Page 1

Largest Hunting and Fishing Newspaper in Texas

June 23, 2017

Texas lakes have fish, lack habitat

Volume 13, Issue 21

Port M serving up reds, trout

By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News

By Robert Sloan

As Texas’ reservoirs age, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department has had one dedicated funding mechanism to deal with fish habitat restoration — sales from its bass conservation license plates. However, $30,000 or so only goes so far in a state with 188 major reservoirs: those with a normal capacity of 5,000 acrefeet or larger. But help may be on the way after Gov. Greg Abbott signed Senate Bill 573, in which the Legislature authorizes TPWD to spend money raised from the sale of the Freshwater Fishing Stamp for purposes other than maintaining its fish hatcheries, specifically habitat restoration. The stamp brings in more than $6 million annually. How much of that will go to refreshing reservoirs across the state remains to be seen. “It’s not stipulated in the bill,” said Craig Bonds, head of Inland Fisheries. “Frankly, it’s too early to discuss what it means long-term. It hasn’t been determined. All this bill does is open up some opportunities for us to pursue in the future.” TPWD until now has had to be creative trying to ensure the renown of Texas’ fisheries. Besides the license plate funds, it’s depended on grants from groups such as the Friends of Reservoirs. A $20,000 grant from the group helped build rock piles at Lake Austin to improve fish habitat.

For Lone Star Outdoor News It’s the classic angler’s choice on the Laguna Madre flats out of Port Mansfield. Drift the flats, wade the various shallow sand bars, sight-cast at the Land Cut or fly-fish for tailing reds along the spoil islands — anglers have so many options and more water than anyone can ever fish. “We’ve got a lot of fishing options,” said Mike Sutton, who owns and operates Getaway Adventures Lodge in Port Mansfield. “But lately it’s been a test to hit the right spot at the right time. Some of the best fishing for trout is along isolated sand bars and structures from here to the Land Cut. At dawn, it’s doing best with topwater lures fished in about 2 to 3 feet of water. But as the sun hits the water and things

heat up, we’ll switch over to soft plastics and ease out to deeper water. Right now about 90 percent of the trout are caught on plastics fished with 1/8-ounce jig heads in 3 to 4 feet of water.” A popular lure choice on the Laguna flats right now is a Kwiggler Ball Tail Shad in electric sunrise or the Mansfield margarita. Sutton said they are rigging those tails on 1/8-ounce Kwiggler spring lock jig heads. But if fishing really shallow over grass, he recommends a 1/16-ounce jig head. Reds have been tougher to pin down on the open flats. However, the area down around Peyton’s Bay and the spoil islands a few miles south of the Mansfield channel have been giving up good numbers of tailing reds feeding on shrimp. This is where wading or using a polling skiff Please turn to page 11

Redfish have been abundant around the spoil islands a few miles south of the Port Mansfield Channel. Isolated sand bars and structure have been best for speckled trout. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

From complex to simple

Texas negotiates snapper extension

Using exposed turret scopes

By Darlene McCormick Sanchez

By Craig Nyhus

Frustration with the shortest federal red snapper season on record prompted Texas Parks and Wildlife Department officials to cut a deal to extend the private recreational snapper season in federal waters this summer while preserving the state’s fall snapper season. Texas and the other Gulf Coast states of Louisiana, Alabama, Florida and Mississippi and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which is housed within the U.S. Department of Commerce, had to agree unanimously in

Lone Star Outdoor News

Lone Star Outdoor News Looking through the reticle of a modernized scope can be overwhelming. Lines everywhere, both horizontally and vertically, aren’t always confidence building. Customers and retailers may get con- Once learned, the new style of scopes like the Nikon Black line can be simpler and easier to use. Photo by fused. When the new Nikon Black David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News. line of scopes came out, their sales rep group in the area, brought in Eric Omans, of Stretchin’ Owens Outdoor Sales, did something the Limits Long Range Shooting about it. Academy, to train the team. Knowing customers would need The line of scopes says so long to to be educated about the new and the days of the holdover on marks or different equipment, owner Waylan circles on the reticle. In the end, it Owens got his team together and simplifies long-range shooting.

While recreational anglers are enjoying an extended federal summer snapper season, there’s a chance the entire season could be canceled in 2018. Photo by Lone Star Outdoor News.

order for the plan to move forward. Two options were on the table, one that would add 27 days over two-day weekends and another that would add 39 days over three-day week-

Please turn to page 27 Freshwater Fishing Report . Page 10 Saltwater Fishing Report . . Page 11 Game Warden Blotter . . . . Page 12 Heroes . . . . . . . . . . . Page 16 Sun, Moon & Tides . . . . . Page 18 Products . . . . . . . . . . Page 22 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . Page 25 Outdoor Datebook . . . . . Page 26

Please turn to page 14

HUNTING

INSIDE

CONTENTS

Time Sensitive Material • Deliver ASAP

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PLANO, TX PERMIT 210

Please turn to page 23

FISHING

Millennials and hunting

(Pg. 4)

Stripers back at Whitney

Sustainable food attracts young.

Locals feel lake is tops in state this year.

Quail award

Fishing the surf

(Pg. 6)

Rick Snipes to receive recognition.

(Pg. 8)

When seas calm, trout cooperate.

(Pg. 8)


Page 2

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

It’s your dream. Let’s make it a reality. At Capital Farm Credit, we understand that a piece of land is more than a place to go hunting; it’s an escape where you create memories with family and friends. That’s why we’re with you every step of the way throughout the entire lending process. We’re a cooperative, and that means your goals are our goals. And our patronage dividend program means we share our profits and put money back in your pocket. Because we’re all in this together. And together we’re better.

Together we’re better. Partnership that really pays.

capitalfarmcredit.com | 877.944.5500 NMLS493828

72073.01 CFC Hunting ad_LonestarOutdoorNews_10.5x15.5.indd 1

1/13/17 2:13 PM


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

June 23, 2017

Page 3


Page 4

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HUNTING Fresh food movement and hunting proving to be compatible By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

Locavore, sustainable agriculture, foodie — the terms bring to mind images of yoga-loving millennials trying to save the planet. But, perhaps surprisingly, this foodbased movement could be the gateway into hunting and fishing for many urbanites that were never introduced to the outdoors. The locavore movement is the idea that

eating locally grown, produced and harvested food is a healthier alternative than purchasing food produced on factory farms and better for the planet. The back-to-nature concept merging with the traditional pastimes of shooting wild game or catching fish is giving rise to some unlikely pairings. One entrepreneur who is on the cutting edge of the sustainable food movement has big plans for a mixed-use village 20 minutes outside of Austin that will cater to people who find it just as appealing to

practice marksmanship as yoga. Nicholas Vedros, a filmmaker from Los Angeles who now lives in Austin, said he and his wife, Hannah, a professional chef, have 26 acres under contract to build Altra Outdoors. Vedros envisions it as the most progressive outdoor industry retail experience seen to date. Altra will be anchored by a firearms and fishing store with food and entertainment in the mix, he said. The goal is to create a nonpolitical environment comprised of “both liberal and

Chef Hannah Crow Vedros creates game dishes such as this plate of venison meatballs. The urban idea of eating natural, healthy foods presents an opportunity to introduce consumers to hunting. Photo by Nicholas Vedros.

Please turn to page 21

New gun shop more than a name By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Kyle Moeller is known for his custom work on firearms and other materials. He’s best known, though, for his giant red beard. When he decided to open his own business in 2016, naming the business was easy. Red Beard Gunworks, located on Hwy 181 in his hometown of Portland, specializes in Cerakote (a ceramic coating), machine work, gunsmithing and precision custom riflemaking. “I went to college in Arizona for digital design,” Moeller said. “I was going to make games, but I ended up designing one gun after another.” He returned to Corpus Christi and worked at a gun shop. That’s where he started doing coating work about five years ago, later starting a side business he called Red Beard Cerakote. “There was no one in the area doing it to the extent I was,” he said.

Kyle Moeller found his niche customizing rifles and handguns. Red Beard Gunworks specializes in a ceramic coating process called Cerakote. Photos by Erich Schlegel, for Lone Star Outdoor News.

Moeller had a good friend who is a machinist and competitive shooter, and along with help from an investor the new shop became a reality on Dec. 10, 2016. “It’s a custom shop and small retail shop,” Moeller said. “We wanted to be more servicebased for a lot of the people around here. We’ve built a pretty good customer base.” Along with repairs and gunsmithing, they build precision rifles, both in the AR and hunting styles, often with custom logos or color schemes. The Cerakote work has taken off, and not just for rifles and handguns. “People like to accessorize guns just like they do their motorcycles and cars,” Moeller said. “We do work for rifle makers out of Dallas and Houston, and I have done car parts, intake exhausts, and a lot of coolers.” Many of the gun customers desire the coating to protect from the enemy of the Texas coast — rust. “We do more black coatings than anything, especially on shotguns, rifles and handguns,” Moeller said. “And we coat a lot of knives for custom knife makers.” The biggest retail seller goes back to the name, and the beard. “I’ve had this big beard since before Duck Dynasty started,” Moeller said. “It took awhile to grow the thing. Now, my customers just call me Red Beard.” On a whim, T-shirts sporting a man with a red beard were developed to help with branding. “We sell the crap out of the shirts,” Moeller said.

One outdoor bill flies with Texas Legislature, others fall short By Darlene McCormick Sanchez Lone Star Outdoor News

Texans will be able to hunt coyotes and feral hogs from a hot air balloon this fall — giving hunters a novel way to kill varmints. The Texas Legislature’s 85th regular session passed House Bill 3535, which allows for coyotes and feral hogs to be harvested from a hot air balloon, but several other notable outdoor bills fell short of becoming law. The balloon bill, sponsored by State Rep. Mark Keough, R-Woodlands, was signed by the governor and will become law Sept. 1. But so far, no one’s indicated to the bill’s sponsor that they are going to try it, said

Ruth Mesta, legislative director for Keough. Bradley Burkett, an avid hog hunter, chuckled when told about the new law. “It sounds kind of funny. Hogs run real fast. I don’t know if a balloon could keep up,” he said, adding he will keep hunting hogs on solid ground. The idea for the bill followed the logic that if it’s legal to hunt varmints from a helicopter, then why not let folks shoot them from a hot air balloon. According to Keough’s camp, the law simply offers another tool for hunting destructive wild hogs. Hogs have also wised up to the sound of helicopters and avoid them. A hot air balloon would be much quieter and not scare them away. “It’s just another option,” said Mesta.

House Bill 550 came close to passing, but an amendment was attached to it that killed it. The bill would have required a sound-producing device for self-propelled boats. The concern was that Texas law needed to align with U.S. Coast Guard regulations by requiring kayak, canoe, and other nonmotorized vessel operators to have a whistle, air horn or other device that could be heard at least half a mile away. The bill, sponsored by State Rep. Ryan Guillen, D-Rio Grande City, was meant to protect millions of dollars in federal funding flowing to the state. However, it received a lot of pushback because many Texans don’t take kindly to federal regulations.

“Because this legislature chose to remain out of compliance with federal water safety regulations, nearly $4 million in federal boater safety funding is now on the line at a time when park system funding has also been slashed. Too many Texans have lost their lives on our coast, rivers, and lakes for safety education and training to be rolled-back now. My hope is that the feds have mercy on us and choose not to deny us these resources,” wrote Guillen in response to LSON questions. Other bills that didn’t quite make it included Senate Bill 722, authorizing TPWD to recoup costs associated with the popular MLDP program, and House Bill 1988, mandating motorized boat operators to engage kill switches.


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

June 23, 2017

The $100 best friend Maverick

June 24, 2004 – May 31, 2017 By Craig Nyhus

Lone Star Outdoor News Chris Swift used to make annual trips hunting and guiding waterfowlers in Alaska and Canada, before returning home to guide in Texas. In 2004, he was introduced to Maverick. “I had just returned home from Alaska and was in between dogs,” Swift said. “A friend called who had two white labs for sale for $200. I took a dove wing and saw the dog. I said I would take him, but I only had $100 and needed an hour to go get the money.” The friend turned him down. “He said he had been there all day and he took the $100,” Swift said. Swift was guiding for well-known outfitter Larry Gore at the time, and he was training a dog named Doc. “I took Maverick along on some of the hunts, and we got the truck stuck,” Swift said. “The customers were pass shooting at some geese and one dropped a blue goose.” The hunters asked Swift where the little white dog was going, and Swift learned he was about to have a great dog. “He took off and drug that goose back by the wing,” he said. For several years, Maverick made trips to Canada while Swift was guiding with friend Ward McGee, where most of the hunting was

in grain fields with the hunters in layout blinds. Not a pup anymore, Maverick weighed in at 85 pounds. “He hunted in the layout blind with me,” Swift said. “He would head out for the bird and jump over the hunters’ blinds.” While guiding at the Pierce Ranch with outfitter Bill Sherrill, Maverick had a run-in with a sandhill crane. “We usually used leashes in areas we had cranes,” Swift said. “But we were hunting in an area that didn’t have cranes, until one came by and a hunter smacked him.” Maverick, as usual, was off and running. After 20 minutes, he still wasn’t back. “I headed that direction and here came Maverick,” Swift said. “He had his eyes closed — the crane was pecking him — I thought I had a blind dog coming back. But there was just some blood on his ears, we cleaned him up with a bottle of water.” Swift was most impressed with Maverick’s drive. “I really started appreciating it when I stopped guiding,” he said. On one hunt, a mallard dropped well into heavy, 8-foot reeds. “Where is your dog going?” the hunter asked. “He’s going to get your duck,” Swift replied. Five minutes later, the pair heard the dog pounce and the bird was returned.

Maverick was part of the family, and when Swift’s son, Cooper, was born, Maverick was there to greet him. “I had an 85-pound dog licking my day-and-a-half-old son in the face,” Swift said. In addition to waterfowl hunting, Maverick hunted pheasants, dove and quail and made trips to North and South Dakota, Saskatchewan and Arkansas. “I really enjoyed watching him work and use his nose,” Swift said. “He had such confidence when we would send him after a bird. If a wood duck sailed off into the trees, we would count it as part of our limit because we knew he would find it.” Maverick was in Swift’s wedding with his groomsmen, sporting a tuxedo collar. But like all great dogs, Maverick’s hunting time came to an end, and he died shortly before his 13th birthday. “He died on his bed, and my wife and I were there,” Swift said. His hunters kept Maverick’s memory alive, though. “I was getting calls and receiving photos from guys from over the country saying what a great dog he was,” Swift said. “I’ll never have another dog like that — and I’ve had some good ones.”

Page 5


Page 6

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Snipes to receive top quail award

PURCHASE AN 18” OR 22” RHINO BAG AND RECEIVE A

10

$

Lone Star Outdoor News

MAIL IN REBATE -

*Purchases must be made between 6/1/17 and 7/31/17.

T H E S AV I N G S ARE IN THE BAG PURCHASE A 26” RHINO BAG AND RECEIVE A -

20

$

LSONews.com

MAIL IN REBATE

*Purchases must be made between 6/1/17 and 7/31/17.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE RINEHART TARGETS & REBATE DETAILS VISIT RINEHART3D.COM

The

Renowned quail hunter, land manager and dog handler Rick Snipes was named the recipient of the 2018 T. Boone Pickens Lifetime Sportsman Award by Park Cities Quail. The award will be presented at PCQ’s annual event on March 8, 2018. Snipes has been described as “the consummate quail hunter” and “the Renaissance Man of the wingshooting world.” Growing up in North Carolina, he witnessed the decline of one quail population, and eventually secured a hunting lease in Texas. He liked the lease so much, he eventually bought the 6,000-acre ranch. Since then, he has been managing for quail and raising English setters. After 2009, Snipes became concerned about the Texas quail decline and the lack of a correlation to habitat and rainfall totals. Later, he became president of the board of Photo by Russell Graves directors that oversees operations of the Rolling Plains Quail Research Ranch in Roby. Now chairman of the Rolling Plains Quail Research Foundation, Snipes is committed to the cause of quail conservation, avocating “outside the box” approaches to solving the problem of quail decline, including research on disease and the effect of parasites on quail. “No one I know better personifies upland hunting as an art form than Rick Snipes,” said outdoor writer Tom Davis. “Rick Snipes encapsulates everything I’ve been trying to say in 35 years of writing about gun dogs and bird hunting.”

