Madeira Today Winter 2021

Page 1

MCLEAN VA 22102-1200

WINTER 2021

8328 GEORGETOWN PIKE

FSC GOES HERE

M A D E I R A TO DAY

MADEIRA’S MISSION IS MADE FOR THIS MOMENT! Education is at an evolutionary point where we have the

A NEW E RA

opportunity to innovate and iterate in ways we never have before. At this critical time in our changing world, Madeira’s mission to launch women who will change the world (for the better!) ISSUE 203

is more relevant than ever.


Milestones D E AT H S 1940 Julia “Judy” Black Stearns, April 28, 2020 1941 Patricia (Patty) Holton Morris, August 23, 2020 1942 Martha (Woos) Wooster Weissberger, September 22, 2020 1944 Martha Shelden Kennedy, October 23, 2020 1950 Diana Hopkins Halsted, August 26, 2020 1951 Iris Love, April 18, 2020 1956 Frances (Fay) DuBose Bohlayer, September 4, 2020 1958 Kathleen (Kit) Wisdom, July 1, 2020 1960 Jacqueline (Jackie) Loomis Quillen, October 1, 2020 1961 Nina Orthwein Durham, July 22, 2020 1962 Mary Lloyd Estrin, April 26, 2020 1966 Junia Pendleton Baker, August 26, 2020 1970 Laura Dalley Tobin, August 31, 2020 1973 Camilla Faunce Williams, June 26, 2020 1978 Julia Reed, August 28, 2020

MARRIAGES 2000 Courtney Homan-Jones married Rio Rogador in November, 2019 BIRTHS

2001 Jessa Vossen, her husband Michael, and their first child, Estelle Sophia Vossen

1998 A daughter, Jona Rhyan, to Jennifer McLaughlin Scott in August, 2020

A year like no other… at a school like no other. Madeira thrives! The monumental change this year has brought is unprecedented. Miss Madeira’s motto of “Function in disaster, finish in style” has never been more fitting. The Madeira community has risen to the challenges and the opportunities of the pandemic.

1999 A son, Sebastian Thatcher Brown, to Kat Lynch on August 2, 2020 2000 A son, Thayer Quaid Rogador, to Courtney Homan-Jones on June 23, 2020 2000 A daughter, Alexandra Eliza, to Olivia Klose Brazee, on August 22, 2020 2001 A son, Estelle Sophia Vossen, to Jessa Vossen, 2020

Madeira thrives with the support of our incredible community. WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 81


Contents Madeira Today WINTER 2021, Number 203 Published by The Madeira School 8328 Georgetown Pike, McLean VA 22102

Editor: Karen Joostema

2

OVAL & Q UAD REF LEC T IO NS

Design: LucidCreative.co Photography: James Kegley & Freed Photography

4

4

M EET M ADEIRA’ S NEW HEAD

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2020–21

Jaylaan Ahmad-Llewellyn ’96 Kara Bell P’21 Ann Baker Boney ’79 (Missy) Gregory Wenzl Brown P’19

12

14

M ADEIRA M ASKS UP

Rene E. Chaze P’22 Wm. Eric Clark P’18 Lee Carol Cook P’19

HY BRID LEARNING

Gaither Smoot Deaton ’88 Board of Trustees President

SPURS INNOVAT IO N

12

William F. Dunbar P’17 (Will) Anne Faircloth ’87 Vice President Sue Luangkhot Hoppin ’87

28

CO - C URRIC ULUM

Carrie Southworth Johnson ’95 Joy Johnson ’77 Vice President George Kaczmarskyj P’19,’22 Harry J. Klaff P’12,’13,’17 Treasurer

29

30

32

36

Louise Stillman Lehrman ’58 Avery Swing Miller ’86, P’19 Nancy Miller Montgomery ’60

CORNER

AT HLET IC S SPOT LIGHT

ARTS SPOT LIGHT

14

Michelle Malek Olson ’86, P’24 Tracy G. Savage ’66 Kumea Shorter-Gooden ’70 Catherine Stuart ’73 Anita Patel Tolani ’91, P’24, Secretary Nancy Rodwell Tuohy ’88 Gretchen Warner Head of School Kate Wisniewski Weir ’02 Audrey Baxter Young ‘80 Madeira Today is published for alumnae, parents, and friends of the School. Send any comments or suggestions to: KJoostema@madeira.org To unsubscribe from Madeira Today send your name and address to: madeiraalumnae@madeira.org

C AM PAIGN UPDAT E

CO LLEGE LISTS

40

C LASS NOT ES

81

M ILESTO NES

29


OVAL+QUAD I am honored to be writing as Madeira’s 10th Head of School in an era that is bright for innovation and creativity. I believe that Lucy Madeira would be proud that her School successfully opened for learning—both in

G R E T C H E N WA R N E R HEAD OF SCHOOL

The theme of this school year is CONNECT, and connect we have! Despite the unusual circumstances, our

D E L I V E R I N G A H I G H Q UA L I T Y H Y B R I D LEARNING PROGRAM

community has

Throughout the following pages you will read about the flexibility, agency, and choice Madeira’s faculty are modeling for our students as they deliver a high-quality hybrid learning program. You’ll glean insight into the technology and tools we are using to deliver on Madeira’s mission and values. You’ll learn more about how the pandemic is redefining the critical aspects of education and how Madeira is using this disruption to spur innovation at every level—including the academic curriculum and our Co-Curriculum, Athletics, and

come together in myriad ways to learn together, play together, and live together as a community.

2

person and virtually—in fall 2020; something that was not possible in the 1918 pandemic. Throughout the fall we lived the spirit of “Function in disaster and finish in style!” I want to acknowledge the extraordinary leadership of the Board of Trustees as well as the hero-like nimbleness and creativity of Madeira’s faculty and staff. The quality of teaching and learning at Madeira this year has been strong, and the outcomes our students are producing are noteworthy.

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021

Arts programs.


“C O N N E C T ” I S O U R T H E M E

The theme of this school year is CONNECT, and connect we have! Despite the unusual circumstances, our community has come together in myriad ways to learn together, play together, and live together as a community. Technology has kept us connected, though the innovation we are using as a community isn’t just about technology. At the heart of the Madeira experience is a bedrock of critically strong relationships and the quality of teaching and learning. I am honored and proud to share with you the happenings around the Oval, across Maynard Quad, and throughout campus this fall.

