Thunderbolt 2/22/2024

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Vol. 52, No. 8

Thursday, February 22, 2024

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News/Features: page 3 Great Power Competition

News/Features: page 3 Operation Deep Freeze

Week in photos: page 4 Images from the week

Photo by Senior Airman Joshua Hastings

Community: page 14 Events, Chapel, more...

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Luis Flores, 6th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, marshals a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to the 91st Air Refueling Squadron at MacDill Air Force Base Feb. 13. Prior to takeoff, aircraft are guided from their parked locations to safely navigate to the runway.


NEWS/FEATURES

DAF leaders present plan to reoptimize Air Force, Space Force Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs AURORA, Colo. (AFNS)—In a show of unity fueled by a sense of urgency, senior Department of the Air Force civilian and military leaders unveiled Feb. 12 a set of sweeping decisions designed to reoptimize the Air Force and Space Force to maintain preeminence, deter adversaries, and prevail in an era of Great Power Competition. The leaders – Secretary of the Air Force Frank Kendall, Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Financial Management and Comptroller performing the duties of the Under Secretary Kristyn Jones, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Allvin, and Chief of Space Operations Gen. Chance Saltzman – outlined 24 specific decisions during a panel discussion at the AFA Warfare Symposium. The package of decisions, they said, will position the services to better confront China and maintain the hard-won superiority in air and space that has been a crucial foundation for deterrence and for protecting the nation’s security. In explaining the “why” behind the decisions, Kendall was clear and unmistakable. “We have the most pacing challenge we have ever faced – China, China, China. Ladies and gentlemen, we are out of time, we are out of

Photo by Eric Dietrich

Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Financial Management and Comptroller Kristyn Jones, performing the duties of the undersecretary of the Air Force, makes remarks for the panel discussion “Reoptimizing for Great Power Competition: A Senior Leaders Discussion” during the Air and Space Forces Association 2024 Warfare Symposium in Aurora, Colo., Feb. 12, 2024. The leaders outlined 24 specific decisions that will position the services to better confront China and maintain the hard-won superiority in air and space that has been a crucial foundation for deterrence and for protecting the nation’s security. time, we are out of time,” he said, reprising two familiar themes. “The United States does not seek a conflict; we have every hope that one can be avoided,” Kendall said in his leadoff remarks. “We are,

COMMANDER’S ACTION LINE The Action Line provides two-way communication between the 6th Air Refueling Wing commander and the MacDill community. Personnel may submit questions, concerns or comments via email to macdillwingcommander@us.af.mil or Facebook @6thARWCommandTeam

MacDill Thunderbolt Publisher: Joe Deluca Editor: Nick Stubbs The MacDill Thunderbolt is published by the Times Publishing Company, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Air Force. This commercial enterprise newspaper is an authorized publication for distribution to members of the U.S. military services on MacDill. Contents of the MacDill Thunderbolt are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by the U.S. government, the Department of Defense,

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the Department of the Air Force or the 6th Air Refueling Wing. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, the Department of the Air Force, 6th Air Refueling Wing or the Publishing Company of the products or service advertised. For retail advertising, call (813) 226-3318. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron.

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however, involved in a competition, an enduring competition that could turn into a conflict at any time. We can no longer regard conflict as a distant possibility or futured problem that we See DAF, Page 12

MacDill on the web Website: www.macdill.af.mil Facebook: www.facebook.com/ MacDillAirForceBase Instagram: macdill_afb Twitter: @macdill_afb News items for the MacDill Thunderbolt can be submitted to the 6th Air Refueling Wing Public Affairs office, 8208 Hangar Loop Dr., suite 14, MacDill , FL 33621. Call the Thunderbolt at 828-2215. : 6arw.pa.macdillthunderbolt@us.af.mil. Deadline for article submissions is noon, Wednesdays to appear in the next week’s publication. Articles received after deadline may be considered for future use. All submissions are considered for publication based on news value and timeliness. Every article and photograph is edited for accuracy, clarity, brevity, conformance with the “Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual” and Air Force Instruction 35-101.


