 100 year old apartment buildings

bordering Central Park are carefully guarded by doormen in crisp jackets. They escort women in fur coats and men in Armani suits in and out of waiting limos. It’s wealth on a scale we don’t see in New Zealand. This really is a world of immense privilege, waited on by drivers, nannies, butlers and maids. One of the more hilarious aspects is finding the entrance for the apartment staff, usually down a sidestreet, far away from the entrance. But while the neighbourhoods offer charm and diversity, don’t discount the tourist trail. The Empire State building really does offer insane views, Central Park is an oasis of calm, and Times Square is as gaudy and noisy and overwhelming as it looks in photos. If theatre doesn’t spin your wheels, the several story tall Pop Tart World, Hershy’s World and M’n’M World, selling elephantine packets of chocolate will. Lit up with flashing neon signs, the entrances employ mascots dressed as their chocolate bars to wave you in. This can only be described as capitalism on crack. And my own Sex and the City moment happened. I met Mr Big. Well, actually the actor that plays him walked past me in Times Square while I was stuffing my face with a Dunkin Donut. Not my best look. But it doesn’t matter. I’ll be back.

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Around The Home

CHOICE Above all else, the Oceania Group offers senior New Zealanders choices.

a superior, well-appointed suite, rather than a traditional rest home room.

We have 59 retirement villages and rest homes throughout the country; with options ranging from large retirement villages through to smaller, specialist senior care centres.

Assisted Living Suites are available in Taradale, Napier (Atawhai), Christchurch (Palm Grove and Windermere), Auckland (Elmwood and Lady Allum) and Blenheim (Redwood)

In Auckland there is the choice of 14 locations, including 4 retirement villages; Wellington has 4 locations, including 2 retirement villages; and in Christchurch there are 7 facilities in total, including 4 retirement villages.

New Developments For 2011

There are also independent living and rest home options available in the popular retirement towns Tauranga and Nelson.

At Elmwood, 23 new, mostly 2-bedroom, villas are under construction. A show home is scheduled to be completed by the start of April, with the final project to be complete by the end of May, 2011.

From Auckland to Invercargill, you can choose from: • Retirement village living in private apartments, villas, cottages or townhouses. • Rest home and hospital care • Dementia care • Respite, palliative and convalescent care At present Oceania has: • 994 residents living independently in its retirement villages. • 3,600 rest home & hospital beds. • 3,200 staff.

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At the time of writing, new villas are being built at the retirement villages Elmwood (Manurewa, South Auckland) and Atawhai (Taradale, Napier).

As well as independent living, Elmwood also offers rest home and private hospital care. And 6 new 2-bedroom villas are being built at Atawhai which also has rest home and hospital options. The time scale for this is similar to that for Elmwood. A National Food Manager, a person who has had an international career as a chef, was appointed in February 2011. This is to further improve the quality of our food offering to rest home and hospital residents.

In the past 18 months one of our most popular offerings has been our Assisted Living Suites.

The Oceania Group are members of both the Retirement Villages Association and the New Zealand Aged Care Association, and was formed in 2008 following the merger of Qualcare and Eldercare.

These offer people requiring rest home or hospital level care the opportunity to live in

To learn more please call 0800 623 264 or visit www.oceanialiving.co.nz

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Make our home your home.

When making the decision to move to a retirement village or rest home, Oceania offers a reassuring solution for seniors at a stage in their lives where comfort, security and a sense of place and belonging are paramount, but also rest home and hospital care is on hand to meet changing needs.* Oceania has 59 retirement villages and senior care facilities across New Zealand. Covering the country from Auckland to Invercargill.

*Services may differ between individual facilities

OG1328

To find out more or to arrange an obligation free visit to a facility near you, call us today on 0800 623 264 or visit www.oceanialiving.co.nz


Restricted Movement Clothing Collection

“What makes these clothes so special?” A question often asked and one I love to hear! Says Sally Aydon of David Lindsay Ltd, (pictured below). “It was really hard to dress one of our patients because she is disabled and really stiff, and because her skin is so frail the skin often tore or got bruised. Now that her clothing is easy to put on and take off it hardly happens anymore.’’ Carolyn Taylor - Nurse manager

from an improved appearance benefits the entire person and that so many of those I had looked after suffered a loss of esteem and dignity, as well as coping with their disability.

David Lindsay offers a great range of daywear, underwear and nightwear for both Ladies and Men.

One day while caring for a patient I realised that the struggle he was having dressing himself was common among so many I had looked after in my 25 years of nursing. Either dressing themselves or being dressed by others. The options of clothing that were suitable were very limited and often meant people had to change their style, as well as cope with restricted movement. I did some research and found that statistics NZ reported 20% of the population have a disability and 2/3rds of those are physical. I knew that the psychological lift that comes

When I started David Lindsay the goal was to design a range of clothing that was fashionable and functional. I wanted the range to look like regular clothes, with adaptations for those dressing themselves to make it easier, without changing the overall look. And for those needing to be dressed by others, I wanted the clothes to go on simply, look good and not label the person as needing full care. So when I am asked “What makes these clothes so special, they don’t look any different?” I know I have achieved my goal.

Cheryl Robertson helping mother Anne Cheriton into a tunstole garment.

Some of the differences in this range are: • Wider waistbands for comfort • Trousers deeper through the crotch for those sitting for long periods • Wrap around skirts that have a double cross at the front (or back), suitable for sitting in • Extra strengthening at the back of the neck of the men’s tops for those who have had a stroke and pull the top off over their head by grabbing at the back of the neck • The unique patented ‘tunstole’ design that has been proven in trials to be so much easier for both the wearer and the carer to put on and take off. There are enough options to mix and match. Every week there are phone calls from people wanting something new. So more designs are being added once we have developed something suitable, and trialed it. Visit our online store at www.davidlindsay.co.nz or call 04 233 0050 for a free catalogue.


Around The Home

the grandkids After two years of raising her young, traumatised grandchildren, Diane Vivian sought support from other grandparents in the same situation. There wasn’t any. Anything but a defeatist, in 1999 Diane put an ad in the paper and her phone didn’t stop ringing. A support group was formed, a public meeting was held and the organisation has grown exponentially from there. Today Grandparents Raising Grandchildren (GRG) has groups across the country offering support to the estimated thousands of grandparents who need it. Bridget Gourlay talks to Diane Vivian about the crucial work they do.

Tell me about the battles you and your team have faced over the past 12 years? Money is a key issue. We lobbied the Ministry of Social Development for parity with foster care parents, and in 2009 they levelled the basic rate. So for an unsupported child – for example, a fourteen year old, grandparents get $172 a week. That has to cover every aspect, such as school fees, school uniforms, the doctor, the dentist, counselling – which is often necessary. Grandparents still don’t get add-ons foster parents do such as a clothing allowance. Grandparents are extremely caring – they’d rather give a child money for a school trip than pick up their prescription for medicine. We know grandmothers who have babies in their care and they only get $137 a week. Then there’s the cost of legal fees and extras which strip away at any nest egg grandparents might have saved.

How many grandparents are raising grandchildren, and how old are they? We don’t know the exact figures. We lobbied for that question to be asked in the census, which it will be, but that has been cancelled this year. Our database shows there are thousands of children being cared for by grandparents across the country. This is partly why we want grandparents to join as then we can show how extensive the problem is so we can get more funding to campaign for them and to provide support for them. Research tells us most grandparents are primarily 50-59 and 60-69, but there are many in their 70s and 80s too. I know there are great-grandparents raising greatgrandchildren. I recently heard of a child growing up in a retirement village! Research done in 2009 looked at children in care for four years or more and it showed children are thriving in their grandparents care. (Continued on next page)

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Around The Home

(From previous page)

They have stability, unlike in foster care they’re not shunted from home to home, they have a familial connection and their grandparents will go the extra distance.

What should those do who want to help grandparents raising grandchildren?

What advice do you have for anyone reading this who is raising a grandchild and is finding life tough?

Perhaps older people downsizing their house could donate surplus linen and clothes to their local support group. They will need it.

Please connect with us. People can join up on our website, or phone our 0800 number. We send out a handbook with every issue they’ll face. We send out monthly emails, run bi-yearly conferences where grandparents get a discounted rate. We have coffee groups where grandparents can meet up with others in the same position so they can make friends, share babysitting, and the children can meet other kids being raised by grandparents. Importantly, we have four field officers, who all have expertise which pertains to the grandparenting role in different ways – they have specialist knowledge in areas such as youth court, the prison system, mental health issues – which is rife.

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Befriend a GRG family and take the children out to the library or the movies to give the caregivers a rest. There’s a lot of hard caregiving involved for the grandparents, as these little children are damaged. They have a lot of issues. They’ve seen violence, neglect, substance abuse. Thank goodness for those grandparents. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren receives a small grant from the Ministry of Social Development, but relies on philanthropic donations as well. It is a registered charitable trust. Visit www.raisinggrandchildren.org.nz for more information.


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Around The Home

Computational conundrums By Bridget Gourlay

These days, it seems everything is online. People read the newspaper, write letters, book plane tickets, do their banking and listen to music on the internet. But for people who remember a time before television, keeping up with today’s technology can be a bit overwhelming. Fortunately, SeniorNet puts an end to older people feeling left behind in the wake of rampantly evolving technology. It was started back in 1992, when Telecom employee Grant Sidaway read an article. “In an American journal I read about something similar to Senior Net which had just started in San Francisco. That concept stemmed from a research report just published that people over the age of 50 would not be able to keep up with the information age and suggested training for those people.” And so Senior Net was born, on a small scale in Wellington. Twenty years later and it has taken off. Today there’s 86 learning centres around the country – not only in cities but in small towns

as well. There’s no need to feel nervous about going to SeniorNet classes. The tutors aren’t clever IT geeks who were seemingly born with a mouse in hand. In fact, the courses are taught by experienced older people who have been there, done that. “Having grandchildren trying to tell grandparents how to use technology is a recipe for disaster. They speak another language – and they’re too fast!” Sidaway says because the tutors are volunteers who have recently learnt computing, there’s a “pioneering spirit”. “People like helping the neighbour next door to learn something new. At SeniorNet people take learning seriously, but they have fun and it’s a great social network as well. You can ask questions in a non-threatening environment.” And Sidaway says that once people start, they often don’t stop. He’s seen people in their 80s begin not being able to type or use a mouse go onto “exceptionally creative stuff” – such as editing movies about their life story.

Make life easier with an Acorn Stairlift An Acorn Stairlift could be the key to retaining your independence, while still being able to enjoy the beauty and space of the home you love.

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Around The Home

Back in the early 90s, most people who did the classes had no idea how to work a computer at all. These days, there’s still some who fall into that camp, but mainly the students want to expand upon the skills they’ve got. “There’s been a shift over the years where people come in to say ‘I’m retired, I’ve got skills but I want to learn skype, use internet banking, do photo editing, learn how to make a movie and how to build a website.’ “We’ve found we’re quite involved in training people for re-employment, because we take people from the age of 50 and up. Some people come in saying they’ve got a new job, and need to understand spreadsheets and excel. There are lots of older people who pick up voluntary jobs, who become the secretary of a local society and find they need word processing skills.” One challenging attitude Sidaway has seen is from a number of older people who want to give up and accept that they can’t keep up with technology. “If they don’t, they are marginalised,” Sidaway says. He points out that many things older people need such as bus timetables and government forms are online. “Those who haven’t taken step will find themselves significantly out of step with the rest of society. Some older people say ‘I don’t want to do that, I’d rather be in the garden.’ They’ve built a wall around it, a mental block.

“They feel society has moved on and left them behind, and they can’t be bothered keeping up. I say if you really want to participate in age which you live you should learn some skills. The day you wake up in the morning and say ‘I don’t want to learn anything new’ is a sad day.” When Sidaway first started SeniorNet, some said it would disappear after a few years once the more technologically-savvy baby boomers came through. That’s far from the case. “Technology has habit of changing quite rapidly. Today’s seniors want to know about smartphones, touchscreens, ipads. We live in pretty exciting times.” For more information check out www.seniornet.org.nz

Connect...

To connect online with other older people, check out www.grownups.co.nz This website is aimed at the 50 plus community. From pertinent news and health information, to columns giving advice on topics such as ‘Getting the most out of your time with your grandchildren’ this website is a hit among older people. There’s also plenty of fun things, such as a joke of the day, recipes and a big travel section.

100% NZ custom made moccasin slippers Shoe/boot Insoles and novelty items 100% NZ sheepskin or possum fur Lightweight and warm to wear Kozi Toez custom makes all items in Southland, NZ We can accommodate any foot size or issues you may have. Guaranteed to fit, or we make you another pair !!! Variety of colours available – please just ask.

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Society

Fulfilling a vital role By Bridget Gourlay

Decades of experience makes an older person’s knowledge and skills invaluable. When older people finish paid work they sometimes might feel redundant. That’s nonsense. Statistics show both families and the voluntary sector are hugely reliant on retired people – who continue to give to society in their later years.

“When you stop paid work you have time to look around and you realise there are lots of things to do out there. It’s a great opportunity to stretch yourself and try things you’ve never done before, whether it’s teaching children to read, planting trees, or having a governance role in a community organisation.” Age Concern’s chief executive Ann Martin explains.

Family matters

“In Age Concern’s Accredited Visiting Service, for example, nearly half the volunteers are over 65, and some are over 85. Not only do these volunteers make their community a better place, but the effort they put in brings personal rewards, even to the extent of improving health.”

In today’s day and age, where both parents often work and sick or elderly family members stay at home as long as possible, the role of the caregiver has never been so important. Often, this role falls to a retired person. “People in their 60s and 70s often play a crucial role supporting family and whanau members old and young. Many families will have at their hub a person aged 65 plus who takes responsibility for caring for older parents and – or as well as - looking after young children. This same person may also be caring for a spouse or a sibling – and could also be holding down a job. Without an older person to fill this often unacknowledged role, some families could come unstuck.”

Volunteering Older people often look for volunteering work when they have retired. In fact, it’s estimated at least one-third of older New Zealanders are involved in voluntary work. Many community organisations couldn’t function without older people. “Older people bring valuable experience and life skills to an organisation. Volunteers can provide services and activities that might otherwise be unaffordable,” Age Concern New Zealand national president Liz Baxendine says.