F R O M T H E E D I TO R In this year like no other, at this school like no other, we wanted to give a glimpse of how Madeira is thriving. Our big news, of course, is that we are in a new era with Gretchen Warner beginning her tenure as Madeira’s 10th Head of School. We hope our readers will get to know this dynamic, inspiring leader as we on campus have. Gretchen proudly carries forward Miss Madeira’s mission along with her own deep commitment and vibrant passion for girls’ education. As you will see throughout this issue, a

Festina Lente,

Madeira education looks a bit different in this unusual year. You will also see through shining examples of innovative teaching

Gretchen

and learning that, just as our alma mater proclaims, “Strong in her girls, Madeira shall remain.”

“Be brave not perfect.” Brené Brown I AM INSPIRED BY THIS QUOTE FROM BRENÉ BROWN. I PRACTICE LIVING THESE

KAREN JOOSTEMA

WORDS, AND WANT OUR STUDENTS TO

Send comments to

PRACTICE, TOO! GRETCHEN WARNER

KJoostema@Madeira.org

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 3


A NEW ERA

GRETCHEN WARNER: A FIERCE ADVOCATE OF GIRLS’ EDUCATION

“I am boldly and unapologetically devoted to the empowerment of young women. I fervently believe in the transformative power of student-centered and research-based teaching. Madeira’s commitment to launching women who change the world is a mission I passionately live on a daily basis and one to which I am wholeheartedly dedicated.” GRETCHEN WARNER MADEIRA’S HEAD OF SCHOOL

4

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


FLY FISHING, ARGENTINA

“Life was meant to be lived, and curiosity must be kept alive. One must never, for whatever reason, turn (her) back on life.” Eleanor Roosevelt GRETCHEN’S INSPIRATION: THIS SPEAKS TO MY EDUCATIONAL & LIFE PHILOSOPHY. A LOVE OF LEARNING MAKES FOR A LIFE WORTH LIVING. CURIOSITY & PERSEVERANCE ARE

ON JULY 1, 2020

CRITICAL FOR EDUCATION TODAY.

Gretchen Warner became Madeira’s 10th Head of School in its 113-year history, succeeding Pilar Cabeza de Vaca and joining Madeira’s storied history of distinguished leadership. Warner views her principal role as innovating while building and shaping a school that develops the future female leaders of the world. Warner’s deep commitment and vibrant passion for girls’ education are immediately evident. “As a teacher and a leader, I know how critical it is to teach girls in the ways they will thrive—with hands-on learning and making the work relevant and applicable to relationships.” Warner continues on the importance of an all-girls education, “So long as gender inequality exists in the world, there is a role for future-facing female institutions.” BIKING IN CALIFORNIA WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 5


AN INSPIRING LEADER Warner is uniquely qualified to steward Madeira’s mission and actively drive the School’s continued evolution toward a bright future. Trustee Anne Faircloth ’87 summarizes the impact Gretchen has had on the community. “In one word, I would describe Gretchen as inspiring,” Faircloth notes. “Gretchen is a true visionary with unusually powerful communication skills.” Students, faculty, parents, and alumnae have been drawn to her warmth, grace, and sense of humor. Her enthusiasm for community building, her energy as a leader, and her dedication to innovative education have been evident to every Madeira constituency. She will carry Miss Madeira’s banner proudly.

“ n othing in life is to be feared; it is only to be understood. now is the time to understand more so that we may fear less.” Marie Curie GRETCHEN’S INSPIRATION: MARIE CURIE WAS A FEARLESS AND AN INSPIRATIONAL SCIENTIST. I HAVE INTERNALIZED HER WISDOM ABOUT HOW TO DISARM FEAR BY UNDERSTANDING AND LEARNING MORE. I THINK A LOT ABOUT HOW WE TEACH OUR STUDENTS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN FEAR AND DANGER.

6

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


­G RETCHEN’S INSPIRATION:

Dr. Rosalind Franklin: an often-overlooked scientist who was pivotal in the discovery of the structure of DNA

FORWARD-THINKING INNOVATOR WITH A STRONG STEM BACKGROUND A fierce advocate for the education of young women, Warner comes to Madeira from The Archer School for Girls in Los Angeles, California (Grades 6–12, all girls, 495 students), where she was Director of the Upper School. She brings a compelling record in team-building, diversity work, faculty hiring, and retention. In addition to her responsibilities as Director of Archer’s Upper School, Warner has been heavily involved with strategic planning and secondary school accreditation. Gretchen’s background includes:

• Using research-based pedagogy and practices • Building a culture focused on ongoing professional development and learning for faculty and staff

• Future-facing curriculum development • Experiential education and global learning competencies Warner began her career as a chemistry teacher and has a depth of experience in the STEM fields, including STEM facilities expertise. She is well-positioned to enhance the program to maximize the interdisciplinary opportunites in the new academic building.

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 7


“ t here is only one thing that makes a dream impossible to achieve: the fear of failure.” Paulo Coelho GRETCHEN’S INSPIRATION: MISTAKES ARE ONE OF THE GREATEST TEACHERS, AND ADULTS MUST MODEL THIS FOR OUR STUDENTS. NO ONE GOES THROUGH LIFE WITHOUT MAKING MISTAKES, AND WE MUST EMBRACE THE LEARNING THAT CAN HAPPEN AS A RESULT.

EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY Warner has a paperweight on her desk that says, “What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?” She curates a culture of informed risk-taking to ensure that student engagement is piqued because the teachers are always challenging themselves to further refine their craft. “A community where the adults are learning is a community where the students are learning,” notes Warner. She recognizes that failure is one of the best ways to gain experience, develop knowledge, and build resilience, and that reflecting on failure can be a joyful endeavor.

­G RETCHEN’S INSPIRATION:

Pauline Rupp Warner: her grandmother, a women’s college graduate, a lifelong educator, and a feminist

8

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


DETERMINATION TO FULFILL MISS MADEIRA’S MISSION Warner views Madeira as geographically, philosophically, and historically relevant in one of the most important moments in girls’ education. She is excited to lead this spirited community that values graduating critical thinkers, creative problem solvers, and women who change the world. “Madeira’s mission is made for this moment,” Warner states. “We are at an evolutionary point where we have the opportunity to innovate and iterate in ways we have never been able to before.” In a glimpse of potential future initiatives, Warner mentions how she is struck by Miss Madeira’s foundational focus on achieving “personal best” both for the students and adults on campus. She sees “personal best” in a broad context. “Personal best encompasses so much more than academic success,” Warner notes, “and I aim to widen the lens of what success looks like for young women who set out to be leaders in the world. Wellness and joy are as important as academic prowess, and I expressly cultivate these values in a diverse and inclusive community where all students are seen, known, and feel a sense of belonging.” Warner appreciates the historic nature of the campus. “I grew up in Pennsylvania in a house that was built in the 1920s and spent my free time in rivers and creeks,” Warner shares. “I understand that in a community as historically rich as Madeira’s, there is a unique balance that must be struck between tradition and innovation, and I am inspired by this opportunity.”