NEWS/FEATURES

Sweeping changes to maintain seperiority amid Great Power Competition Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs AURORA, Colo. (AFNS)—The Department of the Air Force’s senior civilian and military leaders, Feb. 12, unveiled sweeping plans for reshaping, refocusing, and reoptimizing the Air Force and Space Force to ensure continued supremacy in those domains while also better posturing the services to deter and, if necessary, prevail in an era of Great Power Competition. Taken together, the changes made public Feb. 12 and endorsed by Secretary of the Air Force Frank Kendall, Performing the Duties of Acting Under Secretary Kristyn Jones, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Allvin and Chief of Space Operations Gen. Chance Saltzman represent one of the most extensive recalibrations in recent history for the Air Force and Space Force. “Today, we are announcing 24 key decisions that are going to address the current force and our ability to stay competitive,” Kendall said in announcing the changes and the rationale behind them. “We need these changes now; we are out of time to reoptimize our forces to meet the strategic challenges in a time of Great Power Competition.” While the changes feature a mix of near-term and longer-term initiatives, senior leaders emphasized the need for speed. “We are out of time,” Kendall said repeatedly in urging action on the changes. The changes included in the plan are grouped in four main categories – Develop People, Generate Readiness, Project Power, Develop Capabilities – and include: Develop People • Consolidate force development functions under an expanded Airman Development Command to provide Airmen a common, mission-focused development and training path. See GREAT POWER, Page 10

Department of the Air Force graphic

The Department of the Air Force’s senior civilian and military leaders unveiled sweeping plans for reshaping, refocusing, and reoptimizing the Air Force and Space Force to ensure continued supremacy in those domains.

18th AF leadership participates in Operation Deep Freeze by Captain Matthew Stott 18th Air Force SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill.—Recently, Maj. Gen. Corey Martin, 18th Air Force commander, and Chief Master Sgt. Thomas Blount, 18th Air Force command chief, participated in the 68th anniversary of Operation Deep Freeze (ODF). With more than 4,200 hours of flight experience to include the C-17 Globemaster III, Martin flew the aircraft from Christchurch, New Zealand to McMurdo Station, Antarctica in support of the operation. Operation Deep Freeze is crucial in building relationships with partner nations like New Zealand as well as providing Department of De-

fense logistical support to the National Science Foundation (NSF) for their continued research with the U.S. Antarctic Program. “Having the opportunity to fly with the crews supporting the National Science Foundation’s work highlighted the unique austerity of this mission,” said Martin. “It takes a holistic team of flyers, maintainers, and support personnel to make it a success each year.” ODF also showcased how Joint Base LewisMcChord plans and deploys Airmen for complex missions while exercising mission command. This wouldn’t be possible without the 62nd Airlift Wing and 446th Airlift Wing Airmen, who comprise the 304th Expeditionary Airlift See DEEP FREEZE, Page 11

U.S. Air Force photo

Maj. Gen. Corey Martin, 18th Air Force commander, and Chief Master Sgt. Thomas Blount, 18th Air Force command chief, participated in the 68th anniversary of Operation Deep Freeze (ODF).

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WEEK IN PHOTOS

A special operations forces Soldier descends toward MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Feb. 7. U.S. Special Operations Command, Special Operations Command Central and Joint Communications Support Element conducted a non-tactical free fall operation over MacDill as part of a monthly training requirement.

Photo by Senior Airman Joshua Hastings

Photo by Airman 1st Class Derrick Bole

Photo by Senior Airman Joshua Hastings

From left, U.S. Air Force Col. Adam Bingham, 6th Air Refueling Wing commander, right, and Maj. Gen. Mike Martin, director of the Operations International Engagements Branch with U.S. Special Operations Command, center, greet NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg upon his arrival at MacDill Air Force Base Jan. 31.

Members assigned to special operations forces descend toward MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Feb. 7. Free fall parachuting allows special operations forces personnel to deploy their parachutes at a predetermined altitude, assemble in the air, navigate under a canopy and land safely together as a tactical unit ready to execute their mission.

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NEWS/FEATURES PACAF welcomes new commander by Tech. Sgt. Jimmie D. Pike Pacific Air Forces JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, Hawaii (AFNS)—Gen. Kevin B. Schneider took the reins as the new Pacific Air Forcescommander during a change of command ceremony at Joint Base Pearl HarborHickam, Feb. 9. Schneider succeeds Gen. Ken Wilsbach, who commanded PACAF since July 2020 as the third-longest tenured commander in PACAF’s nearly 80-year history. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David W. Allvin presided over the change of command, noting the command’s importance in the world today. “We are committed to maintaining a free, open, and prosperous IndoPacific, but our pacing challenge consistently threatens regional interests, negatively impacting security, sovereignty, and prosperity,” Allvin said. “I know Gen. Schneider assumes command with his eyes wide open to this contrasting strategic approach and I know he will continue to propel the PACAF team forward to meet the challenges of the future.” Schneider returns to the Indo-Pacific having spent 12 years of his nearly 36-year career in the region, most recently serving in theater as the U.S. Forces Japan and Fifth Air Force commander from February 2019 to August 2021. “PACAF Airmen are on the front lines of our reoptimization efforts,” Allvin said. “Adding Gen. Schneider’s leadership and extensive experience in the Pacific will not only benefit them, but also our valued Allies and partners across the region.” As the 37th COMPACAF, Schneider oversees 46,000 Airmen across the

Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jimmie D. Pike

Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Allvin passes the Pacific Air Forces guidon to Gen. Kevin Schneider during a change of command ceremony at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, Feb. 9. During the ceremony, Schneider assumed command of PACAF from Gen. Ken Wilsbach. Indo-Pacific, serving principally in Japan, South Korea, Hawaii, Alaska and Guam. The region accounts for nearly 60% of global Gross Domestic Product, two-thirds of global economic growth, five of the world’s nuclear powers, and seven of the ten largest militaries. See PACAF, Page 7

Be sure to visit the official 6th Air Refueling Wing website at www.macdill.af.mil

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PACAF

From Page 5

“To the men and women of Pacific Air Forces – officers, enlisted, civilians – it is the honor of a lifetime to be part of this team once again,” Schneider said. “I am fortunate to have been assigned in the Pacific for a third of my career, and it feels like home to me.” Schneider also shared his vision for PACAF Airmen, spread across nine major Air Force installations and three Numbered Air Forces, to continue integrating with Allies and partners. “The actions we take to ensure stability and deter aggression in the face of multiple growing challenges will have far-reaching and long-lasting impacts,” Schneider said. “But we do not do this work alone. The allied and partner air forces we team with in the Indo-Pacific grow stronger and more capable each day.” He additionally highlighted his priorities, which include caring for people, ensuring force readiness, and driving modernization, all of which are included in the PACAF 2030 strategy. “This is a time of great consequence for the Air Force and the nation, and much is resting on the shoulders of PACAF Airmen,” Schneider said. “But I have absolute faith in the abilities of our Airmen to do the hard work, to solve the tough issues, and to continue to deter those who attempt to undermine peace and stability.” The event was also attended by many distinguished guests including: the Honorable Kristyn Jones, Under Secretary of the Air Force, and her spouse, Mr. Harry Jones; Adm. John C. Aquilino, Commander of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, and his spouse, Ms. Laura Aquilino; Gen. Schneider’s spouse, Ms. Lori Schneider; Gen. Wilsbach’s spouse, Ms. Cindy Wilsbach; Chief Master Sgt. David R. Wolfe, outgoing PACAF command chief, and his spouse, Dr. Doniel Wolfe; and Chief Master Sgt. Kathleen McCool, the new PACAF command chief and her spouse, retired Chief Master Sgt. Christopher McCool. Wilsbach departs the Pacific after devoting more than 20 years of leadership and service in the region. At the end of February, he will become the Air Combat Command commander at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. Aquilino expressed gratitude for Wilsbach’s dedication throughout his time in command. “Gen. Wilsbach’s leadership over the past three years has set the stage for continued progress and successes for the air component in the Pa-

Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jimmie D. Pike

U.S. Navy Adm. John Aquilino, commander of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, provides remarks as U.S. Air Force Gen. Kevin Schneider listens during the Pacific Air Forces’ change of command ceremony at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, Feb. 9. cific,” Aquilino said. “With his focus on enhancing warfighting advantage, we’ve seen significant strides in ACE and maritime interdiction capabilities. Your leadership brought forth a lethal edge of our air domain that will deter future attacks.” Wilsbach’s command was a storied one, having recently hosted the largest-ever Pacific Air Chiefs Symposium, which demonstrated the breadth and depth of relationships built between partner countries, developing the PACAF Strategy 2030, and expanding ACE capabilities. “Having spent more than 20 years of my career in the Pacific supporting this mission, it’s been my true honor to serve as the PACAF commander,” Wilsbach said. “I am proud to pass my responsibilities to Gen. Schneider knowing he will continue to increase our joint and combined capabilities to deter aggression in the Pacific.”

