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Do you know a girl who’s curious, caring, strong, smart, brave, exciting, happy, passionate, talented? Then she’s a potential Madeira Girl!

M A D E I R A T O D AY

RE FE R A F UT UR E M A D EI R A G I R L

NAME OF STUDENT YOU ARE REFERRING ___________________________________________________________ GRADE OF STUDENT YOU ARE REFERRING ____________________________________________________________ PARENT/GUARDIAN NAME ___________________________________________________________________________ PARENT/GUARDIAN EMAIL ___________________________________________________________________________ PARENT/GUARDIAN PHONE NUMBER ________________________________________________________________ YOUR NAME __________________________________________________________________________________________ YOUR EMAIL __________________________________________________________________________________________ HOW DO YOU KNOW THIS GIRL? ______________________________________________________________________

#cocurriculum50 To fill out the referral online: www.madeira.org/referral

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Mail to Madeira Admissions: 8328 Georgetown Pike, McLean, VA 22102 Questions call: 703.556.8273 • Email: admission@madeira.org

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MADEIRA TODAY IN

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S E P T E M B E R 9 –2 0, 2 0 1 8

Madeira Alumnae

China Tour Join us September 9–20, 2018 Unlike a first-timer’s journey to China, this tour takes us far beyond the usual sites in search of a much deeper and more meaningful cultural experience. By spending time in China’s magical old gardens, meeting her ethnic peoples and hearing their ancient music, and exploring life in vast mountain ranges, ancient villages, and a cutting-edge modern city, we delve into a lesser-known China.

Unravel all that is China Land in Shanghai, where you are met at the airport and transferred privately to our hotel, the Waldorf Astoria Shanghai, which occupies an historic building on the world-famous Bund. We’ve reserved a room overlooking the Huangpu River just for you.

BOOKING DEADLINE: DECEMBER 8, 2017 After that date, reservations are offered on a space-available basis. For questions or to book, contact Rachel Dorsey at rdorsey@rcrusoe.com or call 888-490-8004.

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Contents Madeira Today Spring/Summer 2017, Number 196 Published by The Madeira School 8328 Georgetown Pike McLean, VA 22102

Editor Karen Joostema Design LucidCreative.co

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OBSERVATIONS ON THE OVAL

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Photography James Kegley & Freed Photography BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2016–17

Maryetta Anschutz ’93 Pilar Cabeza de Vaca Head of School

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ARTS

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ATHLETIC S

Brooke Stroud Carnot ’88 Gaither Smoot Deaton ’88 Vice President William F. Dunbar (Josey ’17) Anne Faircloth ’87 Mary Claiborne Frediani (Virginia ’11) Anne Murray Gambal ’81 (Elizabeth ’10)

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C AMPAIGN

Richard P. Hall Elizabeth Meehan Hewitt ’92 Page Hopkins ’81 Kimberly Hughes-Moazed ’81 Carrie Southworth Johnson ’95

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OUR AUTHORS

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CO-C URRI CULUM AT 50

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ALUMNAE EVE NTS

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REUNION

Heather Muir Johnson ’77 Vice President Harry J. Klaff (Caroline ’12, Madeline ’13, Lindsey ’17) Treasurer Louise Stillman Lehrman ’58

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Tim H. Meyers (Skylar ’17) Nancy Miller Montgomery ’60 Elizabeth Breul O’Rourke ’73 Reena Lawande Pande, M.D. ’92 Kumea Shorter-Gooden, Ph.D. ’70 Catherine Harris Shraga ’70 President Margaret Sotos (Katie ’11, Madison ’17) Parents’ Association President Catherine Stuart ’73 Alumnae Council President

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Gordon M. Thomas (Mollie ’16) Anita Patel Tolani ’91 Secretary

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CLASS NOTES

Madeira Today is published for alumnae, parents, and friends of the School. Please send any comments or suggestions to: KJoostema@madeira.org To unsubscribe from Madeira Today send your name and address to: madeiraalumnae@madeira.org

Cover Photo: James Kegley


Observations on

the Oval

Reunions, a 50th birthday celebration for Co-Curricu-

residential life, athletics, and of course, our signature

lum, our annual MadeiraED educational conference,

Co-Curriculum program. It continues to grow our cul-

and the public kickoff of our capital campaign—all in

ture of philanthropy through the Madeira Fund. It reaf-

the same weekend—brought much excitement to

firms the importance of an all-girls education,

campus this April. In what we affectionately called

strengthens the impact of Madeira, and ensures that

the

“Big Weekend,”

Madeira women, past and

present, gathered to connect, learn, be inspired, and celebrate.

nothing is off limits to a Madeira girl. Hear from five alumnae how Madeira made all the difference for them, and how this campaign will impact

And inspired we were. Noted political historian and

current and future Madeira students. Our community

commentator, Cokie Roberts regaled us with stories of

continues to be inspired by stories of how alumnae are

the impact of women throughout history. Alumnae

changing the world.

leaders representing all decades and working in all fields, including scholars, engineers, activists, volun-

For Madeira, YOU make all the difference.

PILAR CABEZA DE VACA HEAD OF SCHOOL

This campaign reaffirms the importance of an all-girls education, strengthens the impact of Madeira, and ensures that nothing is off limits to a Madeira girl.

teers, doctors, artists, writers, mothers, bankers, entrepreneurs, and more led sessions on enlightening topics. Get a taste of their stories in the “Co-Curriculum at 50” feature on page 20.

F ROM THE EDITOR

What a treat it was to have a group of our Co-CurGreetings from Madeira! Though I’m new this year as editor of Madeira Today,

riculum directors from over 30 of the past 50 years join

I’m not new to Madeira. I’m the proud parent of Kristin ’16, and have wit-

us to celebrate Co-Curriculum’s 50th. See them on our

nessed firsthand Madeira’s transformational program. This issue is chock-full

magazine cover and hear from them on page 29.

of news—record amounts of Class Notes, photos galore of recent campus

The alumnae who gathered to celebrate 50 years of

events, a 50th birthday, and insights from many alumnae.

Co-Curriculum exemplify how Madeira makes all the

I think of the magazine as honoring Madeira’s past (see if you can find the uniform from the 1950s! And look at traditions that continue to this day,

difference. So it was only fitting that we culminated the inspirational celebration with the kickoff of All the Difference: The Campaign for Madeira. This campaign affirms Madeira’s commitment to launching women who change the world. It ensures that Madeira remains at the cutting edge in all aspects of education: providing a focused emphasis on interdisciplinary learning through the STEM and STEAM fields,

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like 13 red roses for graduation)…celebrating Madeira today (2nd in nation KA R E N J O O S T E M A

IEA Equestrian team; Co-Curriculum at 50; a thriving performing arts program)…

Send comments to KJoostema@Madeira.org

and paving the way for Madeira’s future (the newly launched fundraising campaign will continue Madeira’s long-held tradition of innovation and setting new standards in the education of girls). All the Difference is a fitting name for the new campaign, and this issue points to a few stories where Madeira has made all the difference in the lives of alumnae. From recognitions to remembrances, roses, and reunions, please enjoy Madeira Today.