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Martin says age often brings additional social responsibility as well. Older people are often happy to share their wisdom as mentors, kaumatua, or advisers. This is often informally organised, but the Ministry of Social Development’s SAGES programme links up older people with others needing help in areas such as budgeting. “The knowledge and experience of a lifetime is shared with younger generations, and many a young person has had their life turned around as a result.” Not only are older people giving to society, but in doing so, Martin says, they often gain personally from it. “Having satisfying friendships and relationships and a feeling of being involved and a part of the community is important for positive ageing. It is not just having contact with others that is important, but also the nature of that contact. “Relationships which have a degree of closeness and emotional warmth have a greater effect on our wellbeing than impersonal relationships based on tasks.”


Society

What to do? We tend to think of older people’s primary unpaid work as caregiving, either in the family or for organisations such as Nurse Maude. But there’s heaps of different ways older people can use their various skills to contribute. Green-thumbed gardeners could plant native trees, ex-teachers could tutor refugees or new migrants and handymen could make items for the community. Whether it’s knitting baby clothes for low income new mothers or cooking for a homeless shelter, your skills can help others. Age Concern’s 34 centres around the country are largely run by hundreds of volunteers. “Help is always needed,” Martin says. “Behind the scenes or in the forefront, volunteers with Age Concern make a difference in the lives of others.”

Volunteering roles include helping with day to day tasks such as newsletters or answering the telephone, or becoming a trained visitor with Age Concern’s Accredited Visiting Service. Alternatively, if your skills are more around planning and strategy, governance might be an option. People who apply for and are voted into key volunteer leadership positions help to guide, shape, and advance their local Age Concern’s services to older people in the locality. SeniorVoice is a national consultative e-panel that Age Concern uses to ask older New Zealanders for comment on issues for older people. It is one of the ways Age Concern New Zealand collects information to allow the national organisation to formulate positions and speak out with confidence. If you are interested in joining Senior Voice, then contact Age Concern.

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Society

People

people

The RSA is one of the largest voluntary welfare organisations in New Zealand with over 116,000 members committed to the motto – ‘People Helping People’. RSA offers assistance to war veterans and exservice people in many ways, most importantly by giving advice on Government entitlements and other services widely available to all exservicemen and women. You do not have to be a member to receive advice and assistance. New Zealand war veterans and ex-servicemen and women may be entitled to a War Disablement Pension and appropriate allowances from the Government. War Disablement Pensions are available to everyone who has a health concern or disability that they can link to their service in the New Zealand Defence Force before 1 April 1974, or in operations that have been recognised for inclusion in the war pensions’ legislation since then. For example John has hearing loss and tinnitus from serving in the artillery and heart disease and emphysema due to smoking cigarettes that he was given in his ration pack whilst on active service. His RSA Welfare Officer helps him to complete the appropriate application form and ensure that he has all the available medical evidence to set the process going. As John is a veteran he is also entitled to a Veteran’s Pension, which is based on his service and disablement qualifications. John, being over 65, has to have a War Disablement Pension of at least 70% to qualify. His 60 year old brother, Tommy, is also receiving the Veterans’ Pension because he too is a veteran, but he has had a stroke and is no longer able to work and so can qualify. John had told the RSA Welfare Officer that Tommy was having difficulty living on the Invalid’s Benefit and the Welfare Officer advised him to change to the Veteran’s Pension.

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A Surviving Spouse Pension may be granted to widows/widowers or partners of ex-service people whose death was attributable to their service in the New Zealand Defence Force before 1st April 1974. For service after this date, it is only payable in connection with a recognised operation. John asked the RSA Welfare Officer what will happen when he dies, will Mary receive part of his War Disablement Pension? The Welfare Officer told him that she will receive a pension in her own right and that like his own it won’t be taxed or treated as income for means tested benefits. RSA aims to ensure that no ex-serviceman or woman suffers undue hardship. The Welfare Officer at your local RSA is the first point of contact for all welfare services enquiries. They have knowledge of Government assistance and other help within the local community, and support administered by RNZRSA. RSA Welfare Services are available to the entire ex-service community and range from monetary grants to help with practical tasks, visiting the sick, providing assistance with transport, meals-onwheels, and offering friendship and support in times of need. Contact your local RSA if you wish to talk about RSA assistance. The Welfare Officer will treat your enquiry in complete confidence. Tommy needs to go to the hospital for a checkup. Because of the stroke he is no longer able to drive and John is away on holiday and so he has no one to help him. Tommy approaches the local RSA Welfare Officer to ask if someone can drive him in. The answer is yes, and the person who takes him in will wait for him to take him home. Members of the public are encouraged to call the local RSA Welfare Officer if they are concerned about the wellbeing of any ex-service person. RSA undertakes to approach each individual with tact and offer appropriate assistance without offending their dignity.


Royal New Zealand

Returned

And Services’

Association Inc The RSA is dedicated to supporting Ex-Servicemen and women and their dependants. It provides material assistance to thousands of men and women each year, through grants for financial help and through practical action, such as taking them to doctors’ appointments or visiting them in their homes and hospitals. The RSA also provides advice on applying for War Disablement and Surviving Spouse Pensions, as well as Work & Income benefits and allowances. If you need assistance of any nature you can call your local RSA Welfare Officer, you do not need to be a member to receive support. The contact details will be in your telephone book.

If you do not need our help, but would yourself like to help those who have served New Zealand, your gift or bequest will help to provide welfare support to ex-Servicemen and women and their dependants, whether they are RSA members or not. Contact us: The Chief Executive, RNZRSA P O Box 27 248 Wellington 6141 T: (04) 384 7994 E: stephen@rnzrsa.org.nz W: www.rsa.org.nz


Society

The right kind of support Help provided to older adults in the aftermath of stressful events, such as the Christchurch earthquakes, needs to be sensitive to particular age-related needs. This is the view of psychology researcher Robyn Tuohy, who says older people may not ask for help, and downplay their own health and wellbeing after a disaster. “They may not want to bother others at this time; yet their own social networks may already have been lessened because family and friends whom they could usually expect to call for help from may be victims of the same disaster.” As a PhD student in the School of Psychology, Ms Tuohy’s masters’ thesis investigated the effect on older people of the 2007 Northland floods. She says the same sorts of concerns and issues will be found in the recovery phase of any natural disaster. Older adults living independently in the community may have particular physical and cognitive health challenges that needed to be addressed in the recovery phase of the disaster, she says. “Able bodied people can manoeuvre, manage and be creative, but for some older adults this may not be possible. A disaster can push older adults beyond their everyday ability to cope.” Medical care, social and emotional support all have to be maintained as does practical support at a time when older people were also trying to cope without basic services like

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power and water. They may be feeling even more cut off than other parts of the population. Research from the World Heath Organisation shows that older adults suffered disproportionately more in a disaster, she says. Social support plays an important role in disaster recovery, and can help protect older adults against the negative impact of stress on health and wellbeing. Social support can help older adults regain a sense of control and mastery after the disaster. Practical support could include help with cleaning, shopping or providing meals and transport. Emotional social support could simply involved visiting older people or talking to them on the telephone. Older residents may also need someone to help them with processes like preparing insurance claims that involved taking photographs to document their losses. “Providing advocacy assistance that enables older adults to make early contact with insurance companies and develop a good rapport with the assessors will positively influence recovery.” Help to save and protect treasured possessions, photos and other memorabilia can be very important for psychosocial wellbeing in old age, she says. “Significant items in an older person’s life can provide a sense of connection with the past through the meanings they have for each owner.”


Society

What is positive ageing? If you’re reading this, chances are you want to learn about positive ageing. Maybe the time has come to consider making changes to the way you live your life, or you are planning for a future change in independence levels. Perhaps you are working alongside a family member as they think about the changes ahead. Sometimes these issues can become more important than at other times, for example, when a setback means a stint in hospital, or a change in health leads to thinking about getting some extra help. Positive ageing is a philosophy that recognises some things make for a healthier,

happy life, no matter what your age: • A sense of community • Friends, family, whanau - people you love who love you back • Being able to give and to receive • A home of your own choosing • Being able to make good decisions for yourself And, most of all, practical support when, how and where you need it most.

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Health & Wellbeing

Malnutrition among our older generation is becoming increasingly prominent, with loneliness being touted as a key factor. By Katie McKone

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Health & Wellbeing

“Wham suggests that families, friends and neighbours of older people whom they know live alone should invite them over for regular meals, or offer to cook.”

Recent research found more than half of the participating 75 to 85 year olds were at high risk of malnutrition. Those perceived to be most at risk are widows and widowers living alone after being in a relationship. The study, which was recently published in the Journal of Nutrition, Health and Ageing, screened 108 participants from rural and urban areas of New Zealand’s North Island. Risk factors such as weight change, food intake, meal frequency, diet restriction, appetite, eating alone and meal preparation were taken into account. Dr Carol Wham, a nutrition researcher at Massey University, says elderly widowers are susceptible to under-eating as they were often used to their spouses preparing the meals. “We found that widows and widowers were more likely to be at nutrition risk than those who were married, partnered, divorced, separated or never married,” she says. Commenting on the findings, Age Concern national president Liz Baxendine says the study highlights the importance of creating social networks. “We already know that older people who live alone are less likely to eat well. We also know that having good social networks can protect against a range of health problems like heart disease, memory loss, strokes, depression and even the common cold. In

fact, research has shown that loneliness is as big a health risk as smoking.” Wham suggests that families, friends and neighbours of older people whom they know live alone should invite them over for regular meals, or offer to cook. “By sharing a meal, older people increase the amount and variety of food they eat by nearly as half as much.” The importance of nutrition in the elderly should not be overlooked, adds Wham, stating it is one of the major determinants of successful ageing. “Food is not only critical to physiological well-being but also contributes to social, cultural and psychological quality of life.” Age Concern offers a range of services aimed at this issue, including its Senior Chef programme, whereby older people learn cooking skills, share meals and increase their social networks. “Many Age Concerns also offer the Accredited Visiting Service, through which older people are introduced to trained, caring volunteers who can visit them at home, or help them to get out and about in the community,” adds Baxendine. For more information contact your local AgeConcern, www.ageconcern.org.nz

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Health & Wellbeing

Telehealthproves Pilot promising The results from New Zealand’s first pilot of telehealth technology indicate the system might be one worth sticking with. Telehealth monitors enable patients to take their own vital health measurements, for example lung capacity, blood sugars and blood pressure. These measurements are assessed remotely by nurses so medical teams can detect any changes before they become serious and the patient requires hospitalisation. The results of the pilot suggest that those patients who were remotely monitored through the telehealth technology had improved life expectancy and reduced hospital admissions. William Hall, who has chronic pulmonary disease and was one of the people who trialled the technology says, “Since I’ve been on telehealth my health has improved dramatically. I got the monitor 12 months ago and if I didn’t have it, I wouldn’t be here today.” During the 12 month pilot, which was run in partnership with Midlands Health Network and the Lakes District Health Board, telehealth monitors were set up in the homes of ten of the 20 Turangi/Taupo patients involved in the trial. These patients had either chronic heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Of the original 10 participants of the nontelehealth group, four died during the pilot, compared to one person in telehealth monitored group. Patients who used telehealth also noted improved confidence and an ability to manage their conditions. “I understand my condition more and I know what my body is doing. As a result, I’ve changed my food, sleep more instead of exerting myself, and take regular breaks,” Mr Hall says.

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The telehealth monitored patients also showed significant improvements in their depression levels - a key quality of life measure. National integrated care manager for Healthcare of New Zealand, Anton Venter says the pilot’s trends were reinforced by large international studies. “The local results are really exciting and provide huge potential to change the way these complex conditions are managed both by the medical professionals and the patients themselves,” Mr Venter says. Chronic conditions are the leading cause of hospitalisations in New Zealand. National Health Committee reported that they account for 80 percent of all preventable deaths and are estimated to consume a major proportion of our health care funds. The growing need to provide innovative solutions to support chronic care management in the community is also recognised by chief executive officer of Midlands Health Network, John Macaskill-Smith. “The telehealth pilot has enabled us to start to develop an understanding of how technology might contribute to the more effective care of our patients with chronic conditions,” he says.


Health & Wellbeing

sore eyes Eye-catching author, TV chef and style maven Peta Mathias has joined forces with Specsavers, to bring into focus a little-known yet harmful problem – the self-diagnosis and treatment of failing eyesight by middle aged Kiwis. Local market research1 has revealed that more than a third of Kiwi specs wearers between the ages of 45 and 64 years are putting their eyesight at risk by self diagnosing their own visual prescription at petrol stations, supermarkets and gift stores around the country using cheap, ready-made reading glasses. The worst offenders are specs wearers aged between 45 and 54 (the age most people first start needing reading glasses) with 42 percent of this group admit to opting for cheap ready readers rather than seeking professional advice from trained optometrist. Long time glasses wearer Peta Mathias says women of her generation are especially guilty of buying into the ready reader craze without thinking of their long term eye health. “Unfortunately I know dozens of women my age who use ready readers. Clearly it’s time for a wakeup call. You’d never dream of doing your own dentistry or panel beat your own car so why on earth would you think it was sensible or safe to diagnose and treat your own eyesight! It’s ludicrous. “These stats also mean people aren’t having eye tests, and for the more mature people, skipping a regular eye test is particularly hazardous because

you run the risk of having more serious health problems not picked up in time to treat them.” Professor Charles McGhee, Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Auckland and Director of the New Zealand National Eye Centre (NZNEC), the largest eye research centre in New Zealand, says that eye health during mid-life years must be a priority - particularly as many diseases that have the potential to cause blindness or even death have no symptoms in the early stages and the sufferer may not even be aware they have a problem. Specsavers New Zealand managing director Graeme Edmond says the results are alarming yet unsurprising, as prior to Specsavers entering the market visiting the optometrist in New Zealand was a prohibitively expensive exercise which deterred many people from getting their eyes tested. “Kiwis have historically paid far too much for glasses, and the cost has definitely been a barrier to seeking proper eye care. “As a result, many Kiwis are choosing to place their eyes in jeopardy by choosing ready reader glasses over a trip to the optometrist.” A recent survey of 589 Kiwis who had bought glasses in the previous six months showed that 40 percent of them are replacing their glasses at least every two years, as recommended by optometrists. But around a third (36 percent) are still delaying seeing the optometrist for three years or more, with five percent waiting four years and almost one in 10 people waiting between five and 10 years.

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Health & Wellbeing

Curcumin Curcumin is one of a small number of super nutrients which has the demonstrated ability to dramatically lower the risk from cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer`s disease and has been shown to influence the storage of body fat by altering fat metabolism. Curcumin is a natural polyphenol which is extracted from curry powder and has powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. You can experience a multitude of health benefits by eating the spice in its natural form or by supplementing with a concentrated extract of active curcuminoids.