GRETCHEN’S INSPIRATION:

Miss Madeira’s focus on foundational “personal best”

“Fight for the things you care about, but do it in a way that you will lead others to join you.” Ruth Bader Ginsburg GRETCHEN’S INSPIRATION: I THINK ABOUT HOW IMPORTANT IT IS TO BE COURAGEOUS AND DRIVEN, AS WELL AS COLLABORATIVE AND INCLUSIVE. WHAT WE WILL CREATE AND CHANGE TOGETHER WILL BE BETTER THAN WHAT WE CAN DO ALONE.

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 9


STRONG VIRGINIA ROOTS Warner has numerous ties to Virginia. She met her husband, Robin Laqui, when they were both

PIENZA, ITALY WITH HUSBAND ROBIN LAQUI

undergraduates at Virginia Tech. Robin is from Fairfax, Virginia. After receiving her B.S. in Chemistry from Virginia Tech, Warner went on to earn her M.A. in Chemistry at The University of Virginia. Gretchen and Robin are both thrilled to be back in Virginia. “While we loved living in California, we are excited to be back in the land of four seasons and to call the historic Madeira campus home,” Warner shares. Her boarding roots run deep, as she is a graduate of Mercersburg Academy and spent her early teaching years at Woodberry Forest School.

­GRETCHEN’S INSPIRATION:

Arlene Blum: a mountaineer who led the first all-women expedition to successfully climb Annapurna

OUTDOOR ENTHUSIAST When she is not at work, Warner is outdoors as much as possible. “Nature restores my mind and spirit and I like to challenge myself with adventurous outdoor activities,” she exclaims. Her hobbies include: • Fly fishing • Hiking & backpacking • Mountain & adventure biking • Rock climbing • Mountaineering Living near the Potomac, she is excited to get back into rowing and kayaking as well. BACKPACKING IN SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS, CA

10

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


“ the desire to reach for the stars is ambitious. the desire to reach hearts is wise.” Maya Angelou GRETCHEN’S INSPIRATION: EDUCATION, INTELLECT, AND EXPERTISE WITH HUMANITY AND EMPATHY AT THE CORE IS CRITICAL

MADE FOR THIS MOMENT

FAVORITE FLOWER, THE LUPINE

Though she arrived during a pandemic when nothing was “normal,” and had to begin the school year remotely, Warner has proven to be the right leader for this moment. Madeira’s forward-looking academic program and Warner’s laser focus on Madeira’s mission will help keep the School at the forefront of girls’ education for years to come. As Warner notes, the future will not present neatly defined problems for our students to solve, so it is imperative we help them develop their abstract reasoning as well as the ability to both define and solve the problems they will face. Warner jokes, “Great life stories do not begin with, ‘It was a beautiful day and everything went as planned’…” Certainly, the start of her tenure is not what anyone planned. Ever the optimist, she galvanized the community around the opportunity of the moment. New technologies, ideas, and rapid iterations have become the norm. “This is the ‘great disruptor’ in education we have talked about, where schools who innovate and lead will be well-positioned for the future,” Warner states. “I am grateful and proud of how our community has seized the moment.” With Warner leading the charge, Madeira is well positioned to thrive in this time of rapid change. Warner intends to enssure Madeira’s future is indeed bright.

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 11


MADEIRA Masks Up! With masks now a must-have accessory due to COVID-19, Madeira girls have a new way to showcase their personalities. From sequins and logos to patterns and polka dots to flora and fauna, our students have masked-up in every way imaginable. How do you mask up?

12

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 13


A Tidal Wave of D isruption Propels Innovation 14

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


MADEIRA’S PIVOT T0 HYBRID LEARNING At Madeira, as with many educational institutions, COVID-19 has completely changed how we work and deliver our program. It has been a relatively short time since the tidal wave of disruption last spring required us to pivot overnight from in-person instruction to remote learning. After that, teachers spent the summer working through the labyrinth of logistical, curricular, and pedagogical challenges to re-imagine the curriculum for “hybrid learning,” knowing that some of our students would return in-person and others would be learning remotely. Head of School Gretchen Warner shared her thoughts about the opportunity that has been presented during this unprecedented time. “We have been talking for a long time about a ‘disruptor’ to change the educational model, and it is here! This is the ultimate opportunity to innovate and take the craft and practice of education to the next level.” Ms. Warner added, “The virus has changed how we deliver our program, but has not changed the fundamentals of a quality education. There has never been a better time to be an educator. We will ensure our students have what they need to be successful now and for many years into the future.” COVID-19 will eventually pass, yet this experience will forever change how we work and live. It has propelled initiatives forward in unexpected and expedient ways. WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 15


WHAT IS HYBRID LEARNING? Hybrid learning blends both in-person and remote learning. The reality of the ’20–21 school year is that some students are able to attend classes in-person on campus and others remain remote. In the first half of the school year, Madeira has already toggled from all distance learning at the start of the year to hybrid learning in Mod 2, while Mod 3 started as hybrid and ended as remote. The hybrid curriculum means teaching is no longer confined by time or place. And “time on learning” is no longer defined by how long a student sits in a classroom. Rather, it is defined by a combination of factors, including collective and individual processing time, authentic collaboration, and frequent feedback. The quality of education is measured by how students are able to interpret and apply skills and content to unique and new situations. Hybrid learning starts with engagement and purpose. It is less summative and more formative, so feedback is frequent and reflection is integral. Teaching competencies and skills fosters a growth mindset and learning agility. There is a “why” behind every task and tasks require extended thinking time. Moving beyond recall or formulaic response, tasks call for an understanding and transfer of knowledge. Part of our charge as educators is to pause and reflect on the virtual classroom experience—to assess how individual students are meeting learning targets and specific outcomes in meaningful ways. Dean of Faculty and Academics M.A. Mahoney acknowledged the enormity of this task. “This is challenging work—for teachers to shift to thinking about competencies and skill development as equal to content. It’s not about doing less, but rather how students develop and apply skills that are adaptable to multiple situations.” Ms. Mahoney continued, “This is an evolution that could have taken years, but we are already doing it now. Traditional assessments may no longer be the benchmark of student success ­— we look at performance-based tasks and performance assessments and tasks.”