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ARTS

PERFORMING ARTS

M A D E I R A DA N C E M E S M E R I Z E S A U D I E N C E Director of Dance Michelle Sarson brought new instructors into the Madeira Dance studio to enliven the passion of Madeira’s dance department. The choreography and intensity of the program has been turned up a few notches under her direction, delighting audiences at Winterfest, Springfest, and DanceGate with stellar presentations. Madeira Select Dancers stunned audiences at the WAISDEA Festival in March at Holton Arms School.

M AG I C A L P R O D U C T I O N O F “ I N TO T H E WO O D S ” W I N S C A P P I E AWA R D The Winter Musical production of “Into the Woods” created a magical experience for actors, techies, and audiences alike. The stage and theater were transformed into a forest of interwoven fairy tales. This year’s accompanist, guest artist Mary Sugar, drew upon her experience with Broadway and film stars to teach master classes for Madeira’s actors. The cast and crew developed the details of storytelling brilliantly. Madeira won the prestigous Cappies critics award for ‘Best Sets” with this enchanting design.

T R I - M M U S I C H O N O R S O C I E T Y E S TA B L I S H E D AT M A D E I R A

Lucy Li ’18 initiated the drive to start a chapter of Tri-M Honor Society this year. Twenty students in Tri-M shared their musical talents in the community, both on and off campus. Girls performed at admissions events, and for happy residents at Vinson Hall retirement community in McLean on several occasions. Sweet Ti a cappella group delighted the audience at the campaign kick-off dinner when they performed an original song written by two members of the group, Zoe Crawley ’18 and Lily Moriarty ’17.

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COACH ROD MONTRIE DIRECTOR OF AQUATICS

Years of Coaching Excellence By Kelly Picardi

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FOR 25 YEARS, Director of Aquatics Rod Montrie has led the swimming Snails to victory, solidified himself as a staple of success for Madeira Athletics, and become a living legend in the swim community. Born and raised in Bethesda, Maryland, Coach Montrie came to Madeira in 1991 as an advisor for the construction of a competition-size pool in the new athletics facility, now the Hurd Sports Center. In the fall of 1992, Madeira officially opened the Hurd, and Coach Montrie began as the Aquatics Director and Head Swim and Dive Coach. When asked if he had originally intended to be a Snail for 25 years, Rod answered, “After about 10 years I thought, ‘This is working out well.’ After 20 years I started thinking that I might just go the distance.” Go the distance he has. Under Coach Montrie’s guidance, Madeira has remained at the top of the Independent School League (ISL), winning the ISL pennant in 2003 and 2016, and the Virginia Independent School Athletic Association State Championship (VISAA) five times. Coach Montrie also garnered VISAA Coach of the Year accolades on five separate occasions. The success of the program is undeniable, boasting 25 consecutive winning seasons, 24 consecutive top-ten state finishes, and legions of individual state and national honors. Coach Montrie has helped over 25 Madeira swimmers advance to compete at the collegiate level at notable schools including Harvard, Georgetown, Duke, Brown, USC, UVA, and many others. Setting the example, developing leaders, and fostering relationships have been hallmarks of Montrie’s culture of success. The relationships built through the program have formed a tightly knit community of past and present Snails. “The success of our program is primarily due to the development of student leaders who have learned from other team leaders and passed the knowledge onto subsequent generations.”

MADEIRA SWIM & DIVE ACCO L A D E S W I T H COAC H R O D M O N T R I E

ATHLETICS 25 24

Coach Montrie’s influence stretches beyond the borders of the pool. “I think one of the most important things we can do as coaches is to lead by example. When difficult situations arise, the girls watch how you respond. Not letting the situation overwhelm you is tough when you are a competitive person, but they need to see that even people who are passionate can be poised.” In his 25 years of coaching at Madeira, Coach Montrie has found that athletes can reach their highest potential when they are having fun and are team players. “Hard work puts you in the position to be successful, but the joy of racing is what makes this sport great. Every athlete needs to work hard every day. Not every athlete can be a championship swimmer, but every athlete can be a great teammate.” 25 years of Rod Montrie’s efforts in cultivating talent, developing leaders, and setting the example have cemented Madeira’s legacy of swimming excellence.

CONSECUTIVE WINNING SEASONS

CONSECUTIVE TOP-10 STATE FINISHES

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INDEPENDENT SCHOOL LEAGUE (ISL)

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VISSA STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS

5 12 3 1 50+ 5 1

CHAMPIONSHIPS (2003 & 2016)

(2001–03, 2005–06)

INDIVIDUAL ALL-AMERICANS

RELAY ALL-AMERICANS

VISAA SWIMMERS OF THE YEAR

A LL-MET SWIMMER OF THE YEAR

ALL-LEAGUE, ALL-STATE, OR ALL-MET SWIMMERS

TIME VISAA COACH OF THE YEAR

NATIONAL INTERSCHOLASTIC SWIM COACHES ASSOCIATION’S DAVID H. ROBERTSON AWARD FOR COACHING EXCELLENCE

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MADEIRA ATHLETICS HALL OF FAME

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#madeiradifference

ATHLETICS

Coach Jessica Leonardi, Jacey Albaugh ’18, Mikayla Connolly ’20, Bridget Vaughey ’19 and Ally Edwards ’18

IEA Team Wins 2nd in Nation! B E AT IN G OV E R 1 1,00 0 RI DE R S AC ROSS T HE COUNTRY Madeira earned the “Reserve Champion High School team” honors when the Interscholastic Equestrian Association (IEA) team competed against the top 22 teams in the country at the IEA National Finals at the Virginia Horse Center in Lexington, Virginia. Finishing second in the nation is a tremendous achievement for Madeira riders. Qualifying for IEA Nationals is an honor in itself, so the second place finish is incredible. The finalists represented 82 teams from a total of 11,167 eligible hunt seat student-riders. Individuals and teams participated in multiple competitions during regular season shows, regional finals and zone finals to qualify for the National Finals competition. Drawing from the nation’s leading middle and high school students, riders competed in a variety of differ-

ent classes over the three-day championship. Nearly 400 of the nation’s leading middle and high school equestrians competed. College coaches took notice of Madeira’s five riders, and complimented the team on the quality of Madeira riders. Coach Leonardi noted, “I was proud of each of the rider’s personal accomplishments at Nationals, and how well they worked as a team to support and cheer on one another. They all controlled their nerves in a high pressure situation, and rode with poise and determination each time they stepped into the ring. Finishing second in the nation was a terrific way to end an incredible season, and is a testament to the hard work these riders have put in all year.”