Curcumin in the fight against Cancer Curcumin has been shown to be a powerful tool in the fight against cancer as it helps to restore immune system function which begins to weaken in many people as a result of decades of poor diet and environmental factors. Curcumin works to bolster immune function by restoring the function of key immune cells known as CD4 and CD8 T cells. According to a study published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, curcumin increases the production of proteins which are needed for immune cell proliferation

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while reducing the development of proteins which destroy immune cells.

Curcumin prevents clogged arteries while lowering heart attack risk Curcumin influences the formation of dangerous coronary artery plaque by lowering levels of systemic inflammation which are known to cause the foamy substance to become unstable and rupture leading to a heart attack. This super nutrient regulates the action of our genes to inhibit the release of chemical messengers through the body in response to stress, poor diet and our environment. The result of a study released in The Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine indicates that curcumin prevents platelet coagulation which can result in a life threatening blood clot.

Curcumin shown to prevent Alzheimer`s disease Researchers have noted that the incidence of Alzheimer`s disease among the elderly Indian population where curry is regularly eaten with most meals is significantly lower than their western counterparts.


Health & Wellbeing

Curcumin exhibits strong antioxidant properties and is known to cross the crucial blood-brain barrier, where it acts to limit the accumulation of damaging plaque; it also reduces the neuronal response to existing plaque tangles. By inhibiting amyloid plaque formation at the synapse where electrical impulses connect different parts of the brain, memory is preserved and symptoms of this devastating disease are minimized or eliminated.

Curcumin assists weight management goals Curcumin helps to prevent obesity and assists natural weight loss due to its ability to inhibit the formation of new blood vessels which are required to form new baby fat cells. This polyphenol also influences how the body regulates triglycerides (blood fats) which are then stored as body fat or burned as a source of energy. A study published in The Journal of Nutrition details how curcumin prevents excessive accumulation of triglycerides in the blood and shifts our metabolism away from fat storage. The study

authors conclude that curcumin `may have a potential benefit in preventing obesity`. Very few natural nutrients exhibit such a wide array of health benefits as curcumin. Extensive research confirms the powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects which provide protection against many of today`s most devastating illnesses. Whether you choose to add curry to your diet or supplement with a concentrated form of this amazing spice, you can be assured of lowered disease risk and improved quality of life.

About the author John Phillip is a health researcher and author who writes regularly on the cutting edge use of diet, lifestyle modifications and targeted supplementation. He is the author of ‘Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan’, a comprehensive EBook explaining how to use diet, exercise, mind and targeted supplementation to achieve your weight loss goal. Article kindly provided courtesy of NaturalNews.com

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Please include the Cancer Society in your Will and make a difference for future generations. For more information call 0800 55 65 85 or visit www.goodwill.org.nz


You can help reduce the incidence and impact of cancer within your community, now and in the future, by including the Cancer Society in your Will Your good Will will make a difference

As your family grows and changes, it’s important to update your Will. It’s the best way to provide for those you care about. It’s also a chance to extend your legacy to future generations, by supporting a worthy cause such as the Cancer Society. Your bequest, no matter how large or small, will be used within your community to make a valuable and lasting contribution towards the fight against cancer. Every dollar helps in our efforts to: •

Provide practical support services and information

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Reduce cancer risk through health promotion and education

Updating or making a Will is a simple process and we would like to offer you a free Will information pack.

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Health & Wellbeing

FOR ANY AGE AND ANY STAGE Every one of us needs exercise. Whether you’re naturally thin, or pregnant, or recovering from illness, there’s very few cases where you shouldn’t do some kind of a work-out at all. But everyone’s needs are dependant on their age and stage. Sam Hall, a local fitness guru, has worked with people of all shapes and sizes in his career and he spoke to Bridget Gourlay.

Children

30 somethings

“Children should exercise daily – exercise for them should develop fine motor skill, so games with balls and bats that teach balance and co-ordination are important.” Hall stresses children must see exercise as something fun.

Believe it or not, this is the age a lot of studies say humans hit their aerobic peak. That���s why so many top marathon runners are in their 30s. So there’s no reason to take a step back from physical activity.

Teenagers

Even though technically you’re past you aerobic peak, people in their 40s can still be very fit – many complete the Coast to Coast. “Exercise is important for women at this age as it aids the start of menopause. Weightbearing exercise can prevent osteoporosis in later years. Keep going, because you’ll want to be able to play with the kids or grandkids in your 40s and 50s without doing your back in.”

“This is quite a difficult one,” Hall says, “because co-ordination deteriorates for them for awhile! Don’t make them do exercise which makes them look goofy in front of other teens.” Hall says it’s very important for teens to start base strength training – ie being able to do a certain amount of push-ups and sit-ups and squats. This is called ‘pre-hab’ and if you start this in your teens and continue into your 20s, you’re less likely to get injured throughout your life whatever sport you play or activity you do. Pre-hab also has an aerobic element – for example, you should be able to go for a 20 minute walk without puffing.

20 somethings “In their 20s, people are often in gyms, or doing social sport. A game of indoor netball a week is not going to maintain strength, so keep going with pre-hab - set yourself five base exercises and never fall below that,” Hall advises.

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40 somethings

50 somethings At this age, there’s an emphasis on social aspects of exercise – there are walking groups, gardening tours and trips overseas which involve a lot of walking. At 50, Hall says it’s common for people to go back to sports they played when they were younger - but there’s a higher risk of injury if they haven’t exercised properly in years. “Work at flexibility – seek advice from physios and personal trainers. If you go all out could get injured very quickly. Prepare your body. But there’s no reason why you can’t play rugby or tennis as long as you’ve got that strength base.”

(Continued on next page)


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Health & Wellbeing

(From previous page)

60 somethings For people 60 and over, Hall recommends low-impact non weight-bearing exercise, such as walking, cycling and aqua-jogging. “Listen to your body,” he advises. “Niggles are there to tell you something’s not quite right.” But being at retirement age is no reason to give up exercising. Unless a doctor has told you not to, Hall believes you should exercise according to your ability until you die.

Pregnant First and foremost, Hall stresses, you should always ask your midwife, G.P or specialist if it is ok for you to start or continue an exercise plan. You should check with them before your second and third trimester as well. There are many things which may prevent you exercising as your baby grows such as your blood pressure and weight, your baby’s position and heart rate, and water retention. But if you’ve got the all clear, then light aerobics, walking, pregnancy yoga and swimming are good. Exercise during pregnancy can boost your energy, improve your sleep, reduce constipation and relive back pain. It can also lead to a faster birth and help with post-natal recovery.

After giving birth Again, Hall says you must be given the all clear from your midwife or doctor before starting back on an exercise routine. However, once you are good to go, exercise is a great way of helping you bounce back. Hall recommends taking it slowly and listening to your body instead of throwing yourself back into the intense work-out you did pre-pregnancy.

Recovering from illness Hall says not to exercise when you are ill – it will take away from your immune system’s efforts. He says it is much more important

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to rest, eat nutritious food and make sure you are getting the necessary vitamins and antioxidants. When you do recover, Hall recommends listening to your body about how much exercise to do. If it’s only a short walk instead of your usual run, then so be it.

Never exercised before For people who have never exercised before, Hall says finding a work-out they enjoy is key. “If exercise is a chore, then you’re less likely to do it. There’s so much out there – if you hate running or going to the gym it doesn’t matter.” Again, he recommends pre-hab to prevent injury.

Overweight/obese people For overweight and obese people, Hall recommends not trying to do what a person with a healthy BMI would do. “For people carrying 30 kilograms of extra weight, a 20 minute session moving and doing squats etc is a big workout. My clients ask me - is that all? But as they get fitter they can do more. Overweight people need exercise that doesn’t put too much pressure on their knees as this can be really painful. “Bikes are good – such as excer-cycles with big seats. For some of my clients I start them off by walking to the drive and back, and sets of ten going up and down a stair. The body will adapt aerobically and as you lose weight you can do more, which will lose more weight. The Biggest Loser technique doesn’t work in the long term.” Sam Hall has a Bachelor of Sports Coaching, a Certificate in Fitness Consultancy, and a Les Mills Body Trainer Certificate. He runs his own fitness consultancy ‘Work Ya Bum Off’ which runs private one on one and small group sessions. For more information, visit www.wybo.co.nz.


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Health & Wellbeing

Voluntourism

By Bridget Gourlay

Travelling changes us. The new cultures, languages and maps can be overwhelming and inspiring and frustrating in one dizzying moment. But as people travel, they realise there’s so much more than visiting the tourist sites and lying on a beach. In the face of developing world poverty and environmental degradation, today’s travellers are wanting to do more. That’s where ‘voluntourism’ emerged from. Today’s Kiwi traveller can chose from a host of trips around the world which involve fun and charitable work. Tali Emdin, general manager of the New Zealand World Expeditions office says the company has been advertising its community projects travel options since 2005, although it has been running them for much longer. With World Expeditons, a group travelling through an area such as Nepal can add a three to five day community project to their trip, such as conservation work or a help with building a classroom. “All sorts of people do these trips,” Emdin says, “but generally it’s for the time-starved middle-aged person who only gets three to four weeks of annual leave a year. They want an exciting holiday and also to give back. A lot of voluntourism involves taking three to six months off. Our smaller projects still give a real sense of achievement for our clients.” For longer trips, more volunteer-focused trips, Habitat for Humanity NZ does two to four week projects to countries usually in Asia or the Pacific. For a two week trip, usually about eight to ten days are working on building a house, school or community centre and the rest of the time is spent exploring the local area, enjoying cultural activities, and travelling around the host country.

For more information visit:

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However, not all providers are as reputable as World Expeditions and Habitat for Humanity. Many companies offer expensive placements which sound amazing, but they wind up being scams to take well-meaning people’s money or poorly organised. Some find when they arrive at their placement, there is little work for them to do and the community clearly isn’t benefiting from volunteer’s money or work. The situation got so dire in Britain, where taking a ‘gap year’ between the ages of 18 and 25 is common, that Volunteer Service Overseas (VSO) issued a statement in 2007 saying most would-be volunteers would be better off backpacking. Recently, in part to combat this, an organisation called the International Citizen Service (ICS) has been launched in Britain. VSO is coordinating the scheme, which will enable 18 to 22 year-olds to work as volunteers for 10 to 12 weeks in a developing country on projects to improve the lives of the world’s poorest people. Tali Emdin says when World Expeditions began organising its voluntourism projects it did it in partnership with the local people. “We got into discussion with community leaders – there’s a lot of planning and research involved, some of these projects take 12 months to put together. Often within communities, they decide what needs to be done. “We employ locals on our ground operations and they know the areas that need help. Everybody is very comfortable before we embark on these projects.” World Expeditions ensures a build is sustainable in the long term. “With our community projects the materials are all bought locally, so we’re putting into the economy and things then can be fixed once we’re gone. We employ local staff – if there’s roof work or electrical work they do it and can continue to do it.” The best advice for would-be voluntourists is to research a project thoroughly beforehand. Talk to friends or family who have been on voluntourism trips, or ask an organisation to get an ex-volunteer to phone you so you can talk to them about what the experience was like. Don’t just trust the internet – get a first hand recommendation.

www.worldexpeditions.co.nz http://www.habitat.org.nz

http://www.voluntourism.org www.vsa.org.nz


Health & Wellbeing

Nature’s Best Cashews Cashew nuts are little bundles of goodness. Native to South America, cashew trees are today grown around the world and the nuts (actually seeds) are found in most New Zealand supermarkets. Nuts get a bad rep for being fatty, but studies are showing this isn’t true - actually, eating nuts twice a week aids weight loss. Cashew nuts are particularly good as 75 percent of the monosaturated fat found in them is ‘oleic acid’ – the good stuff in olive oil. They are also cardio protectors by being chocked full of antioxidants. We all know how important calcium is for our bones, but magnesium is just as vital. Insufficient magnesium can contribute to high blood pressure, muscle spasms (including spasms of the heart muscle or the spasms of the airways symptomatic of asthma), and migraine headaches, as well as muscle cramps, tension, soreness and fatigue.

The other great thing about cashews is that they are rich in copper. Yes, copper. It’s not something you think would be important, but numerous health problems can develop when copper intake is inadequate. These include iron deficiency anemia, ruptured blood vessels, osteoporosis, joint problems such as rheumatoid arthritis, brain disturbances, elevated LDL (bad) cholesterol and reduced HDL (good) cholesterol levels, irregular heartbeat, and increased susceptibility to infection. Twenty years of dietary data collected on 80,000 women from the Nurses’ Health Study shows that women who eat least one ounce of nuts, peanuts or peanut butter each week have a 25 percent lower risk of developing gallstones. Most importantly, cashews are delicious! Sprinkle them on a curry, toss them through a stir-fry, or just munch on them as a snack. Your body will thank you!

Antioxidant - lutien “If you eat your carrots, you’ll be able to see in the dark.” Every child gets told that by their parent at some stage, but believe it or not there is a (really, really tiny) grain of truth to this old wives’ tale. An antioxidant called lutien is found in vegetables; particularly dark green leafy ones. It’s also found in corn, egg yolks and some types of fruit. The body doesn’t make lutien so you need to eat it. Lutien is good for your eyes and your skin – it does this by filtering ‘blue light’ by

as much as 90 percent. Blue light, which occurs indoors and outdoors, is believed to cause health problems in the human organs exposed to it, such as the eyes and skin. That’s why research has found that a lutienrich diet lowers your risk of developing cataracts and macular degeneration. Lutein may also be good for your heart – it could help prevent or slow down atherosclerosis, the thickening of arteries. So you might not be able to see in the dark – but avoiding cataracts is definitely a bonus.