ELEMENTS OF REMOTE AND HYBRID LEARNING Makes thinking visible Starts with engagement & purpose

Personalized & equity-focused

16

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021

Fosters a growth mindset

connect

Clear learning targets & meaningful time on learning

Frequent feedback & reflection


TEACHING EVOLVES, YET RELATIONSHIPS REMAIN AT THE CORE Creating a curriculum that could integrate students on campus as well as those dispersed through 10 different time zones was a high hurdle. Simultaneously preparing students for the unknown of their future while we are in the unknown of the present, we are proud to deliver a high-quality Madeira relationship-based learning experience. “We do not aim for an exact replica of the traditional classroom experience,” shares Ms. Mahoney. “Yet we keep the core of the experience—strong relationships between the teacher, the student, and the content.” The entire community has met this moment with creativity, resilience, and resolve. Students still read a variety of texts, write thoughtful essays, research topics, solve complex problem sets, complete multi-step labs, and create inspiring art. They still gather in community, train together, and collaborate. Students are engaged, challenged, and learning. All Madeira students, whether sitting in the same room as the teacher or across the world, have access to the same learning experience. Teaching methods and technologies have evolved rapidly, yet the student-teacher relationship remains, as ever, at the center. What has worked in Madeira’s favor? “The Mod schedule gives us this built-in nimbleness to continue to iterate in nearly real time,” Ms. Mahoney remarked. “Every five weeks we have a natural refresh with a new Mod.”

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 17


TECHNOLOGY ENHANCES LEARNING Even when students and teachers cannot gather physically in the same room, Madeira’s faculty take advantage of technology and various platforms to create innovative and meaningful ways to engage their students in learning and connect as a community. Teachers use a variety of technology tools and apps to enhance student learning, to support student self-assessment, and to provide opportunities for students to demonstrate knowledge. “We have even built purposeful time into the remote schedule to take a break from technology, giving the day a pause with student time to reflect and recharge,” Ms. Mahoney notes.

HYBRID CLASS WITH A VIRTUAL GUEST

Students in Sra. Cooley’s Spanish IV class (with both in-person and remote learners) spoke with guest researcher, author, and professor Dr. Herman Aguinis about growing up in Argentina under a military dictatorship. The class had read Prisoner Without Name, Cell Without Number by Jacobo Timerman and was able to question Dr. Aguinis about what it was like to live in Argentina during this time.

18

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


TOOLS TO TACKLE EVERY CHALLENGE Madeira uses a variety of tools to amplify learning. Technology allows students to think in new ways and to demonstrate learning in modes that otherwise would not have been possible. Below are some of the resources Madeira has used in pivoting pedogogy to hybrid learning.

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 19


TRANSFORMING TODAY’S CLASSES HERE IS A GLIMPSE OF SOME OF MADEIRA’S TECHNOLOGY TOOLS, WHICH GO WELL BEYOND TRADITIONAL TEACHING, THAT ENHANCE STUDENT LEARNING.

COMMUNITY BUILDING FLIPGRID HELPS TEACHERS FACILITATE VIDEO-BASED DISCUSSIONS

“We started using it when we went remote last year as a way to add social presence to the online classroom, but we have found it so helpful for deeper discussion that we continued using it in hybrid learning and will likely use it when we are fully in person again.” STACY TIPPENS, DIRECTOR OF INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN & INNOVATION

GOOSECHASE A VIRTUAL SCAVENGER HUNT

“We have been using GooseChase since 2018. It is a fantastic resource because it is interactive, fun, and builds asynchronous connections between students.” EMILY DOWD, LIBRARY, INFORMATION & INNOVATION

DISCUSSION BOARDS DIGITAL LOGS WHERE STUDENTS ASYNCHRONOUSLY ADD COMMENTS

“Discussion boards are a great tool for eliciting detailed and precise comments from highly motivated students who enjoy offering a thoughtful response to a question. And, of course, it’s especially useful for engaging students who are a bit reluctant to jump into a live conversation.” DR. DONAVAN ARIZMENDI, ENGLISH TEACHER

20

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


“I do well with learning things by listening, so having the chance to do that instead of reading everything was helpful. Having so many options to see other people’s responses made the transition to remote learning more enjoyable.” LILLY TANENBAUM ‘21

STEAM FUSION360 A DESIGN TOOL THAT ALLOWS STUDENTS TO UTILIZE 3D CAD, CAM, AND CAE ON A CLOUD-BASED PLATFORM

“Fusion360 has been such a powerful tool for our students. It has allowed them to design both 2D sketches and 3D objects within the same program.” SASHA NEWMAN, ARTS DEPARTMENT CHAIR

BANDLAB ALLOWS STUDENTS TO CREATE AND COLLABORATE ON MUSIC

“We have been able to use BandLab to help students record their parts for the musical. Students are picking it up very quickly. In fact, many have said that they want to use BandLab to create and record their own music in the future.” KELSEY MEIKLEJOHN, THEATER TEACHER

DESMOS GRAPHING SOFTWARE THAT ALLOWS INTUITIVE VISUALIZATION OF MATHEMATICAL THINKING. AN ACTIVITY BUILDER LETS TEACHERS CREATE LONG, MULTI-STEP EXPLORATIONS OF A CONCEPT.

“I use Desmos to give students new ways to explore abstract mathematical concepts at their own pace in a hands-on way. There’s also a fantastic community of educators building different activities such as geometric transformation golf. I honestly don’t know how I could teach some of these concepts remotely without it.” GLEN RUSSELL, MATH DEPARTMENT CHAIR WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 21


“With discussion-based classes, tools like VoiceThread are great ways to communicate; we post interpretations of a text and reply to each other very easily. VoiceThread provides multiple ways to post information, such as audio recordings or text, which allows for students to learn in the way that suits each individual best.” ELENA JOCHUM ‘21

COLLABORATION SCRUM AGILE FRAMEWORK FOR PROJECT MANAGEMENT— WE ARE USING ONENOTE AND PLANNER FOR A DIGITAL COMPONENT TO THIS ANALOG PROJECT MANAGEMENT METHOD.

“The Scrum method of project management is a real-world method of managing projects and helps students learn how to work together in teams.” STACY TIPPENS, DIRECTOR OF INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN & INNOVATION

TEAMS A SPACE FOR GROUPS TO COLLABORATE, SHARE DOCUMENTS, ATTEND ONLINE MEETINGS, AND ORGANIZE COURSES

“Teams is part of the Office 365 suite and gives students access to real world tools that they will encounter during internships and after high school.” STACY TIPPENS, DIRECTOR OF INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN & INNOVATION

WE VIDEO A COLLABORATIVE VIDEO-EDITING TOOL THAT ALLOWS ANYONE TO EDIT VIDEOS IN THE CLOUD, INSTEAD OF HAVING TO USE A HIGH-POWERED COMPUTER.