Mobile quail lab to debut Texas Tech University’s Wildlife Toxicology Laboratory is rolling out a new Mobile Research Lab June 27. The dedication of the laboratory will be held at the Rolling Plains Quail Research Foundation in Roby. It will include a demonstration of the molecular techniques used to quantify or detect parasite DNA in both wild bobwhite quail and insect intermediate hosts. The Mobile Research Laboratory is being deployed for surveillance capability of parasitic nematode infections in wild quail in the Rolling Plains ecoregion of West Texas. Sponsors include Park Cities Quail, the Rolling Plains Quail Research Foundation, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, the Cross Timbers, Big Covey and San Antonio chapters of Quail Coalition, and the Smith South Plains automobile dealership which provided a Ford F150 4x4. —Quail Coalition

Best

Women are Hard to Find, because they wear

Camo.

Women’s outdoor gear created with function, fit and a whole lot of style.

Lone Star QUAILforever ANNUAL FUNDRAISER BANQUET Join us for an evening of fun! Supports preserving quail habitat. Help us get youth involved in hunting. Funds raised stay local. 

BBQ DINNER • RAFFLE • GAMES • LIVE AUCTION • GUNS • PLUS MORE Thursday, August 17, 2017 Starts at 6:00 PM

Grapevine Convention Center • 1209 S. Main Street • Grapevine, TX 76051

Whether you are embarking upon a stag hunting adventure in New Zealand, a hiking excursion in the Rocky Mountains, or a wild boar hunt at your deer lease; you should expect great technical performance and comfort from your outdoor gear.

LY MADE IN UD

A US

PRO

ORDER YOUR TICKETS TODAY

New Styles and Girls Sizes to Choose From!

Enter to Win a Pair of Leggings!* Like, Share and Comment “Stylish Camo” on Our FaceBook Page. (*Winner’s picked monthly)

Member Dinner Plus Membership $65 Couple $100, Youth $25 www.lonestarqf.org Email: info@lonestarquailforever.org or Contact Al Stover @ 972-332-1612


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

June 23, 2017

Page 7


Page 8

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

FISHING

Pros advise against letting long runs shortchange hearing Alton Jones and his son both wear custom earplugs when moving across lakes to protect from hearing loss. Photo from Alton Jones.

By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News Alton Jones Jr. wears custom-fitted earplugs when he barrels across lakes in search of his next largemouth. He calls them a “competitive advantage.” “Fishing is all about decision-mak-

ing,” said Jones Jr., a Lorena resident who won the 2016 Bass Pro Shops Central Open. “If I get to my spot and all I have to focus on is my next move, rather than my ears ringing, it can make a difference in whether I get that one big bite.” The moderate hearing loss suffered

by his father — Alton Jones, the 2008 Bassmaster Classic winner — influenced his decision, Jones Jr. said. It had gotten to where conversations in loud public places proved frustrating for both men. “We jokingly called it selective hearing,” he said. “After he got tested, we Please turn to page 19

When to fish the surf By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News The first couple of weeks of June the weather was off-the-charts wacky. The north wind was blowing just about as much as the southerly breeze. That’s not all bad — just a little unpredictable. A north wind sets up a flat surf and based on early reports this should be a banner summer for catching trout in the first and second guts along the coastal beachfront. “Getting a cool front through Texas is kind of strange during June,” said Bobby Andrews. “But it set up some good catches of trout in the surf. That was kind of unexpected. I fish at Surfside Beach a lot. On one morning we drove over the big Surfside bridge and could see that the surf was flat and green to the beach. We drove towards San Luis Pass and waded a stretch of flat surf and caught easy limits of trout. It was a blast.” Guide Charlie Paradoski said the second week of June they had a few great days in the surf. Two were with a north wind. One Please turn to page 17

When the surf is calm, especially with a light northerly wind, trout may be caught by surf-fishermen in the first and second gut. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

Whitney proves to be striper fishing hotspot By Mark England

Lone Star Outdoor News Ignore that fishing report from Texas Parks and Wildlife Department that lists striped bass fishing at Lake Whitney as “slow,” lake guides strongly advise. “I’d say that this year, Lake Whitney is probably the number one striper lake in the state,” said guide Johnny Campbell. “Boat limits are pretty much the norm and almost everything you catch is a keeper.” Guide Pat Small’s sigh was audible over the phone. “They always say that,” he said. “It’s like they just copy and paste their fishing report every week. Right now, Whitney is doing better than Texoma, in my opinion. They lost a large bit of fish to the flood. As good a striper population that Lake Whitney has, there probably won’t be a bad time to go fishing here this year.” For the record, TPWD officials note that its fishing reports are done by a third party. And, by most accounts, striper fishing is rebounding at Lake Texoma. However, there’s no question that Texoma saw a huge amount of its striper stock escape into the Red River below Denison Dam after flooding there in 2015. Lake Whitney has endured flooding, too, in recent years. “The funny thing is that the flooding helped us,” Campbell said. “It pushed a lot of fish from Possum

Project to restore coastal waterfowl and fish habitat By Darlene McCormick Sanchez

Lone Star Outdoor News

Good size and good numbers of striped bass are being caught on Lake Whitney, especially on humps, old roadbeds and along the edges of river channels. Photo from Pat Small.

Kingdom and Granbury to us.” Campbell said stripers can be found all over the place at Lake Whitney, which covers 35 square miles and has 225 miles of shoreline. Many anglers consider Whitney one of Texas’ more beautiful lakes with its clear waters and limestone cliffs. “We’re finding them on humps, old roadbeds and the edges of river channels,” Campbell said. “There’s still some top-water action going on. It will probably last until it gets into the 90s every day. That’s when Please turn to page 21

Backers of a large-scale marsh restoration project along the Texas coast are trying to secure Deepwater Horizon funds to finish it. Plans to restore the Chenier Plain marsh in Jefferson At stake is the County are in the works. Photo from LJA Engineering. health of the Chenier Plain Branick spent his boyhood marsh along the Jefferson County Gulf Coast hunting and fishing around the that supports wildlife important marsh and wants to preserve to Texas hunters and anglers the area for future generations such as redfish, founder, trout to enjoy. “I didn’t want to see that and waterfowl, according to advocates. It is considered one of marsh disappear,” he said. For the past four or five years, the western hemisphere’s larghe has been working on drawing est migratory bird flyways. Jefferson County Judge Jeff attention to the restoration of Please turn to page 14


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

June 23, 2017

Improving economy fuels boat sales in Texas

The Fly-Fisher’s Craft Coffee table book examines fly-fishing history By Shannon Drawe

For Lone Star Outdoor News Darrel Martin’s “The Fly-Fisher’s Craft” is a beautifully illustrated coffee table book that has a ton of information about fly-fishing. It includes precise drawings, historical artwork and photographs, all doing a great job of documenting the history of fly-fishing, along with current methods of tying flies. As a coffee table book, there is no shortage of words in “The FlyFisher’s Craft.” Much of the information is directed at the details of tying flies, and the book does a good job of separating and detailing the sections of a tied fly. For fly-fishers and fly-tiers who think they have seen ev-

erything, this book could prove them wrong. There are numerous historical illustrations you likely have never seen before. Also, many of the drawings, plates, and photographs of tools and methods used to make wood rods and even fly-fishing hooks are very unusual. There’s just enough of everything about fly-fishing in Martin’s book to entice someone to pick it up off your coffee table and not close it — once they discover it’s more than a book about fishing. If you want to please the flyfisher in your life, “The Fly-Fisher’s Craft” is a great choice for a fly-fisher who thought their library of fly-fishing books was already complete. “Fly-Fisher’s Craft - The Art and History,” by Darrel Martin, is available from Skyhorse Publishing and at online book retailers. Photo by Shannon Drawe

Give a Heart for J D Green benefit tournament The Bassmasters of East Texas and the North East Region will put on a benefit tournament for J D Green at Lake Palestine on July 16. The tournament entry is $50 per team and it will be a 25 percent payback to the top five finishers. For conservation purposes and to provide assistance to Green, this will be a two-fish tournament. There will be a separate $20 big-fish pot that will pay back 100

percent to the top 3 big fish (70 percent -20 percent -10 percent). Green is a lifetime B.A.S.S member and has been a charter member of Texas Bass Nation. He has fished with the Bassmasters of East Texas for 25 years (original member), fished in 14 Top Six BASS Nation tournaments, and marshaled the first set of B.A.S.S Elite events here in Texas.

Page 9

Green is a small business owner of Southern Outlaw Tattoo in Tyler, and this will be his second heart transplant. He had his first transplant in 2014 and has suffered from protein rejection but fished until recently in both B.A.S.S Nation Team and Regional events. He is 59 years old and a father of five children. ­—Bassmasters of East Texas

Texas was second in the nation for boating sales last year, according to a new National Marine Manufacturers Association report that further indicated nationwide numbers were at their highest in a decade. According to new data from the 2016 Recreational Boating Statistical Abstract, unit sales of new powerboats increased 6 percent in 2016, reaching 247,800 boats sold nationwide, and are expected to increase an additional 6 percent in 2017 — a trajectory NMMA anticipates to continue through 2018. “Economic factors, including an improving housing market, higher employment, strong consumer confidence, and growing disposable income, are creating a golden age for the country’s recreational boating industry,” said Thom Dammrich, president of NMMA. Demand continues to grow across nearly all powerboat segments. Outboard boat sales, which represent 85 percent of new traditional powerboats sold, and include pontoons, aluminum and fiberglass fishing boats, as well as small fiberglass cruising boats, were up 6.1 percent in 2016 to 160,900 units. Sales of new ski and wakeboard boats, used for popular water sports such as wakesurfing and wakeboarding, saw a double-digit increase, up 11.5 percent to 8,700 boats. New personal watercraft sales rose 7.3 percent to 59,000 craft, and jet boats, smaller fiberglass boats that use jet engine technology to propel the boat, saw a sales increase of 8.7 percent to 5,000 boats. Sales of yachts (33 feet and longer) saw gains of 3.5 percent, reaching a seven-year high of 1,715 units in 2016. Annual U.S. sales of boats, marine products and services totaled $36 billion in 2016, an increase of 3.2 percent from 2015. Leading the nation in sales of new powerboat, engine, trailer and accessories in 2016 were the following top three states: • Florida: $2.5 billion, up 5 percent from 2015 • Texas: $1.4 billion, up 5 percent from 2015 • Michigan: $868 million, up 9 percent from 2015 —NMMA

Grow... BIGGER FISH ...Faster!

“The Most Accurate and Reliable Fish Feeders Ever Designed.”

CHOOSE FROM THREE CAPACITIES

70 lb. • 175 lb. • 250 lb. KEY FEATURES:

45’

See Us at www.TexasHunter.com

Patt

800.969.3337

Made in America Under US Utility Patent #7222583

Optional Solar Charger mounts on any side of feeder for maximum sun exposure.

Feed

DF425 with Adjustable Legs

Your Choice of Leg Type: • Adjustable legs for sloping pond banks • Straight legs for piers and docks

Ideal for use along ponds, streams and lakes.

20’ x

Exclusive quick-release panel and ClearView funnel provide instant blower system access.

Premium Digital Timer • Feeds 1 to 9 times per day • Run Time 1 to 60 seconds • Test Run 1 to 60 seconds • 5 Year Limited Warranty

ern

Dual motors and a high velocity air blower system project fish feed into the water in a large 45’ x 20’ pattern.

C ELEBRATING Fish Feeder

3350 IH 35 N, San Antonio, TX 78219 • TexasHunter.com

P LUS Y EARS

FEED PATTERN


Page 10

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS FRESHWATER FISHING REPORT ALAN HENRY: Water clear on the main lake, stained up the river; 76 degrees; 3.28’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are fair on live perch and goldfish. AMISTAD: Water murky; 77–81 degrees; 32.05’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon and green/pumpkin crankbaits and soft plastics in 18–20 feet. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are good on trotlines and jug lines baited with live perch. ARROWHEAD: Water fairly clear; 73–79 degrees; 0.91’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters early, later switching to Texas rigs, drop-shot rigs and shallow-running crankbaits. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows around structure. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. ATHENS: Water lightly stained; 81–84 degrees; 0.32’ high. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged craws, buzz frogs and hollow-body frogs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair. BASTROP: Water stained; 75– 79 degrees. Black bass are good on green/pumpkin soft plastics. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on frozen shrimp, minnows and stink bait. BELTON: Water stained; 74–78 degrees; 0.47’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon spinner baits and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stink bait. BOB SANDLIN: Water lightly stained; 80–84 degrees; 0.45’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged worms, white buzzbaits and hollow-body frogs. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BONHAM: Water lightly stained; 79–82 degrees; 3.00’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters, shallow crankbaits and Texasrigged soft plastics around rocks, docks and secondary points. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs around the bridges and dam. Catfish are good cut bait and frozen shad, shrimp and chicken liver. BRAUNIG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and dark soft plastic worms in reeds. Striped bass are slow. Redfish are good down-rigging near the jetty and dam. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp, cut bait and cheese bait near the dam. BRIDGEPORT: Water lightly stained, 78–81 degrees: 0.04’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, weightless flukes and square-billed crankbaits in shad patterns. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are fair on trotlines. BROWNWOOD: Water stained; 75–79 degrees; 0.01’ low. Black bass are fair on buzzbaits and spinner baits over grass, and on watermelon red worms with chartreuse tails around docks. Hybrid striper are good on shad in Hybrid Alley. White bass are fair on jigs off lighted docks at night. Crappie are fair on minnows in 8–15 feet. Channel catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait. BUCHANAN: Water stained;

76–80 degrees; 0.49’ low. Black bass are fair to good on watermelon flukes, white crankbaits and Texas-rigged watermelon stick worms in 4–8 feet early. Striped bass are good on lipless crankbaits and plastic swim baits. White bass are fair on plastic swim baits in creeks. Crappie are slow. Channel catfish are good on liver, minnows and dip bait. Yellow and blue catfish are good on goldfish and perch upriver. CADDO: Water stained; 80–84 degrees; 1.05’ high. Black bass are fair on black and blue jigs, black buzzbaits and hollow-body frogs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines with cut bait. CALAVERAS: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon crankbaits and spinner baits. Striped bass are fair on chicken livers and shad along the shoreline. Redfish are good down-rigging silver and gold spoons and live bait along the crappie wall in 10-20 feet. Channel catfish are good on cheese bait and nightcrawlers near the railroad trestle. Blue catfish are fair on liver and cut bait. CANYON LAKE: Water stained; 75–79 degrees; 0.22’ low. Black bass are fair on top-waters, watermelon flukes, and stick worms around flooded bushes. Striped bass are slow. White bass are slow. Smallmouth bass are fair on clear grubs and watermelon crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs in standing timber. Channel catfish are fair on shrimp. Yellow and blue catfish are good on goldfish and perch upriver. CEDAR CREEK: Water lightly stained; 79–83 degrees; 0.01’ low. Black bass are fair on top-water poppers, Texas-rigged craws and white buzzbaits. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines and cut shad. CHOKE CANYON: Water stained; 75–79 degrees; 21.32’ low. Black bass are good on green/ pumpkin soft plastics and white/chartreuse spinner baits. Crappie are slow. Drum are fair on nightcrawlers. Channel and blue catfish are fair on cut bait and punch bait. Yellow catfish are good on juglines baited with perch. COLEMAN: Water stained; 76–80 degrees; 0.16’ low. Black bass are fair on green/pumpkin soft plastics and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on live shad. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles in 20–30 feet. Channel catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live bait. COLETO CREEK: Water clear; 95 degrees at the hot water discharge, 84 degrees in main lake; 1.23’ low. Black bass are good on white crankbaits and spinner baits. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live perch and shad. CONROE: Water stained; 75–79 degrees; 0.07’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse