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Health & Wellbeing

Brain By Bridget Gourlay

We all know how important exercise is to keep your body fit and healthy. But how often do we think about giving our brains a work out? Studies have overwhelmingly shown that using your brain throughout your life is the key to starving off dementia. Dementia is a group of diseases which cause brain cells to gradually die, resulting in changes to memory, thinking, behaviour and emotion. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. It has no known cure and limited treatment options. Alzheimers New Zealand says the number of people with the disease is doubling every 20 years. Each year over 12,000 New Zealanders are diagnosed with the disease and some of these people are as young as 40. So keeping your brain active isn’t just something the middle aged need to think about – people of all ages need to have a healthy mind. Alzheimers New Zealand says there are four key things you can do to prevent dementia. Firstly, challenge yourself to something a bit tricky! Do crosswords, Sudoku, brain teasers, learn a new language and play card games. Secondly, be social. Studies show socially active people are less likely to get dementia. Alzheimers New Zealand recommends making a coffee date with a friend, jumping on Facebook to connect with friends or getting involved in a new hobby group. It also recommends joining its facebook page if you are looking for a way to connect with others. Thirdly, get fit. Dementia is yet another nasty disease regular exercise wards off. It has been

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proven to better both your cognitive function and your mental health. Lastly, another simple one - eat well. Snacking on ‘brain foods’ such as omegas 3 and 6 (fish, nuts, vegetables, olive oil and garlic) are another dementia preventer. And go easy on the alcohol - research in UK journal Alcohol and Alcoholism claims heavy drinking could be responsible for as many as one in four cases of dementia in the United Kingdom. Care Chemist, a community pharmacy group, last year launched a nationwide campaign to raise awareness of dementia and memory loss and to provide information on how to slow down the process. “Memory loss is an increasing problem with an ageing population but fortunately, there are a number of things that can be done to keep the brain in tip top condition,” explains Care Chemist CEO, Nicolette McDonald. That advice will be provided both in-store and through its monthly healthcare brochure. Otherwise check out the Alzheimer’s New Zealand website http://www.alzheimers.org.nz for more information.

Keep your brain healthy by: • playing scrabble or cards • doing a jigsaw or a crossword puzzle • learning a language or a new skill/hobby • staying social • exercising regularly • eating well – a diet high in omega 3 and 6


Health & Wellbeing

HEALTHY FOOD TICKS By Katie McKone

There seems to be a constant bombardment of messages encouraging us to eat this as opposed to that, informing us what is, or more to the point what isn’t, good for our health. Initiatives such as the Heart Foundation Tick have been introduced in a bid to simplify this process, streamlining it so consumers can easily recognise the familiar red and white symbol as a signpost for healthy eating. But what actually constitutes a Healthy Food Tick, and does it lend us to make the right decisions?

The criteria Manufacturers have to meet specified standards in regards to saturated fat, trans fat, salt and energy in order to feature the Heart Foundation Tick. Standards for fibre and calcium have also been added to relevant items. There are currently around 1000 foods across more than 50 supermarket categories that have successfully met the criteria. This ranges from fresh and frozen produce, canned and dried foods, meat, seafood, and convenience meals. The programme is voluntary, so therefore not all products will feature the label even though some may qualify.

What does it mean? A large majority of household shoppers – 89 percent – have bought food with the Tick on it at some point, according to recent data from the Heart Foundation. This may be well and good, but does the common consumer actually understand what it means?

One can accurately assume that foods bearing the symbol have met the Foundation’s comprehensive nutritional criteria, and represent a healthier choice when compared with other foods in the same category. The important point to remember however is it may not be a healthy item per se. As the Fight the Obesity Epidemic organisation states: “A meat pie with the Tick is healthier than some other meat pies, but this does not make regular consumption of meat pies carrying the Tick a healthy choice.”

Limitations Some organisations and nutrition advocates go so far as to claim the Tick is working to mislead consumers, and driving up the price of some products. Auckland University nutrition professor Elaine Rush says while the Tick is certainly well recognised, one of the concerns is that it is only applicable to the manufacturers – and consumers – that can afford it. Since its conception in 1996 the Tick programme has significantly improved the food supply available to New Zealanders. Simply using Tick approved margarine instead of butter on your toast each morning will remove almost three kilograms of saturated fat from your diet in one year. What constitutes healthy eating in our modern world is forever changing, and the old adage still rings true – moderation is the key. A simple point to remember says Rush, is that the supermarket trolley should act as a control point. “Our plates should be half vegetables, a quarter carbohydrate and a quarter protein. The trolley should look like that too.”

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Health & Wellbeing

The denture that allows active seniors to eat, smile and talk with confidence A number of New Zealanders wear full or partial dentures, yet many of them are dissatisfied because of poor fit, unpleasant odours and less than attractive smile. Apart from the annoying clicking and slipping endured by some denture wearers, ill-fitting dentures can also affect enjoyment of food. Because the wearer is unable to chew properly, he or she may change diet, thereby jeopardising daily nutritional requirements. Eating less or making alterations in the food texture also can influence digestion and overall general health. This, combined with existing medical conditions may cause unnecessary health complications. Most people would agree that an attractive smile is an important social asset and that first impressions are often judged by appearances. For this reason your dentures should give you a warm, natural look. Dentures look their most natural when the teeth used are of similar shape and size to the teeth that have been lost. Unstable dentures that move or wobble when you speak can have an effect on your confidence and social life; the better your dentures fit the less likely they are to dislodge when you are talking. Some other effects of poorly designed dentures can lead to a variety of unexpected problems and affect the wearer’s overall quality of life, including:

Joint and Jaw Disorders

Excessive denture tooth wear may cause improper fit which can upset the jaw mechanism

Premature Ageing

Inferior dentures wear excessively and can lead to wrinkles around the mouth and cheeks. These are just a few of the reasons why it is increasingly important that patients wear dentures that are made from quality materials by highly trained

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Health & Wellbeing

dental professionals, such as BPS operators. High quality dentures are worth the investment, restoring your self esteem and confidence.

BPS Premium Quality Dentures

Tips for denture wearers

“Recently, Ivoclar Vivadent, one of the world’s leading dental manufacturers introduced BPS Dentures, a new brand of denture which fits the needs and aesthetic demand of the fastest growing market in dentistry“– the ‘Active Senior’. BPS dentures are fabricated using the latest developments in European denture technology, including a unique injection process. This process ensures that the denture is denser, stronger, eliminates the growth of bacteria (which leads to bad breath) and ensures proper fit. The teeth used are manufactured in layers to mimic layers of dentin and enamel giving the luminescence and form of natural teeth. Your BPS denture teeth are chosen based on the shape of your natural teeth, or your facial features. If you have photographs taken before tooth loss you can take them along to your first appointment. However if your wish is for a totally new smile then this can be done as well! When your new dentures are fitted you will understand why these are the most popular brand of denture world-wide. A set of attractive, quality dentures, skilfully crafted to your mouth will make a positive impact on your lifestyle. Straight away you will be able to eat, talk and smile with confidence. BPS Clinical Dental Technicians have attended specialist training courses to teach them the advanced skills required to craft these premium quality dentures. “For the first time we now have a complete denture system that eliminates technical errors,” says John Bachelor, BPS Clinical Dental Technician. “BPS enables us to give all our patients the very best treatment using the very latest European technology.” For more information on BPS dentures, or to book a consultation, contact your nearest BPS Clinical Dental Technician. See the back cover advert for contact details.

Check the fit Do not wear loose dentures. Have them checked immediately. Loose dentures can cause excessive friction between the soft tissues and the dentures resulting in sore areas that may become infected, which may also result in supporting bone loss.

Care for your dentures Dentures can warp if placed in hot water. Dentures can change shape if they dry out. When not in use cover dentures with water or a denture cleaning solution to prevent drying. Brush dentures daily with a soft nylon denture toothbrush and rinse with cold water.

Care for yourself Dentures aren’t forever. Be sure to visit your dental professional regularly for a check-up. Medication can affect denture fit and wearability. Only your dental professional is qualified to diagnose your oral health condition and to fit and adjust your dentures.

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Health & Wellbeing

Going

viral By Bridget Gourlay

For many of us, the word AIDS conjures up images of thousands of gay men dying in the 80s and 90s. We may occasionally pass an HIV-related safe sex advertisement at a bus stop, but many of us are guilty of thinking that today in New Zealand, HIV and AIDS are no longer an issue. 
In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. While being diagnosed with HIV isn’t the death sentence it used to be, the Ministry of Health estimates nearly 2000 New Zealanders have it. Along with international trends, there has been a steady increase in the number of HIV diagnoses – there are more today than in the 1980s. These people aren’t just drug addicts, sex workers or gay men, but people from all walks of life. That’s a message Jan Waddell wants to put out there. In 2002 she was working as a phlebotomist, taking blood from an HIV positive patient. While disposing of the needle, she accidently pricked the web of skin between her forefinger and thumb.


Initially, she didn’t think much of it. She followed the procedures in 
place, took the preventive medication and her six week blood tests came back negative. Jan wasn’t worried. A few weeks later she was struck down by what she thought was a bad flu. It got worse and worse until she got to the stage where she couldn’t lift her head off the pillow.

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“I was rushed to hospital,” she remembers. “I had a battery of tests done and the following morning on the 5th April, the doctor came in looked at me and said ‘I’m so sorry, Jan, the results are positive’.” That was it. She had HIV. Jan’s life has undeniably changed since that day.

“I certainly don’t do as much because of the side effects of the 
combinations of medicine I’ve been on. I’m now on my seventh combination of HIV medication; I’ve had problems with my liver, kidney stones and have kidney damage. “Muscle weakness has meant I can’t swim as much, a pastime and hobby I used to love and I can’t get out into the garden as much because I get so breathless. The biggest change and upset was giving up the job I loved.” Fortunately, Jan hasn’t faced any stigma because of her illness, but she’s all too aware it’s out there.
 “I was never discriminated against, and sadly that’s probably because of the way I was infected. I wasn’t a sex worker or a drug addict or a member of the gay community. People would say things like ‘you didn’t deserve this’ – my response is and always will be that no one deserves this!


Health & Wellbeing

Jan wants more HIV and AIDS education. She herself travels the country on behalf of Positive Women and the Positive Speakers Bureau, talking to medical professionals about safety in the workforce and getting rid of discrimination and stigma by using people living with HIV as speakers so as to put a face to the illness and to help breakdown the current stereotypes. Because of the secrecy around HIV, she says many New Zealanders will know someone with it even if they think they don’t. Each year, Positive Women runs an annual retreat. Jan says it always 
makes her sad knowing so many of those women, who love sharing their stories and being open during the retreat, go back to a life of secrecy when it’s over.

“I’ve come across a lot of people who have suffered greatly from stigma and discrimination and I’ve became passionate about erasing it. Until we get rid of the stigma that is still attached to HIV and AIDS people will keep on dying. “They are too afraid to come in and get tested, but when they do finally decide to come in and get tested the chances are they will already be sick, and for many it will be too late.”
 This passion has led to her involvement in Positive Women, an organisation that provides support to women and families living with and affected by HIV or AIDS and raises awareness about it. 
Jan is worried that people don’t realise how serious HIV still is. “Today some people think, if I’m HIV positive all I have to do is take a few pills and I’ll be fine – it’s not the death sentence a diagnosis used to be. That’s partly true, although there are still thousands dying. And it’s still a big deal. What they’re not being told about is all the terrible side effects of the drugs and that HIV will change their lives as it changed mine.”

Silence for her was never an option. Jan immediately told all her family and friends about her HIV status. Although illness meant she had to leave her job, she still volunteers with the local St John Ambulance and works tirelessly with Positive Women. “I’m quite a stubborn person,” she reflects on her nine years of being HIV positive. “I refuse to let this virus take control of my life. My whole attitude is that I have HIV, there is no cure, so I’ll damn well live with it.”

What is HIV? Human Immunodeficiency Virus, or HIV, is an illness which slowly destroys your immune system. HIV is not AIDS. Some people have HIV for years before it becomes AIDS and feel relatively well.

What is AIDS? Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or AIDS is when HIV has weakened a person’s immune system so much so that it can no longer fight infections. For more information visit ww.nzaf.org.nz or www.positivewomen.org.nz

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Dollars & Sense

$$ $

$

$ MONEYMATTERS $ $ $

Retirement – a world away for some, while for others reality is just around the corner.

$

Fast forward 20 years, and one in five people in New Zealand will have surpassed the age of 65. The golden years of retirement are associated with increased leisure, travel and quality time spent with family. The hard yards completed, many look forward to enjoying the dividends. Yet the rose-coloured glasses may have to come off for some New Zealanders, with recent studies highlighting the fact people are largely unclear about their retirement finances.

New research by the Retirement Commission reveals 42 percent of people aged 45 to 59 years have not calculated how much they would need to save for retirement. Of the 400 respondents, 84 per cent did not know how much superannuation a single person living alone would receive, and 81 percent were unclear about how much a couple aged 65 years or older would be eligible for. The findings clearly highlight a lack of knowledge and inadequate financial planning, Retirement Commissioner Diana Crossan says. “Almost all Kiwis are entitled to New Zealand Super at 65 but many of us don’t really know how much we will receive. What’s interesting is that the group we surveyed is not very far from retirement, yet a large number didn’t have a financial plan or any knowledge of how much money they would actually get.”

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$$

$

$ $$

By Katie McKone

$

New Zealand Superannuation

Under the current pension scheme, singles living by themselves aged 65 years or over should expect to receive $333 per week, and $511 for a couple.

People need to be a legal resident of New Zealand in order to qualify, having lived in the country for ten years since age 20. Five of those years have to be since the age of 50. The pertinent question is whether people can afford to survive off just the pension alone. Says Crossan: “Some people will be really surprised at how little the New Zealand Super is, and will have to tighten their belts. We do know that there are people who live on it and there are also people who get into trouble on it.” “There is almost too much of a reliance on super, as too many people just think it will be there waiting for them,” says de Klerk. “But as time moves on this may change. The baby boomer generation will soon be upon us, and the future Government will have to grapple with this problem.”

How much is enough? Defining and measuring what constitutes adequate financial preparation is somewhat of a grey area, as it largely depends on each circumstance.


Dollars & Sense

Crossan says a benchmark of around 70 percent of an individual’s pre-retirement annual income is normally regarded as a good indicator. However questions have been raised about whether the figure is too high, prompting the Commission to conduct further study into retirement expenditure.

Time is of the essence

Retirement expectations are lowered the longer people put off investing. “I have met many people who are constantly wishing they could wind the clock back 10 years or so, but it is just too late,” de Klerk says.

“We have now got a campaign going that is about looking at the lifestyle of six different groups of people to see what it is like to live on super alone versus having money on top,” says Crossan.

“It is up to the consumer to take the initiative. All the advice in the world is there for the taking, but people are choosing not to. Waiting until you are 60 is not good enough, there just isn’t enough time.”

“It gives people an idea of what sort of lifestyle they may lead in retirement and what they may need to save in order to support themselves.”

Getting the most out of retirement involves sitting down and getting all the facts, establishing a plan to avoid unexpected financial stress.