“Juniors preparing for Capitol Hill internships are conducting research on an issue area in which they are interested. Since the internships have expanded beyond the Hill, students are preparing 30-second ads for a variety of placements, including congressional offices, interest groups, and federal agencies. The focus of the research is how these institutions support policy related to their area of interest.“ REBECCA GRAHAM, HISTORY TEACHER

22

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


MULTIMEDIA VOICE THREAD TOOL FOR COMMENTING ON VARIOUS KINDS OF MEDIA

“In an asynchronous class, I created a slide for each item on my agenda for the day: the syllabus might appear on one slide and then a video of an acting exercise would be on the next slide. Students could respond by recording themselves carrying out the assigned activity. And moving from one activity to the next is as easy as turning a page in a book.” KELSEY MEIKLEJOHN, THEATER TEACHER

VIDEO GRADING ALLOWS TEACHERS TO PROVIDE VIDEO FEEDBACK ON STUDENTS’ WORK

“I think video grading gives more personalized feedback to my students, by combining both visual and auditory messages.” LARRY PRATT, HISTORY TEACHER

SWAY COLLABORATIVE, WEB-BASED MULTIMEDIA TOOL FOR CREATING INTERACTIVE, MAGAZINE-LIKE PRESENTATIONS

“Our students are using it for a variety of projects including several in Global Studies. Those students chose eight contemporary female global citizens. They created interactive presentations reflecting upon these females— analyzing their strategy, how they became activists— while comparing and contrasting them with medieval global travelers.” MATTHEW SUDNIK, HISTORY DEPARTMENT CHAIR

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 23


”Asynchronous learning has promoted my engagement with academics. With little set schedule in my life, I have to keep track of assignment progress and communicate with teachers whose classes I don’t attend live. The logistics were challenging at first. However, adapting to this made me feel more prepared for college, where I will have to take more initiative in communication with professors and peers.” ISABELLA HAN ’21

HOW FACULTY MADE THE SHIFT This summer, our faculty focused on the iterative design process to think about the learning outcomes they wanted for students this year. Throughout the summer they engaged in professional development to strategize how to design and implement courses, how to capitalize on best practices, and how to create community. What is both fascinating and challenging about remote teaching is that we have many different types of learning that we deliver: discussion-based, lecture-based, lab-based, performance-based, and language-based, to name several. We’ve been strategic in thinking about how we can make our courses align with our educational philosophy. One of the research-based decisions we made is about content delivery and the need for a clear separation of synchronous learning (which is live and collaborative involving students), and asynchronous content (which is pre-recorded and on-demand). In a typical classroom, we can improvise between the two, but that is harder to do in an online setting. Learning demands reflection, and weaving asynchronous with synchronous opportunities ensures reflection time. Learning demands engagement and weaving synchronous with asynchronous ensures collaboration time.

24

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


BLENDING SYNCHRONOUS & ASYNCHRONOUS LEARNING Madeira blends real-time collaborative elements with time for individual reflection.

SYNCHRONOUS LEARNING On the screen with others in teams Communication happens in real time Immediate feedback Focused, purposeful & in smaller chunks

ASYNCHRONOUS LEARNING On or off screen More flexible: self-directed and self-paced Communication is not live—feedback is offered through collaborative tools More processing time for deeper thinking

Connect with students & make thinking visible

Digital instruction longer than 20 minutes

Small group collaboration & breakout rooms

Readings

Video demonstrations & curated content

Individual and small group check-ins & conferences

Basic checks for understanding

Focused activities with real-time interaction

Presentations

Community building

Independent practice & extension/ reinforcement opportunities Processing & reflection time

* ADAPTED FROM CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY CENTRE FOR TEACHING & LEARNING WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 25


TOP 10 LESSONS FROM HYBRID LEARNING Our Dean of Faculty and Academics, M.A. Mahoney, shares Madeira’s “Top 10” lessons from hybrid learning 10. B E READY TO BE NIMBLE. The world health situation has required educators to practice nimbleness regularly. Madeira teachers have students in the classroom, out of the classroom, in congruent time zones, and in time zones that require alternate arrangements. Nimbleness precedes learning.

9. FUNCTION IN DISASTER & FINISH IN STYLE. Some technologies will work perfectly every day. Other days the internet won’t cooperate with a teacher or with a student. It seems Lucy Madeira knew the school year ’20–’21 was coming when she left us this treasured adage.

8. DESIGN THE COURSE AS THOUGH IT WILL BE TAUGHT COMPLETELY ONLINE. A course retains its integrity if it is designed as an online course but is then delivered all or partially in person. Conversely, a course designed for all in-person instruction requires more re-imagining to deliver it remotely. This is an important learning, given all the different schedules we have had since March 2020!

7. ACKNOWLEDGE GRATITUDE FOR STUDENTS WHO LOVE TO LEARN, FOR SUPPORTIVE FAMILIES, & FOR A SCHOOL WITH RESOURCES. Madeira faculty remain inspired when teaching in a pandemic because they are teaching eager and flexible learners, from families who value education, in a school that has provided resources in terms of technology, professional development, and human resources.

5. H AVE AGREED-UPON PRACTICES FOR CLASSROOM OPERATIONS. The faculty are working from agreed-upon common practices. The student benefits from using a limited number of learning management systems and from a limited number of practices surrounding work submission. We have agreed to specific user-friendly designs of assignment sheets, among other tenets.

4. R EIMAGINING EDUCATION AND REDESIGNING COURSES IS HARD WORK & A JOYFUL ACTIVITY. Re-imagining education is an opportunity. Madeira faculty, all lifelong learners, have used the time to enjoy rethinking their craft, their methods, and their focus. What we are learning now will guide us beyond the present moment.

3. G O TO THE RESEARCH. What we know about neuroscience, adolescent development, and how girls learn, remains a trove of useful information, even in hybrid learning.

2. W HEN THE BELL RINGS TO SWITCH CLASSES, THE SOUNDS OF STUDENTS SHOULD FOLLOW. When teachers are in the classrooms but all students are learning remotely, we miss the student presence on campus. We are committed to community health, and we will continue to make community health our top priority. Still, we wait until all Madeira students can be back on campus. We are eager for a school year with students on campus every week.

1. A LL LEARNING IS RELATIONAL. Research has 6. PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE. Students are not the only ones who must practice what they learn. All summer, faculty practiced using new technologies so that the first day of class would be as seamless as could be. Never before did we start a school year with teachers in classrooms and all students learning remotely! Practice makes perfect (or as close as we could get).

26

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021

proven that the best learning happens when there is a deep relationship between student, teacher, and content. Our biggest take-away from our current moment: learning doesn’t depend on shared physical space or a shared time zone. Whether in a pandemic or not, the best learning is based upon strong relationships.