Congratulations to the team!

C A M PA I G N P R I O R I T I E S

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RESIDENTIAL LIFE

Better facilities, better experiences

STEAM

Center for Innovation & Collaborative Learning CO-CURRICULUM

Madeira’s signature differentiator AT H L E T I C S

Judy Bishop sends daughter… and horse to Madeira

Excellence both on and off the fields THE MADEIRA FUND

Madeira is lucky to have not only Emma Bishop ’20 join the Madeira family—the school is fortunate to also have a new horse

An immediate impact

join the barn family. Judy Heisley Bishop graciously donated her 15 year-old Thoroughbred mare “Daisy" to Madeira this past fall when Emma came to school as a freshman. Daisy, whose show name is “Wildest Dreams” was one of Emma’s first competition mounts, and has been enjoyed by the whole Bishop family over

campaign.madeira.org

the years. Daisy has been a wonderful addition to the Madeira program and is a favorite of the students to ride.

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C A M PA I G N PUBLIC PHASE LAUNCHES

MADEIRA MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE TO ITS STUDENTS, AND

YOU MAKE

ALL THE DIFFERENCE TO MADEIRA.

Five years ago, Madeira began to lay the groundwork for the All the Difference campaign, the most ambitious fundraising initiative in our history.

SEE HOW MADEIRA HAS MADE ALL THE DIFFERENCE FOR THESE 5 WOMEN >

The response during the quiet phase of our Campaign was immediate and enthusiastic. The fierce love and dedication that Madeira alumnae, parents, and friends have for this life-changing institution is inspiring, and it has enabled us to make incredible strides in a short period of time. The Campaign kicked off with a $10 million challenge gift—the largest gift ever made to Madeira. These funds enabled us to renovate Main and East EACH GIFT HAS INSPIRED THE NEXT. WE HAVE RAISED $54 MILLION

dorms as well as Main Terrace. We then received a second challenge gift of

THUS FAR TOWARD OUR GOAL

$3 million, which allowed us to complete renova-

OF $85 MILLION.

tions to West Dorm, and the hardscaping and landscaping of the Oval. These contributions

brought early, tangible achievements that helped attract additional support. In a world where women continue to be underestimated and undervalued, it is more important than ever to have a place like Madeira—where young women have all the encouragement and opportunities they need to realize their full potential.

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ON CAMPAIGN PRIORITY: RESIDENTIAL LIFE

BEV ER LE Y MB U ’0 6

B

eing at a boarding school thousands of miles from home is not supposed to be easy. But it was for me, because Madeira felt like home from day one. Madeira continues to be the one place in the world, other than when I’m around my biological family, where I feel completely and fundamentally myself. I cherish all the friendships I forged at Madeira. I had teachers who loved me, knew me well, and pushed me to be my best. I still think about Ms. Keilhauer’s delicious baked goods, and about how she helped me get through a difficult time during my senior year, when I

“Residences will provide an enhanced experience for all students and make Madeira more competitive in the admissions world.” was burning the candle at both ends. My Madeira friends remain the closest friends I’ve ever had, and I still meet my former math teacher, Mrs. Goldman, out for happy hour in D.C. And I hated math. My boarding experience at Madeira was so wonderful and transformative that even the loud, cranking radiators and lack of electrical outlets in the dorms didn’t dampen it. And yet, when my classmates and I toured the residences at our reunion last April, we were all floored—and admittedly, a bit jealous—by the beauty and thoughtfulness of the renovations. Every detail was considered, and the common rooms are warm and inviting. While Madeira is so much more than its facilities, it’s clear that the residences will provide an enhanced experience for all students and make Madeira more competitive in the admissions world. From the bottom of my heart, thank you for supporting a place that was—and continues to be—a home for so many of us.

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ALL THE DIFFERENCE:

I

n my senior year at Madeira, two of my classmates and I participated in the United States Invitational Young Physicists Tournament. Of the 150 students who participated, there were maybe 10 girls. And our team was the only one composed exclusively of girls. Our teacher, Mrs. Pratt, never once told us that we did well for girls. At Madeira, we were expected to work hard and do well no matter what. For as long as I can remember, I had an interest in and aptitude for science and technology, and I took every AP science class Madeira offered. When I struggled, no one held my hand; I had to work through the problem and figure out the answer myself. I developed a strong work ethic and confidence in my abilities at Madeira. I went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering and am currently applying to PhD programs in bioengineering. As a business analyst at Deloitte, I manage 13 men who are all at least a decade older than I am. Madeira was the perfect place for a young woman like me to learn, grow, and explore, and it’s only getting better. The school has new requirements in computer science and makerspaces where students can do all the imagining, creating, collaborating, and connecting they need to prepare for STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) related careers.

ON CAMPAIGN PRIORITY: STEAM

L E NA BA DR ’ 1 1

“Every opportunity I wish I had in high school will be made possible through the campaign.” I owe my Madeira education to the alumnae whose generous donations made it possible for me to receive a crucial scholarship. I give to Madeira because I want other young women to have the same opportunities Madeira alumnae gave to me. I’m proud to be a graduate of such an inspiring and innovative place, and I’m grateful that our community is committed to ensuring that no career path is off limits to a Madeira girl.

T H E C A M PA I G N F O R M A D E I R A

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ON CAMPAIGN PRIORITY: CO-CURRICULUM

AV ERY M IL LE R ’8 6, P ’ 19

T

he summer after my freshman year at Princeton was a pivotal one for me. I had been hired as a clerk at the Washington Bureau of the New York Times. That summer, the Iran-Contra hearings dominated the news cycle, and it was incredibly exciting to be at the center of the action in Washington. As thrilling as it was, working in a busy newspaper newsroom clarified that I wanted something different. I craved to tell stories at the speed that was, back then, possible only through television. I decided to become a broadcast television reporter. I experienced that life-changing realization thanks to Madeira’s Co-Curriculum program. My Co-Curriculum experiences included working in the press office of Senator Mark Hatfield and as an assistant to R.W. “Johnny” Apple, the distinguished international correspondent for the New York Times and stepfather to a Madeira classmate. These opportunities cemented my interest in news reporting and enabled me to build a resume impressive enough to land me a job at ABC News after college. In addition, the volunteer work I participated in through Co-Curriculum led to my lifelong passion to help the homeless, particularly those who suffer from mental illness.