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AMC rises to increasing global tension by Air Mobility Command Public Affairs AURORA, Colo.—Gen. Mike Minihan, commander of Air Mobility Command, participated in the “Rising Intensity of Competition and Conflict” panel with commander of Air Combat Command, Gen. Mark D. Kelly, U.S. Air Forces in Europe-Air Forces Africa commander Gen. James B. Hecker, and Pacific Air Forces commander Gen. Kevin Schneider, Feb. 13, at the Air and Space Forces Association Warfare Symposium at the Gaylord Rockies Resort & Convention Center in Aurora, Colo. During the panel, moderated by Gen. Herbert J. “Hawk” Carlisle, USAF (Ret.), former Commander, Air Combat Command, Minihan centered on advancements the command is pursuing in 2024 to account for rising global tensions and strategic competition. He emphasized the need for near-term investment in connectivity to improve the survivability, agility, resiliency, and lethality of AMC warfighting capabilities. “I want to get 25 percent of my fleet connected by 2025,” Minihan said. “Connectivity and joining the DAF Battle Network allows us to maneuver the exquisite joint, coalition capabilities into the position of advantage so that they can be successful. This is not about the MAF’s survival, it is about everyone’s survival and ability to win.” Minihan’s approach also includes his 10-line initiatives—broken down to four bins of data, decision advantage, development and discipline—aimed at creating irreversible momentum toward addressing gaps in solidifying Command Relationships, improving Command and Control, and honing AMC’s ability to Explode into Theater. “I’ve got six months left in command and in my career, and I intend to close those gaps by the time I’m on that change of command stage,” Minihan said. Over the course of 2023, AMC flexed to respond to contingency operations on a large scale. Across the year, the command flew over 23 thousand global missions, transporting more than 283 thousand tons of cargo and more than 705 thousand passengers. The end of the year saw the sharpest increase in tempo as the Department of Defense surged support to the Central and European Commands areas of responsibility while maintaining its global obligations. These events once again demonstrated AMC’s role as the joint force maneuver. “It is not lost on AMC that we are the most relied upon 8

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force in the history of warfare,” Minihan said. “The reality is everybody else’s success–the Air Force, the joint force, the multiple combatant commands—is dependent on us being able to put them in position to be successful, and we take this charge very seriously.” Even with the success the Command saw throughout 2023, Minihan recognizes there is more work to be done, including ensuring the MAF is ready for strategic competition, deterrence, and potential conflict in the Pacific. One of the major areas of improvement is optimizing human performance for aircrew conducting maximum endurance operations. To address this problem set, AMC hosted a Human Performance Industry Day in December aimed ensuring the MAF is ready for maximum endurance operations in the Pacific. Exercises also aligned joint and allied partners to ensure the command is ready. AMC played vital roles in Exercises Bamboo Eagle 24-1 and Red Flag in January while testing new capabilities that supported Minihan’s 10-line initiatives. Examples of these capabilities include palletized effects, connectivity advancements, and maneuver battle management. “MBM is not the fun part of battle management. It is all the things that need to happen so that we have the privilege of executing a kill chain,” said Minihan. “Do we have the gas in the right place? Do we have the munitions in the right place? Do we have everything required so that we can maneuver our capabilities to a position of advantage so that they can be lethal. Amateurs study tactics, professionals study logistics…victors study maneuver.” “BE 24-1 gave us a realistic, challenging scenario to get after maneuver and what we need most to be successful is connectivity,” he continued. Each commander expressed concern for global tensions rising, and the need to ensure forces are postured to respond. AMC is aggressively addressing shortfalls, and filling gaps that will allow the joint force to operate at the tempo and relevance to win if called upon. “I don’t lose sleep because of our amazing Airmen, who fill the gap between what they have versus what they need, and they do so with courage, tenacity, professionalism, passion,” Minihan said. “It doesn’t matter whether they fly, fix, or support. [Their] value to the mission is not proportional to [their] proximity to the cockpit. It takes all of us to get the mission done.

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U.S. Air Force photo

(Above and left) Gen. Mike Minihan, commander, Air Mobility Command spoke on a panel titled “Rising Intensity of Competition and Conflict” during the Air and Space Force Association Warfare Symposium, Feb. 13. Gen. James Hecker, commander, U.S. Air Forces in Europe, Gen. Mark Kelly, commander, Air Combat Command, and Gen. Kevin Schneider, commander, Pacific Air Forces, also participated in the discussion.