PHYSICALLY DISTANT AND SOCIALLY CONNECTED Community building is critical to the Madeira experience, and even more so as we navigate uncertain times. “Madeira’s mantra in thinking about creating community in remote and hybrid environments has been ‘physically distant while socially connected,’” according to Dean of Students Kim Newsome. “We have to follow health guidelines and we want to continue to build connections,” Ms. Newsome notes. Creative students and adults have adapted favorite traditions like the gnome hunt (we hide six gnomes at a time to scatter everyone; remote learners help decode clues), the bakeoff (quesadillas outdoors over a campfire), and Thanksgiving dinner (three seatings, outdoor dessert, served mid-day this year). New opportunities have emerged from our hybrid schedule, which contains a long mid-day break to accommodate multiple lunch seatings. Student leaders, in conjunction with Madeira’s Health and Wellness Center, organize daily activities that promote important themes of self-care, connection, and gratitude. Recent programming has included archery, creating stress balls, drawing mandalas, yoga, tie-dying, and making root beer floats. Dorm gatherings continue, whether virtual or in-person. Not surprisingly, Madeira girls have found a way to learn remotely while holding each other close.

THRIVING IN THIS TIME OF CHANGE In the midst of a global pandemic, this year certainly has been different. But who Madeira is—and what Madeira does—remains the same. Now as much as any time in our history, we are a school that innovates, inspires, evolves, and supports. Madeira is made for this moment. Girls’ leadership is needed, now more than ever, and Madeira’s mission fits the time. Madeira is not only getting through this challenging year, but is thriving during this time of great change.

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 27


CO-CURRICULUM

CORNER

Julia Skowronek ’21 completed a virtual internship working on the election campaign of Carolyn Bourdeaux in Georgia’s 7th District

28

Co-Curriculum Goes Virtual! While the pandemic has necessitated virtual internships for some Mods, it has not shut down Madeira’s signature program. Students and hosts have adapted to the virtual model while retaining the best of what Co-Curriculum has to offer—students gaining valuable real-world experience.

EXPERIENCING A POLITICAL CAMPAIGN —VIRTUALLY

During her internship with a political campaign for newcomer Carolyn Bourdeaux in Georgia’s 7th District, Julia Skowronek ’21 diligently worked on phone and text banking, prepared mail for voters, and conducted donor research. Since the internship was virtual, she completed most of her meetings via Google Meet and Zoom and was given access to all of the necessary software applications so she could complete her work remotely. While the virtual nature of the internship is different from what she had initially envisioned her Co-Curriculum experience to be, she has learned a great deal and has had an excellent experience. “Every intern on the campaign was virtual, which meant there were a few interns from far away. It also meant having more interns was possible, so the campaign was able to achieve more of a grassroots foundation than would have been possible with fewer interns making calls to voters

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021

and donors,” Julia noted. “We did get to participate in some safe collaborative events, like outdoor rallies and online game nights.” GAINING VALUABLE REAL-WORLD EXPERIENCE Despite the different

version of the Co-Curriculum internship this year, Julia learned so much about what it means to help run a political campaign. “I think the biggest takeaway I have found is the power in numbers. The finance team was able to raise $2.1 million in the third quarter, which is the most raised in GA-07 ever, by any candidate in a single quarter. 88% of that came from individuals who donated $200 or less, and not a single penny came from corporate PACs. I definitely got bogged-down, feeling that the work I did was not important sometimes, but then I remembered that the campaign is the definition of grassroots and Carolyn could not win without every person on her team putting in work.”


ATHLETICS Athletic Program Reimagined for ‘New Normal’ Postponement of interscholastic competition. Virtual learning. Hybrid schedules. Athletics looks a bit different across the nation this year, but at Madeira, our students are still working hard, practicing every day, and taking part in an innovative leadership program. Athletic Director Tavis Laws noted that the department had several goals as they re-imagined the program, regardless of whether virtual, in-person, or a hybrid of the two. “We aim to keep our girls engaged, working hard, connected to their team and the program, and accountable for their progress,” Coach Laws said. “Our ‘new normal’ means students are managing changes in their routines,” he continued, “and well-being has never been more critical.” INTENSE PRACTICES-VIRTUAL AND IN-PERSON

Establishing a daily physical routine contributes to overall wellness, and that is what the program was designed to do. With a remote start to the year, daily virtual workouts were held via Zoom sessions. The return to campus in Mod 2 brought the opportunity for drills on the fields and cardio in the workout rooms—a winning combination of sport-specific practices and general conditioning to get our athletes competition-ready. While practices looked a bit different, with masks, socially distant taped-out areas, and equipment moved outdoors, the intensity and Snail spirit were there.

SNAIL SPIRIT STRONG

Speaking of spirit—the Red and White captains kept school spirit high, even without athletic games this season. The year kicked off with the traditional Red/White sorting event, adapted to take place virtually. Continuing the hype and connection, the captains organized a spirit week and a fall festival to celebrate Madeira’s teamwork, even in the face of challenges. WEEKLY LEADERSHIP TRAINING

Another way girls connected was through “Leadership Thursdays,” a weekly leadership program for all athletes. Beyond the daily training, athletes stepped away from the fields and workout rooms to participate in mindful leadership discussions around the athletic core values of commitment, positive mistake response, and gratitude. The goal of these weekly sessions was to prompt personal reflection and growth, and to create better players, teammates, and leaders. “I like how decisive and introspective this program is,” said Sarah Abara ’21. “Through small group conversations, the program teaches us to dig deep within ourselves and connect with our team as if we are one big family.”

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 29


Dance students rehearsed in specially marked, socially-distant spaces, as other dancers joined via livestream or watched recordings

ARTS

The lights may be out on Broadway, but they shine brightly at Madeira This fall the Arts Department stretched their creativity to bring the visual and performing arts to distance and hybrid learning environments. Classes and activities were re-designed using new platforms and technology to connect with students and keep the arts alive. Madeira was able to stage a live, in-person show when most theaters across the country were shut down! Arts Department Chair Sasha Newman noted, “After a few Mods of distance and hybrid learning, we got more flexible and creative, challenged ourselves to think outside the box, and made music, art, theater, and dance happen in new ways. Teachers and students alike have learned so much through this new format.” DANCE DID NOT MISS A BEAT In the dance program, classes

were livestreamed via Microsoft Teams to students with the instructors in the studio—dancing together in real time. Lessons were recorded for students in different time zones to watch and dance along with later. The hybrid learning environment didn’t stop the program from performing either, as students recorded themselves and videos were compiled to create a unique collaboration on the screen. Parents and students viewed this performance as part of the “Arts Showcase” presented at Back to School Night. This photo resembles classic

WHAT’S IT LIKE TO STAGE A SHOW DURING A PANDEMIC?

darkroom results, but was

For the theater program, hybrid learning offered students in the fall play the chance to learn a variety of new techniques and dive deeper into specific aspects of acting. During pre-season, students submitted video auditions with a focus on building two contrasting characters. Rehearsals began virtually, honing characterization and establishing motivation. Once back onstage, the students adapted quickly to socially distanced blocking and began expanding

taken and developed using digital means

30

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


the physical lives of their characters to portray emotion while wearing masks. To create safer physical distancing for the show, the set designers incorporated picture frames to establish individual boxes and areas where actors could safely stand or sit. These frames not only provided physical barriers for the actors to stay separated, but also offered a way for the “Gossip” characters to spy on the scenes in front of them. The frames became part of the room as a painting, and sprung to life as a vehicle to comment on a character’s choices. After just three weeks of in-person rehearsal the students performed Sense & Sensibility by Jane Austen live and via livestream!