“I know many Madeira alumnae would join me in saying that Co-Curriculum made an amazing, lifelong difference in their careers and their lives.” I know many Madeira alumnae would join me in saying that Co-Curriculum made an amazing, lifelong difference in their careers and their lives. And today, thanks to Madeira’s new modular schedule, Co-Curriculum is even more impactful. My daughter, who is in her second year at Madeira, recently volunteered at a nursing home for five weeks. Her intensive experience enabled her to build practical skills and meaningful relationships with the residents. Supporting and strengthening the CoCurriculum program is one of the most critical ways we can honor the talents and ambitions of current and future Madeira students.

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ALL THE DIFFERENCE:

M

y most cherished sports-related memory from Madeira is not scoring the winning goal or perfecting my squash serve: It’s getting the chance to smoosh cupcakes in the faces of the senior players after the last home game of the season. I loved all of Madeira’s traditions, but that one was the

ON CAMPAIGN PRIORITY: ATHLETICS

ME G AR MST RONG ’ 10

“I can attest firsthand to the incredible difference our new turf fields make to Madeira athletes.” most fun, even when I was a senior and on the receiving end. Participating in sports was one of the most important components of my Madeira education. Being on the soccer, lacrosse, and basketball teams as a first-year student enabled me to form instant connections with older students who helped ease my transition into high school. It taught me how to manage my time, communicate clearly, work well with others, and respect the knowledge of people more experienced than I am. It also helped me become a better student, because I often applied lessons learned on the field or on the court to my studies. Today, while I work toward my law degree, I’m also working as the goalie coach for Madeira’s varsity lacrosse team. I can attest firsthand to the incredible difference our new turf fields make to Madeira athletes. Practices and games no longer have to be cancelled or cut short due to rain. And, now that our sports facilities are up to the standards of other schools, our players are no longer at a competitive disadvantage. I was always proud of our beautiful campus, and now—thanks to our supportive community—it’s even more attractive to prospective students, parents, and coaches.

T H E C A M PA I G N F O R M A D E I R A

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ON CAMPAIGN PRIORITY: THE MADEIRA FUND

K ATE WIS NI EWS KI W EI R ’ 0 2

I

sometimes say that my professional career is the embodiment of the Madeira motto, “Function in disaster, finish in style.” As director of cybercrime and breach response at PricewaterhouseCoopers, I help clients in a range of industries— from finance to nuclear energy—figure out what to do during and after a cybersecurity breach. I’m responsible for translating complex information from IT professionals and cyberforensics specialists to communications directors, corporate boards, CEOs, and general counsels. I have to keep everyone calm and help them make intelligent decisions quickly. Madeira prepared me for this role in a multitude of ways. • I learned how to respect, relate to, and communicate with people who are different from me. • I benefited from an academic program that fostered my proclivity for logical thinking and problem solving. • I gained experience balancing rigorous academics, sports, and other extracurricular activities at Madeira, which equipped me to juggle complicated tasks and function well in a fast-paced, high-stress environment.

“I appreciate everything Madeira did for me, and the people that helped me find my path, which is why I proudly give to the Madeira Fund every year and have made a commitment to [this] campaign.” I appreciate everything Madeira did for me, and the people that helped me find my path, which is why I proudly give to the Madeira Fund every year and have made a commitment to the All the Difference campaign. Together, we can make sure that young women continue to have all the opportunities we had, and the confidence and support to pursue them.

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A L L T H E D I F F E R E N C E : T H E C A M PA I G N F O R M A D E I R A

ALUMNAE

AUTHORS

C HEAT TH E C LOC K MARGARET WEBB PRESSLER ’83

GRENDEL’S GUIDE TO LOVE AND WAR A.E. KAPLAN ’95

Award-winning, veteran Washington Post reporter Margaret Webb Pressler’s research into the work of some of the world’s leading experts on aging and genetics reveals a new world of discoveries and advice about how the aging process works and what you can do to age less, feel better, and look younger. Margaret’s eyeopening reporting does not suggest the program of a fitness buff or a nutrition fanatic. Rather, she offers minor tweaks in diet, exercise, lifestyle, and personal care that are painless to adopt and achievable for anyone, but which can have a big payoff over time.

Tom Grendel lives a quiet life—writing in notebooks, mowing for his elderly neighbors, and pining for Willow, a girl next door who rejects the “manic-pixie-dream” label. But when Willow’s brother, Rex, starts throwing wild parties, the nearby senior citizens’ community is transformed into a war zone. Tom is rightfully pissed—his dad is an Iraq vet, and the noise from the parties triggers his PTSD —so he comes up with a plan to end the parties for good.

JULIA REED’S SOUTH JULIA REED ’78

Julia Reed’s parties capture the celebratory nature of entertaining in her native South. Her informative and down-toearth guide to throwing an unforgettable party includes secrets she has collected over a lifetime of entertaining. She offers up a feast of options for holiday cocktails, spring lunches, formal dinners, and even a hunt breakfast. Eleven seasonal events feature delicious, easy-to-prepare recipes, ranging from fried chicken to Charlotte Russe and signature cocktails or wine-pairings. She introduces her talented friends along the way. Each occasion includes gorgeous photographs showing her original approach to everything—from invitations and setting a table to arranging flowers and creating the mood. This irresistible book is the ultimate primer for every party-giver.

TH E LIG H T O F PA RI S E LE AN OR B ROW N ’9 1

Madeleine is trapped in an unhappy marriage and a life she never wanted. From the outside, it looks like she has everything, but on the inside, she fears she has nothing that matters. In Madeleine’s memories, her grandmother Margie is the kind of woman she should have been— elegant, reserved, perfect. But when Madeleine finds a diary detailing Margie’s bold, romantic trip to Jazz Age Paris, she meets the grandmother she never knew. Margie and Madeleine’s stories intertwine to explore the joys and risks of living life on our own terms, of defying the rules that hold us back from our dreams, and of becoming the people we are meant to be.

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...

April 27, 2017 The Renwick Gallery, Washington DC Campaign Launch Gala

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Co-Curriculum at

50 TRANSFORMING LIVES AND CAREERS

Co-Curriculum at Madeira is experiential learning at

Empowering Women

its best. Madeira students have had front row seats

COKIE ROBERTS, KEYNOTE SPEAKER

to significant moments in history and exposure to careers across all disciplines. For the nearly 400 guests that gathered on April 28, 2017 to commemorate 50 years of CoCurriculum, Madeira alumnae showcased impressive achievements—they have made an impact, they’ve changed lives, altered history in large and small ways, moved a movement, saved a species, made a deal, inspired others, captured a moment, chaired a board, founded a school, starred in a production—and more. Different from the original “Wednesday Program,” Co-Curriculum today provides students with three distinct five-week internships over the course of their Madeira experience. Sophomores serve within local community organizations, juniors intern on Capitol Hill, and seniors pursue a passion in a career-oriented placement. This tremendous exposure helps build a robust resume that makes Madeira’s students stand out. For 50 years, Co-Curriculum has been the vehicle for Madeira girls to be front row, see first hand, be immersed, learn by doing, affect change, and ultimately, be transformed.