Your bequest will save lives Your bequest will help vulnerable people when it’s needed most, by providing care and comfort to Kiwis with disaster relief, meals on wheels and hospital transport. Help Red Cross reach out to relieve suffering. Talk to New Zealand Red Cross today about how your bequest can make a real difference. Call 0800 478 37437 or email bequests@redcross.org.nz www.redcross.org.nz

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At Caritas our vision is ‘a world where all people are able to live fully, free from poverty and injustice’, and we are helping people achieve this because of our donors and their belief in us. If you are interested in helping to change the world by making a bequest to Caritas of finding out more about us , please phone 0800 221022 and for Diane Taylor.

ONE WORLD ONE PROMISE


Some women and children have had the toughest of starts in life through no fault of their own. Yem and her daughter Sophan needed support from Hagar after an acid attack left them both badly disfigured. Sophan was only a baby at the time and lost sight in one of her eyes. She is believed to be the youngest acid attack victim in the world. They have both had several operations with a plastic surgeon and have become stronger and more resilient, wanting to take every opportunity to embrace a more positive future. Yem joined Hillary Clinton as a speaker at the Women in the World Summit at the UN in New York. Including Hagar in your will gives hope to those who deserve a chance at life Hagar is a respected international Christian recovery organization totally committed to women and children who have suffered severe human rights abuse - including trafficking, rape and domestic violence. Our work strengthens the independence of each individual through counselling, education, resilience building, career pathways training and placement in a fair trade job.

Whatever it takes for as long as it takes to restore a broken life Hagar NZ Toll Free: 0508 424 769

www.hagar.org.nz

Email: admin@hagarnz.org

The gift of a great life Spectrum Care is an independent charitable trust that provides services for children, young people and adults with disabilities and their families. At present, we support nearly 400 people in 80 residential houses in the greater Auckland, Waikato and Bay of Plenty regions. Our emphasis is on inclusion and creating opportunities for people with disabilities to live great, fulfilling lives in their communities. A bequest or endowed gift keeps giving forever and even modest gifts can provide lasting benefits. The generosity of our benefactors increases our ability to make a real difference in the lives of people with disabilities and your bequest will contribute directly to helping achieve our vision of ‘People with disabilities live great lives’.

270 Neilson Street, Onehunga, Auckland 1142 Phone: 09 634 3790 Email: info@spectrumcare.org.nz Web: www.spectrumcare.org.nz


Dollars & Sense

Are your retirement

finances sorted? We might be looking forward to a whole lot more leisure, spending time with family or travelling the world, but most of us have no idea what our retirement will cost. Surveys have revealed that 84 percent of 45 to 59 year olds don’t know how much NZ Super a single person living alone will receive. And 81 percent don’t know how much a couple aged 65 or older would receive and 42 percent hadn’t calculated how much money they need to save for retirement. Retirement Commissioner Diana Crossan says the lack of knowledge about NZ Super indicates people are not thinking enough about how they will manage when they stop working.

“Almost all Kiwis are entitled to NZ Super at 65, but many of us don’t really know how much we will receive. What’s interesting is that the group we surveyed is not very far from retirement, yet a large number didn’t have a financial plan or any knowledge of how much money they would receive on NZ Super.” Ms Crossan says around 40 percent of today’s retirees live on NZ Super alone; $333 per week for singles living by themselves and $511 for a couple. Another 20 percent live on NZ Super and approximately another $100 a week of other income. She says Kiwis need to be aware of current NZ Super rates so they can work out how much money they will need to afford the retirement they would like. (Continued on next page)

Choose Life!

The Grant family supports women and babies during pregnancy and beyond. Last year we supported 18 women to choose life for their babies, also providing supported accommodation based at our home. We’d love to provide more accomodation. Such support could help stop abuse of babies too. We rely on donations to run our 0800 crisis phone line and website, and provide transportation, home-based supported accommodation, and medical expenses. We are a not-for-profit organisation with recognised charitable status for donations. Please will you help us to save lives? Please contact for more information:

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0800 uchoose

jgrant@maxnet.co.nz

www.0800uchoose.com


Create brighter futures for Kiwi kids Every child deserves the opportunity to reach their potential Remember Variety – The Children’s Charity in your will and your generosity will brighten the futures of so many deserving Kiwi kids. Get the Variety feel-good factor helping all sorts of children in need! Please call us on 09 520 4111 or email helpkids@variety.org.nz

www.variety.org.nz

Help shape the future of our planet Leaving a lasting legacy for future generations with a gift in your Will to WWF is a thoughtful way to reflect your commitment to a living planet. WWF is one of the world’s most respected independent conservation organisations working to build a future where people live in harmony with nature. We do this by working with local communities, partnering with government and business — as well as advocating change and effective conservation policy. And all this is made possible by people like you. Leave a lasting legacy in your Will to WWF.

Kiwi release with Oxborrow family © NZLandcare Trust

For more information please contact: WWF-New Zealand, PO Box 6237, Marion Square, Wellington 6141 P: 04 499 2930 or 0800 4357 993 E: info@wwf.org.nz


Dollars & Sense

(From previous page)

“Most of us look forward to our retirement because we see it as a time to enjoy the things we love, like our hobbies, travel and spending more time with family and friends. But to really make the most of it you need all the facts and a plan – it’s never too late to start to save.”.

So, how hard should we be saving for retirement? According to David Ireland, chair of Workplace Savings NZ, New Zealand should look to overseas experience as this country debates the adequacy of our approach to retirement income. “I believe we can learn a lot from overseas research, such as that done by the

Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia – ASFA. “That research looks at expenditure for a given category of individual or household, and from that, constructs annual income targets for retirees for both modest, and comfortable, lifestyles. People need to understand what sort of lifestyle their retirement savings will support.

Giving flowers is a lovely sentiment when someone you love passes away..... .... But unfortunately flowers wither and fade. An alternative to flowers that won’t wither or fade but instead spreads hope and life is a gift ‘In Memoriam’. Caritas’ In Memoriam programme allows you to make a gift in honour of a loved one, and/or in lieu of flowers. Contact Caritas or your Funeral Director to find out more about how your guests can be encouraged to honour your loved one with a contribution to Caritas - and help make change a reality.

ONE WORLD ONE PROMISE Free Phone: 0800 221022 caritas@caritas.org.nz www.caritas.org.nz

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Caritas working with refugees in Darfur 2011 Photo Credit: Mohammed Noureldin/ACT Caritas

2011 – 2012


will&you YOUR

Dollars & Sense

Why a Will?

Who should prepare a Will for you?

A Will lets you decide what will happen to what you have spent a lifetime accumulating.

Anyone can make a Will, but there are some essential rules to follow to ensure that your wishes stand.

If you have family, it is a kind and responsible act. At a time of great stress for them you have ensured they need not worry, you have planned and provided for what should happen. If you don’t have family, or they are well catered for, you can provide for an organisation or cause that you would like to support so that your giving can carry on long after you have gone.

The safest option is to get a solicitor or trustee company to prepare a Will according to your instruction.

When is the best time to prepare a Will? Now, while you are able, for who knows what tomorrow may bring.

Your legacy can help thousands of people For over 125 years The Salvation Army has been supporting New Zealanders in need and helping build better communities for us to live in. We want to continue doing this for many years to come … but we can’t do it alone. For more information or to receive our free books, phone 0800 53 00 00 or write to: Director Wills & Bequests, PO Box 27001, Marion Square, Wellington 6141 or visit

If You Have THe WIll We Have THe WaY Wills & Bequests

www.salvationarmy.org.nz Your Will

Te ope Whakāora

Wills & Bequests

Te ope Whakāora

Te Ope Whakāora

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Motoring

Roadworthy

The Peugeot RCZ wouldn’t look out of place on a catwalk but how does it perform on the road? Tim Grey finds out.

of competing European nations are completely blurred beyond meaning.

In most areas of life there is nothing a Frenchman would least like to be than German. But for some reason, when it comes o cars, the French can’t help but pine for efficient Teutonic engineering with precision and common sense.

The Peugeot RCZ certainly wouldn’t be in existence if it were not for the success of the TT, but beyond why it’s on the market, the RCZ couldn’t be any Frencher if it came with a free beret and a signature fragrance.

Oh, sure, Citroen trades on its futurist concepts and love of left-field innovation, but as for Renault and Peugeot, they’ve produced some of the most bland Euro hatches and sedans of the last decade, all in the pursuit of making a Gallic Golf or a Parisian Passat.

Peugeot has taken real design risks with the RCZ and in the process re-discovered its flair for the first time since it decided to bin its famous GTi badge (which, no surprises for guessing, is now set for a return). Its double-bubble roof is so unique to be instantly iconic, while its perfectly formed rear is so sublime it makes up for what can look like a rather bulbous nose.

So when Peugeot hinted at a rival to the ubersuccessful Audi TT sports coupe earlier this year, my heart sank faster than the Rainbow Warrior. Once again, the French were going to try to be German and the result was not only going to be bland, but EU bland — that special level of blandness reserved for when the cultural lines

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Fortunately, I was wrong.

In pictures that nose can make the car look too big and busy up front, almost as if the centre of balance is slightly too far forward, like a Porsche Boxster. But in the flesh the RCZ is actually surprisingly petite and makes perfect sense from every angle.


Motoring

It puts the MkII Audi TT in the shade the way that current model makes its blocky predecessor look like a life-sized toy car. Looks, of course, aren’t everything. The coupe segment may be the one hairdressers like to frequent, but even here handling and ride count. The TT isn’t known for its dynamism on the road, despite the fact the range ($86,900 upwards) starts with a potent 155kW turbo under the bonnet, but the 245kW Nissan 370Z ($76,000$81,000) is a more competitive driver’s car. Any fan of French action films will tell you, however, that when it comes to getaway cars its usually a Pug being driven by the men with Gitanes sticking out of their balaclavas. Peugeots used to be known for their ability to deliver precision handling dynamics, rather than precision diesel economy, and the RCZ grips the road and tackles corners in a way which harks back to the brand’s heyday. The RCZ employs “Inverted Pseudo” McPherson strut suspension front and back, all linked in to an anti-roll bar, and the results — combined with weighty, communicative steering — are magnificent. Of course, on New Zealand’s roads, such flatstanced control can translate into a bumpy ride, but find a long stretch of winding road as I did on the way to Akaroa and the experience is sublime. The RCZ hasn’t got the same firepower as the TT, instead using a smaller 1.6 litre turbo petrol which produces 115kW at its 6000rpm peak. Don’t go thinking you’ll see benefits at the other end, though. With a claimed combined economy average of only 7.3L/100km the RCZ is also not as economic as the base TT.

Calling the lightweight RCZ under-powered, though, is inaccurate, especially as it can do the 0-100kmh dash in a highly respectable nine seconds. In fact, the only thing which held back my test model from throwing itself into every corner with gusto was its six-speed automatic, which tended to be too grabby for my tastes. To get the most out of the RCZ I’d opt for the six-speed manual. Intriguingly, both are priced at $64,990 to undercut the competition, but Peugeot hasn’t skimped on specification to maintain its margins. Sound insulation could be better — although it is certainly not as bad as the 370Z. The interior is awash with extra elements, from full-leather upholstery and electrically adjustable and heated front seats to hands-free Bluetooth capability and dual zone climate control. Where Peugeot might be saving its pennies, however, is in the car’s conversion to the righthand-drive market. Until the media volume controls were discovered behind the bluetooth stalk, hidden itself behind the steering wheel, reaching the radio in the centre console was a bit of a stretch — the console definitely felt angled towards the front passenger. But overall Peugeot has resisted the urge to make the RCZ as spartan as its price tag, with the most intriguing feature having to be the button for the active rear spoiler. Press it and the smooth lines of the boot up-end into a slim downforce device. As its name suggests, it is an automatic feature which activates at speed anyway, but for me it epitomises the playful individualism of the RCZ — like the rest of the car it provides real flair.

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Motoring

Boys Just call it ‘The Beast’. It’s got more attitude than your teenage daughter; more ferocity than your wife when you’re late home and more brawn than an action hero on steroids. The Range Rover Sport is much more than a mode of transport; it’s masculinity at its finest. Available: From selected dealerships nationwide RRP: From $137, 990 plus on-road costs

Girls She’s hotter than the Sahara and got curves Available: like Beyonce. Just call her perfection because From selected dealerships nationwide she purrs like a kitten, but has the speed of a Cheetah. The BMW Z4 is heaven on wheels. RRP: From $93,900 plus on-road costs.

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Lifestyle

Bean By Bridget Gourlay

I hate to think what office productivity statistics would look like if coffee were banned for a week. Certainly this magazine wouldn’t be printed, as we are proud to continue the time-honoured journalistic tradition of caffeine addiction. I went on a mission to find the best coffee machines and coffee to fill them with. For the home or office, for those on a budget or those who want to splurge on the shiniest and fanciest machine out there – here they are.

Microbar by Nuova Simonelli I could talk about how compact and easy to use the Microbar by Nuova Simonelli is, but really the selling point is it uses fresh milk and fresh coffee beans, ensuring that the end product tastes just like a coffee you would get in a café. Available: www.coffeesystems.co.nz or their showroom in Mays Road, Onehunga

RRP: $4,485

Jura Impressa S9 One Touch Your coffee-loving employees will love the Jura Impressa S9 One Touch and will love you for getting it. Gone are the days of a choice between black or white coffee, this machine makes both cappuccinos and latte macchiatos.

RRP: $3,999

Available: www.coffeefix.co.nz

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Lifestyle

Jura Impressa Z5 Sleek, simple and Swiss-made, this machine has fancy technology, but isn’t in your face about it. For example, its ‘active bean monitoring’ system gets rid of empty coffee grinders and half-empty coffee cups because it tells you in good time when you need to refill the bean container. Available: www.coffeefix.co.nz

RRP: $4,999

Vibiemme DOMObar Super Really impress your friends with this Italian coffee machine by making them hot drinks that seems like they’re from a café. With a steam wand you can make lattes, cappuccinos and hot chocolates. Available: www.coffeefix.co.nz

RRP: $3,210

DeLonghi Nespresso Lattissima Coffee Machine This machine is a steal at only $744. It may be cheap, but it uses fresh milk (not powdered) and the Nespresso capsule system, so it’s easy to use. And while it might cost well under a grand, it doesn’t look it. Available: Harvey Norman

RRP: $744

Sunbeam ‘Café Latte’ Coffee Machine The bargain basement price doesn’t mean there’s no frills to this machine. Its LCD indicator tells you the status of the water temperature and the best time for coffee making or creating steam for texturing milk. Available: Harvey Norman

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RRP: $249


Lifestyle

beans Upshot Upshot uses only fair trade organic beans, roasted daily in their small premise in Heathcote, Christchurch. Tangy and strong, you will smell this coffee as soon as you pick up the bag.