U.S. Air Force photo


GREAT POWER From Page 3

• Expand technical tracks for officers and create technical tracks for enlisted Airmen; reintroduce warrant officers in IT and Cyber fields to maintain technical leadership in these highly perishable skills. • Develop “Mission Ready Airmen” with training focused on a mix of skills needed for wartime operational mission readiness. • Continue to transform leadership development and training at U.S. Air Force Academy, Officer Training School, and ROTC to prepare new officers to effectively lead Airmen and Guardians in the context of Great Power Competition. • Redesign career paths to produce Guardians that meet our high-tech operational demands. Generate Readiness • Reorient Air Combat Command to focus on generating and presenting ready forces to combatant commanders. • Implement large scale exercises and mission-focused training encompassing multiple operational plans to demonstrate and rehearse for complex, large-scale military operations. • Incorporate no-notice/limited-notice operational readiness assessments and inspections in the Air Force and Space Force to reflect pacing challenge requirements. • Restructure key processes related to aviation spares and weapons systems to be data-driven and risk-informed to improve weapon systems health. • Implement Space Force readiness standards that reflect operations under contested conditions rather than those of a benign environment. • Conduct a series of nested exercises in the Space Force, that increase in scope and complexity, fit within a broader Department of the Air Forcelevel framework, and are assessed through a Service-level, data-driven process to measure readiness. Project Power • Structure Air Force Operational Wings as mission-ready “Units of Action” categorized as Deployable Combat Wings, In-Place Combat Wings, or Combat Generation Wings. Each will have its own structure, with a redesigned concept of support for agile combat employment or ACE, to ensure the wings are prepared to execute their missions with assigned Airmen and units. • Establish the relationship between Combat Wings and Base Command. Combat Wings will focus on mission level warfighting readiness and Base Commands will focus on supporting Combat Wings and operating the

base in competition, crisis and conflict. • Elevate AFCYBER to a standalone Service Component Command, reflecting the importance of the cyber mission to the Joint Force and across the Department of the Air Force. • Formalize Space Force Combat Squadrons as Units of Action, complete activation of the remainder of Space Force Service Components and accelerate implementation of the Space Force Generation model. Develop Capabilities • Create a Department of the Air Force Integrated Capabilities Office to lead capability development and resource prioritization to drive Department of the Air Force modernization investments. • Combine disparate efforts to create the Office of Competitive Activities to oversee and coordinate sensitive activities. • Create a Program Assessment and Evaluation Office to foster structure and incorporate a more strategic and analytically based approach to resourcing decisions. • Establish Integrated Capabilities Command to develop competitive operational concepts, integrated requirements, and prioritized modernization plans to align with force design. • Create a new Information Dominance Systems Center within Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) to strengthen and elevate the Air Force’s focus on Command, Control, Communications, and Battle Management; Cyber; Electronic Warfare; Information Systems; and Enterprise Digital Infrastructure. • Strengthen the support to nuclear forces by expanding the Nuclear Weapons Center to become the Air Force Nuclear Systems Center within AFMC. This will provide comprehensive materiel support to the nuclear enterprise; establish a 2-star general officer as the Program Executive Officer for Inter-Continental Ballistic Missiles. • Refocus the Life Cycle Management Center within AFMC as the Air Dominance Systems Center to synchronize aircraft and weapons competitive development and product support. • Establish an Integration Development Office within AFMC to provide technology assessments and roadmaps. It will drive alignment and integration of mission systems across centers and provide technical expertise to assess operational concept feasibility. • Create Space Futures Command, a new field command, that develops and validates concepts, conducts experimentation and wargames, and performs mission area design.

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DEEP FREEZE From Page 3

Squadron and Joint Task Force-Support Forces Antarctica (JTF-SFA). JTF-SFA is responsible for integrating with the NSF and DoD to plan and execute cargo ship offload, mobile causeway assembly, intracontinental resupply, and intercontinental heavy airlift. On average, they transport more than 2 million pounds of cargo and 2,000 personnel to and from McMurdo Station each year with the C-17. The C-17, with its small airfield footprint and capability to rapidly deploy helicopters, large concrete building supports, vehicles, station machinery and equipment, food, and personnel, has proven to be the ideal aircraft to provide support for science exploration in Antarctica. “The heavy airlift provided by the C-17 gives the National Science Foundation increased logistical efficiency with ongoing infrastructure modernization at McMurdo Station, allowing for greater capacity for science in the future,” said Lt. Col. Anna Fischer, JTF-SFA Chief of Staff. “The professionalism and aviation expertise provided by members across several activeduty and reserve C-17 squadrons showcases the effective construct of operations and training within the Air Mobility Command community.” ODF is a testament to the global reach of AMC and its ability to employ Command and Control in remote, austere environments, as well as 18th Air Force’s mission to provide ready aircraft, Airmen, and equipment… anytime, anywhere. “I am certainly proud of the long history that mobility aircraft like the C-17 have had with Operation Deep Freeze,” Martin concluded.