Madeira was one of the only area schools to stage live theater this fall

NEW TECHNOLOGIES HELP VISUAL ARTS In the visual arts,

virtual darkroom photography gave students the experience of learning and implementing the basics of 35mm film photography through a digital medium. Incorporating digital camera apps, such as Gudak and Huji, students were able to simulate the experience of shooting a roll of film and waiting to “process” their images. The apps mimicked a challenge of 35mm processing, where students had to troubleshoot the production of their images and the meaning behind them well before seeing a final picture develop. Students also learned to use a virtual gallery as a forum to view and critique others’ artwork. Invigorated by the creativity that flowed from recent challenges, Ms. Newman concluded, “We will continue to grow no matter what hurdles face us. That’s what keeps the arts at Madeira thriving.”

Picture frames were designed into the set to establish individual areas where actors could safely perform; masks became part of the costumes

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 31


CAMPAIGN NEARING COMPLETION! Final Stage Ends June 30, 2021 Over nine years ago, our school launched All The Difference: The Campaign for Madeira. At $85 million, it is our most ambitious campaign to date. 13 people have given gifts of $1 million or more, over 400 donors have given their largest gift to Madeira, and 180 have made multiple gifts. These funds have allowed Madeira to renovate the five original dorms, install an organic turf athletic field, repave and landscape the Oval, refurbish Maynard Quad, and install a geothermal heating and cooling system. These improvements

THE FINAL STRETCH

to our campus are not only seen, but truly felt by the entire community. We are so grateful for all of the donors who have participated to date. But we are not finished yet. With the Campaign ending on June 30, 2021, we need your help. We have $6 million left to raise for the new academic building to house the STEAM program and $3.3 million for the Co-Curriculum Endowment. This Campaign represents an extraordinary opportunity for supporters to make a substantial difference at the School they love and to show support for the importance of the Madeira mission. With your gift to the All The Difference Campaign, we will “Finish in Style” this June 30th!

GROWTH OF THE ALL THE DIFFERENCE CAMPAIGN

Key: All the Difference

$16.7 M

The Madeira Fund

$12.1 M

$12.5 M $11 M $9.7 M $8.3 M $7.3 M

$6.1 M

FY2013 32

$5.8 M

FY2014

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021

FY2015

FY2016

FY2017

FY2018

FY2019

FY2020

FY2021 GOAL


CO-CURRICULUM ENDOWMENT THE FUTURE IS UP TO US: THE Next Generation Society Whether it enabled you to find your calling or gave you the necessary insight to pivot toward a more suitable career, Co-Curriculum informed what you wanted to be and shaped who you’ve become. Now, you can ensure the future of Co-Curriculum and help Madeira girls continue to launch themselves into the world with strength, resilience, and determination—just like you did. A key pillar of the All the Difference Campaign is to endow Co-Curriculum at $5 million — the amount needed to fund the program in perpetuity. An endowment of this size will allow Madeira to fully fund the program’s operations from its revenue stream each year. It will also help to ensure that the program will always be a dynamic, creative, innovative, and crucial component of the Madeira experience.

JOIN THE

Next Generation Society

Members of the Next Generation Society give or pledge $10,000 to Co-Curriculum — allowing current and future generations of Madeira girls to benefit from unique experiential learning opportunities and ensuring the continued financial strength of Madeira.

Benefits of Membership • Recognition on the Next Generation Society donor plaque and in publications • Annual invitation to join Madeira on Capitol Hill for a tour, lunch, and guest speaker • Conversations with Madeira leadership and current students showcasing the program • Quarterly updates on Co-Curriculum placements • Being part of a committed group that wants to make a tremendous impact on Co-Curriculum at Madeira

CO-CURRICULUM, TO GO: $3.3 M RAISED: $1.7 M

GOAL: $5 M

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 33


MADEIRA WOMEN CHANGING THE WORLD AN INTERVIEW WITH MERRITT JOHNSON MORRIS ’99 Tell us about the industry you are in now. I currently work for Canoo, an electric vehicle start-up in southern California. I have worked in automotive for my entire professional career, and have focused on vehicle electrification for 13 years. I have also worked in powertrain development for vehicle manufacturers and Tier 1 suppliers. The term powertrain generally encompasses all the components that form a vehicle’s propulsion system.

How did you decide to be an engineer? Why mechanical engineering? Engineering encompassed everything I was drawn toward. While in college I met some automotive industry connections that advised me on mechanical MERRITT IS THE POWERTRAIN TEST AND

engineering, so I set myself in that direction. I found that mechanical engi-

VALIDATION LEAD AT CANOO, AN ELECTRIC

neering, particularly electro-mechanical engineering or mechatronics, best

VEHICLE START-UP COMPANY

tied together my desire for hands-on tinkering plus electricity and computer programming.

What do you think are the key skills you gained at Madeira that have made you successful? It was a painful experience when I went through it, but Madeira gave me a great foundation for writing and communication. In the engineering world writing is especially valuable as it is not a strength found in many engineers. Madeira also demanded great time management skills. Heavy schoolwork loads and an extensive athletic schedule set me up to succeed in college and beyond. Surviving the load of a tech start-up plus having two small children pulls on a lot of the same mental and physical energy stores I originally developed at Madeira.

Which Madeira teachers inspired you? My physics teacher, Ben Daley, was highly encouraging of my pursuit in the field. He pushed me to take AP Physics my senior year where my teacher, Reyna Pratt, was another inspiration. She helped me to be more comfortable setting a unique path for myself, which led me to major in physics.

What do you think about the plans for Madeira’s new STEAM building? I am excited! When I was at Madeira, if a class was in session, the building was off limits. Any use of equipment in the building was tied to class use. A lot of learning can happen when students are allowed to experiment and fail. The new building will expand access to resources and space, inspiring crossMERRITT’S YEARBOOK PHOTO

collaboration and increasing learning opportunities.

What else would you like to share? I have seen Madeira increase STEAM opportunities for students since my time there. I hope to see this momentum continue, and that is why I will be hosting a Madeira student for a virtual internship.