RRP: $10 fo 250 g r ram

Available: www.fairtradeorganiccoffee.co.nz

s

C4 Another Christchurch roastery punching above its, weight, C4’s blends are sharp, tangy and delicious. You can buy single blends or some of their creations. I highly recommend Krank for the perfect espresso.

RRP: $9 for 250 g rams

Available: www.c4.co.nz

People’s Coffee Sold in every so-trendy-it-hurts café in Wellington, People’s Coffee is as unique as it is delicious. For them, fair trade is more than a logo - the People’s Coffee staff have travelled to Columbia, Peru and Ethiopia to meet the growers at the organisations they buy from.

RR $10-$ P: 1 250 g 1 for rams

Available: www.peoplescoffee.co.nz

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Lifestyle

Top Peregrine Central Otago Pinot Noir Few things in life are better than a good red wine and a hearty meal. And as autumn approaches, now’s the time to think about what to serve at your next dinner party. Look no further than the award-winning Peregrine Central Otago Pinot Noir. The 2009 vintage took out the overall award at 2010’s prestigious Air New Zealand wine awards, hailed by the chair of judges Steve Smith as “the finest example of the finest red wine variety in this country”. He went onto say, “Wild flowers, thyme and black fruits on the nose, nothing restrained but there are a few hidden earth and savoury bits hiding in the corner, with briary dry forest on the palate and black cherry and vivid fruit notes.”

RRP: $39.99

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Available: Wine shops and www.peregrinewines.co.nz


Lifestyle

Sacred Hill 2008 Halo Hawke’s Bay Chardonnay Sacred Hill has released its 2008 Halo Hawke’s Bay Chardonnay to an exciting response. It delivers captivating aromas of peach and rock melon with subtle nuances of nutty oak. The palate is mineral and tight with generous stone fruit flavours confined with a fine chalky texture. This is an elegant and long drop with ripe peach flavours which linger on to a clean and dry finish. Only a limited number of each varietal of the Halo range is produced each year. Available: From premium wine outlets, restaurants and bars.

RRP: $25.90

Villa Maria Reserve Hawke’s Bay Syrah 2009 When we think of a good New Zealand red wine, we often think only of a Central Otago Pinot Noir. But Villa Maria’s 2009 Syrah is proving New Zealand has the climate (and the talent) to do something different. The Royal Easter Show Wine Awards is New Zealand’s oldest wine competition and in 2011 had a record 1500 wines entered from 276 wineries around the country. This year, the Villa Maria Reserve Hawke’s Bay Syrah 2009 took out the award for the champion wine of the show. Villa Maria says the Syrah is a blend of fruit from its most premium vineyards in Hawke’s Bay’s Gimblett Gravels. “Deep red hues lead to a brooding nose of pepper and liquorice, alongside hints of violets and red berries.”

RRP: $59.99

Available from: Supermarkets and wine shops nationwide, or www.villamaria.co.nz

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Living Options

Life’s little luxuries

The Beautyrest Black bed

Nothing beats a great night’s sleep, but why not catch some quality snooze time in style? If this sounds like you, then the Beautyrest Black bed is the cat’s pyjamas, offering ultimate comfort and opulence. It features triple woven springs, advanced memory foam, progressive latex with anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties and alpaca fibres, all offset by sparkling, hand rivetted crystals. The foam is pre-crushed three times and eliminates the body impressions that form in the bed over years of use. It comes with a 15-year warranty, in four sizes and with three different bases. It all adds up to the ultimate sleep solution in a timeless fashion statement. RRP: $16,500 for a king Available: From selected retailers – visit www.beautyrestblack.co.nz

Apaiser Haven One of the best ways to relax, unwind and thaw out during the cold winter months is in a luxurious bath with some bubbles — both the bath kind and the beverage kind. Apaiser sits among the world’s best designers of freestanding stone bath tubs. The Haven is fluid in form, made from handcrafted stone, has a soft warm organic feel and remains highly resistant to abrasions, scratches and stains. The sleek minimalist designs will transform any bathroom into an oasis of tranquility, elegance and calm. RRP: $10,750 Available: www.inovo.co.nz

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Living Options

Who said material indulgence isn’t practical? So we went on a style scouting mission to find bag solutions that fit into the functional luxury category.

Men

RRP: $1199

Rodd and Gunn Large Weekender Bag Don’t do metrosexuality when it comes to a ‘manbag’? You don’t have to, because Rodd and Gunn’s Large Weekender Bag defines traditional masculinity. Handcrafted in New Zealand, this 100 percent Italian leather luggage is a hybrid of practicality and presence. It’s rare to find a bag that makes a statement without ‘look at me’ bells and whistles, but the Large Weekender Bag has done just that. Dimensions: 32cm H x 56cm W x 26.5cm D Available: www.roddandgunn.co.nz

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By Kate Pierson

Women

RRP: $528

Konev Zip Top Overnight Bag Handcrafted in New Zealand and made from cow hide, the Konev Overnight Bag has been made with your spontaneous streak in mind. Featuring a zip top for ease of content accessibility, this practical pleasure is available in black and chocolate cowhide, black and red calf and avocado or tamarillo antique nappa. Dimensions: 25cm H x 65cm W x 29cm D Available: www.shopnewzealand.co.nz


Situated within beautiful grounds on the banks of the Karamu Stream, Mary Doyle offers a range of facilities designed to suit all stages of need. • Villas, Apartments & Studios • Rest Home Care • Specialised Dementia Care • Hospital Care

• Registered nurse on site 24/7 • Individual care packages • Short term respite/carer support welcomed.

Enquiries? Contact Diana Triplow, General Manager • 5 Karanema Dr, Havelock Nth • P: 06 873 8400 • E: MaryDoyle@xtra.co.nz

We are located on the old Athletic Park site, and offer a range of facilities designed to suit all stages of need. • 36 spacious 2-bedroom villas, • 33 apartments, 1 & 2 bedroom units • Hospital level care facility • Specialised dementia care • Rest home care • Registered nurse on duty 24/7. Enquiries to: The Village Manager, Village at the Park, 130 Rintoul St, Newtown, Wellington. • P: 04 380 1361 • E: vm@villageatthepark.co.nz • W: www.villageatthepark.co.nz

Live the good life! We are a community that caters for every level of ability, with the aim of having fun and providing company and security. • 1, 2 and 3 bedroom villas • Serviced apartments • Resthome care • Specialised dementia care • Hospital care For enquiries, please contact Debbie McMaster, General Manager 31 Konini St, Timaru • P:(03) 686-1996 • E:strath@ihug.co.nz

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73 Bryndwr Road, Christchurch 8052. P: 03 351 5979. E: reception@fendaltonretirement.co.nz W: www.fendaltonretirement.co.nz

We offer a variety of living options, including villas, serviced apartment/studios, and rest home rooms. We also provide varying levels of care, from supported community living to 24-hour nursing care. If you or your family are considering retirement options, please call us anytime to arrange a visit.


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To find out more about any of our lifestyle villages nationwide, call us on 0800 909 303 or visit our website.

30 Rest Home beds • 13 Studios • Set in a large, peaceful garden. Providing excellent quality of care from a dedicated team, with owner/operators as the management team.

For more information please contact Helen or Tony. Phone: 03 544 4099 49 Wensley Road, Richmond, Nelson email: wensleyhouse@xtra.co.nz


Willson Gardens Retirement Village Willson Gardens Retirement Village is situated in the beautiful coastal town of Whangamata. Close to golf courses, bowling greens and numerous hobbyist clubs. Units come complete with wheelchair accessible shower, safety railings, non slip floors and 24 hour emergency button. Each centrally heated unit has 2 dble bdrms and a single internal entry garage. An added benefit of this complex is the Moana House community hospital and rest home with 24/7 R.N. and well trained dedicated staff providing quality care. This facility, which is governed by a Trust, has attached serviced apartments for independent living. Inspection is most welcome. Moana House & Village, 353 Tairua Road, Whangamata • Phone: 07 865 9643 Fax: 07 865 7650 • Email: office@moanahouse.org • Website: www.moanahouse.org

Let’s talk about

you.

Making the decision to move can be hard. So before you make that decision, let’s talk about how you like to live life. Elmswood Retirement Village is a close-knit community offering a variety of living options, including villas, rest homes and serviced studios and apartments. We welcome your visit for an initial chat about what you need and life here at Elmswood. Phone us anytime on 03

351 0974

Elmswood Retirement Village, 131 Wairakei Road, Christchurch 8053. www.elmswoodretirementvillage.co.nz • Email sales@elmswood.co.nz

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This village is conveniently located in the centre of Avondale, level walk to shops, train and bus stations. Many apartments have breathtaking views of the race course. We provide different levels of service options catering for your growing needs, so unless specialised care is needed, you can be confident of not having to move again.

17 Geddes Terrace, Avondale, Ph: 09 828-2885 Beckett Real Estate Licensed Agent REAA 2008 Ph:09 828-9812 • A/H: 09 828-7978 or 021-629 066 Em: jim@gaowoo.com • www.cosmopolitancare.com

Independent Villas • New Independent Apartments Serviced Apartments • Rest Home

Phone: 576 5990 www.pakurangaparkvillage.co.nz

• Enjoy the freedom of NO external home maintenance • Enjoy large luxury villas with Internal Garaging • Enjoy the 24hour on-site security • Enjoy the privacy, space and park like surroundings • Enjoy a true village atmosphere • Enjoy the Half Moon Bay location and all it offers • Enjoy the activities, amenities and the companionship When it’s time to retire it’s time to start living!!!


Living Options

Rest homes

what to expect and nothing less By Katie McKone

Care subsidy or private funding, rest home or private hospital – a minefield of terminology and difficult decisions. Choosing an aged-care facility is not a task met with eager anticipation, yet a significant proportion of us will have to cross this bridge at some point in our lives. The hard part lies in knowing where to start, with boxes to be ticked and pages of legal small print to be analysed. It is a big step for all involved, and not one to be taken lightly.

First steps New Zealand has one of the highest levels of people in aged-care in the developed world. Recent figures from the New Zealand Aged Care Association indicate that already, more than 42,000 people receive care in some 700 residential facilities each year. The first priority for those seeking to secure a place should be a needs assessment. This aims to ascertain what degree of care is required and can be achieved simply by way of a GP referral. Aspects such as health requirements, difficult tasks and the level of social support available will be considered. If such needs cannot be met safely at home, the assessor will authorise entry into residential care.

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Age Concern professional advisor Jayne McKendry says an advocate or support network is essential to help wade through the process. “There is a lot of information to sift through when you go into a rest home, and given that many older people do this at a time of crisis and stress it is often difficult for them to take everything in.” The Ministry of Health has also developed a comprehensive list of certified facilities and associated audit reports to help streamline the procedure. Age Concern says that some homes are now also requiring residents to have a signed Enduring Power of Attorney (EPA) before admission. This is not a legal necessity however. “While we encourage everyone to have an EPA, not everyone does. A residential care facility cannot legally require this as a condition of entry, although we understand some are presenting it as such a requirement and it is an issue we are keeping an eye on,” says McKendry. The final Admission Agreement is perhaps the most important aspect, as it lays out the responsibilities of both parties.


Living Options

The legal document stipulates all terms and conditions, for example liability for damage or loss of personal belongings, safety, extra costs and complaint procedures. It is advised to read the Agreement in full, making sure all points are understood.

Finances A financial means evaluation has to be obtained in order to gauge what level of Government funding, if any, is available to the resident. The Residential Care Subsidy is paid to those with assets found to be equal to or below the applicable threshold. For example the threshold for the year ending June 2012 is $210,000 for a single person or couple both in care, as stated by the Ministry of Health. Work and Income will assess income levels and determine how much is needed to contribute towards the cost of care, including New Zealand Superannuation. Privately paying residents who do not meet the criteria for funding are obliged to pay a Maximum Contribution rate. This is the same for all residents despite care levels, unless extra services have been agreed to in the contract. The amount varies between regions, for example the Auckland rate is currently set at $864.78, Wellington $840.91 and Christchurch $814.94 per week including GST.

Expectations Choosing a rest home can be likened to buying a house, so do not expect to like the first one you come across, New Zealand Aged Care Association chief executive Martin Taylor says. “Similarly the first residential care facility you visit may not meet your needs. This means you will need to look around to see what is on offer and how accurate your expectations are.” Whilst visiting a potential facility, Taylor says people should ask themselves if they feel welcome, how well the staff appear to treat residents, and to what degree they are provided for. “It is also important you are happy with the look of a facility and to compare the size of the bedrooms, the grounds and gardens, privacy and the availability of extra services such as en-suites.” Age Concern encourages people to make a short list of potential homes that meet their expectations, then return a second time to see if first impressions still hold true. The organisation also states that whilst visiting the facility it is important to ask questions about daily living and life in the home, and staff to resident ratios. If you move into a facility and discover it is not the right place after all, it is possible to transfer.

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TerraNova Homes & Care is a family owned group of aged care facilities throughout the North Island. We are committed to providing quality care in a safe, homelike environment. We can offer you or your loved ones a home with delicious home cooked meals and a community that provides excellent care and lifestyle choices. Brittany House Residential Care

Monte Vista Residential Care

2221 Wolseley St, Hastings. Tel: (06) 878 5606

11-23 Shepherd Rd, Taupo Tel: (07) 378 01825418

Just minutes from the fabulous Hawke’s Bay Wine country, Brittany House is set in beautiful, park-like grounds.

Riverleigh Residential Care

Riverleigh is set in attractive landscaped surroundings close to the Hutt city centre.

Connolly St,Lower Hutt Tel: (04) 569 7955

West Harbour Gardens Residential Care

West Harbour Gardens is near Hobsonville Road, making it easily accessible for residents’ family and friends.

315 Hobsonville Rd.,West Harbour, Akl. Tel: (09) 417 0400

Monte Vista is situated on the shores of Lake Taupo and enjoys panoramic views of the Lake and Central Plateau.

Jervois Residential Care

Jervois is a beautiful restored home conveniently situated in the innercity Auckland suburb of Herne Bay.

302 Jervois Rd, Herne Bay, Auckland Tel: (09) 376 5418

Papatoetoe Residential Care

Papatoetoe Residential Care is situated in a quiet street just minutes from the local shopping centre.