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Noted political commentator Cokie Roberts engaged the audience with political and cultural stories from her roots in Louisiana to her time in Washington, DC. Reflecting Madeira’s mission of launching women who change the world, Roberts shared the impact that women have had throughout history, including our very own Miss Lucy Madeira, who founded the school 14 years before women had the right to vote. Madeira, who was just ten years out of Vassar at the time, wanted a school that allowed women to go beyond their expected roles in society. “Other girls’ schools were finishing schools, but we didn’t want to be ‘finished’,” Madeira explained. Roberts remarked that this is such a wonderful metaphor because, “none of us should ever be finished…we are always growing and learning.” Madeira’s vision of having girls learn in a variety of ways empowers young women. Roberts challenged the students, “Go out into the world; learn the importance of social service; take it back to this beautiful campus, and take it forward as you go out and change the world.” Political participation is key if women want to have an impact. From abolition to suffrage to equal-employment, fairness and more, women have been the driving force. Title Nine is perhaps the only piece of legislation commonly known by name. It changed the face of athletics, and it was driven by women. Young girls learning about politics and social service through high school internships gives experience and breeds courage. Lucy Madeira and others paved the way for today’s young women. “You can have it all,” Roberts asserted. “You just have to figure out what ‘ALL’ is to you.”

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CO - C U R R I C U LU M AT 5 0

Find Your Balance “We learned to go in and be comfortable with whatever you threw us. We had to pull it together, walk in there, and do the job. Co-Curriculum enhanced my self-esteem and gave me such confidence.”

How Co-Curriculum Launched My Career JULIA REED ‘78, KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Tools to transform your physical and emotional well being REV. KATHERINE STANFORD P’18, ALEXIS MERIN ’00, EMERY MIKEL ’96, & DR. REENA LAWANDE PANDE ’92

Coming from several perspectives in art therapy, counseling, medicine, and spiritual guidance, the panel described how to find balance dealing with life’s challenges. A key point: one person's balance is not another’s—you must experiment to find the balance that works for you. You might not get it right the first time, but try different things until you do. All have seen increased anxiety resulting from the November elections. Mikel suggested that though the elections may have caused people to seek therapy, they subsequently realized the election was a trigger to deal with underlying issues. Merin added, “The nation feels out of balance in a similar way that a family can feel out of balance.” Dr. Pande suggested there is a crisis of empathy in the country—we must restore a feeling of basic humanity.

Backstage! Professional actors share the good, bad, and ugly of a career in show business HOLLY TWYFORD ’86, FATIMA QUANDER ’97, & JUNE SCHREINER ’12

When asked to describe Co-Curriculum in a word, Julia responded, “Revolutionary. The effect of Co-Curriculum was profound and life-changing.” Julia recounted how her Co-Curriculum placement at Newsweek along with her time at Madeira helped launch her journalism career. Confidence was one of the biggest benefits that Reed gleaned from her Co-Curriculum placements. “We learned to go in and be comfortable with whatever you threw us. We had to pull it together, walk in there, and do the job. Co-Curriculum enhanced my self-esteem and gave me such confidence.” Reed found it incredibly instructive to know how a Congressional office and a news bureau works. Katherine Graham ‘34 helped Julia secure her senior Co-Curriculum placement at Newsweek, which Reed turned into a job she kept all through college. Reed notes that she learned a lot about herself at Madeira. “I can talk my way around anything,” she recounted, sharing entertaining stories about her creative use of charge account taxis, having lunch with Jack Kemp, and getting through Madeira’s gates when other reporters were barred from entering. Reed credits Madeira with giving her the important tools for success in landing her dream job. “I get paid to go be curious about stuff!”

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(L to R)

(L to R)

Holly moderated an absolutely hysterical and lively panel with Fatima and June. A teacher, Fatima shared her love of seeing her students succeed and push themselves outside of their comfort zones. June talked about how she treasured her time in high school stealing the show as Ado Annie in Oklahoma! at Arena Stage, and how intimidating it can be to have to cry on command when filming…take after take after take. Holly shared her love for the stage, how she needed a break for a few years to focus on family, but how she ultimately couldn't stay away. Each traded stories about the hardships of working with difficult cast members and directors, auditioning and not getting parts for reasons out of your control, and the joy of being on stage or on camera and providing an experience for the audience.

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CO - C U R R I C U LU M AT 5 0

Pandas Gone Wild A remarkable photographic journey inside China’s efforts to save the giant panda from extinction SADIE QUARRIER ’88 & AMI VITALE ’89

Ami and Sadie took us on a roller coaster adventure, from photographing dangerous, war-torn nations to capturing incredible wildlife shots. Ami shared spectacular images from her time in conflict-ridden Kashmir, to baby elephants and rhinos in Africa, and finally to a brood of baby pandas in China. While she was assigned to documenting the atrocities of war in Kashmir, it was the other human interest pieces that captured her heart. After Kashmir, Ami spent significant time in a wildlife sanctuary in Africa photographing rhinos, elephants, giraffes and other animals. Sadie shared their joint experience in photo editing and cutting tens of thousands of photos to a few dozen for a 26-page spread in National Geographic, while Ami discussed how to convince a magazine to publish a new take on a story that they seemingly had already covered.

“The number one takeaway for what we can do to help is to think local.” — Catharine Gilliam Burns ’74

Earth in Crisis Running for Office Navigating the course from volunteer to candidate JANELLE IRICK BYNUM ’92, SYLVIA BRAVO LARSEN ’67, SARA AKBAR ’92, & MEG KRUIZENGA FROELICH ’81 not pictured

(L to R)

Moderating a panel of experts, Sara Akbar guided the group across topics including barriers to running for office, secrets to successful fundraising, and the importance of putting women on the ballot. In 2016, Democrat Janelle Bynum won a seat in the Oregon House of Representatives. She joined Sylvia Bravo Larsen, former New Hampshire state senator in sharing experiences about campaigning, fundraising and serving in office. Filmmaker, Meg Kruizenga Froelich discussed her documentary, Strong Sisters, which tells the extraordinary stories of elected women in Colorado. When asked about the obstacles faced in pursuing public office, Larsen responded, “The ability to have a voice outweighs the barriers to running for office.”