and watermelon Carolina-rigged soft plastics and spinner baits. Striped bass are fair on chrome spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles. Catfish are good on stink bait, nightcrawlers and shrimp. FALCON: Water murky; 76–80 degrees; 32.97’ low. Black bass are fair on shallow-running crankbaits on the north end of the lake. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on frozen shrimp under birds. FAYETTE: Water murky. Black bass are fair on watermelon/red Carolina-rigged soft plastics off points, and on top-waters and buzzbaits early. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and cut shad. FORK: Water lightly stained; 81–84 degrees; 0.12’ high. Black bass are fair on Texasrigged craws, buzzbaits and hollow-body frogs. White and yellow bass are good on slabs and minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. FT. PHANTOM HILL: Water murky; 75–79 degrees; 0.46’ high. Black bass are fair on chatterbaits early, later switching to lipless crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. GIBBONS CREEK: Water stained. Black bass are fair on chartreuse spinner baits and watermelon/white crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs. Catfish are good on stinkbait, shrimp and cut bait. GRANBURY: Water stained; 74–78 degrees; 0.02’ high. Black bass are good on Carolinarigged soft plastic worms and lizards, and on shad-colored crankbaits. Striped bass are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are fair on minnows and silver spoons. Crappie are good on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers, chicken livers and frozen shrimp. GRANGER: Water stained; 73–77 degrees; 0.26’ high. Black bass are fair on spinner baits in willows upriver. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on jigs in 5-15 feet. Blue catfish are good on shad and prepared bait in 5-12 feet. Yellow catfish are good on trotlines baited with live bait upriver. GRAPEVINE: Water lightly stained; 78–81 degrees; 1.20’ high. Black bass are good on Texasrigged worms, squarebilled crankbaits and top-waters. White bass and hybrid bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. GREENBELT: 30.85’ low. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early, later switching to Texas rigs, lipless crankbaits and jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. HOUSTON COUNTY: Water stained; 78–82 degrees; 0.16’ high. Black bass are very good on Carolina-rigged and wackyrigged white or red stick worms

and red frogs. Crappie are very good on live minnows over brush piles. Bream are fair on live worms off piers. Channel and blue catfish are good on live worms, chicken livers off piers, and on trotlines baited with shad. HUBBARD CREEK: Water offcolor; 74–78 degrees; 0.41’ low. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early, later switching to square-billed crankbaits, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows around cover. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. JOE POOL: Water lightly stained; 80–84 degrees; 0.09’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut bait. LAKE O’ THE PINES: Water stained; 82–85 degrees: 2.47’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged creature baits, hollow-body frogs and weightless worms. White bass are fair on minnows and slabs. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. LAVON: Water stained; 81–84 degrees: 0.44’ low. Black bass are good on square-billed crankbaits, buzzbaits and Texas-rigged craws. White bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. LBJ: Water stained; 75–79 degrees; 0.71’ low. Black bass are fair on motor oil worms, watermelon top-waters and watermelon/red stick worms in 6-12 feet. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and watermelon jigs over brush piles. Channel catfish are good on shrimp and stink bait. Yellow and blue catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live perch. LEWISVILLE: Water lightly stained; 78–82 degrees; 0.54’ high. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged craws, squarebilled crankbaits and top-water poppers. White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Crappie are good on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. LIVINGSTON: Water stained; 75–79 degrees; 0.46’ high. Black bass are good on chartreuse spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are good on pet spoons, trolling tubes and slabs. Crappie are excellent on minnows. Blue catfish are very good on cut bait and shad. MACKENZIE: 73.57’ low. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers. MARTIN CREEK: Water lightly stained; 81–86 degrees; 0.16’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are fair on minnows. MEREDITH: 59.73’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on Texas rigs, chatterbaits and dropshot rigs. Bream and channel catfish are being caught in good numbers. MONTICELLO: Water stained; 82–86 degrees; 0.25’ high. Black bass are good on hollow-body frogs, deep-diving crankbaits and stick worms. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines and cut shad.

NASWORTHY: 73–78 degrees; 1.17’ low. Black bass are fair to good on drop-shot rigs, finesse jigs and Texas rigs. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait. NAVARRO MILLS: Water stained; 74–78 degrees; 0.42’ high. Black bass are good on silver lipless crankbaits in Liberty Hill Park, and on shallow-running crankbaits near the dam. White bass are fair on slabs over humps. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs off docks early. Channel catfish are good on stink bait in 4–5 feet. O.H. IVIE: Water stained; 73– 79 degrees; 33.43’ low. Black bass are good on top-waters early, later switching to Texas rigs, jigs and Senkos. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on cut bait and nightcrawlers. OAK CREEK: Water stained; 74–80 degrees; 8.26’ low. Black bass are good on Texas rigs and top-waters. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows. Catfish are fair on cut bait and nightcrawlers. PALESTINE: Water lightly stained; 78–82 degrees; 0.36’ high. Black bass are fair on black and blue jigs, squarebilled crankbaits and top-waters. Crappie are fair on minnows. Hybrid striper are good on slabs and topwaters White bass are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. POSSUM KINGDOM: Water off-color; 72–78 degrees; 0.11’ high. Black bass are fair to good on top-waters early, later switching to Texas rigs, shallow-running crankbaits and shaky heads. Crappie are fair on live minnows. White bass are fair to good on slabs and inline spinners. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are good on nightcrawlers. PROCTOR: Water stained; 73–77 degrees; 0.61’ high. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow. RAY HUBBARD: Water lightly stained; 79–82 degrees; 0.01’ high. Black bass are fair on shallow crankbaits, top-water poppers and walking baits. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs. Catfish are fair on trotlines. RAY ROBERTS: Water lightly stained; 78–81 degrees; 0.16’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas-rigged worms, Carolina-rigged creature baits and football jigs. White bass are good on minnows and slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are good on trotlines. RICHLAND CHAMBERS: Water lightly stained; 80–83 degrees; 0.28’ high. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged creature baits, buzzfrogs and buzzbaits. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs and top-waters. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on trotlines. SAM RAYBURN: Water stained; 74–78 degrees; 0.49’ high. Black bass are good on white spinner baits and dark soft plastic worms. White bass are fair on

n Saltwater reports: Please turn to

Page 11

silver and gold spoons. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs over baited holes in 2025 feet. Bream are slow. Catfish are very good on trotlines baited with liver and cut bait. SOMERVILLE: Water murky; 75–79 degrees; 0.32’ high. Black bass are good on watermelon spinner baits and lipless crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair trolling slab spoons near the dam. White bass are fair trolling slab spoons near the dam. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on punch bait, and on juglines baited with cut shad. STAMFORD: Water stained; 71–77 degrees; 1.08’ high. Black bass are fair to good on buzzbaits early, later switching to Texas rigs and stick worms. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows around cover. White bass are fair to good on Rooster Tails. Blue catfish are fair to good on cut and live bait. STILLHOUSE: Water murky; 74–78 degrees; 0.82’ high. Black bass are good on white spinner baits and watermelon/ red soft plastics. White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on dough bait, chicken livers and chicken blood bait. TAWAKONI: Water lightly stained; 81–84 degrees; 1.56’ low. Black bass are good on Texas-rigged craws flipped in flooded bushes and docks, and fair early on black buzzbaits and hollow-body frogs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid bass are good on slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are fair on trotlines. TEXOMA: Water lightly stained; 79–82 degrees; 2.07’ high. Black bass are fair on top-water poppers and medium crankbaits. Crappie are good on minnows. Striped bass are good on slabs and top-waters. Catfish are good on trotlines. TOLEDO BEND: Water stained; 75–79 degrees; 0.15’ low. Black bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Bream are slow. Catfish are slow. TRAVIS: Water stained; 75–79 degrees; 1.44’ low. Black bass are good on plum worms and smoke grubs in 10–25 feet. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on chrome spoons and white grubs. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are good on blood bait and shrimp in 25–40 feet. WALTER E. LONG: Water murky. Black bass are fair on shad. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and frozen shrimp. WHITNEY: Water stained; 74–78 degrees; 0.67’ high. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are good on top-waters and live shad. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Catfish are slow.

—TPWD


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Boat insurance – if you don’t have it, get it By Robert Sloan

For Lone Star Outdoor News Boat owners know anything and everything relating to boating can happen on any given day, on or off the water. The No. 1 claim on boats is hitting an obstruction or some sort of floating debris. Next up is an injury. Somebody slips on the boat or is getting on or off. And, there are al- Boat insurance offers protection from costly repairs or medical expenses. ways thieves lurking Spending $900 a year can protect a motor and boat worth upward of that want to steal $60,000. Photo by Robert Sloan. tackle, coolers or the entire boat, motor er unit. Replacement of that is anywhere and trailer. from $3,000 to $4,000. Hull repairs can “A lot of people don’t have boat insur- go from a few hundred bucks to several ance because they don’t think it’s worth thousand dollars in a hurry. the money,” said Tommy Hardegree with It pays to read the fine print on your the Siegeler Insurance Agency. “It’s re- boat owner’s policy. For example do you ally pretty simple logic. You can spend have on-water towing coverage? $700 to $900 a year for good boat insur“Many boat insurance policies today ance and pretty much be covered for just offer some kind of on-water towing enabout anything that can happen. Or you dorsement that provides a level of towing can take a chance, get in a bind, and lose and assistance for routine breakdowns or a lot of money in a hurry when your boat soft ungroundings,” said Scott Croft with and motor is worth upwards of $60,000.” BoatUS. “It’s important to know how you Case in point. On June 14, three guys will be able to use that coverage includleft the dock in their new boat and mo- ing who provides the service and does the tor in Port Mansfield. About 20 minutes company have 24-hour dispatch service. later the boat was upside down, they were Also know when you will have to pay for without lifejackets and very lucky anoth- a tow out of pocket and be reimbursed.” er boat came along and saved them from Croft said half of boat sinkings occur complete catastrophe. Sadly, they had at the dock. Usually that’s when a plug no boat insurance. It was a loss of about is not used. Who pays for that? It’s in the $65,000. fine print. “Boat insurance covers a lot,” Harde“Always check out the boat trailer fine gree said. “Other than just something like print,” Croft advised. “Not all boat insura lower unit, insurance can cover a hit ance policies automatically provide boat from a stingray and even Vibrio Vulnificus. trailer coverage so be sure to check. Also One of my clients got vibrio last summer. find out if there are geographic limits on We covered his $5,000 deductible, and his where you may trailer the boat. Note that health insurance covered the rest.” if you have an accident while towing, it When it was all said and done the total is your boat policy that pays to repair or on that case was well over $225,000. replace the trailer, but any third-party Mark Vanepps is a sales manager with damage your trailer causes to property or Gallagher Charter Lakes boat insurance. injuries to people is covered under your They are the fourth largest in the nation. auto policy.” “The most common thing we cover is Charter Lakes has been insuring recrereplacing or repairing a lower unit,” he ational fisherman and tournament ansaid. “Boat theft is way up there, too. glers for 30 years. Before you sign off on There are boat wrecks, sinking, fire and boat insurance ask about the following even lightning strikes. We cover it all coverage features: physical damage; disfrom recreational, guides and commer- appearing deductible; fishing equipment; cial. Something that a lot of boaters aren’t liability; medical payments; towing and aware of is the number of injuries that oc- emergency assistance with the boat and cur on boats. Most involve a slip and fall.” trailer. Even minor boat malfunctions can be a major financial burden. Consider the low-

MADE IN USA

w e N

Walk where no other topwater has walked before!

Compact and durable, the PT-7’s sleek aerodynamic body casts like a bullet and skips into tight places where others can’t. 3 inches in length and 5/8 oz., this soft plastic minesweeper detonates explosive strikes like no other topwater. Snook, redfish, and seatrout, to lunker largemouth bass find its “walk-the-dog” action simply irresistible. Pre-rigged with a single premium 7/0 EWG hook, it keeps the big fish on where standard trebles fail. Available in 10 realistic colors with several more on the way.

w w w . d o a l u r e s . c o m 171003_DOA_4.17_Lonestar Outdoors.ad_PT-7_TROUT_5.1x3.45.indd 1

4/17/17 11:35 AM

June 23, 2017

Page 11

TEXAS SALTWATER FISHING REPORT NORTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad on soft plastics. Trout are good in the river on live shad and scented plastics. SOUTH SABINE: Trout are fair to good under birds and pods of shad. Trout are good at the jetty on live bait and top-waters when the water clears. Redfish are good in the marsh and under birds. BOLIVAR: Trout are good on the south shoreline on top-waters and soft plastics. Black drum, sand trout and redfish are good at Rollover Pass. Trout are good at Rollover Pass in the evening on the outgoing tide. TRINITY BAY: Trout are good for while working deep shell around the wells on MirrOlures, Lil’ Johns and Bass Assassins. Redfish are good on live bait around the reefs and in the marsh. EAST GALVESTON BAY: Trout are good for drifters working deep shell on live bait and glow plastics. Trout are good on the south shoreline on She Dogs and Corkies. WEST GALVESTON BAY: Trout, sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. Trout are good on MirrOlures and live shrimp at San Luis Pass. Offshore is good for red snapper and kingfish in state waters. TEXAS CITY: Trout are fair to good on April Fool’s Reef on live shrimp and croakers. Trout are good in the ship channel on live bait and plastics. FREEPORT: Trout are good in the surf and at the jetty on live shrimp and croakers. Sand trout and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs in Christmas Bay.

EAST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are good for drifters on live shrimp over humps and scattered shell when the winds allows. Redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on crabs and mullet. Sand trout are good over deep reefs on shrimp. WEST MATAGORDA BAY: Trout are good on sand and grass humps on soft plastics and top-waters. Redfish are good on scented

plastics and live shrimp in Oyster Lake and Crab Lake. PORT O’CONNOR: Trout and redfish are fair to good on top-waters and live bait over sand, grass and shell in San Antonio Bay. Trout and redfish are fair for drifters working the back lakes with live shrimp. ROCKPORT: Trout are fair to good in the guts and channels on free-lined shrimp. Trout are fair to good over grass while drifting with live shrimp. Redfish are good on mullet on the Estes Flats and around Mud Island.

PORT ARANSAS: Trout, redfish and sheepshead are fair to good at the jetty on shrimp and croakers. Redfish are fair around Pelican Island on shrimp. Offshore is good for red snapper and kingfish in state waters. CORPUS CHRISTI: Trout are fair to good on the edge of the spoils on scented plastics and live shrimp. Redfish are good in the potholes on shrimp and crabs. BAFFIN BAY: Trout are good on top-waters and soft plastics around rocks and grass. Redfish are good in knee-deep water and on the flats on shrimp, scented plastics and gold spoons. PORT MANSFIELD: Trout are good on topwaters around sand and grass. Redfish are fair to good while drifting potholes on small top-waters and live shrimp. Offshore is good for red snapper and kingfish in state waters. SOUTH PADRE: Redfish and trout are good along the sand and grass flats in South Bay. Tarpon are fair around the passes and jetties on mullet and pogies. Snook are fair on shrimp in the channel and while wading with top-waters over mud. PORT ISABEL: Trout and redfish are fair to good on the flats on live shrimp and in Airport Cove. Trout are good on the deeper edges and flats in Laguna Vista on top-waters, DOA and live shrimp. —TPWD

Fishing Port Mansfield Continued from page 1

to tap into the action on flats that are 1 to 2 feet deep. “We’ve been finding tailing reds from the Mansfield channel and south towards the shoreline along the Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge,” said guide Ben Paschal. “That’s a good option throughout most of the day. I’m mostly looking for tails under hovering gulls.” Running the Mansfield channel up to the Land Cut allows anglers to double down on both reds and trout. “That’s a very good way to sight-cast to reds and trout,” said Nate Skinner. “I fished Nate Skinner recently landed this 27-inch speckled trout at Port there last week, and it was Mansfield, using a pink and silver Skitter Walk. Photo by Robert game on for trout to 7 pounds, Sloan. and lots of reds.” His best trout was caught on his first cast one morning with a pink and silver Skitter Walk. Skinner made a cast along the edge of the grass where it drops off into the cut. “I made a couple of cranks with the reel handle and she blew up on it,” he said. “Some days the reds are easy to catch in the cut, but we had a couple of days recently when they wouldn’t eat anything.” One pretty good option to check out is the fishing along the King Ranch shoreline north of Mansfield. That can be good for both reds and trout. But that’s usually an early bite. Veteran guide Ted Springer recommends wading that shoreline at first light with a Super Spook Jr. in a spectrum or clown color pattern. “What I usually do is run the shoreline and look for mullet,” Springer said. “That’s not always a guarantee of fish, but it’s a good start. Lately the trout have been about 20 to 50 yards off the shoreline.”