3 Fairview Rd, Papatoetoe, Auckland Tel: (09) 278 5370


We are located on the old Athletic Park site, and offer a range of facilities designed to suit all stages of need. • 36 spacious 2-bedroom villas, • 33 apartments, 1 & 2 bedroom units • Hospital level care facility • Specialised dementia care • Rest home care • Registered nurse on duty 24/7. Enquiries to: The Village Manager, Village at the Park, 130 Rintoul St, Newtown, Wellington. • P: 04 380 1361 • E: vm@villageatthepark.co.nz • W: www.villageatthepark.co.nz

Live the good life! We are a community that caters for every level of ability, with the aim of having fun and providing company and security. • 1, 2 and 3 bedroom villas • Serviced apartments • Resthome care • Specialised dementia care • Hospital care For enquiries, please contact Debbie McMaster, General Manager 31 Konini St, Timaru • P:(03) 686-1996 • E:strath@ihug.co.nz

Oxford Court R E S T

H O M E

We are a 50-bed rest home situated in south Dunedin, offering friendly care and support by trained staff. A modern, purpose-built facility that provides a full range of services and activities. Short term stays welcomed. Contact the General Manager • 164 Oxford Street, Dunedin • Phone: 03 455 9230 • Email: oxfordcourt@xtra.co.nz

Situated within beautiful grounds on the banks of the Karamu Stream, Mary Doyle offers a range of facilities designed to suit all stages of need. • Villas, Apartments & Studios • Rest Home Care • Specialised Dementia Care • Hospital Care

• Registered nurse on site 24/7 • Individual care packages • Short term respite/carer support welcomed.

Enquiries? Contact Diana Triplow, General Manager • 5 Karanema Dr, Havelock Nth • P: 06 873 8400 • E: MaryDoyle@xtra.co.nz


Pets at Home

Attention pet lovers What you feed your cat or dog directly affects how long they live and the quality of their life. Not all foods are created equal. There is only one way to establish what you’re really feeding your pet...read the ingredients! In today’s competitive pet food industry, it’s hard to believe what may go into your pet food. Many companies (owned by multinational corporations) have extensive marketing budgets, that portray a healthy pet jumping around, all thanks to their fantastic pet food. However, they seldom talk about ingredients. And to be frank, that is the most important element, followed closely by taste. Because let’s face it, if your pet doesn’t like the taste, they simply won’t eat it. (Unless it’s a Labrador....) Here’s the most important bit.

The ingredients I’m not going to tell you how happy your pet will be or how high they will jump by using our pet food. I’m simply going to give you a quick lesson about ingredients and what to look for and what to avoid. The way ingredients are listed on packaging is the order that they are according to the percentage of food, so the first ingredient listed is the primary ingredient and so on down the list. Some list “by-products” as the first ingredient, usually chicken or beef. Now this doesn’t have to be a bad thing. One of the many problems with by-products is what can go into the mix. So for cows this can mean bones, hooves, hides, hair, intestines, or with poultry by-products it can mean feet, beaks, feathers, bones, intestines, as well as the small trimmings that are left behind after they have been boned out for human consumption. By law, by-products don’t have to include any meat at all in order to be called chicken or beef by-products.

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did you know?

Products with by-products will of course look like any other pet food biscuit. The organic chemicals that make up the mush that remains will still register as amino acids and proteins etc, yet the fact is that a large percentage of it will be completely indigestible to your pet’s digestive system. This means your pet will be unable to harvest goodness for its body out of much of its food. This results in two things. First, you will have to feed more of the product to your pet to satisfy its nutritional requirements. Second, there will be more “unharvested remains” left to be picked up off your lawns. One of the huge benefits of feeding your pet a food that uses high quality ingredients is that there is less stool volume, because the animal is able to digest more of it. Another notable benefit is that your animal’s stools will smell a lot better when they are fed a high quality, natural, highly digestible food that doesn’t have rancid meats and fats in it. Canidae lists chicken and turkey meal as their first ingredients. Chicken, turkey and lamb meals are dry and are less than 10% moisture and contain 50-65% meat proteins. Canidae and Felidae contain 10 skin and coat conditioners with balanced Omega 6 and Omega 3 fatty Acids: chicken fat, fish meal, flax seed, sunflower oil, lecithin, linoleic acid, rosemary, sage, vitamin E and biotin. Please go to our website or give us a call for the full Declaration of Ingredients. Without a declaration of ingredients, how do you really know what’s going into your pet’s food? Petsumer Report does an independent study and ranks pet food out of five, with five being the absolute best. Here’s some of the results: Beneful CANIDAE Eukanuba Iams Pedigree

0 4.2 2.7 2.7 1

Purina One Purina Pro Plan Purina Dog Chow Science Diet

1.9 2.1 1

1.5


Pets at Home

to paying a lot for their raw materials, or marketing the products at a correspondingly high sales price.” - Nancy Kerns

Save you time and money

Why haven’t you heard of us? Simply because we’re relatively new into New Zealand. We have hundreds of satisfied clients and this year we’ve doubled the number of clients from last year and this is literally growing daily. However, Canidae for dogs and Felidae for cats have been selling in America for many years and are consistently ranked in the top few by leading pet journals and publications including The Whole Dog Journal. We also don’t have the marketing budget of the huge corporations. In fact we have relied heavily on word of mouth, which works well, but we are now starting to do print and radio. If you would like to discuss anything we’ve mentioned or would like to get sent some info and testimonials please give us a call, or go to our website to see the dozens of raving testimonials available. In fact a large number of clients are breeders, which is testament in itself, as these people take feeding their pets (their business), very seriously. These people normally spend a lot of time researching all options available and we’re pleased to say, they’re massive fans of our product. Here is a quote that I recently read in The Whole Dog Journal, arguably the best independent dog journal in the world. “I’d like to quickly dismiss the idea that any of the giants – Iams and Eukanuba, Purina, Science Diet - could possibly make dry dog foods that are as good as the foods that have a regular presence on WDJ’s “approved foods” list, (such as Canidae). The fact is, though, of course they could; they have all the resources needed to do so. They could bury most of the competition in the “natural and holistic” niche... if they followed through and used only the same high-quality ingredients typically used by the smaller, boutique brands. But they generally stop short – perhaps because they are unaccustomed

As mentioned this is a premium product, and if we sold in pet stores or vets, it would command a huge price tag. However, as we don’t have a “middle man” we can sell it at a price comparable to other “premium” products. In addition to this, your pet will actually require less, as he/she will actually be able to digest and utilise more of the food, which also creates less stools. In addition to this we will take the hassle out of driving to your pet store, lugging the food into and out of your boot, as we will deliver to your door free of charge. Your satisfaction is assured every time you deal with us through our Make You Happy Guarantee If we ever let you down, we’ll ask “what can we do to make you happy?” So far we’ve never refused a customer’s request. And of course there’s a full money back guarantee on the product if your pet doesn’t like it. Gary Collins, Owner

Call for a FREE sample and more information or call now to place an order. If you place an order this month WE’LL TAKE 33% OFF YOUR FIRST ORDER when you mention this advert. You’re probably wondering what’s the catch? Well we know that almost everyone who buys from us once, buys again, and again, and again!

We deliver anywhere in NZ free

Ph: 0800 101 729 www.canidae.co.nz

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What you put in your pet’s bowl can affect their life now – and in the future

What you feed your pet directly affects how long they live and the quality of their life 11 Reasons why you should feed your pet Canidae all natural pet food 1. Excellent palatability – “cats and dogs love it”. 2. All natural ingredients (chicken, rice, lamb). 3. All naturally preserved (Vitamins E & C). 4. Premium quality proteins for increased energy. 5. Natural herbs for savoury & medicinal purposes. 6. Premium oils & fat for a healthy, shiny skin & coat (with balanced Omega-3 & Omega-6 fatty acids).

Testimonials

7. Excellent for dogs with allergies or problem skin. 8. Low stool volume (low odour too). 9. Superior digestibility (natural digestive enzymes). 10. CANIDAE is cost-effective (feed 1 cup for 11 kg of body weight). 11. 100% money back guaranteed.

To see hundreds of testimonials in full go to our website

“It has been almost a year since I switched and Chynna is doing great” After the recall scare, I decided to switch dog food for then 11 year old terrier mix dog, Chynna. The food she was on was not one of the recall but she has been having bladder infections her entire life, and was overweight despite giving her a food for overweight dogs. After reading about all the stuff that was in other dog foods and all the great reviews for Canidae, I decided to let her try it. It has been almost a year since I switched and Chynna is doing great. She has lost close to five pounds, has a lot of

energy and no bladder infections. I adopted another dog six months ago and immediately threw away the food the pound gave and started her on the Canidae All Life Stages dry food formula. Canidae is more expensive than other food, but the money that I saved in medicine for bladder infections and vet visits more than make up for it. One thing to be thankful for with the food recall, it made me more aware about the nutrition of my dogs. Linda, Houston

“Thank you for making a great pet food” I just wanted to say that I recently switched my two dogs to Canidae All Life Stages and it is wonderful. They are both doing great on it and their coats have never looked better. If I can budget it in I plan to switch our two cats to

Felidae when the bag of food we currently have runs out. I’m sure they will do equally as well on it. Thank you for making a great pet food and saving me, I’m sure, hundreds in future vet bills.


2011 - Once again voted one of the best pet foods in the world

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How to order All orders are couriered to your door FREE. If you place your order by 2.00pm most orders are received within 48 hours, unless it’s a rural delivery.

CANIDAE Snap Biscuits Original

CANIDAE Snap Biscuits Lamb & Rice

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Simply go to our website www.canidae.co.nz or call us toll free on 0800 101 729 and ask for a FREE sample and information pack, or place your order today.

We Offer A No Questions Asked Money Back Guarantee

For more detailed information call on

0800 101 729

PO Box 1879, Christchurch • Email: info@canidae.co.nz • Web: www.canidae.co.nz


Pets at Home

Bones

and raw food diet

The longevity industry is infested with quacks, charlatans and outright crooks - there are billions of dollars to be made from antiwrinkle creams and anti-oxidants, Tibetan goji berries and ‘Okinawan’ diet books - and billions more to be fleeced from investors in bio-tech floats to fund the, so-far, futile search for the genetic key to living longer. Millions again is spent investigating factors affecting longevity and attempting to unravel the genetic codes involved. But for most, we are convinced the key to a long life lies in diet and lifestyle. So it’s little wonder the diet debate has filtered down to our next closest companions - our pets. Our Paleolithic ancestors, said to be the healthiest of past civilisations, hunted and gathered all their foods; a diet consisting predominantly of wild game meats. It’s a similar discussion to that of our domesticated animals. The oldest dog ever recorded, a 29 year old Australian cattle dog named Bluey, died in 1939, several years before commercial pet food was invented and of the two oldest dogs in recent years, one was fed primarily on kangaroo and emu meat. Which begs the question - are we feeding our pets the right foods?

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2011 – 2012

Raw feeding is the practice of feeding domestic dogs and cats a diet primarily of uncooked meat, edible bones and organs. Supporters of raw feeding believe the natural diet of raw meat, bones and organs is nutritionally superior to highly processed commercial pet food. These supporters mimic a similar diet for their domestic companion, believing a balanced raw diet gives the animal a healthier coat, cleaner teeth and breath, reduced stool volume and odour and better overall health. Opponents of raw feeding believe the possible risks outweigh any benefits. They suggest raw foods contain harmful bacteria which are destroyed in the manufacturing process of commercial pet foods and claim that vitamins and nutrients, essential for a balanced diet, cannot be controlled in the consumption of raw foods. Raw food proponent and owner of registered trademark ‘Barf Diet’ (an acronym for bones and raw food) Dr Ian Billinghurst, argues in his books that the dog has evolved over many millions of years on a natural raw diet and logically, this is the ideal food source. He claims processed foods are “not what the dog was


Pets at Home

programmed to eat during its long process of evolution,” and says foods similar to those eaten by the dog’s wild ancestors are more biologically appropriate. Opponents state substantial risk of intestinal puncturing and dental fracturing in pets which consume raw bones, the very act which supporters say scrapes off plaque and improves dental health in these animals. Few studies have been conducted to prove or disprove the numerous beneficial claims of a raw diet. One of the most substantial studies of its kind, a 12 month study undertaken by researchers from the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, sought to compare the effects of a whole ground rabbit diet with a high quality commercial diet on 22 kittens and adolescent cats. The researchers noted the superior palatability of the raw rabbit diet. Significant stool quality improvements were seen in the

raw rabbit diet group after just one week. After one month, the raw diet group had soft formed to liquid stools and better coat quality. Ten months into the study however, one cat in the raw diet group died suddenly from dilated cardiomyopathy due to a severe taurine deficiency. It was then discovered 70 percent of the group had heart muscle change compatible with the deficiency. The researcher ascertained that the raw rabbit diet did contain the minimal requirement of taurine, but speculated that bacteria in the rabbit carcasses might have broken down some of the taurine. The processing and grinding of the rabbit might have also caused some of the taurine to be destroyed due to the low level of vitamin E in the diet. “A natural diet may not always be as healthy as imagined and that even measuring nutrient values may not predict how a diet will perform after being fed for many months,” the authors concluded.

Homemade carrot treats 1/2 cup cheddar cheese (shredded) 1/4 cup margarine (half stick) 1 drop red food colouring (more if needed) 1 drop yellow food colouring (more if needed) 1 jar baby food carrots 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 garlic powder 1/4 cup milk (more if needed)

Melt cheese and margarine in a saucepan, stirring frequently. Take off heat. Stir in food dye, to make orange colour. Add carrots, flour, and garlic powder. Stir until well blended. Add enough milk to form into a ball. Transfer to a mixing bowl and chill for one hour. Roll dough on a lightly floured, flat surface to 1/4” thickness. Place on a cookie sheet lightly sprayed with nonfat cooking spray. Bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for 20 -30 minutes, or until golden brown. Cool completely.

2011 – 2012

Issue 6

Retirement Today

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Do you have a fussy dog? All the

Natural Goodness your pet deserves

in the palm

of your hand 3.

We think it’s really wonderful that you are able to be your dog’s veryown chef, but unfortunately, not every one can afford the time. What’s great about Canino Toppers is that we use the same natural and fresh ingredients, cooked perfectly, and served straight from the can. It is hassle-free, and can provide an extra source of protein on top of the original diet. It is convenient, economical, and adds variety to life!

Faqs 1.