U.S. Air Force photo

The C-17, with its small airfield footprint and capability to rapidly deploy helicopters, large concrete building supports, vehicles, station machinery and equipment, food, and personnel, has proven to be the ideal aircraft to provide support for science exploration in Antarctica. Operation Deep Freeze (ODF) is crucial in building relationships with partner nations like New Zealand as well as providing Department of Defense logistical support to the National Science Foundation (NSF) for their continued research with the U.S. Antarctic Program.

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DAF

From Page 2

might have to confront. “Our job, our fundamental mission – the reason we exist – is so we can be ready now and always. The name of the game is deterrence. But deterrence rests on strength and the will to use it,” he said. With that foundation laid, Kendall and the other leaders walked through the decisions and changes that will result. “We need fully capable units with all the assets they need to fight China or possibly Russia on short or no notice. We need units fully ready to deploy or conduct operations in place also on short or no, notice,” Kendall said. “We need mechanisms to ensure these units are in fact ready and address any shortfalls that may be found. We need the right mix of Airmen and Guardians with the skills necessary for high end combat and to ensure technological superiority. We need an efficient and effective pipeline of technologies flowing continuously into more competitive capabilities for our highest priority missions.” He also laid down a mandate. “Successful execution of these changes will be the Department of the Air Force’s and all senior leaders’ top priority,” Kendall said. The senior leaders who followed Kendall – Jones, Allvin and Saltzman – echoed his assessments and the need to move fast while also adding detail about specific parts of the initiative. Jones focused on changes at the department’s headquarters designed to merge strategic planning and modernization more precisely and seamlessly with long range. The effort would also address resources needed to achieve the results. One element, for example is a new command to be called the Integrated Capabilities Command that will merge and consolidate work being done separately across different commands that do not always mesh as needed. As designed, this new command will look into the future, understand force design, and test operational concepts against that and look for opportunities to update and improve force design into the future. At the same time, this new command will examine the current force and current modernization efforts to prioritize them for the senior leadership to decide which ones get resourced at what level. Jones, as did others, acknowledged that effort is complex, and the leaders do not have every answer to every question. “We are confident that the changes we are putting into place will move us forward [and we’ll] adapt as needed,” she said. “This effort is not about efficiency or doing more with less. … The world has gotten more dangerous, our battlespace is increasing, technology is advancing, decision space is shrinking, the pace of our adversaries is accelerating. All of this is driving our need to change.” Allvin made a similar point as he outlined the decisions assigned to the Air Force. “We are committed to these [decisions]. We do not have them exactly right, but I am unapologetic to stand here in front of you and say I do not know the exact, final destination,” he said. “Because if we wait to move, to have those final answers, we will be too late,” he said. “We have to have trust and confidence that the analysis See DAF, Page 13

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Photo by Eric Dietrich

Secretary of the Air Force Frank Kendall leads the panel discussion “Reoptimizing for Great Power Competition: A Senior Leaders Discussion” during the Air and Space Forces Association 2024 Warfare Symposium in Aurora, Colo., Feb. 12.

Photo by Eric Dietrich

Chief of Space Operations Gen. Chance Saltzman makes remarks for the panel discussion “Reoptimizing for Great Power Competition: A Senior Leaders Discussion” during the Air and Space Forces Association 2024 Warfare Symposium in Aurora, Colo., Feb. 12.