Page 12

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

GAME WARDEN BLOTTER WHILE THE OWNER’S AWAY A game warden was on his way home from work near Bay City when he noticed a pair of four-wheelers driving around a private ranch working spotlights. He called another warden for backup and together they gathered up what turned out to be eight individuals and their hog dogs. Allegedly, a neighbor who knew the hunters told them that the ranch owner was out of town and wouldn’t be around. The warden contacted the rancher, who indicated that he would be getting with him to file charges on the group once he returned home. MACKEREL BAIT A Matagorda County game warden was checking an offshore sport fisherman and found several frozen undersized Spanish mackerel. The fisherman stated that he had purchased the fish for offshore bait from a seafood dealer in Matagorda, who turned out to be the same business owner who received numerous citations for the same violation when wardens inspected his place of business a few weeks earlier. The warden contacted the business owner and questioned him about the possible possession of any more undersized mackerel. The dealer admitted to having more and led the warden to a freezer where he had 256 illegal undersized mackerel stored. Citation and approximately $1,700 in civil restitution are pending. SHOCKING DISCOVERY A Trinity County game warden received a call from a bass fisherman who found a gill net in a creek off the Trinity River. Wardens located three illegal nets the next day and also discovered a fishing camp not far from the net locations. At the camp, several holding baskets

SPOTTING THE TRUTH Harris County game wardens were patrolling Lake Houston late one night by jonboat looking for hunting and fishing violations. The wardens observed three people spotlighting the bank of an island near Luce Bayou by boat. The boat circled and spotlighted the whole island. Once the boat began to leave the area, the wardens turned on their lights and conducted a vessel stop. The front passenger had a bow, the driver had a .22 rifle with a flashlight crudely taped to the muzzle, a spotlight and corn all over the front floor of the boat. The boat also had no lights, lifejackets or vessel registration. The individuals said they were just looking for raccoons, alligators and other animals. The wardens followed

and stringers were found with fish inside. Some of the fish were dead and rotten. The wardens located a boat in the water at the camp but were unable to make contact with anyone. Two days later, wardens made contact with three individuals at the camp. A fish shocker was found in the boat. The three fishermen were identified and 17 citations and warnings were issued including no Texas fishing license, fishing by illegal means and methods, running illegal trotlines/ jug lines, and failure to keep fish in edible condition. ONE TOO MANY Game wardens were patrolling the Sabine River when a call came in from a fisherman regarding a boat repeatedly driving back and forth at high rates of speed near the city bridge. Wardens notified the Gladewater Police Department and officers were able to locate and shut down the boat until the wardens could arrive to investigate. The operator was identified and later acknowledged consuming

the boat back to one passenger’s house nearby. The two adult suspects were separated and interviewed. One admitted that they were driving around spotlighting deer. The other individual denied any type of hunting despite having a bow with him on the boat. It was discovered that he was in fact a convicted felon. He gave consent to a search of his vehicle where wardens found the truck contained a loaded .30-06 hunting rifle as well as 4.4 grams of methamphetamine. He was then arrested for possession of a controlled substance as well as the unlawful carry of a firearm by a felon. The other suspect was cited and released.

“three or four beers” — then said he was “too drunk to drive a boat.” The subject failed field sobriety tests and was arrested by the wardens for boating while intoxicated. The blood test lab results and case are pending. TURTLE RELEASED Brazoria County game wardens seized a 300-foot gill net found set in Christmas Bay. Approximately 150 fish were caught in the net, as well as a Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle. The turtle was released alive. ABSENTEE OPERATOR Tyler County game wardens observed personal watercraft motoring without any occupants near Rattlesnake Island on Sam Rayburn Lake. The wardens then saw an individual swimming from the watercraft. Wardens were able to stop the watercraft before it crashed into rocks along the island. Wardens identified the operator and, after a short interview, became concerned the man was potentially intoxicated. The man admitted to drinking two beers

and later added he also smoked marijuana. The subject was booked into Jasper County Jail on boating while intoxicated charges. NO SUPPORT While on enhanced patrol of Lake Amistad during Memorial Day weekend, a Val Verde County game warden arrested a fisherman for an outstanding warrant for criminal nonpayment of child support – he owed $17,000. The subject was booked into the Val Verde County Jail. UNDERSIZED CATCH A Willacy County game warden cited a subject for possession of untagged oversized red drum and fishing without a valid license. Later that night, the warden made contact with two other fishermen, and they were each in possession of two undersized black drum. Cases and restitution pending. RATTLED A call from an informant was received from a Jasper County game

warden that an individual in San Augustine County was in possession of a timber rattlesnake inside a residence in a fish tank. The Jasper County warden relayed the information to a San Augustine game warden who executed a search warrant for the residence and discovered the timber rattlesnake along with drug paraphernalia. The snake was released and cases were filed. SNAPCHAT VIDEO LEADS TO ARREST A game warden in Shelby County received information that occupants in a truck were night hunting on the county road behind his house. By the time the warden arrived, the vehicle had already left the immediate area. The warden met with the informant where he viewed a SnapChat video of four men with rifles and spotlights in the truck bragging that they were out spotlighting. Two hours later, dispatch advised that there was a man with a gun at a nearby gas station threatening individuals. The warden was first on scene and was able to disarm and secure a pistol from the man’s back pocket. When asked what the man was doing, he explained that the guys in the gas station had shot in front of his house, and he had chased them to that location. Ironically, they were the same four men the warden was looking for and had seen in the video earlier. The gunman was arrested for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and multiple hunting charges were filed against the four men.

REPORT ILLEGAL HUNTING AND FISHING ACTIVITY FOR A REWARD OF UP TO $1,000. CALL OPERATION GAME THIEF AT (800) 792-4263

For more info visit: www.allseasonsfeeders.com


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Excel Bay Pro 220, 203 & 183 Up to 200 Horsepower Rating Exceleration Pad Hull Performance up to 55 + MPH Twin Folding Rear Jump Seats Dry Box Storage Compartments 30 Cubic Feet Large Front and Rear Deck .125 Tough Aluminum Alloy 24 Gallon Rear Aerated Livewell 30 Gallon Fuel Tank Lean Post w/Footrest Deluxe Console w/6 Rod Holders w/16 Gallon Aerated Livewell w/Three Tray Tackle Center Front Bow 48 qt. Cooler w/220 Model Twin Spacious Rod Boxes Features vary depending on boat model and size. With a finish so fine, it looks like fiberglass.

www.Excel-Marine.com 801-352-8011 You’re up for most anything. So is the F150. The unprecedented displacement and massive power and thrust of a Yamaha teamed with the Excel’s Exceleration™ pad hull enable the Bay Pro 203 and 220 to be the fastest in its class. On step lightning fast with neck-breaking hole shots. Experience the smooth operation, handling and legendary trustworthiness of Yamaha and an Excel Bay Pro.

June 23, 2017

Page 13


Page 14

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

New - Fiberglass Blinds

LSONews.com

Coastline project Continued from page 8

Wrap-around Shelf

Texas Twister Seating

Molded Poly Blinds

RealBark® HUNTING SYSTEMS

1-800-256-4465 www.realbark.com Dealer Inquiries Welcome Lonestar_W5.125xH7.75_final.indd 1

3/17/2017 11:26:03 AM

the Chenier marsh, which could die from too much salinity. The impact of a dying mash would mean less protection from hurricanes and a reduction in wildlife, which would hurt hunters, anglers and the local economy. “It would have a dramatic economic impact,” he said. “The marsh environment has gotten too The Keith Lake fish baffle was installed to reduce the salt water flow. Photo from saline.” LJA Engineering. The marsh has sustained damage both Ecosystem Project Leader, said that’s a comman-made and natural over the years. mon misconception among some locals. Branick said photos from 2005 show the “We have no plans to close that off,” he marsh image as green and lush with onesaid, adding there were no plans to turn the acre ponds. In current photos, the marsh area into a lake for duck hunters either. appears browner and the small ponds have Rezsutek said the goal is to stabilize the turned into a 20-acre lake. vegetation, which is being harmed by large State and federal groups, including Ducks swings in salinity. The plants are the basis Unlimited and the Jefferson County Engiof the food chain for the entire estuary. If neering Department, began collaborating the plant life dies off, animals, waterfowl, in 2000 to save some of the deteriorating finfish and shellfish would be impacted, he coastline. The Salt Bayou Watershed Restosaid. ration Plan seeks to prevent salt water from Branick added that the next step is to indestroying the 139,000-acre marsh comstall two siphons to transport fresh water plex along the coast. from north of the Intracoastal Waterway So far the project has completed two critinto the Salt Bayou watershed to restore ical pieces of restoration work — a baffle hydraulic flows that push saltwater out of restricting salt water in the Keith Lake fish the marsh system. Another part calls for pass, and a 17-mile beach berm built by the dredging and pumping offshore sand to reTexas General Land Office to prevent saltbuild the dunes and beaches in or around water over-wash from small Gulf storms. McFaddin National Wildlife Refuge. So far, But the remaining work is costly. 3 miles of the 20 miles of coastline has Branick’s county doesn’t have the funding, been completed. The remaining 17 miles is so he is urging citizens to speak up to seanticipated to cost approximately $45 milcure money from the Deep Water Horizon lion. funds. Branick said funding from Deepwater However, not everyone is convinced that Horizon is critical for the completion of the the project will benefit all sportsmen. work. A $10-million portion of the grant is Capt. Randy Foreman, a guide in Sabine taking public comments until June 30 by Lake area near Port Arthur, fears the project emailing rcomments@tceq.txas.gov. is geared to benefit duck hunters. He ques“We are in permitting and could begin tions whether Keith Lake will eventually be as early as this fall,” Branick said, adding cut off from the saltwater, meaning a loss the beach dune restoration project could for anglers and a gain for duck hunters. be completed within six months, and the Michael Rezsutek, Texas Parks and Wildsiphons could take 10 months. life Department’s Upper Coast Wetland

More snapper days Continued from page 1

ends. Both of these options involve closing state and federal waters during the week. In addition, the second option would have required some if not all of the fall state red snapper season to be closed. The good news is that after talking it through, officials decided that the state’s fall season could remain open while adopting the three-day weekend option. The three-day weekend framework began June 16 and runs through the first weekend of September. Red snapper harvest will be closed in state and federal waters Monday through Thursday, with exceptions being July 3-4 and Sept. 4. Fishing for red snapper in the fall in state waters will remain in effect. Texas had been leaning toward the twoday option after anglers expressed concern during public hearings about giving up fall fishing in state waters. “We’re excited, but this isn’t a fix,” said Shane Bonnot, advocacy director the Texas Coastal Conservation Association. Bonnot said the other Gulf Coast states backed the idea of allowing Texas a fall season if the three-day option was agreed upon. Texas anglers were mixed on the entire idea of trading in state days for federal days. Those on the upper coast were more

in favor of it because there’s not a lot of snapper in state waters, but many anglers on the lower coast were against it because red snapper fishing is good in state waters. The new agreement does not affect the recreational season for anglers who fish from charter and party boats. That season, which is underway, runs through July 19. While the plan is only for the 2017 season, Robin Riechers, director of TPWD’s coastal fisheries division, said there is the potential it could change the 2018 season as well. Bonnot added that the chances are extremely high that the 2018 federal red snapper fishing season will be closed all together and that the closure may stretch into 2019 if the data shows anglers exceeded the allowed quota in 2017. “We want to move toward state management,” Bonnot said. Those in the fishing community feel changes need to be made in light of a greatly improved red snapper numbers over the years. The Texas Legislature also got into the fray, passing a bill encouraging the U.S. Congress to allow Texas to manage the fishery out to 200 nautical miles because officials feel Texas can efficiently manage it while offering more fishing opportunity.


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

June 23, 2017

Page 15

CALL YOU LOCAL PURINA DEALER TO SCHEDULE YOUR NEXT ANTLERMAX® DELIVERY! ALICE FEEDERS SUPPLY JOHNSON FEED AND WESTERN WEAR ANGLETON FEED AND SUPPLY ARCOLA FEED AND HARDWARE SOUTHSIDE FEED AND SUPPLY BANDERA RANCH STORE BASTROP FEED AND SUPPLY BAY CITY FEED INC SAMS WESTERN STORE BLUE RIBBON COUNTRY STORE BEAR CREEK LINSEISENS FEED AND SUPPLY BELTON FEED AND SUPPLY HOWARD COUNTY FEED AND SUPPLY WHEELERS FEED AND OUTFITTERS BEREND BROTHERS OF BOWIE BRENHAM PRODUCE CO PRODUCERS CO-OP DAVIS FEED AND FERTILIZER INC BERNARDO FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY BOLES FEED SILVERS PET AND FEED RICKS FARM AND HOME CLIFTON FEED SERVICE CENTER J AND D COUNTRY STORE LONE STAR COUNTRY STORE PECOS COUNTY FEED/CRANE COUNTY FEED CROCKETT FARM AND FUEL CENTER DEWITT COUNTY PRODUCERS DAMON FARM AND RANCH SERVICE CENTER NRS FEED STORE DEL RIO FEED AND SUPPLY D AND L FARM AND HOME BLAMAR FEED AND SURPLUS MARTIN FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY UNITED AG CO-OP POTTS FEED STORE CAPPS TRUE VALUE HARDWARE AND AG NOONDAY FEED STORE PECOS COUNTY FEED AND SUPPLY LOCHTE FEED FREER DEER CAMP GANADO FEED AND MORE CORYELL FEED AND SUPPLY GEORGETOWN FARM SUPPLY HINES CO INC GOLIAD FEED CO E-BARR FEEDS INC J AND N FEED AND SEED S AND S AG CENTER BUCHANANS FEED MACI FEED AND SUPPLY MUMME’S INC HIEDEN FEED AND SUPPLY HUNTSVILLE FARM SUPPLY LINDEMANN STORE C AND T AUTO-FEED H-BRAND FEED ODIORNE FEED JUNCTION WAREHOUSE MCDONNELL BUILDING MATERIALS KERRVILLE RANCH AND PET CENTER RICARDO RANCH AND FEED LA VERNIA COUNTRY STORE HOFFPAUIR’S RANCH & SUPPLY LAREDO COUNTRY STORE BEAR CREEK COUNTRY STORE LEXINGTON FEED AND FARM LLANO FEED & SUPPLY TEXAS RANCH OUTFITTERS JAKES FEED AND ANIMAL CENTER LUFKIN FARM SUPPLY LULING AND HARWOOD FARM AND FEED STANDLEY FEED AND SEED SPRING CREEK FEED CENTER WILLIAMS FEED STORE MCGREGOR GENERAL STORE CIRCLE G ENTERPRISES KOTHMANN’S SHEFFIELD FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY WALDEN FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY SOUTHWEST HAY AND FEED SCOTTS CROSSING FARM STORE BOLES FEED COMPANY MIDDLE G CATTLE CO NEEDVILLE FEED AND SUPPLY NEW BRAUNFELS FEED AND SUPPLY BEREND BROTHERS ORANGE GROVE CO-OP ENGLEDOW FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY BIG COUNTRY FARM CENTER MUMME’S INC REEVES COUNTY FEED AND SUPPLY D AND L FARM AND HOME PRIMOS FEED ANDERSON AG SUPPLY BORDER ENTERPRISES MUMME’S INC ROUND TOP FARM AND RANCH SABINAL GRAIN CO GROGAN’S FARM & RANCH FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY STEINHAUSERS PRODUCERS COOPERATIVE D&D FARM & RANCH BERANS AGRI-CENTER SOMERVILLE FARM AND RANCH STRUTTYS FEED AND PET SUPPLY SPRINGTOWN FEED AND FERTILIZER COOPERS COUNTRY STORE THREE RIVERS FARM AND RANCH FREE FLO FEEDS D AND D FEED AND SUPPLY TEXAS FARM STORE INC NORTHSIDE RANCH PET AND GARDEN CENTER WACO BRAZOS FEED AND SUPPLY BAR NONE COUNTRY STORE NEUHAUS AND CO WHARTON FEED AND SUPPLY BEREND BROTHERS KING FEED AND HARDWARE BEREND BROTHERS TRI COUNTY ENTERPRISES YOAKUM GRAIN SERIOS FEED AND SEED G AND H OUTDOOR STORE THOMAS NURSERY AND FEED RANCH OUTLET LLC CURRIE AND SON FEED AND GARDEN CENTER RAMSEYS SOUTHERN OUTFITTERS LANDRYS FEED STORE TOMMYS FEED STORE AND MORE PAULS FARM AND GARDEN SUPPLY TAYLORS FEED AND FARM SUP T AND C SPORTSMANS HAVEN VINTON FEED STORE CIRCLE S FEED STORE BUNKS FEED BARN

ALICE ALPINE ANGLETON ARCOLA ATHENS BANDERA BASTROP BAY CITY BEAUMONT BEEVILLE BELLS BELLVILLE BELTON BIG SPRING BOERNE BOWIE BRENHAM BRYAN BUFFALO CAT SPRING CENTER CIBOLO CLARKSVILLE CLIFTON CONROE CORPUS CHRISTI CRANE CROCKETT CUERO DAMON DECATUR DEL RIO DENTON EAGLE PASS EDINBURG EL CAMPO EMORY FAIRFIELD FLINT FORT STOCKTON