Won’t feeding a Topper with normal food cause my pet to put on weight since he is eating more than his usual? Canino Toppers help provide a more satisfying meal for your dog, and encourages your dog to finish up the kibble. Canino Toppers is an all-natural topper made only with fresh, wholesome ingredients. It provides nutrients in the best form available, with high digestibility. If you have been feeding your pet a dry diet exclusively, we encourage you to transition your pet by decreasing the amount of kibble slowly. Canino Toppers should make up an approximate 10% of the entire meal.

2.

If I’m feeding lamb and rice kibble, can I still mix it with Beef and Potato topper? Unless your dog is allergic to a certain type of protein, Canino Toppers complement all dry diets. Providing your dog with different types of proteins in a single meal ensures that your dog receives nutrients in different forms, which is a good thing. Apart from being extremely convenient, Canino Toppers are created to give you and your dog more variety in life so each mealtime is worth looking forward to.

I cook my dog’s meals myself at home, why should I still feed Canino Toppers?

4.

Why should I switch to using a topper instead of feeding an occasional canned food? Most canned foods are designedto be complete meals, with added vitamins and minerals. In our efforts to keep nutrition simple and natural, you’ll find that “what you see is what you get” with Canino Toppers, which means there are no by products or unnecessary vitamins. Our raw ingredients come in fresh every day, with no preliminary processing. That’s because we believe in feeding our pets the best, naturally.

5.

Puppies have different nutrient needs from the adults; can I feed them Canino? Unlike complete meals, Canino Toppers act as a topping to make your dog’s meals more satisfying. Imagine the usual dry diet as a plain pizza and Canino Toppers as your ‘pepperoni’. A good quality kibble will properly nourish your puppy for its life stage, while Canino Toppers provides the fresh proteins that will make your dog a happy healthy one.


Sometimes, a Shrimp cocktail just isn’t enough. Pile the succulent OCEAN ENSEMBLE on top of his usual dry food and watch your doggie smacks his lips with appreciation. Bon Appetite!

There can never be too much of a good thing; treat your best friend to a hearty serving of prized Mackerel and Lobster. Turn that boring meal into a fancy occasion with DEEP SEA TREASURES, because every day should be a special day.

The connoisseurs love Canino’s freshly caught Tuna from the ocean, which is why they prefer eating it on its own. Simmered in simple gravy, BIG COAST TUNA is a wonderful addition to an everyday meal.

Imagine having dry, meat-flavoured cookies for dinner every day. While our pets may never have complained, it is only logical to think that having too much of the same thing ruins the joy a meal should bring.

It’s difficult not to love a healthy and tasty meal of Tuna and Chicken, especially when they are freshly farmed and quaranteed of good quality. FISH AND FOWL is low-fat and nutritious perfect as a daily topper for your dog’s dry diet.

Canino Toppers is all about providing a healthy variety to nutrition. Containing only fresh, whole ingredients of the best quality, our products strive to turn each mealtime into an event worth looking forward to. With bite-sized morsels of human grade real meat and vegetables, Canino Toppers can be mixed into your dog’s kibbles for a different texture and taste whenever you think your furry best friend deserves a better meal.

Give your dog something to howl about - a deeply satisfying TUNA AND BEEF JUMBO. The firmness of the choice cuts add extra bite to a simple dish. Mixed with kibble, this topper is a hot favorite.

Perfect for staving off that meat craving, HOME-STYLE GOULASH is deliciously flavourful. Quality cuts of Beef combined with bite-sized Sweet Potatoes ensure your dog has a growlingly good time at dinner.

Ditch the “Chicken or Beef ” dilemma and have them both! Pair the versatile Chicken chunks with the robust taste of gently cooked Beef for a delightful combo. ROOS AND MOOS always hits the spot.

For the delicate palate, this all-vegetable topper is light and chock-full of vitamins. With the colourful salad steamed and then simmered in gravy, GARDEN FIESTA can be used on its own or served with your dog’s usual dry or wet diet.

Believing that the best way to ensure our dogs gets the best nutrients is from consuming an assortment of proteins, Canino Toppers can be fed by rotating between the meat, poultry and fish varieties. This means your dogs receive everything they need for a pleasurable and healthy meal experience.

Normally $39.95,

mention this ad and it’s $24.95 + free delivery incl gst Box of 24 Servings

Nothing beats the wholesome taste of tender Chicken, accompanied with soft-stewed Carrots and a thick, delicious gravy. CHICKEN STEW POT PIE is like a doggie cuddle on a cold day - heartwarming and comforting.

For more detailed information call on 0800 101 729 PO Box 1879, Christchurch. Fax 03 961 5112 Email: info@canidae.co.nz - Web: www.canidae.co.nz


Pets at Home

Second hand smoke

and your pet

Tobacco smoke is highly toxic to humans, but we all know that, right? However, there is a small and growing body of research suggesting second hand smoke is equally bad for animals. There are many types of illnesses pets are susceptible to if they are exposed to second hand smoke, from cancer to respiratory diseases. Lung cancer is rare in dogs - only one dog in every 25,000 gets it each year according to one study. But a 1992 study of dogs with cancer, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found that dogs in smoking households had a 60 percent greater risk of lung cancer. The risk was found to be even higher for dogs with short or medium sized noses, as the shorter nose does not have the ability to filter out the carcinogens. Dogs with long noses however, were found to be at higher risk of developing nasal cancer. Another study, published in the same journal in 2002, found cats whose owners smoked were three times more likely to develop lymphoma. The most common cat cancer, lymphoma, kills quickly; even with thousands of dollars worth of chemotherapy and radiation, lymphoma is only cured about half the time. But even more threatening for cats than second hand smoke, is third hand smoke. This is the lingering toxins found on the skin, hair, clothes and carpet which are dangerous to everyone who is in proximity to the contaminated surface. Not only do cats inhale the smoke, but their fur acts as a big filter to trap smoke particles which it then swallows during grooming, making cats extremely susceptible to oral cancer.

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Retirement Today

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2011 – 2012

The effects of exposure to second hand smoke are long lasting. Chemicals from cigerette smoke can be found in animals’ bodies for long periods of time. Measurable levels of cancer causing carcinogens can be detected in dog hair and urine months after exposure to second hand smoke. Furthermore, kittens and puppies have smaller lungs and less developed immune systems. They also breathe faster, meaning they take the chemicals in very quickly. The ingestion of tobacco products can be just as bad for pets as the inhalation of smoke. Tobacco products like cigerettes and cigars can be fatal if they are ingested. It only takes one cigerette or one cigar to be ingested to develop fatal nicotine poisoning and even cigerette butts can do harm. Research is ongoing into the effects of second and third hand smoke on animals, but if it’s causing you harm, chances are it’s having an effect on your little loved ones as well.

To keep your pet safe from the hazards of smoking consider these options: • Now you know the hazards of smoking around your pet, you may wish to consider quitting • Only smoke in areas that are physically separated from your pet, such as outside or in a detached garage • Keep your tobacco products out of your pets reach so they do not accidentally eat them. For more information on smoke free pets visit www.fluffyquits.com


Pets at Home

and your pet Kidney disease, known as Chronic Renal Failure (CRF), is a diagnosis no one wants to hear for their beloved companion. It is however, one of the most common health problems seen in aging pets. While chronic renal failure is more common in cats, it is often seen in dogs too. There are two types of renal failure in animals; acute kidney failure results from poisoning or external toxins and chronic kidney failure, a progressive disease most often related to the declining years in the life of an animal. As an animal's health begins to deteriorate, its organs slowly stop functioning at normal levels. The function of the kidneys is to filter out and excrete toxins from the body through the urine. When the kidneys fail to function in the proper way, these toxins build up and usually end up damaging the kidneys irreparably. Most animals do not show signs of kidney failure until about 70 to 75 percent of kidney function has been lost. If any of these symptoms are apparent in your furry friend, you must get it to your vet urgently: • Excessive thirst • A stiff, arched back • Loss of appetite • Reduced urine production • Blood in urine In order to diagnose and determine the extent of the disease, a blood test and urinalysis is needed. After diagnosis of kidney disease is made, the vet will advise you on the best course of action. While in most cases it is incurable, if caught early,

the toxins can be eliminated from the body. Your veterinarian will advise you on what is best for your pet.

Diet The diet is an important aspect to caring for a pet with kidney disease, as the right diet ensures the kidneys do not have to work too hard. A low-protein, low-phosphorus and/ or low-sodium diet may be recommended for a cat or dog with kidney disease. The diet for each cat or dog with kidney disease should be tailored to its own specific needs, as indicated by the stage of the disease and the blood and urinalysis test results.

Nutritional supplements Omega 3 fatty acids from marine fish oil have been shown to slow the progression of kidney disease in a clinical trial with dogs, by reducing kidney inflammation. Vitamin E is often recommended, along with omega 3, as they act synergistically. B-complex and vitamin C are often recommended to help replenish the vitamins lost due to the inability of the kidneys to recycle and retain these nutrients in the body. Additionally, potassium supplements may be necessary for some animals.

Herbs and nutraceuticals Both Chinese and western herbs can be useful in the beginning stages of kidney diseases.

Emotional support You should take steps to reduce stress for any animal with kidney disease. Flower essences can be helpful in supporting your companion emotionally and aiding in stress reduction.

A quality life The most important consideration when deciding how agressively to treat any disease should be quality of life. While you are ultimately the decision maker in the treatment of your companion, your veterinarian is a crucial part of the team and you must always consult with them before commencing any treatment plan.

2011 – 2012

Issue 6

Retirement Today

97


Affordable housing for people over 55 The difficulty in buying a home is often seen as a problem for younger people. However, the lack of affordable housing is often much more difficult for those over 55. “We understand your preference to have time and cash for holidays, rather than spending it maintaining an expensive house” say Llonia Curreen, manager of Cosmopolitan Retirement Village in Auckland. “Our units are appealing since they are priced from just $79,000. We can also assist with finance, and to date, over 70% of our units are sold” Even better, the weekly fee, which covers rates, insurance, shared facilities, security and 24 hour medical alarms are from just $49 / week for a studio apartment. “We’ve been able to achieve these rates by forgoing the swimming pool and some of the other luxury facilities some complexes offer, but many residents just don’t need”

“We provide different levels of service options, so unless specialised care is needed you can be confident of not having to move again”

Big screen: An in-house movie theatre is just one of the village’s wonderful facilities on offer.

“The well insulated units also have low running costs. On average studio residents pay about $30/month in electricity, with the $320 annual electricity company dividend each of our residents received this year it almost covers the year’s electricity bill” said Llonia.

Your unit will have everything you need for comfort and convenience and you’ll enjoy the village’s weekly outings, activities and its wonderful facilities which include a lovely landscaped courtyard, lounge, gym, movie theatre and library with internet access and massage chairs “You can do so much in your retirement, we run free computer classes at the village, some of our residents have learnt to use the computer, internet, email and play video games on playstation and wii” said Llonia Lovely courtyard: Residents find the courtyard to be a sunny and sheltered rendezvous.

“The purchase of my unit is the best decision I’ve ever made,” says Mrs French. “I value the security. I feel totally blessed to live here.” This is a sentiment shared by Miss Evans, “I was happy to find independent living, close to amenities and within a safe, caring environment.”

“I like the location and the affordability, I feel very safe, comfortable and happy. I enjoy my surroundings, we are a great crowd.” said Mrs White,

“Here I have a feeling of belonging. I can have both companionship and privacy. The movie theatre is my favourite place in the village.” Said Mr Allen

You don’t have to be retired to buy here. The minimum entry age for the village is 55, and some of the residents like Mr Large are still working. He uses the apartment as his week day crash pad, while spending his weekends at his bach. “We also have kiwis retiring overseas, but wanting to keep a base in Auckland, and they think the village is a very affordable way to do this,” says Llonia. The Village Sales Office phone number is 09 828-9812.

Brain food: A library of quality books and DVDs, computers with internet access and comfortable chairs.


UNITS

FROM

0

0 $79,0

Are you aged 55+ and... • Worried about your personal safety?

• Would you like the security of 24 hours emergency call? • Want to retain or enhance your independence? • Sometimes feel lonely?

• Fed up with the hassles of maintaining your home? • Want to have time and money to enjoy yourself?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions then the lifestyle of the retirement village environment is just the solution for you! 17 Geddes Terrace, Avondale, Ph: 09 828-2885 Beckett Real Estate Licensed Agent REAA 2008 Ph: 09 828-9812 • A/H: 09 828-7978 or 021-629 066 Em: jim@gaowoo.com • www.cosmopolitancare.com


Eat, smile, talk…enjoy! with confidence!

BPS premium quality dentures instill confidence and provide optimum function while eating, speaking, laughing… motor biking. Eating

BPS dentures allow you to enjoy your meal with your dentures being optimised for chewing your food. High quality denture teeth are used that aid the digestion process and keep loss of chewing efficiency to a minimum.

Smiling

An attractive smile is an important social asset and when you first meet someone you often judge them by their smile. There is absolutely no reason why your denture teeth should appear artificial. The teeth used in BPS dentures are selected according to the individual features of your face, meaning a more realistic smile that suits your personality.

Talking

Unstable dentures that move or wobble when you speak can have an effect on your confidence and social life. BPS dentures are created with sophisticated instrumentation and techniques to ensure an improved fit that is more stable and comfortable, so you can talk with confidence.

Enjoy… BPS high quality dentures can help you enjoy life more! Contact your nearest BPS Clinical Dental Technician TODAY! Merivale Denture Clinic, CHRISTCHURCH Phone: 03-355 4704 Duchenne Dental Services, CHRISTCHURCH Merivale: 03-375 4444 Fendalton: 03-375 4449 New Brighton: 03-375 4445 Hornby Dental Lab, CHRISTCHURCH Phone: 03-349 5231 Beckenham Dental Lab,CHRISTCHURCH Phone: 03-332 4169 Nelson Denture Clinic, NELSON Phone: 03-548 1478

The Dental Lab- Taranaki, NEW PLYMOUTH Phone: 06 7585033 P.A. Tasker Dental Laboratory, ROTORUA Phone: 07-348 3970 Peter Scott Dental Laboratory, TAURANGA Phone: 07-578 9659 Hamilton Denture Services, HAMILTON Phone: 0800 4 DENTURE (33688) Denture Tech, AUCKLAND Albany, Orewa or Henderson Phone: 0800-822 500 Evolution Dental, Glen Eden, AUCKLAND Phone: 09-818 0078

Contemporary Dental, AUCKLAND Phone: 09-638 3308 Leah Taylor Pakuranga Dental Perfection, AUCKLAND Phone: 09-576 6987


Retirement Today Magazine Issue#6