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Bold strategies to effect social changes MEG GOLDTHWAITE P’15,’19, LUCY BLAKE ’76, & CATHARINE GILLIAM BURNS ’74

(L to R)

Catharine recounted how she became interested in saving the environment during the first Earth Day celebration in 1970, and began to immerse herself in the world of environmental social change. The number one takeaway for what we can do to help is to think local. Actions such as contacting your local representatives to discuss how they are voting on environmental issues, and supporting local organizations committed to saving and protecting the planet, help immensely. Lucy, President of the North Sierra Partnership, discussed the excitement she gets from working with businesses to enact environmental change. Meg is currently the Chief Marketing Officer for NPR, but previously worked at Conservation International (CI) and World Wildlife Fund (WWF). Her favorite projects include the “Nature is Speaking” films with CI and “Earth Hour” for WWF, where she assisted in getting major cities across the world to turn all of their lights off for an hour to raise awareness.

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CO - C U R R I C U LU M AT 5 0

“Work your network not just when you are looking for a job…work hard to introduce others within your network to each other.” —Brandon Holley ’85

Necessity is the Mother of All Invention Seizing opportunities in the modern marketplace KATHERINE PETTY MACLANE ’96, SAMANTHA MEYER DUPONT ’90, & BRANDON HOLLEY ’85

(L to R)

Reinventing themselves, sometimes by choice and sometimes by necessity, these women credit their experience at Madeira for giving them the resiliency to make the change. A recurring theme is that they look at where they are, assess it and own it, then plan their own story for the next step. As sales in the magazine industry fell, including at Lucky where she was editor-in-chief, Holley found the need to re-create herself. She took a position at Yahoo! for half her previous salary, but viewed it like going to graduate school. Taking what she learned about technology and combining it with her fashion experience, she launched Everywear, an e-commerce platform that personalizes the online shopping experience. MacLane is an executive recruiter in luxury retail and hospitality markets with Pi Executive. Her experience in building her own polo shirt company from scratch as well as extensive experience with luxury retail and hospitality firms led her to this dream job. After spending years working for luxury houses in New York, DuPont moved to Atlanta, where she opened a fashion agency. Following a hiatus to spend time with her growing family, she created Sam DuPont, her own jewelry and accessories business. Holley suggests, “Work your network not just when you are looking for a job…work hard to introduce others within your network to each other.” DuPont sees a growing trend over the last several years of women supporting each other in business rather than feeling competitive.

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Design Thinking in Real Life How to bring design, creativity, and innovation into your everyday life EMI KOLAWOLE ’00

Kolawole, a multi-media strategist and founder of Dexign, emphasizes human-centric ways to tackle complex problems and reframe them to find effective solutions. By integrating core elements of design thinking into our lives, we are empowered to address challenges that occur every day in our companies, our countries, and even our planet. Want to incorporate design thinking into your everyday life? Emi’s 10 Rules of Design Thinking: 1. No one is in charge 2. Pain is a tool—to make joy 3. It’s not about you… it’s all about other people 4. Walk in like Beyonce 5. Make your own manifesto 6. Forget passion. Find purpose. 7 Form diverse and inclusive teams 8. Change your frame 9. Make your own design process 10. Forgive yourself

Empower Your Impact! Discover how energy and body language affect your leadership…by way of the horse SHARI JAEGER GOODWIN

Adapting strategies learned from working with horses to improve human interactions, Goodwin shared the importance of reading non-verbal signals. “Paying attention to undercurrents—the nonverbal cues in a situation—allows the right kind of action at the right time.” Goodwin came to this conclusion as a weekend rider who fell off horses regularly. She realized it was something about her—her own energy was too high—that was causing the horse to react negatively. When she “settled her own vibe,” her riding improved. If you match the energy level of the other person, you improve the interaction. “Use your head, heart, gut—your entire being—as a sensor.” She explained that three regions of the body have neurons: the brain, the heart, and the enteric (or “gut”). Often we use only our brain to make decisions. Goodwin notes, “If we look at what our heart and gut say by turning off the intellect deliberately, we often can make better decisions.” SPRING/SUMMER 2017 MADEIRA TODAY

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By Beth Anne Carr

Social Justice Movements Where do we go from here? JOAN MOWER ’67 P’10, GILLIAN THOMAS ’86 & CLARA BINGHAM ’81

(L to R)

This award-winning panel, featuring alumnae whose work has focused on social justice and women’s issues, covered topics ranging from climate change to the recent Women’s March, equal rights and 1960’s politics. Moderated by Mower, panelists addressed what actions can best facilitate social justice and how to make a difference in our communities. Thomas, who wrote Because of Sex: One Law, Ten Cases, and Fifty Years That Changed American Women’s Lives at Work, urges, “Pick an issue that really matters to you and take action.” Bingham, author of Witness to the Revolution: Radicals, Resisters, Vets, Hippies, and the Year American Lost its Mind and Found its Soul predicted, “Today’s generation will be the next awakened generation.”

Co-Curriculum through the eyes of Directors

5

CELEBRATE MADEIRA brought together five difference makers who share a common bond in helping nurture Madeira’s Co-Curriculum program over the past five decades. The group reminisced with former students about fond memories, including boarding those yellow buses and white bussettes, anticipating Wednesday morning, figuring out what “professional attire” and sensible shoes were, commuting with friends, caring for the under-privileged, archiving interviews, taking phone calls, seeing world-changing events like Iran-Contra, presidential elections and 9/11, observing medical procedures, launching an advocacy campaign, supporting art installations… the 50-year list goes on and on. And so does the tremendous tradition of Co-Curriculum at Madeira.

... STUART DAVIS

Dr. Davis, director from 1986 through 1991, was drawn to the position by his interest in politics and the junior year experience on Capitol Hill. Davis, who taught history for several years before and after, feels that CoCurriculum gives Madeira students “a window into the broader world of what’s going on in Washington.”