FREDERICKSBURG

FREER GANADO GATESVILLE GEORGETOWN GEORGE WEST GOLIAD GONZALES GRAHAM GROESBECK HALLSVILLE HARDIN HONDO HOUSTON HUNTSVILLE INDUSTRY IRAAN JACKSBORO JOHNSON CITY JUNCTION KELLER KERRVILLE KINGSVILLE LA VERNIA LAMPASAS LAREDO LEONARD LEXINGTON LLANO LOMETA LONGVIEW LUFKIN LULING MADISONVILLE MAGNOLIA MARLIN MC GREGOR MCALLEN MENARD MEXIA MILLSAP MISSION MURCHISON NACOGDOCHES NAPLES NEEDVILLE NEWBRAUNFELS OLNEY ORANGE GROVE PALESTINE PARIS PEARSALL PECOS PILOT POINT PLEASANTON REFUGIO RIO GRANDE CITY RIO MEDINA ROUND TOP SABINAL SAN ANGELO SAN ISIDRO SEALY SEGUIN SEGUIN SHINER SOMERVILLE SPRING BRANCH SPRINGTOWN STEPHENVILLE THREE RIVERS TILDEN TOMBALL UVALDE VICTORIA WACO WACO WESLACO WHARTON WICHITA FALLS WIMBERLEY WINDTHORST WINNSBORO YOAKUM BOSSIER CITY CROWLEY FARMERVILLE LAFAYETTE LAKE CHARLES MINDEN RAYNE RUSTON SHREVEPORT SPRINGHILL TROUT VINTON CARLSBAD HOBBS

TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA NM NM

361-664-3404 432-837-5792 979-849-6661 281-431-1014 903-677-5373 830-796-3342 512-321-3700 979-245-2712 409-842-2625 361-392-3333 903-965-4900 979-865-3602 254-939-3636 432-267-6411 830-249-2656 940-872-5131 979-836-3523 979-778-6000 903-322-4316 979-732-5161 936-598-3061 210-566-8020 903-427-3395 254-675-3416 936.756.7667 361-387-2668 432-558-2225 936-544-3855 361-275-3441 979-742-3317 940-627-3949 830-775-5090 940-891-0100 830-757-6310 956-383-4949 979-543-4104 903-473-2249 903-389-4504 903-561-5622 432-336-6877 830-997-2256 361-394-5586 361-771-2401 254-865-6315 512-930-4054 361-449-1713 361-645-3266 830-672-6515 940-549-4631 254-729-8008 903-668-2012 936-298-9404 830-426-3313 281.444.1010 936-295-3961 979-357-2121 432-639-2189 940-567-3794 830-868-4579 325-446-2537 817-431-3551 830-895-5800 361-592-3622 830-779-2600 512-556-5444 956-206-7357 903-587-0385 979-773-2782 325-247-4126 512-564-0303 903-663-3139 936-634-7414 830-875-5423 936-348-5272 281.252.5400 254-883-2401 254-840-3224 956-631-1321 800-637-0951 254-562-3818 940-682-4667 956-580-1717 903-469-3122 936-564-2671 903-575-1869 979-793-6146 830-625-7250 940-564-5674 361-384-2766 903-723-3210 903-785-8372 830-334-3323 432-447-2149 940-365-3129 830-570-1134 361-526-5018 956-487-2570 830-931-2215 979-249-5666 830-988-2215 325-227-6870 956-481-3346 979-885-2967 830-379-1750 830-379-7340 361-594-3395 979-596-2224 830-438-8998 817-220-7656 254-968-5633 361-786-3242 361-274-3232 281.351.7144 830-278-3713 361-573-5000 254-756-6687 254-848-9112 956-968-7502 979-532-8533 940-723-2736 512-847-2618 940-423-6223 903-342-5328 361-293-3521 318-746-8559 337-684-3391 318-368-2425 337-235-2163 337-433-2111 318-377-5355 337-334-4224 318-255-4095 318-425-2222 318-539-5818 318-992-6310 337-589-3260 575-885-8369 575-397-1228


Page 16

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

HEROES

Ray Buckley of Euless caught this blue catfish on Lake Lewisville.

Jerry Jimenez, 64, took three toms in less than an hour in San Patricio while on a hunting trip with his brother, Ronnie. The gobblers where harvested between 40 and 70 yards using a .270 Ruger American with a Nikon scope.

James Gautreaux caught and released this great catch while surf-fishing the upper Galveston area.

SHARE AN ADVENTURE

n Want to share hunting and fishing photos with other Lone Star Outdoor News readers? Email them with contact and caption information to editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com. High-resolution original jpegs only. Mail prints to Heroes, Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355.

Stephen Rodriguez’s nephew Grayson bagged his first turkey at 14 yards while bow hunting on the LNB cattle ranch.

Conor Harrison, former LSON managing editor, caught a skipjack while fishing in the Bahamas. Yellow-eyed snapper were also plentiful during the trip.

SQUARE 1 CONTAINERS, LLC 20Ft/40Ft Used Containers Modifications Available Hunting Camps Construction Offices

20ft Used Containers - $1600 + Delivery 40ft Used Containers - $2100 + Delivery

Great for storage of: Small Equipment Four Wheelers Feed Anything you want to keep secure and dry Ernie Williamson ernie1@square1containers.com

Fran Linnell fran@square1containers.com

877-470-1662

www.square1containers.com


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

June 23, 2017

Page 17

Surf-fishing for trout Continued from page 8

was on an afternoon run with a slight southeast breeze. “Fishing the surf is usually good in June, but not like we’ve seen lately,” he said. “I think we’re in for some above-average runs for trout in the surf.” Paradoski is based out of Matagorda. They run through the jetties there and head south towards the Port O’Connor jetties. It’s almost all fishing from the boat. But occasionally, on a really flat day, they will opt for wading. Most of the guides out of Port O’Connor prefer to run the surf in a boat. Last summer, the trout showed up in the surf in pretty good numbers toward the last week of June. The options of running the surf are diverse out of POC. Anglers can run out of the jetties and head north toward Matagorda, or head south toward Pass

Cavallo. “You never know where the trout are going to be in the surf,” said Mike Barnes, who grew up fishing POC. “The main thing is to find baitfish and birds. The best thing that can happen is that you run up on a bunch of pelicans diving into the surf with baitfish scattering everywhere. That pretty much guarantees a good trout bite.” The surf from Pass Cavallo is good for about 25 miles south, well past the lighthouse. About 15 miles past the lighthouse is the old Darlington wreck. It’s another good place to find trout. You can use a variety of live baits and lures in the surf. Guide Dodd Coffey said his go-to bait in the surf is a live croaker. “I like to fish lures in the surf,” he said. “But when I’ve got custom-

ers with me it’s easier to fish croakers or live shrimp. On most days a live croaker is best.” Some of the most proven lures in the surf are jigs. A Yum Money Minnow in pearl/chartreuse rigged on a 1/4-ounce Assassin screw lock jig head is good. A 5-inch Shad Assassin in an opening night color pattern is a great option. But you can also tap into some awesome top-water action at first light. A bone/silver or chrome/ blue Super Spook Jr. will draw some pretty good blowups. Two other popular lures are the Mirrolure 52M Series in chartreuse and the Catch 2000, a suspending twitch bait. The surf isn’t always smooth enough to fish. But, when it’s flat and green to the beach, it’s definitely worth the run.

Built Right the First time to last a lifetime!

Surf fishing is expected to be above average in June. A flat surf can produce great trout fishing. Photo by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.

R

U.S. PATENTS 8201520, 7370605, 6920841, D575908, D599503, D602649, D603104, D603105, D604017, D603566, D624706, D624708, D622453, D624707, D636942, D629572, D629976, D629975, D624709, D630802, D630653, D647253, D642750, D681883, 9278813, 9554555 • OTHER PATENTS PENDING • U.S. TRADEMARKS 3629190 & 3625066

BRAND NEW DESigN!

Bobwhite Quail SALE

FOR

The “Share-Kropper” Low profiLe feeder

Strong Wild Beautiful •

(325) 945-2508 (325) 660-7869 •

645 C.R. 105 - MORAN, TX 76464

ChOOse FROM DiReCTiOnAl OR SPINNER DISTRIbUTION Directional Feeder spreads heavier feed out to 50’ in a 20’ wide pattern. spinner Feeder spreads up to 360 degrees. • Works equally well with all types of fish feed, corn or milo • Can be placed on a pier, dock, bank or truck • 24” tank diameter holds 175# floating fish feed or 300# corn

BUIlT wITH PrIde In AMerICA wITH Only AMerICAn MATerIAls And CrAfTsMAnsHIP

CP REGULATOR The Regulator has “The Timer” inside the gravity flow system allowing control of the feed amount while maintaining dispensed feed inside the feeder housing and tubes. You program to dispense feed up to 6 times/day at the rate of 2 lbs./ second & 360 lbs./day max.

CF CORN FEEDER with Solar Powered Timer • 600, 1000, 2000 & 3000 lb. capacities • Optional Fold-up Cage • Optional 4-Tube Adapter on TM Tube For home or office delivery, go to LSONews.com, or call (214) 361-2276, or send a check or money order to the address below.

OUTBACK feATUres THe TIMer 12-VOlT COnTrOl UnIT wITH 5

Lone Star Outdoor News, ISSN 21628300, a publication of Lone Star Outdoor News, LLC, publishes twice a month. A mailed subscription is $30 for 24 issues. Newsstand copies are $2, in certain markets copies are free, one per person. Copyright 2017 with all rights reserved. Reproduction and/or use of any photographic or written material without written permission by the publisher is prohibited. Subscribers may send address changes to: Lone Star Outdoor News, P.O. Box 551695, Dallas, TX 75355 or email them to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com. Executive Editor

Craig Nyhus

Managing Editor

Darlene McCormick Sanchez

Design Editor

C2-Studios, Inc.

Associate Editor

Mark England

Products Editor

Mary Helen Aguirre

Operations Manager

Mike Hughs

Accounting

Ginger Hoolan

Website

Bruce Solieu

National Advertising Mike Nelson Founder & CEO

yeAr wArrAnTy

CP GRAVITY FLOW PROTEIN FEEDER • 1000, 2000 & 3000 lb. capacities

BRAND NEW DESigN! GREAT bALL OF FIRE WILDLIFE sCene eMbellisheD FiRe piT no two alike, each one a work of art! • 1400o high-temp. powder-coat finish • Fire poker & ash pan included FIRE PITS • Features swivel grill, Dutch oven support, fire poker & ash pan • 3 sizes: 38” Texas, 30” Junior or 24” Tailgater

hAlF-bACk pROTein FeeDeR • 700 lb. capacity has 4 feed ports • 1000 lb. capacity has 6 feed ports

The “Grub-Shak” comes standard with all the ruggedness & reliability Outback is known for. “GRub-shAk” Open-TROuGh REGULATED FEEDER • Feed all types of animals including deer, sheep, goats, horses, cattle, etc. • 1000# & 2000# capacities • built-in rain shield • Removable ladder & platform included

David J. Sams

Advertising: Call (214) 361-2276 or email editor@lonestaroutdoornews.com to request a media kit.

For home delivery subscriptions www.LSONews.com • (214) 361-2276

“bAbY-bACk” seRies VeRY lOW pROFile FeeDeRs • 360o corn distribution or up to 50 feet in one direction via Outback’s “pistolero” directional unit • 400#, 600# & 1000# capacities

See our many other products at

.outbackfeeders.com

www

office 903.734.4210 • 800.396.6313 • shop 903.734.6774 • cell 903.790.1071 • e-mail: rickmeritt@yahoo.com • 5197 FM 2685 • Gilmer, TX 75645


Page 18

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

TEXAS SUN, MOON AND TIDES Moon Phases

First

Full

Last

New

June 30

July 8

July 16

July 23

Solunar Sun times Moon times

Houston

Dallas

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Jun/July Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Jun/July Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

23 Fri 24 Sat 25 Sun 26 Mon 27 Tue 28 Wed 29 Thu 30 Fri 01 Sat 02 Sun 03 Mon 04 Tue 05 Wed 06 Thu 07 Fri

23 Fri 24 Sat 25 Sun 26 Mon 27 Tue 28 Wed 29 Thu

5:07 11:23 6:09 ----7:14 12:58 8:19 2:04 9:22 3:08 10:22 4:09 11:16 5:04

5:38 11:54 6:40 12:56 7:44 1:29 8:48 2:33 9:50 3:36 10:47 4:34 11:40 5:28

06:20 06:20 06:20 06:20 06:21 06:21 06:21

30 Fri

----- 5:54

12:05

06:22 08:38 1:19p

1:03a

01 Sat 02 Sun 03 Mon 04 Tue 05 Wed 06 Thu 07 Fri

12:28 6:39 1:10 7:21 1:50 8:01 2:28 8:40 3:08 9:19 3:49 10:00 4:32 10:43

12:50 7:01 1:32 7:43 2:11 8:22 2:51 9:02 3:30 9:42 4:12 10:24 4:55 11:07

06:22 06:23 06:23 06:23 06:24 06:24 06:25

1:37a 2:10a 2:43a 3:18a 3:54a 4:34a 5:17a

5:02 11:17 6:03 ----7:08 12:52 8:13 1:58 9:16 3:03 10:16 4:03 11:10 4:58 11:59 5:48 12:22 6:33 1:04 7:15 1:44 7:55 2:23 8:34 3:02 9:13 3:43 9:54 4:26 10:38

5:33 6:34 7:38 8:42 9:44 10:41 11:34 ----12:44 1:26 2:06 2:45 3:25 4:06 4:50

11:48 12:50 1:23 2:28 3:30 4:28 5:22 6:11 6:55 7:37 8:17 8:56 9:36 10:18 11:02

06:21 06:21 06:22 06:22 06:22 06:22 06:23 06:23 06:23 06:24 06:24 06:25 06:25 06:25 06:26

08:24 08:24 08:24 08:25 08:25 08:25 08:25 08:25 08:25 08:25 08:25 08:25 08:25 08:24 08:24

6:00a 8:05p 7:01a 9:07p 8:06a 10:03p 9:11a 10:54p 10:15a 11:39p 11:17a NoMoon 12:16p 12:19a 1:13p 12:57a 2:07p 1:32a 3:00p 2:06a 3:53p 2:40a 4:45p 3:16a 5:36p 3:53a 6:28p 4:34a 7:17p 5:17a

6:17

08:37 08:37 08:37 08:38 08:38 08:38 08:38 08:38 08:38 08:38 08:37 08:37 08:37 08:37

6:01a 8:17p 7:01a 9:19p 8:06a 10:14p 9:12a 11:04p 10:18a 11:48p 11:21a NoMoon 12:21p 12:27a 2:14p 3:08p 4:02p 4:55p 5:48p 6:39p 7:29p

Amarillo

San Antonio

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Jun/July Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

2017 A.M. P.M. SUN MOON Jun/July Minor Major Minor Major Rises Sets Rises Sets

23 Fri 24 Sat 25 Sun 26 Mon 27 Tue 28 Wed 29 Thu 30 Fri 01 Sat 02 Sun 03 Mon 04 Tue 05 Wed 06 Thu 07 Fri

23 Fri 24 Sat 25 Sun 26 Mon 27 Tue 28 Wed 29 Thu 30 Fri 01 Sat 02 Sun 03 Mon 04 Tue 05 Wed 06 Thu 07 Fri

5:14 11:30 6:16 ----7:20 1:05 8:25 2:11 9:29 3:15 10:28 4:15 11:23 5:11 ----- 6:00 12:35 6:46 1:17 7:27 1:56 8:07 2:35 8:46 3:14 9:26 3:55 10:07 4:38 10:50

5:45 6:47 7:51 8:55 9:56 10:54 11:47 12:12 12:57 1:38 2:18 2:57 3:37 4:19 5:02

12:01 13:02 1:35 2:40 3:43 4:41 5:35 6:23 7:08 7:49 8:29 9:08 9:49 10:30 11:14

06:35 06:35 06:35 06:35 06:36 06:36 06:36 06:37 06:37 06:37 06:38 06:38 06:38 06:39 06:39

08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36 08:36

6:14a 8:17p 7:15a 9:19p 8:19a 10:15p 9:25a 11:06p 10:29a 11:51p 11:31a NoMoon 12:30p 12:32a 1:26p 1:09a 2:20p 1:45a 3:13p 2:19a 4:05p 2:53a 4:57p 3:29a 5:49p 4:07a 6:40p 4:47a 7:29p 5:31a

5:28 11:43 6:29 ----7:34 1:18 8:39 2:24 9:42 3:29 10:42 4:29 11:36 5:24 12:01 6:14 12:48 6:59 1:30 7:41 2:10 8:21 2:49 9:00 3:28 9:39 4:09 10:20 4:52 11:04

5:59 7:00 8:04 9:08 10:10 11:07 ----12:25 1:10 1:52 2:32 3:11 3:51 4:32 5:16

12:14 13:16 1:49 2:54 3:56 4:54 5:48 6:37 7:21 8:03 8:42 9:22 10:02 10:44 11:27

06:33 06:34 06:34 06:34 06:34 06:35 06:35 06:36 06:36 06:36 06:37 06:37 06:38 06:38 06:39

09:04 09:04 09:04 09:04 09:04 09:04 09:04 09:04 09:04 09:04 09:04 09:04 09:04 09:03 09:03

6:17a 8:43p 7:17a 9:45p 8:22a 10:40p 9:29a 11:29p 10:35a NoMoon 11:40a 12:11a 12:41p 12:50a 1:39p 1:25a 2:36p 1:57a 3:31p 2:29a 4:26p 3:02a 5:20p 3:35a 6:13p 4:11a 7:05p 4:50a 7:55p 5:33a

Legend: Major=2 hours. Minor=1 hour. Times centered on the major-minor window. For other locations, subtract 1 minute per 12 miles east of a location, and add 1 minute per 12 miles west of a location.