34

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


NEW ACADEMIC BUILDING FOR STEAM A TOP PRIORITY FOR THE HEAD OF SCHOOL Head of School Gretchen Warner states: “I believe every girl can excel in science, technology, engineering, and math at the highest levels, and that creativity is essential for success in any endeavor. Our STEAM program will engage girls in challenging, integrated curriculum that provides a deliberate balance between cultivating scientific and mathematical literacy and encouraging creativity and innovation. This interdisciplinary approach focuses on analytical inquiry, creative thinking, and technical and digital literacy that will ensure success for Madeira girls both in jobs that exist today and in those that have not yet been created. Student-driven research must be at the core of a girl’s experience. There must be purpose, passion, and empathy before research questions are asked and as experiments are designed. Madeira students learn with purpose behind essential questions and enduring understandings. To uncover the big ideas that will successfully propel our girls into an ever-changing future, Madeira needs classes and labs that are open-ended and inquiry-based. And as we ask our students to design their own procedures and processes — we need to give them the physical resources and space to reach their highest potential. Everything I do is rooted in our mission, but the world is not going to stop while we prepare our girls. Madeira’s time is now and providing a state-of-the-art facility is a top priority. Join me in preparing a generation of women who will truly change our world.”

HEAD OF SCHOOL GRETCHEN WARNER IS EXCITED TO MAKE THE PROPOSED NEW ACADEMIC BUILDING A REALITY

$500,000 STEAM CHALLENGE GIFT Double your impact! Emmy Champion Knobloch ’52, P’77, ’78 has offered a challenge to the community to help the School “Finish in Style” and reach our fundraising goal for the new academic building that will house our innovative STEAM program! Between now and March 31st, all gifts and pledges of $10,000 or more toward STEAM will be matched dollar-for-dollar. Emmy invites, “Please join me in making this new academic building a reality for the School.”

STEAM, TO GO: $6 M RAISED: $20 M

GOAL: $26 M

For further information, please visit campaign.madeira.org or contact the Development Office at madeiradifference@madeira.org or call 703.556.8221.

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 35


Prepared to change

36

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021


the world

2016–2020 M A D E I R A CO L L E G E M AT R I C U L AT I O N

Madeira girls are prepared to be confident contributors to their college communities. From the Oval to Capitol Hill they explored, discovered, advocated, and grew. We know they are prepared to take ownership and open doors. These colleges are lucky to have Madeira graduates from the last five years to enrich their schools. The University of Alabama 3+ American University Babson College Bard College Barnard College Bates College Boston College Boston University 3+ Brandeis University Brigham Young University University of British Columbia Bryn Mawr College Bucknell University 3+ University of California–Berkeley 3+ University of California–Davis University of California–Los Angeles 3+ University of California–San Diego 3+ University of California–Santa Barbara 3+ California Polytechnic State University– San Luis Obispo 3+

3+

three or more Madeira students enrolled


You can find Madeira girls just about anywhere, from the Ivy League to the Big-10, large national research universities to small liberal arts havens, and art schools to athletic powerhouses, cities in the US and around the world. MA DEIRA GRA DUATES FROM 2016–2020 BY THE NUM B ERS:

319:

145:

accepted to

attended

# of colleges

# of colleges

35:

# of states where

4:

# of countries

where attended college

38

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2021

attended college

15%

attended college in VA


2016 –2020 MADEIRA COLLEGE MATRICULATION, CONTINUED

Carnegie Mellon University 3+

Johns Hopkins University 3+

Rutgers University–Camden

Case Western Reserve University

University of Kentucky

Sarah Lawrence College 3+

Centre College

Kenyon College 3

Savannah College of Art & Design

Chapman University 3

+

Lafayette College

Scripps College

University of Chicago

University of Lausanne

Christopher Newport University

Lawrence University

Sewanee: The University of the South 3+

Claremont McKenna College

Lehigh University

Clemson University

Liberty University

Colgate University 3

+

+

Skidmore College Smith College

Loyola Marymount University

University College Dublin

Macalester College 3+

College of Charleston 3+

University of Maryland– College Park

University of Colorado–Boulder Colorado College Columbia University University of Connecticut Cornell University 3+ Dartmouth College Davidson College Denison University Drexel University Duke University 3+ Duquesne University East Carolina University

McGill University

St. Lawrence University

University of Miami 3

+

University of St. Andrews 3+ St. John’s College

University of Michigan

St. Mary’s College of Maryland

Michigan State University

Stanford University

The New School–Parsons

Swarthmore College

New York University 3+

Syracuse University 3+

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 3+

Texas Christian University 3+

Northeastern University

Trinity College

Emerson College

Northwestern University 3+ University of Notre Dame

University of Florida

Oberlin College

Fordham University 3+

Occidental College

Franklin and Marshall College

Ohio Wesleyan University

George Washington University 3+ Georgetown University 3+

University of Oklahoma– Norman Campus

University of Georgia

University of Pennsylvania 3+

Georgia Institute of Technology 3+

Pennsylvania State University

Georgia State University

University of Pittsburgh 3+

Grinnell College

Princeton University

Hamilton College

Purdue University

Harvard College 3+

Queen’s University

High Point University

Randolph College

Hobart William Smith Colleges 3+

University of Redlands

Hofstra University

Rice University

Howard University

University of Richmond

Indiana University–Bloomington

University of Rochester

Irvine Valley College

Rochester Institute of Technology

James Madison University

Rollins College

three or more Madeira students enrolled

Southern Methodist University 3+ Spelman College

Elon University 3+

3+

University of Southern California 3+

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 3+

Northern Virginia Community College–Loudoun Campus

Fashion Institute of Technology

University of South Carolina– Columbia

University of Toronto Tufts University 3+ Tulane University 3+ United States Coast Guard Academy United States Naval Academy Vanderbilt University 3+ Vassar College University of Vermont Villanova University University of Virginia 3+ Virginia Commonwealth University 3+ Virginia Polytechnic Institute 3+ Wake Forest University 3+ Washington and Lee University Washington University in St. Louis 3+ Wellesley College Wesleyan University William & Mary 3+ Williams College The College of Wooster Xavier University of Louisiana

WINTER 2021 MADEIRA TODAY 39


MCLEAN VA 22102-1200

WINTER 2021

8328 GEORGETOWN PIKE

FSC GOES HERE

M A D E I R A TO DAY

MADEIRA’S MISSION IS MADE FOR THIS MOMENT! Education is at an evolutionary point where we have the

A NEW E RA

opportunity to innovate and iterate in ways we never have before. At this critical time in our changing world, Madeira’s mission to launch women who will change the world (for the better!) ISSUE 203

is more relevant than ever.