Langford cited one girl who had committed to a year-long position at a veterinarian’s office because she had always wanted to be a vet. After three weeks, the girl realized she did not like giving animals vaccinations. She was reassigned to a new position in research and ended up in that field as a career. ANDRE WITHERS

5 Days, 5 Weeks, 50 Years Co-Curriculum today KATE OPALAK WATTS ‘94 & DR. TARA NAYAK PALMORE ‘88 (L to R)

WITH STUDENTS SAHANA BHAGAT ‘17 & SOLEIL

EPHRAIM ‘17 (not pictured)

Alumnae who supervise current Co-Curriculum students gathered to reflect on the experience. Palmore and Watts reminisced back to when they were students at Madeira and what their own CoCurriculum placements were like. They remarked that, unlike their student interns, Sahana and Soleil, they did not have the pleasure of working with other females, let alone other Madeira alumnae. Bringing their industry knowledge and Madeira experiences to their current positions (NIH and Huge), Palmore and Watts sought to make the students’ placements memorable. Watts recalls that when Soleil was to give her final presentation, a senior employee was dismissive when he learned a high school student was on the agenda. After Soleil’s presentation, he was shocked by her high level of sophistication and maturity, which Watts expected, because that’s what Madeira girls do! Palmore remarked how valuable it was to have Sahana at NIH, and gushed about Sahana’s eagerness to learn and readiness to be involved in all aspects of the job. 28 MADEIRA TODAY SPRING/SUMMER 2017

GLORIA MOBLEY

After graduating from only the second class at Williams College with women, Mobley was used to being a trailblazer. As Madeira’s Co-Curriculum director from 1991 to 1997, she was the highest ranking African American in Washington area independent schools. During Mobley’s time, girls had to not only keep journals but also show her (not just tell her) what they learned during their Co-Curriculum experiences. One student who worked with a massage therapist gave her a massage as part of her presentation. Students who worked in museums made audio tours. As a twist on “Take Your Daughter to Work Day,” Mobley organized a “Take Your Parents To Work Day,” where students brought their parents to their placement. Many parents learned for the first time the significant work their daughters were performing. CHRISTINE LANGFORD

Langford worked as Mobley’s assistant before assuming the director role in 1997. “I looked at those Wednesdays as the highlight of the week, and loved to go on visits to see what the girls were doing.” She stressed how important the placements were in either confirming that a girl was on the right track in thinking about her future, or completely changing her mind about it, which is equally valuable.

Withers, now Assistant Head of School, has a strong belief in experiential learning. When Withers became head of Co-Curriculum in 2005, he was charged with thinking more strategically about the program, and began to rethink with an eye toward United Nations Millennial goals and internships abroad. “It had been one day a week during the school year for so long, no one thought it could be different,” he says. The Co-Curriculum changes were inspired by some opportunities along with some threats to the program’s uniqueness. With more college interns coming on board and some other programs mimicking CoCurriculum cropping up, Madeira found Capitol Hill offices harder to secure. Changing the academic calendar to support the five-week internship has allowed the placement to become an important milestone. KARIN HAMEL

Hearing the stories of alumnae and current students’ experiences in their placements is energizing to Hamel. Their excitement is contagious when they talk about having edited a piece of legislation or observing a surgery. Hamel started as director in 2013, the same time the new modular schedule began. The work that the students can do in the concentrated five-week time has allowed fully immersive experiences, where students complete a project and capstone presentation.

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Reunions 2017

A LU M N A E E V E N TS

CLASS HIGHLIGHTS

1967 CO C KTA IL S , CO N VE R SATI ON & C EL E BR ATI O N ! M AY 1 8 , 2 0 1 7

THE FESTINA LENTE CUP

50

for highest participation level for The Madeira Fund was awarded to the Class of 1967.

TH

PA L O A LT O , C A FRONT ROW (L to R): Katherine Farquhar, Jennifer Owen

HOSTED BY BOARD MEMBERS CARRIE SOUTHWORTH JOHNSON ’95 & NANCY MILLER MONTGOMERY ’60

Murphy, Susie Pool Moses, Jan Weathers, Laura Mink Gardner, Debbie Bell, Ellen Peirce 2ND ROW: Anne Huyler Baker, Sylvia Bravo Larsen, Julia Bradford, Maida Parker-St. Hilaire, Maria Nyhart Dahlman, Melanie Mander 3RD ROW: Elizabeth Soyster, Carolyn Jones Gray, Binney Rankin McCague, Judith Reynolds, Rindy Higgins 4TH ROW: Caroline Palmer Mickle, Cathy Cloutier, Sarah Wilder Fuller, Joan Mower, Susan MacGregor Wheelwright, Whitney Mason Germon, Kathy Doyle Watson.

1987 T HE MA D EIR A C U P

for most dollars raised for The Madeira Fund was awarded to the Class of 1987.

S AV E T H E D AT E 7 TH A N N UA L A LU MN A E COU N C I L R E CE P TI O N O CTO BE R 2 0, 2 01 7 TH E ME TRO PO LI TA N C LUB OF WASHI N GTON 1 70 0 H STR EET N W,

STAIRS, TOP TO BOTTOM: Octavia McLeod Barrett,

Anne Faircloth, Kate Venters Duncan, Karen Jacobs Sulek, Laura Jones Herfel, Lauri McBurney Catalano, Randall Moore Ware, Christine Jepsen, Jenny Brown Sheehan, Sophie Muir Rothschild FRONT ROW (L to R): Kristen Pissaro, Sue Luangkhot Hoppin, Vida Grebliunas, Nancy Cooper Coles, Meg Weems Desmond

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20006

MISSY PARKER ’89 SET DECORATOR FOR FILMS: HIDDEN FIGURES,

LO N D O N RECEPTION M AY 1 9 , 2 0 1 7

THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON, THE AVENGERS, PIRATES OF

1992 25 TH

THE CARIBBEAN, THE GREAT WALL HOSTED BY SOPHIE MUIR ROTHSCHILD

BACK ROW (L to R): Tanya Gogolak Cote, Janelle Irick

’87 & LIA CHOI ’00

Bynum, Jacqueline Morais Easley, Bess Battle, Sara Akbar, Jen Gifford Bainbridge, Reena Lawande Pande, Kendra Dale, Nana Tchabo-desBordes, Buckley Kuhn Fricker, Jessica Watson, Allison Lefrak, Kelley Johnson Boyd FRONT ROW (L to R): Jennifer Friedlander, Anna Simms, Antonia Stout, Maddy Templeton

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APR IL 28 -29,2017

Reunions 2017

1952 Jane Richards Roth

1957 FRONT ROW (L to R): Kay McElvain Harvey, Jeanette Phelps Evans, Kate Carpenter Heny BACK ROW (L to R): Mary Cosby Rinehart, Mary Blair Vinson Koehl, Mary Winters Schlendorf

1977 TOP ROW (L to R): Laura Holmes Peters, Kim Kinkead Knight, Jennifer Okun Harper, Sarah Holmes BOTTOM ROW (L to R): Susan Wrampelmeir Atkinson, Heather Muir Johnson, Polly Holyoke, Suj Johnson Rodgers, Joan Bierbower Kaye

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1972 STAIRS, TOP TO BOTTOM: Marti Bellingrath Sullivan, Isabel Swift, Ann ffolliott, Beth McGowin, Marnie Nimick Silbert, Andrea Hatfield, Mary Clare Zannini Wall, Lili Avery, Sarah Tuten Dayton FLAG HOLDERS (L to R): Wanda Brownlee, Sandy Heussler Carney, Pattie White Johnson, Bentley Andrews