Sabine Pass, north Date Jun 23 Jun 24 Jun 25 Jun 26 Jun 27 Jun 28 Jun 29 Jun 30 July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7

Time 4:37 AM 5:27 AM 6:17 AM 7:08 AM 12:15 AM 1:08 AM 2:05 AM 3:07 AM 4:20 AM 12:58 AM 2:10 AM 3:05 AM 3:49 AM 4:24 AM 4:54 AM

Port O’Connor Height 1.9H 1.9H 1.9H 1.8H -0.4L -0.1L 0.2L 0.5L 0.7L 1.2H 1.4H 1.5H 1.6H 1.6H 1.6H

Time 9:50 AM 10:40 AM 11:32 AM 12:29 PM 7:59 AM 8:50 AM 9:39 AM 10:25 AM 11:05 AM 5:45 AM 7:16 AM 8:33 AM 9:26 AM 9:58 AM 10:14 AM

Height 1.2L 1.3L 1.2L 1.2L 1.7H 1.6H 1.5H 1.4H 1.4H 0.9L 1.1L 1.1L 1.2L 1.2L 1.2L

Time 2:10 PM 2:57 PM 3:48 PM 4:45 PM 1:35 PM 2:49 PM 4:03 PM 5:04 PM 5:52 PM 11:41 AM 12:11 PM 12:37 PM 12:57 PM 1:13 PM 1:29 PM

Height 1.6H 1.6H 1.5H 1.4H 1.1L 0.9L 0.8L 0.5L 0.3L 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H

Time 9:44 PM 10:33 PM 11:23 PM

Height -0.8L -0.7L -0.6L

5:56 PM 7:33 PM 9:32 PM 11:25 PM

1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 1.1H

6:32 7:07 7:40 8:13 8:46 9:21

0.2L 0.0L -0.1L -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L

PM PM PM PM PM PM

Galveston Bay entrance, north jetty Time 5:13 AM 6:01 AM 6:48 AM 7:39 AM 12:18 AM 1:09 AM 2:05 AM 3:10 AM 4:25 AM 12:49 AM 2:11 AM 3:17 AM 4:13 AM 4:56 AM 5:30 AM

Height 2.1H 2.1H 2.0H 1.9H -0.3L -0.1L 0.2L 0.5L 0.8L 1.3H 1.4H 1.5H 1.6H 1.7H 1.7H

Time 11:35 AM 12:21 PM 1:04 PM 1:52 PM 8:30 AM 9:15 AM 9:53 AM 10:26 AM 10:54 AM 6:08 AM 7:28 AM 8:31 AM 8:16 PM 8:48 PM 9:23 PM

Height 1.4L 1.4L 1.4L 1.3L 1.8H 1.7H 1.6H 1.5H 1.4H 1.0L 1.1L 1.2 -0.1L -0.2L -0.2L

Time 1:58 PM 2:49 PM 3:47 PM 4:49 PM 2:46 PM 3:39 PM 4:30 PM 5:20 PM 6:05 PM 11:14 AM 11:20 AM 11:15 AM

Height 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 1.4H 1.2L 1.0L 0.8L 0.6L 0.4L 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H

Time 9:43 PM 10:37 PM 11:28 PM

Height -0.6L -0.6L -0.5L

5:54 PM 7:26 PM 9:31 PM 11:08 PM

1.3H 1.2H 1.1H 1.2H

6:43 PM 7:16 PM 7:46 PM

0.2L 0.1L -0.1L

Height 1.2H 1.3H 1.2H -0.5L -0.3L -0.1L 0.1L 0.3L 0.5L 0.7H 0.8H 0.9H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H

Time 11:56 AM 12:43 PM 1:33 PM 8:58 AM 9:46 AM 10:25 AM 10:59 AM 11:27 AM 11:46 AM 7:26 AM 8:27 AM 9:25 AM 9:22 PM 9:56 PM 10:31 PM

Height 1.0L 1.0L 1.0L 1.2H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.9H 0.8H 0.6L 0.7L 0.8L -0.2L -0.2L -0.2L

Time 2:08 PM 2:53 PM 3:48 PM 2:31 PM 3:28 PM 4:23 PM 05:23 PM 6:23 PM 7:08 PM 12:03 PM 12:20 PM 12:30 PM

Height 1.0H 1.1H 1.0H 0.9L 0.8L 0.7L 0.6L 0.4L 0.2L 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H

Time 10:39 PM 11:29 PM

Height -0.5L -0.5L

Time 6:15 AM 7:02 AM 7:59 AM 12:17 AM 1:07 AM 2:05 AM 3:13 AM 4:26 AM 6:00 AM 2:06 AM 3:28 AM 5:02 AM 5:36 AM 5:59 AM 6:23 AM

4:48 PM 5:43 PM 6:52 PM 9:30 PM 11:45 PM

1.0H 0.9H 0.7H 0.7H 0.6H

7:44 PM 8:17 PM 8:49 PM

0.1L 0.0L -0.1L

Height 2.1H 2.2H 2.1H 2.0H 1.9H 0.0L 0.3L 0.6L 0.9L 1.3H 1.4H 1.6H 1.7H 1.8H 1.8H

Time 9:09 PM 10:00 PM 10:56 PM 11:50 PM 3:25 PM 8:57 AM 9:33 AM 10:01 AM 10:21 AM 6:20 AM 8:16 AM 7:29 PM 7:57 PM 8:25 PM 8:54 PM

Height -0.6L -0.5L -0.4L -0.3L 1.1L 1.7H 1.6H 1.4H 1.3H 1.1L 1.2L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.2L

Time

Height

Height -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L 0.1L 0.2L 0.4L 0.9H 0.9H 1.1H 1.2H 1.3H 1.3H 0.0L 0.0L

Time 9:25 AM 10:22 AM 11:17 AM 12:06 PM 12:46 PM 1:14 PM 1:31 PM 7:36 AM 8:53 AM 10:12 AM 11:31 AM 11:35 PM

Height 1.5H 1.5H 1.5H 1.4H 1.3H 1.2H 1.2H 0.6L 0.8L 0.9L 1.0L 0.1L

9:53 AM 10:23 AM

1.3H 1.3H

Freeport Harbor Date Jun 23 Jun 24 Jun 25 Jun 26 Jun 27 Jun 28 Jun 29 Jun 30 July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7

Time 4:59 AM 5:49 AM 6:37 AM 7:24 AM 8:12 AM 12:41 AM 1:34 AM 2:40 AM 4:06 AM 12:47 AM 2:08 AM 3:00 AM 3:46 AM 4:28 AM 5:06 AM

Time 12:34 AM 1:23 AM 2:17 AM 3:13 AM 4:13 AM 5:16 AM 6:23 AM 12:27 AM 3:30 AM 6:11 AM 7:32 AM 8:28 AM 9:14 AM 12:09 AM 12:41 AM

Time 11:46 PM

Height -0.4L

12:11 PM 12:44 PM 1:03 PM 1:14 PM 1:15 PM 12:23 PM 8:28 PM 8:46 PM 9:11 PM 9:39 PM 10:10 PM 10:45 PM 11:25 PM

0.7H 0.7H 0.6H 0.5H 0.4H 0.3H 0.0L -0.1L -0.2L -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L -0.3L

Time 12:14 AM 1:06 AM 1:59 AM 2:49 AM 3:34 AM 4:12 AM 4:39 AM 4:50 AM 4:37 AM 11:55 AM 12:06 PM 12:27 PM 12:55 PM 1:30 PM 2:09 PM

Height -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L 0.1L 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H 0.2H

Time 2:00 PM 2:55 PM 3:54 PM 4:56 PM 5:59 PM 7:08 PM 1:21 PM 12:15 PM 11:56 AM 8:53 PM 9:38 PM 10:21 PM 11:03 PM 11:47 PM

Height 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.2H 0.1H 0.2H 0.2H 0.0L 0.0L -0.1L -0.1L -0.1L

Height 1.0H 1.1H 1.0H 1.0H -0.4L -0.2L 0.0L 0.2L 0.4L 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H

Time 10:31 AM 11:18 AM 12:05 PM 12:56 PM 8:52 AM 9:32 AM 9:53 AM 9:18 AM 9:26 AM 6:31 PM 7:08 PM 7:49 AM 8:44 AM 9:28 AM 10:08 AM

Height 0.9L 0.9L 0.9L 0.9L 0.9H 0.8H 0.7H 0.7H 0.7H 0.1L 0.0L 0.7L 0.7L 0.7L 0.7L

Height 1.3H 1.3H 1.3H 1.2H -0.6L -0.4L -0.2L 0.1L 0.3L 0.6H 0.7H 0.9H 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H

Time 9:25 PM 10:16 PM 11:08 PM

Height -0.9L -0.9L -0.8L

9:14 AM 9:41 AM 9:59 AM 10:11 AM 10:16 AM 5:08 AM 6:39 AM 7:30 PM 8:03 PM 8:36 PM 9:09 PM

1.1H 1.0H 0.9H 0.8H 0.7H 0.5L 0.7L -0.3L -0.4L -0.5L -0.5L

Height 0.4H 0.4H -0.1L -0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.1L 0.1L 0.2L 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.4H 0.4H

Time 11:28 PM

Height -0.1L

1:25 PM 1:40 PM 1:35 PM 12:53 PM 12:46 PM 12:44 PM 12:18 PM 7:29 AM 8:34 AM 10:06 AM 10:54 AM 11:28 AM 11:23 PM

0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.3H 0.2L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.3L 0.0L

Time

8:38 PM

Time

Height

Time

Height

Time

Height

0.1L

Height

4:44 PM 6:55 PM 8:03 PM

0.1L 0.1L 0.0L

8:40 PM 11:09 PM

0.2H 0.1H

Date Jun 23 Jun 24 Jun 25 Jun 26 Jun 27 Jun 28 Jun 29 Jun 30 Jul 1 Jul 2 Jul 3 Jul 4 Jul 5 Jul 6 Jul 7

Time 5:30 AM 6:21 AM 7:13 AM 8:04 AM 12:03 AM 12:54 AM 1:45 AM 2:37 AM 1:58 AM 9:46 AM 10:09 AM 5:30 AM 6:07 AM 6:37 AM 5:41 AM

Time 12:47 PM 1:35 PM 2:27 PM 3:22 PM 1:55 PM 3:00 PM 4:05 PM 5:02 PM 5:49 PM

Height 1.0H 1.0H 1.0H 0.9H 0.8L 0.7L 0.5L 0.4L 0.2L

Time 9:30 PM 10:20 PM 11:11 PM

Height -0.5L -0.5L -0.5L

4:22 5:37 7:10 8:53

PM PM PM PM

0.8H 0.7H 0.6H 0.5H

10:35 11:09 11:50 12:34

0.7H 0.8H 0.8H 0.8H

7:43 8:17 8:50 9:22

PM PM PM PM

-0.1L -0.2L -0.3L -0.3L

Time

Height

AM AM AM PM

South Padre Island Time

5:26 PM 4:00 PM 4:35 PM 5:11 PM 5:48 PM 10:34 AM 10:40 AM

Height

1.2H 1.0L 0.8L 0.6L 0.4L 1.3H 1.2H

6:47 PM 8:45 PM 10:52 PM

1.1H 1.0H 1.1H

6:25 PM 6:59 PM

0.3L 0.1L

Rollover Pass Date Jun 23 Jun 24 Jun 25 Jun 26 Jun 27 Jun 28 Jun 29 Jun 30 July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7

Date Jun 23 Jun 24 Jun 25 Jun 26 Jun 27 Jun 28 Jun 29 Jun 30 July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7

Height 0.8H 0.8H -0.4L -0.4L -0.3L -0.2L -0.1L 0.0L 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H 0.5H

Port Aransas

San Luis Pass Date Jun 23 Jun 24 Jun 25 Jun 26 Jun 27 Jun 28 Jun 29 Jun 30 July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7

Rockport

Time 10:32 AM 11:23 AM 12:42 AM 1:37 AM 2:29 AM 3:17 AM 3:58 AM 4:30 AM 11:30 AM 10:58 AM 10:14 AM 10:15 AM 10:25 AM 10:26 AM 9:57 AM

Date Jun 23 Jun 24 Jun 25 Jun 26 Jun 27 Jun 28 Jun 29 Jun 30 July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7

Time 5:55 AM 6:52 AM 7:47 AM 8:35 AM 12:01 AM 12:54 AM 1:49 AM 2:46 AM 3:50 AM 2:25 AM 3:58 AM 4:54 AM 5:41 AM 6:23 AM 7:01 AM

Time

5:18 PM 5:49 PM 10:07 AM 9:31 AM

Height

0.3L 0.1L 0.7H 0.7H

10:24 PM

0.5H

6:23 PM 6:57 PM

-0.1L -0.2L

Time

Height

East Matagorda Time

7:38 8:18 1:36 1:34 1:35 1:43

PM PM PM PM PM PM

Height

0.9L 0.7L 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H 1.1H

Time

Height

10:22 PM

1.0H

9:00 PM 9:40 PM 10:20 PM 10:58 PM

0.5L 0.4L 0.2L 0.1L

Date Jun 23 Jun 24 Jun 25 Jun 26 Jun 27 Jun 28 Jun 29 Jun 30 July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7

Time 1:17 PM 1:09 PM 12:08 AM 1:11 AM 2:29 AM 3:09 AM 3:38 AM 4:00 AM 4:18 AM 2:10 AM 5:29 AM 5:51 AM 6:29 AM 8:52 AM 9:25 AM

Time

6:40 PM 7:17 PM 7:52 PM 12:13 PM 12:33 PM 12:57 PM 1:20 PM 1:42 PM

Height

0.2L 0.2L 0.1L 0.3H 0.3H 0.4H 0.4H 0.4H

8:58 PM 10:27 PM

0.3H 0.2H

8:31 PM 9:16 PM 9:59 PM 10:34 PM 11:01 PM

0.1L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L 0.0L

Texas Coast Tides

Date Jun 23 Jun 24 Jun 25 Jun 26 Jun 27 Jun 28 Jun 29 Jun 30 July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7

Date Jun 23 Jun 24 Jun 25 Jun 26 Jun 27 Jun 28 Jun 29 Jun 30 July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 6 July 7


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Protecting hearing Continued from page 8

came to find out there was a reason for it.” Long runs across lakes at speeds of 60-70 mph did the damage, his father believes. “Stick your head out the window while driving on the highway, and you’ll get an idea of what we’re exposed to,” said Jones, also of Lorena. “It’s well over 100 decibels.” Long runs are common in pro angling, where the competition is fierce. “Three to five times a day I’ll make a long run, usually longer than 10 minutes,” Jones Jr. said. “Some days I’ll travel 180 miles total.” The head of the audiology program at the University of Texas at Dallas said the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health puts the safe listening period for a sound in the range of 100 decibels at 15 minutes. “And that’s assuming that period is once a day,” said Dr. Colleen Le Prell. Jones Jr. said for years he ignored the ringing in his ears after long boat runs, considering it to be “normal.” “I learned it was the furthest thing from normal,” he said. “It’s your body telling you that you’re hurting yourself.” Ringing in the ears is called tinnitus and can last for minutes or hours. It can be temporary, depending on how long one is exposed to such loud noises. “When you repeat those injuries day after day, then there’s the potential those injuries will become permanent,” Le Prell said. She advocates using earplugs to prevent hearing loss. Those cheap foam earplugs available at drug stores offer surprising protection. They can be iffy, however. “They can be very effective at bringing the noise level down,” Le Prell said. “The biggest problem is that many people don’t use them correctly. They often don’t push them far enough into the ear.” Both of the Joneses wear custom-fitted

earplugs — made by Miracle-Ear, a sponsor. A mold is made by injecting soft silicone into the ear canal. Cotton is first inserted, however, to protect the tympanic membrane. After it sits for a few minutes, the hardened mold is removed and sent to the manufacturer. “The earplug is perfectly fitted to the individual user and has the potential to be more comfortable, particularly if a person’s ear canal is very small or very curvy,” Le Prell said. She said fittings range from $25-$100, while earplugs go for $150 and up. Jones swears by his earplugs but fellow pros are slow to emulate him. “There are 108 anglers on the Elite Series,” he said. “I only know of the two of us, me and my son. So about 2 percent. Some wear earmuffs, which provide some protection. And some is better than none.” Father and son both wear their earplugs on lanyards when fishing. “I put on my life jacket, start the engine and put on my earplugs,” Jones said. “It doesn’t cost me any time on the water. I hope more anglers will come to see that protecting their hearing is as important as protecting their skin. It’s about quality of life.” His son compares it to wearing a seatbelt. “It takes nothing out of your day, and it protects you,” he said. “Do it before it’s too late.” Jones also now wears a hearing aid while fishing. As with his son, it’s all about gaining a competitive advantage. “I’ve been in tournaments where I caught an extra bass because I heard it explode out of the water behind me, or I heard seagulls breaking on baitfish being driven to the surface a quarter-mile away,” he said. “I know that time without my hearing aid can mean missed opportunities.”