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DAF

From Page 12

we’ve done will put us on the right path. I am fully confident…we can adjust once we get on course.” Among the more high-profile changes Allvin outlined was reconfiguring air wings into “Units of Action,’ which will be more capable of operating as a self-sufficient unit with the command and control, mission, and sustainment layers needed to provide airpower. Each will include experts that understand what it takes not only just to get the jets airborne, but to support them in an austere environment, be able to regenerate that combat power, be able to do logistics under attack, and other functions that Allvin and other senior leaders say are going to be required in the highly complex combat environment anticipated in an era of Great Power Competition. These units will be organized so they can be severed from their home installations, which planners expect will face disruptions that require leaving leaders and capabilities in place that Allvin said can “fight the base.” In his remarks, Saltzman conceded that the decisions are substantial, but he portrayed them as an opportunity. “We are going to reoptimize because this leadership team is telling you … we’re willing to change fundamentally everything about our services so that we can get after the pacing threat, the PRC and the challenges they face,” Saltzman said, using shorthand for the People’s Republic of China. For the Space Force itself, Saltzman said change is necessary even though the service is only four years old. “We have to transform this service if it’s going to provide the kinds of capabilities, to include space superiority, that the joint force needs to meet its objectives. That’s the transformational charge that’s at hand,” he said. Like the others, Saltzman put a high priority on readiness. In that regard, one of the decisions calls for implementing Space Force readiness standards that reflect operations under contested conditions rather than those of a benign environment. Readiness must be defined by the ability to deter and defeat rival powers rather than its capacity to provide services to others. Guardians will build and conduct a series of nested exercises that increase in scope and complexity to fit within a broader departmentlevel framework, and they will use assessment results to shape force design and development. The proposal also calls for formalizing combat squadrons as the Space Force’s Unit of Action, completing activations of the remainder of Space Force service components to combatant commands, and accelerating the implementation of the Space Force Generation Model. To be prepared for GPC, the service must fully integrate into the Joint Force — properly trained, equipped, and ready to accept mission command for assigned objectives. MACDILL THUNDERBOLT u Thursday, February 22, 2024 u WWW.MACDILLTHUNDERBOLT.COM u 13


COMMUNITY

EVENTS

Dueling Pianos Prepare for an unforgettable night of music, laughter, and good times as Boomers presents “Dueling Pianos” on Friday from 7– 10 p.m. This live-musical event is not to be missed, and the best part? It’s a free event for all to enjoy. Grab a seat early to ensure the best view of the dueling pianos in action. It’s a night you’ll want to experience up close and personal. While you enjoy the fantastic melodies, savor a selection of drinks and food available for purchase. For more information visit, bit.ly/ DuelingPianos_Boomers. Spring craft market Get ready to celebrate spring at the craft market on March 2. Join the Arts & Crafts Center for a day of craftivities for all ages. Browse through a variety of grab & go items, shop from local vendors showcasing their unique creations, and indulge in delicious bites from food trucks parked onsite. For more information, visit bit.ly/ SpringCraftMarket24. 2024 Club Championship Don’t miss out on the Bay Palms 2023 Club Championship on March 2 and 3. The tournament is open to all patrons with access to MacDill AFB. Stroke play, amateurs only and must have current USGA GHIN to compete for net score. Price includes green fees, cart, and lunch. $110 Advanced Green Fee Holders/$150 Active Duty & Retirees/$175 Civilians. For details, vist bit.ly/ClubChampionship24.

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The Champ!

Photo by Airman 1st Class Derrick Bole

Members of the 6th Air Refueling Wing command team award U.S. Air Force Airman Jaileen Beasley, 6th Contracting Squadron contracting airman, the Champ of the Week award at MacDill Air Force Base Feb. 13. Beasley secured $25,000 in conference room space for the Joint Regional Cyber Chief’s Conference within days of receiving the requirement. She also acquired an additional 50 licenses on a system that allows data scientists and analysts to develop natural language processing and used a new method that saved $20,000.

CHAPEL SCHEDULE Normal Hours- Monday - Friday - 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. After hours chaplain, call the Command Post at 828-4362/4361.

Monday-Wednesday Mass - 12:10 p.m. www.macdill.af.mil/chapel

Catholic Mass - Sunday - 9:30 a.m. (confessions by appointment)

Protestant services - Sunday - 11 a.m. Contact the Cha-

pel at 828-3621 or email at 6ARW.HCADMIN@us.af.mil for inquiries regarding Protestant religious education.

Jewish - Monthly Lunch and Learn: For schedule & to join distro, please contact elimelach.estrin@us.af.mil

Islamic Service - Friday 1:30 p.m. (space reserved) Other Faith Groups - Please contact the Chapel at (813) 828-3621 or via email at 6ARW.HCADMIN@us.af.mil

For more details and information, visit the Chapel Facebook page at http://www.facebook/6amwhc/ or MacDill’s Chapel website is: https://www.macdill.af.mil/chapel

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