1982 STAIRS, TOP TO BOTTOM: Suzanne Novak, Jane Lawrence Peeples, Paula Giovanetti, Reed Montague, Isabel Day, Priscilla Craven, Kirsten Menes, Stephanie Henry, Tara Labovitz, Alicia Ragsdale Alford, Sally Gambill, Ceci Carter Monahan BOTTOM ROW (L to R): Lori Parker, Beth Ann Trapold Newton, Page Robinson, Anne Keith, Cappy Flynn Daume

1997 STAIRS, TOP TO BOTTOM: Nicole Buote, Kerla Moore Wolf, Arie Goldberg Finkel, Joy Morris Hutchinson, Andrea Press Yue, Megan Brown Rokicki, Norah Lycknell, Shwetha Rai, Angela Scoggins Goodwin, Moon Paul Athwal, Marina Zavahir Chaudhari GROUND (L to R): Beth Rogers Maoui, Elizabeth O'Gorman, Heather Desmond, Jee Bang, Lara Wilkinson, Alyssa Flanagan Cook, Adele Cowart Nelson, Priya Kathpal, Emily Arnold Cairo, Erin Fox Polak, Michelle Nguyen Wormmeester, Fatima Quander

2002 STAIRS, TOP TO BOTTOM: Elizabeth Leiter, Caitlin Elmore Limonciello, Leila Sidawy, Margaret O’Gorman, Jami Rotimi, Melanie Denson Reza, KC Fort, Kate Wisniewski Weir, Ashley Prescott Lesser GROUND (L to R): Natalie Romanoff, Edem Timpo, Cri-Cri Richards Randolph, Frances Atkins, Melanie Stevens, Rachel Webster, Halima Sykes Dumas

2007 FIRST ROW ON GROUND (L to R): Idil Ali, J.C. Kennedy, Katherine Kies, Caroline Osherow, Kristen Chou, Mary Coffman Quick SECOND ROW ON GROUND (L to R): Ellie Woodward, Caitlin Alderfer, Cathy Poon, Krista Harriman Wren, Kate Derby, Alex Nasif, Anne Patton STAIRS, TOP TO BOTTOM: Katherine Lee, Katherine Sanford, Gaby Lapera, Alex Moore Montanio, Shea Whittaker, Alyssa Weinberger, Chelsea Guster, Meredith Lovegrove, Rena Bears, Charlotte Harris, Pegah Kazemifar, Willa Freedman

2012 STAIRS, TOP TO BOTTOM: Angelica Partin, Priyanka Khanna, Adiya Taylor, Jordan Williamson, Alexis Osei, Lisa Walton, Caroline Peterson, Ines Castillo BACK ROW (L to R): Olivia Jallits, Breanna Atkinson, Claire Karakozoff, Brittney Jansen, Charlotte Fuss, Kate Woloshin FRONT ROW (L to R): June Schreiner, Caroline Klaff, Krista Braun, Josephine Osei, Micah Parks

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A P R I L 2 8 – 2 9, 2 0 1 7

Reunions

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2017

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GRADUATION 2017

FRONT ROW (L to R): Chaejung Lee, Veronica Gould, Claire Simpson, Josey Dunbar. Kamagana Ngaiza, Leah Fine, Morgan Wallace, Catherine Luther, Victoria Garcia Artiles, Isabella Dunlop, Kelly Nguyễn, Nicole Fifield, Shreya Arun, Madeleine Caldeira SECOND ROW (L to R): Mary Madeline Clemente, Hannah Adams, Emily Bush , Madison Sotos, Millenah Nascimento, Abigail Melton, Kaitlin McCarthy, Sahana Bhagat, Olivia Levin, Sofia Marrufo, Peyton Flory, Chanel Dulay THIRD ROW (L to R): Emily Hamilton, J. Reeves Sturtevant, Soleil Ephraim, Meng Yuan, Sasha Alexander, Cyan Perdue, Mary Catherine Morris, Lexi Gage, Jihyun Kim, Wenxi Xu, Calvert Jacks, Sarah Hussain FOURTH ROW (L to R): Skylar Meyers, Kerstin Shimkin, Kayleigh Day, Alexa Zartman-Ball, Grace Bilicki, Lindsey Klaff, Charlotte Burch, Wenqing Huang, Claire Pitzer, Charlotte Smith, Mara Delta, Abigail Stephenson FIFTH ROW (L to R): Sequoia Ragland, Mae Hunt, Nicole Kolmstetter, Elfrieda Nwabunnia, Hannah Studen, Sierra Giles, Sinclaire Jones, Elizabeth McMahon, Emily Leins, Liana Song, Kelsey Campbell, Sarah Clarke SIXTH ROW (L to R): Toby Cooke, Lily Moriarty, Diana Smith, Sophia Notter, Jenna Shackelford, Briana Harrington, Chioma Anomnachi, Seo Hyun Kim, Vasha Thomas, Mary Kate Gould, Ursula Hedlund, Queen Obosu, Emily Barré

LEGACY GRADUAT ES FRONT ROW (L to R): Claire Pitzer, sister of Elizabeth Pitzer ’13 & Granddaughter of Lavinia Plumley Packard ’60 • Brianna Harrington, daughter of Sunjin Harrington ’78; niece of Sookyung, Sunyoung & Soojung Chang, ’73, ’86, & ’80 • Lindsey Klaff, sister of Caroline & Madeline Klaff, ’12 & ’13 • Chaejung Lee, sister of Sojung Lee ’13 SECOND ROW (L to R): Calvert Jacks, granddaughter of Marguerite Jones Palmer ’54, great-niece of Calvert Armbrecht ’52 & cousin of Ann & Sally Armbrecht, ’80 & ’86 • Sarah Hussain, sister of Nadeen Hussain ’11 • Janet Reeves Sturtevant, granddaughter of Janet Knox Sturtevant ’52, great-niece of Elizabeth Knox Radigan ’57 & niece to Leslie Marriott Bartletta ’90 • Madison Sotos, sister of Katherine Sotos ’11 • Abigail Stephenson, sister of Grace Stephenson ’16 THIRD ROW (L to R): Elizabeth McMahon, sister of Anna McMahon ’15 • Morgan Wallace, granddaughter of Nancy Brimmer Wallace ’29 • Toby Cooke, cousin of Shelby Wildish ’14 • Elfrieda Nwabunnia, sister of Toulia Nwabunnia ’14

Madeira Today Spring/Summer 2017  
Madeira Today Spring/Summer 2017  
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