June 23, 2017

Page 19


Page 20

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

INDUSTRY

OUTDOOR PUZZLER OUTDOOR PUZZLER

New CEO at Pure Fishing

Solution on Solution on Page Page2622

1

2

3

4

5

6

8

Neil Eibeler has replaced John Doerr as CEO of Pure Fishing. Eibeler has been with Newell Brands for 16 years.

7

9

10

11

13

12 14

Mossberg takes sales in-house

15

16

17 18

23

O.F. Mossberg and Sons, Inc. will transition to a dedicated sales force on July 28.

19

20

21

24

LSONews.com

22

25 26

27

Leica seeks digital help

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38 39

40 41

Across

ACROSS 1. Picking up the bas our of the water 4. A hook manufacturer 1. Picking up the bass out of the water 9. Slang4.for a saltwater catfish A hook manufacturer 10. The brown lab 9. Slang for a saltwater catfish 11. A disease in cervids 10. The brown lab destination 14. A water buffalo-hunting 11.manufacturer A disease in cervids 16. A rifle 17. Type ofAflywater buffalo-hunting destination 14. 18. A favorite baitfish for bass 16. A rifle manufacturer 22. These birds can show the way to the fish 17. Type of fly 24. A favorite food for speckled trout 18. Aof favorite baitfish 26. Member the jack familyfor bass 30. Shotshell brand 22. These birds can show the way to the 31. Steady fish ____ is important in accurate shooting 33. Fastest growing group of hunters 24. A favorite food for speckled trout 34. Rabbit fever 26. Member jack family 35. Shoulder hide onofathe deer 30. Shotshell brand 38. Archery organization in schools 39. The31. extra hook____ added to the spinner bait Steady is important in accurate 40. Pine trees of the Southeast shooting 41. When a pointing dog freezes upon seeing 33. Fastest growing group of hunters another dog's point 34. 35. 38. 39.

Rabbit fever Shoulder hide on a deer Archery organization in schools The extra hook added to the spinner bait 40. Pine trees of the Southeast 41. When a pointing dog freezes upon seeing another dog’s point

Nature’s Calling

Down

DOWN 2. A shorebird species 3.2. Protection from stingrays while wading A shorebird species 5.3. A Protection spiral-horned antelope from stingrays while wading 6. A type of fishing line 5. A spiral-horned antelope 7. The water dog A type of fishing line on Canyon Lake 8.6. Invasive mussel found water species dog 12. 7. AnThe offshore 13. 8. Squeeze, pullfound on Canyon Lake Invasive don't mussel 15. A An dove-hunting destination 12. offshore species 19. The underwater island 13. Squeeze, don’t pull 20. Method of fishing while moving 15. A dove-hunting 21. Leaves and twigsdestination of woody plants, for deer 23. Rifle attached to a saddle 19. Thecase underwater island 25. The sharpofpart of the fish moving hook 20. Method fishing while 27. Deer corn should be free of ____ 21. Leaves and twigs of woody plants, for deer 28. Command to stop a pointing dog 23. case attached to a home saddle 29. A Rifle fish big enough to take 25. Thethat sharp partback of theagainst fish hook 30. Bow bends its natural bend 32. Device constructed to free provide water for wildlife 27. Deer corn should be of ____ 33. The Achilles to heel fora long-range shooters 28. Command stop pointing dog 36. The slippery swimmer 29. fish big enough to take home 37. AA grouse species 30. Bow that bends back against its natural bend 32. Device constructed to provide water for wildlife 33. The Achilles’ heel for long-range shooters 36. The slippery swimmer 37. A grouse species

By Aaron Anderson, For Lone Star Outdoor News

Leica Sport Optics is seeking a digital marketing specialist/ administrator in its Allendale, New Jersey office.

H&K hiring sales manager Heckler & Koch is seeking a national sales manager who will be responsible for supervising the sales of all distributors of major accounts and managing U.S. sales representatives.

Calandro receives NWF award The National Wildlife Federation recognized David Calandro, a recent college graduate from Joplin, Missouri, as its National Conservation Youth Leader of the Year.

GSM buys Bullseye GSM Outdoors acquired Bullseye Camera Systems, a maker of longrange target cameras.

Crosman acquired, names CEO Crosman Corporation has been acquired by Compass Diversified Holdings, and named Robert Beckwith as its chief executive officer.

New CEO at Hodgdon Hodgdon named Steven M. Kehrwald as its new president and CEO.

Marketing job at CSF The Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation is seeking an entry-level marketing and communications assistant.

Product manager for dog-training accessories SportDOG Brand is seeking a senior product manager at its office in Knoxville, Tennessee.

HSM hires rep group HSM Ammunition named Bentley-Scott Marketing to represent the company in Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Mississippi.

Cattrano joins Confluence

Fishing tournament coordinator job

Confluence Outdoor hired Greg Cattrano as vice president of sales.

Yamaha Marine is looking for a tournament support coordinator.

FOR THE TABLE *email LSON your favorite recipe to news@lonestaroutdoornews.com.

Stuffed wild duck 2 young, plump wild ducks, cleaned Parsley, grapes, apple wedges 2 small onions, chopped 1 cup chopped apple, unpeeled 1 1/3 cups water 6 tbsps. melted shortening or bacon drippings 2/3 cup orange juice 2/3 cup chopped celery Salt Rub cavity of each duck with 1 tsp. salt. Combine celery, chopped apple, and onion;

stuff into cavity of each duck. Close cavity with skewers. Brown ducks in shortening in a heavy Dutch oven; add water, orange juice, and 1/2 tsp. salt. Cover tightly; cook over low heat 45-60 minutes or until tender (time depends on age of duck). Baste 2-3 times during cooking. Garnish with parsley, grapes, and apple wedges. —North Carolina Cooperative Extension

Mustard battered fried catfish This batter works well with white bass or catfish, but is also good with most any fish. Again, using different mustards (whole grain, Dijon, yellow) and different beers will affect the outcome in good ways. 1 1/2 pounds fish fillets 1 beer 1 egg 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup mustard Dredge: 2 cups all-purpose flour 3 cups unseasoned breadcrumbs Oil or lard for frying

Make a batter with the beer, the half cup of flour, egg and mustard, then refrigerate. Season the fillets with salt. Dredge the fish first in flour, then dip in the batter, then dip in the breadcrumbs, making sure the fillets are evenly coated with the crumbs. Refrigerate until ready to fry, or up to 2 hours. Fry in hot 375-degree oil until golden, then drain well on absorbent paper. Serve immediately with your preferred condiments. —Texas Parks and Wildlife Department


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

Whitney stripers

2017 KAWASAKI 4010 TRANSMULE CAMO W/EPS RANCH PACKAGE $14,499

2017 KAWASAKI MULE PRO-FXT CAMO

W/EPS RANCH PACKAGE $18,699

UNTIL JULY 31, 2017

OR UNTIL ALL OUR 2017 SIDE-BY-SIDES ARE GONE.

Some big striped bass, along with good numbers of smaller fish, are being landed at Lake Whitney. Photo by Pat Small.

Campbell has two words for you: “Circle hooks.” “Circle hooks are the best thing to happen to live bait,” he said. “It eliminates the need to set the hook, which not everyone can time right. Even the pros can’t always do it. Nearly 99 percent of the time, when the fish hits a circle hook, it will end up hooking itself through the top lip. All you need to do is when the rod goes down in the water, pick it up and start cranking.”

Sustainable food movement Continued from page 4

conservative outdoor activities,” complemented by great food and beverage experiences. “In doing this, we believe we can tap into the urban core and give customers the opportunity to see what they might enjoy but have never tried,” according to marketing literature. Vedros said his research shows that roughly 67 percent of the population is open to or fine with hunting and fishing, so long as it’s conducted ethically. That middle ground is Altra’s targeted consumer. The plan is to open the site’s doors before the summer of 2018. Vedros himself is a convert to hunting and fishing and feels like there is potentially a large pool of clientele who would enjoy it. While his wife had grown up around hunting, he had never experienced it. Now he and his wife hunt all over the world. For Vedros, hunting was a life-altering experience. “I felt like a part of me was asleep. I realized our society had been removed from a part of who we are,” he said. “If you want to rejuvenate hunting and fishing … we need to teach a lot more adults.” Vedros isn’t the only one sensing an opportunity. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department hosts wild game and fish cooking classes at local Central Market stores, which are known for providing organic food. Cecilia Nasti, producer and host of the Passport to Texas Radio Series for TPWD, said she has been coordinating the cooking classes since 2011. She sees them as a way to increase awareness about hunting and possibly add to its ranks. Taking wild game allows people to have an intimate connection with their food. The misconception is people simply hunt for sport, she said. “You’re clear about taking an animal’s life, so you don’t waste that life,” she said. “They’re not bad people because they hunt.” Heidi Bailey, a biologist out of Van, goes to some of the classes to help answer questions about the game or fish. It’s a mixed bag, with some classes being full of hunters while others are without even one. Most of the outdoor neophytes who approached her at the classes are interested in fishing, but some want to try public hunting or hunting feral hogs. Most are from ur-

Page 21

2017 KAWASAKI BONUS DEAL RANCH PACKAGE, STARTING AT $14,499

Continued from page 8

the stripers will move into deeper water.” Small, too, reports finding stripers along channel edges. “When you find them there, they’re there to feed,” he said. “We’re catching them as fast as they come up.” Live bait, shad, is Small’s bait of choice. “With live bait, you’ll get limits every day,” he said. “With top-waters or jigs, you may catch ’em one day and not the next.” Campbell primarily uses downriggers to chase stripers. If you prefer live baits, shad is the go-to live bait, he said. Bream and perch are good, too. Guides will furnish what live bait you need at Lake Whitney, if you go that route. Those flying solo may need to brush up on fishing for bait. The lake’s big marina, Lake Whitney Marina, got socked by a tornado in January and still hasn’t opened. The marina has been a flooding victim, too, in recent years. So, once again, owner Jerry Anderson is rebuilding. “I’m kinda disappointed in myself,” he joked. “I thought I was smarter than that.” As far as tips for catching stripers, Small recommends hiring a guide at least the first time you go to Lake Whitney in order to learn the lake — as well as get a look-see at what techniques are working. “Fishing is an ever-changing game,” he said. “You have to keep up.”

June 23, 2017

PURCHASE A RANCH PACKAGED SXS

FREE “INSTALLED” - PICK ONE - “Rear Game Winch” Reg $799 Installed, Patented Pending - Set of Roctane Premium 8ply Tires - WetSounds Premium Sound System - Fortress Powder Coated Sliding Windshield

KAWASAKI SxS RANCH PACKAGE (seat sold and installed by: Ranch Packages of Del Rio LLC)

For Details: DelRioPowerSports.com THE ORIGINAL AND NEW IMPROVED RANCH PACKAGE

• (ALL EQUIPMENT NOW POWDER COATED) FROM DEL RIO POWERSPORTS (seat sold and installed by: Ranch Packages of Del Rio LLC), GET OUR PACKAGE ON MOSTSIDE X SIDE MODELS • SEAT NOW BUILT WITH 1-1/4” tube steel, no need for under seat wasted space basket welded to keep legs from buckling as our “competitors” have to do • See photos for improved open room in bed for hay bales and feed

PACKAGE INCLUDES: • All Applicable Equipment Now POWDER COATED • 4,000# Winch (2,500# on Kawa 4000 & 4010 Series) • Steel Rollbar Basket • Front Floor Double Gun Holder • HD Tire Tractor Seal

• Steel Roof, Insulated, Powder Coated • Roof Oversize Steel Basket • Rear Utility Seat • Double Gun Holder • Shooter Gun Rest • 50” LED Light Bar

RANCH PACKAGES AVAILABLE ON OTHER MAKES AND MODELS

300# PROTEIN FEEDER

®

Hannah and Nicholas Vedros, California transplants from Austin, have embraced the sustainable food movement and hunt, fish and plan to open an outdoor retail store. Photo by Nicholas Vedros.

ban settings, she said, adding there seems to be an interest in getting groceries in the woods. “That’s a gateway into the hunting side of it,” Bailey said. “I’m reaching folks I otherwise wouldn’t reach.” Another factor is that most of the wild game dishes are more flavorful than many expect. “I think a lot of people are just blown away by how good the food is,” she said. Steve Hall, Hunter Education coordinator for TPWD, said the back-to-the-land movement seems like a natural segue into hunting. “It’s the meat-eaters revolution,” he said. As Hall points out, hunters and anglers have long embraced the idea of putting fresh, natural meat and fish on the table. So, politics aside, the two groups have a common bond: fresh food. “With hunting statistics the way they are, it’s something that’s caught our attention,” he said. “It’s really kind of giving us a nice way of communicating with people who don’t understand us.”

1,000# PRO EVO Built to be varmint and weather resistant. With adjustable baffles used PROTEIN FEEDER 600# ELECTRIC to regulate feed flow, All Seasons A heavy duty protein feeder designed to keep Feeders, offers the best protein feeders STAND & FILL FEEDER varmints and rain out! Holding 1,000lbs on the market. This feeder holds 300lbs, comes with legs, drive pins, The 600lb Electric Stand & Fill Feeder™ of protein, this feeder is for those who are serious about supplemental feeding. This and sight glass for easy view of feed maintains the quality and durability of is the most weather resistant and varmint our traditional protein feeders, while levels. resistant feeder on the market! offering you a much safer way to fill your feeder, and regulate feed use. ®

®

THE ANTLERMAX® TECHNOLOGY STORY ANTLERMAX® BY-PASS PROTEIN TECHNOLOGY Developed in 1995 as an innovative first from Purina, AntlerMax® By-Pass Protein Technology promotes antler growth by improving protein quality.

HOW IT WORKS - Traditional

deer feed protein is typically broken down by bacteria in the deer’s rumen and the deer digests the bacteria in its stomach. But the quality of the protein can be degraded by these bacteria, leaving lower quality amino acids available for antler growth. AntlerMax® By-Pass Proteins are protected from being broken down by these bacteria. They “by-pass” the bacteria in the rumen, so the high-quality amino acids are digested in the small intestine, which can support greater antler growth.

www.mummesinc.com

For prices and information call

1-800-221-6398 or visit us online at www.mummesinc.com

830.426.3313 Hondo, TX

120 Hwy 173N

830.334.3323 Pearsall, TX

1845 Business I-35N

830.931.2215 Rio Medina, TX 10195 FM 2676

Follow Mumme’s Inc. on Facebook for info on the latest items & special sales!

* We ship feeders anywhere in the continental United States. 2,000 and 3,000 LB Feeders Available. Skids Available on 2,000 LB & 3,000 LB Feeders. Feeder Capacity Determined by corn weight.


Page 22

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

PRODUCTS BAIT CORN: After years of testing, Robert Champion of The Bait Corn Company developed flavored deer corn that he says outperforms the rest. The key is an oilbased coating at proper concentrates that evaporates over time, getting the flavors and scents in the air. All of the corn is processed at the company’s El Campo facility, and it’s available in five flavors including persimmon, white oak acorn and green apple. “When I tried the Bait Corn on a Hill Country hunt, I watched as the deer chose the Bait Corn over regular corn,” said Lone Star Outdoor News’ Operations Manager Mike Hughs. “I also felt it helped mask my scent when the wind wasn’t in my favor.” Each 40-pound bag costs $8.99.

>>

400RT WAIST PACK: Pioneer by Vanguard has introduced a line of hunting packs that have been tested and challenged in the most rigorous of outdoor conditions, ensuring that they will hold up in any weather. The line includes this waist pack, which provides a convenient smaller option for carrying essentials around the waist for quick and easy reach. Made from a durable Tricot Realtree Xtra fabric, the waist pack is silent and water-repellant. It also offers a builtin removable hand warmer making it a handy tool for hunters who are outside in the cold for extended periods of time. It costs about $60.

>> SALES | AUCTIONS | FINANCE | APPRAISALS | MANAGEMENT

>> LIVERMORE RANCH FT. DAVIS, TEXAS 4,772± acres in the heart of the Davis Mountains, with alpine elevations offering some of the most spectacular views in Texas. Exceptional big game, diverse ecology, and comfortable improvements. $17,500,000

TYLER JACOBS

|

EAST CAROLINA CREEK RANCH HUNTSVILLE, TEXAS Located near Huntsville, this 832± acre game ranch offers enchanting variety, three living quarters, immaculate shop improvements, a large lake, abundant water resources, and exceptional timber assets. $3,669,000

TJACOBS@HALLANDHALL.COM

|

888.557.3090

MALLARD DRAKE WHISTLE: This molded polycarbonate call by Zink Calls is equipped with the “easy blow” sound system to allow even a novice caller to produce quality sound. The duck head-shaped call costs about $13.

POLYCYCLE HOODY: Patagonia’s soft and warm full zip hoody for fly-fishermen is made of a fast-drying, 100-percent postconsumer recycled Polyester fleece. Available in men’s sizes extra small to XXL, the hoody comes in Black, Big Sur Blue, Feather Grey and Glades Green (pictured). It costs $75.

>>

WWW.HALLANDHALL.COM

TROKAR SHUTTLE JIG: Anglers can trail this jig with their favorite plastic bait to match the bait forage. This jig by Cabela’s can be fished in a variety of situations — from open water to heavy cover. It can be used to fish directly on the bottom or it can be fished in a slow, steady retrieve to entice strikes. The jig comes in three sizes (1/4 ounce, 3/8 ounce or 1/2 ounce) and in three colors (Black/Blue, White and Green Pumpkin). A two-pack costs about $5.

>>

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THESE PRODUCTS, CONTACT LSON AT (214) 361-2276


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

June 23, 2017

Page 23

ADVERTISEMENT

Improving habitat for fish Continued from page 1

And the agency received about $5 million from the Legislature to deal with invasive aquatic species like giant salvinia plaguing many fisheries. TPWD also raises vegetation at its Athens’ facility to plant at various reservoirs. Significant annual dedicated funding is needed to address the enduring habitat needs of Texas’ reservoirs, however, said Jeff Boxrucker, head of the Friends of Reservoirs. He noted that even if a lake has a great spawn, it can be for naught if there’s not suitable habitation to allow fingerlings to escape prey fish. “We’re looking at needing 20 to 40 percent cover, according to studies done by biologists like South Dakota State’s Brian Graeb,” Boxrucker said. “No way a fisheries biologist can make that happen in one year. Basically, it’s an ongoing effort.” Several states have been pioneers in securing guaranteed funding to address habitat rehabilitation at lakes and reservoirs. Boxrucker pointed to Iowa, where the Legislature approved dedicated funding 10 years ago. Funding has averaged $8.2 million annually, according to Iowa officials. “Before, the DNR and partners would save up to try to tackle a project at a time,” said George Antoniou, coordinator of the Lake Restoration Program for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. “A stable funding source has allowed a number of projects around the state to move forward at the same time.” States such as Colorado, Nebraska and New Mexico have gone a different route. They require most hunters and anglers to buy annual habitat stamps. New Mexico pioneered that funding

model back in 1986. It produces about $900,000 annually for the state, according to the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish’s website. More than $26 million has been raised since the habitat stamp was first sold. A current project includes channel improvements, habitat restoration and stream-bank stabilization in a section of the Rio Bonito River in the Sierra Blanca Mountains to prepare it for the stocking of native trout. States that improve their fisheries get paid back quickly, according to Boxrucker. “Nebraska has shown that angler use of their rehabbed lakes is four times greater than at lakes that have not been rehabbed,” he said. Doubtful that Texas legislators would ever be persuaded to devote serious money to restore the state’s fisheries, Boxrucker long advocated that TPWD officials tap funding earmarked for its hatcheries. TPWD officials, however, are reluctant to discuss the topic. “Stocking fish is an important tool in our toolbox to manage the fish population,” said Dave Terre, Inland Fisheries director of management and research. “So is habitat restoration.” Boxrucker understands state officials treading lightly on the subject. “If you cut stocking there’s going to be a public outcry,” he said. “States have to do their homework and explain it to the public. Anglers still think that if you stock 100,000 bass in a lake, you’re going to have 100,000 bass to catch. The truth is you’re never going to stock your way out of bad habitat.”

Expo returns to Rio Grande Valley The 27th Annual Texas Hunters/Sportsman’s Expo, coined the Original, the Only, the Best Show in the Rio Grand Valley, is coming back to the new McAllen Convention Center July 21- 23. “We have had solid crowds over the past 26 years, and the show’s attendance continues to grow each year,” said Justin Curl, who directs the show with his brother, Chris. “It really gets better each year.” The three-day event will draw several thousand hunting and fishing enthusiasts and visitors from both sides of the Texas/Mexico border. “We have items for everyone and a variety of exhibits to enjoy,” Justin said. “This is the only show of its kind south of San Antonio and North of Monterrey, Mexico.” The show features guides and outfitters from across the United States, Canada, Mexico and Africa, booking hunts for trophy whitetail, big game, exotics, bear, nilgai, moose, elk, mule deer, turkey, quail, dove, waterfowl, trophy bass and saltwater fishing trips and more. Manufacturers and dealers will be on hand offering special show prices on hunting blinds, feeders, gun safes, custom knives, hunting vehicles, ATVs, boats, fishing rods and reels, camouflage, ranching equipment, tractors, hunting accessories and more. Not just for the hunter, fishing guides and camps will be on hand as well to book that fishing trip of a lifetime. Tackle and rods will be specially priced, along with huge boat displays, all at special show prices. Looking for a new RV? A huge display will help you decide. Entertainment for the whole family will be at this year’s show, including Frank Addington, “The Aspirin Buster,” showing his unique archery skills, Joe Martin’s Snakes of Texas, trophy exotic and whitetail exhibits, a taxidermy display, wildlife artists, door prizes and a CCA boat raffle. “This is a show the entire family can enjoy,” Justin said. “There is something here for everyone, and children under 12 get in free.” To learn more, call (956) 664-2884 or visit texashunterassociation.com.


Page 24

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NATIONAL UTAH

FLORIDA

Cutthroat trout are on the move

Anti-bear trashcans available

Cutthroat trout are migrating out of the Strawberry reservoir and up the Strawberry River to spawn. The river runs past the visitor center at Strawberry and into a fish trap and egg-taking facility the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources operates behind the visitor center. The Strawberry Reservoir is just off U.S. Highway 40, about 25 miles southeast of Heber City. Fishing is allowed in the reservoir but not the tributaries at this time. —UDWR

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and Seminole County are teaming up to provide bear-resistant trashcans to county residents at discounted rates. The FWC awarded Seminole County a $200,000 BearWise grant to help reduce prices for residents living within the Urban Bear Management Area (west of Interstate 4). —FWC

MINNESOTA

Summer rockfish season open

Pheasants Forever acquire Hogan WMA

TY HEURING, 8, WITH HIS FIRST TURKEY TAKEN OPENING MORNING OF YOUTH WEEKEND WITH HIS DAD NEAR CHRISTINE. THE BIRD HAD A 9-INCH BEARD AND 1 1/8-INCH SPURS.

Nikon will send your 10x42 ProStaff 7 binoculars. You can check out the entire line at the nearest dealer:

See a full selection of Nikon products at:

Primo’s Feed & Supply 1347 W. Oaklawn Rd. Pleasanton, TX 78064 (830) 569-0080

Pheasants Forever and partners have acquired 75 acres in southern Minnesota as an addition to the Linde Wildlife Management Area. Spearheaded by the Waseca County Chapter of Pheasants Forever and supported by grant funding from Minnesota’s Outdoor Heritage Fund, the newly acquired Hogan WMA will enhance public hunting opportunities in the region while providing significant habitat benefits for pheasants, waterfowl, and other wildlife. —PF

MASSACHUSETTS

Outdoor company earns public’s trust Bass Pro Shops, a leading national retailer of outdoor gear and apparel, has been named one of “America’s Most Reputable Companies” by Forbes magazine in recognition of the public’s trust in the organization.
 The achievement is based on a national study compiled by The Reputation Institute – a well-established reputation management consultancy based in Boston – that measured 800 leading companies by gauging the perceptions of nearly 43,000 respondents familiar with them. Bass Pro Shops ranked 19th on the list of 100 nationally distinguished companies, ranking above such other iconic national brands as Disney, Home Depot, Marriott, Harley Davidson, FedEx, and others. The recognition is based solely on direct feedback from consumers. Firms were not invited to apply for the award. —Bass Pro Shops

MONTANA

Wolf population still strong Wolf numbers in Montana remained healthy in 2016 and more than three times the federally mandated minimums. Montana’s annual wolf report shows a minimum of 477 wolves were counted for 2016. This is down from 536 wolves counted in 2015, but doesn’t necessarily reflect a reduction in wolf numbers, but rather a reduction in counting effort. Included in this number is a minimum number of 50 breeding pairs. This compares to a minimum count of 32 breeding pairs in 2015, and 34 breeding pairs in 2014. —Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks

KENTUCKY & TENNESSEE

Five convicted in waterfowl case Five Kentucky and Tennessee residents paid more than $10,000 in fines and restitution after pleading guilty in Fulton District Court to charges resulting after joint investigations by Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Special Investigations Unit officers and conservation officers looking into illegal waterfowl hunting guides. The last two cases were resolved May 30. SIU and conservation officers from the First Law Enforcement District in western Kentucky say the five also forfeited $16,400 in firearms and equipment and lost hunting privileges for a total of 16 years. —KFW

MARYLAND

Anglers wanting to get in on this year’s striped bass fishing season have more areas to fish starting June 1. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources announced the official opening of the summer/fall striped bass season with no exclusions on where anglers can catch the state fish. All areas of the Chesapeake Bay, including tidal rivers and tributaries, are now fair game. —MDNR

NEBRASKA

Mountain lion kills calf Nebraska Game and Parks Commission officials have confirmed that a male mountain lion killed a calf near Hay Springs in Sheridan County. The owner of the land where the calf was killed contacted Game and Parks officials on May 30 after finding the carcass. Game and Parks representatives examined the carcass and immediate vicinity the following day. The landowner and Game and Parks officials worked together to identify and euthanize the offending animal in accordance with the agency’s Mountain Lion Response Plan. This is the second confirmed instance of livestock depredation in Nebraska by a mountain lion in modern times. The first took place in Blaine County in the spring of 2014. —NGPC

LOUISIANA

Blueprint for coastal restoration approved Louisiana’s State Legislature passed a resolution approving the 2017 Coastal Master Plan, the state’s blueprint for coastal restoration and protection activities. The master plan prioritizes $50 billion in coastal restoration and risk reduction activities over the next 50 years to address the state’s increasingly severe land loss and sea level rise. Local and national conservation groups praised both the Legislature for its oversight and approval of the plan as well as the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority for developing a comprehensive, science-based vision for how the state can realistically address future environmental challenges. —Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition

CCA Louisiana partners to build “Big Jack’s Reef” Coastal Conservation Association of Louisiana, Shell Oil, Building Conservation Trust (CCA’s National Habitat Program), the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Lotte Corp., Road Rock Recycling and DLS Energy will begin construction on a new artificial reef, to be named “Big Jack’s Reef” in Calcasieu Lake this month. The reef will be named in honor of the late Jack Lawton Sr., a renowned and beloved businessman and philanthropist from the Lake Charles area, and a founding member of CCA Louisiana and the Lake Charles CCA Chapter. The new reef will be built using a combination of recycled whole and crushed concrete, placed across 5-6 acres in a newly permitted reefing area. The material will be arranged in a strategic pattern to maximize tidal flow over the reef and to create elevation contours. This method has proven to be particularly effective in recent reef projects completed by CCA. —CCA


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

June 23, 2017

Page 25

CLASSIFIEDS HUNTING ANTLERS WANTED Buying all species, all conditions. Looking for large quantities. Call Del: (830) 997-2263

AFFORDABLE HUNTS AOUDAD HUNT SPECIAL. Exotics: Black Buck, Red Stag,  Axis, Barbado. FREE LODGING FOR EXOTIC HUNTS. Whitetails: Limited number of Bucks  & Does.Javelina, Hogs, Bobcat, Coyote,  Quail, Dove. (713) 501-6159

HUNT THIS YEAR!

Huge Hill Country Ranch Divided into 100 - 500 acres. Low fenced neighbors, exclusive game management for high quality whitetail, axis and other free ranging game. Call Bill for a personal showing: (361) 815-0140 TDHA - JOIN TODAY TEXAS DOVE HUNTERS ASSOC. TexasDoveHunters.com (210) 764-1189 NEED AMMO? Largest selection in Central Texas Lampassas (512) 556-5444 LSONF LOOKING FOR LEASE Lone Star Outdoor News Foundation creates hunters for a lifetime by giving an opportunity to people who have the passion for hunting but lack the opportunity. LSONF is seeking hunting property to accomplish its mission. All hunting rights sought and house/camp needed. Call Craig at (214) 361-2276

DECOYS WANTED WOODEN Duck and Goose. Top prices paid. Ask for David. (214) 361-2276 AXIS HIDES

Tanned axis hides Axis pillows gbroach@ktc.com

TEXAS TROPHY WHITETAILS

Axis, Blackbuck, Hogs Free range whitetail and exotic hunts in Sonora, TX www.HuntTexasWhitetails.com (717) 512-3582

COLORADO ELK AND MULE DEER RANCH Own a beautiful 5,800 ac ranch that sits in the middle of the home to the largest elk herd in North America. Remote, end of road. 45 mins SW of Trinidad CO  Elevation: 6,389 – 7,543 ft Resident and migrating elk herd with exceptional trophy genes. Large mule deer, bear and turkey population. 2 story custom log home, 3 BR, 3 1/2 Bath,  2 Master Suites, Bunk Room 2+ car garage, 2 RV pads with all utilities, beautiful views. call Paul Phillips (210) 274-9094 TIRED OF LEASING? BUY YOUR ON HUNTING PROPERTY. Prime hunting property for a family. Great hunting for whitetail, axis, turkey and dove.  125 acres or 67 acres with log style home 30 minutes northwest of Kerrville. (830) 928-4437

FISHING BULL RED RUN AND FLOUNDER GIGGING

Port O’Connor, TX Call Capt. Alex Cruz Now booking trips for September and October www.affordableguideservice.com

BAY FISHING PRO CALL CAPT. THOMAS Check Out Multiple Trip Discounts (956) 551-1965 PORT MANSFIELD Get away from the crowds Trout and red fishing at its finest. Great lodge, Great food, Great guides. Dove hunts during fall, book now for best dates. (956) 944-4000 DOS GRINGOS FISHING CHARTERS

TENPOINT TITAN XTREME CROSSBOW

RANCH FOR SALE 470 Low Fence Acres 1.5 Hours from DFW Boone & Crockett Deer Turn Key: Cabin, Food Plots, Feeders, Tower Stands. (940) 464-0121

STOCKERBUCK.COM Call now to order Texas Trophy Bred does and stockerbucks or check us out online at stockerbuck.com JAY (505) 681-5210

TROPHY WHITETAIL BUCK HUNTS Intensive Management Program. Lodging included. (940) 362-4219

5-D RANCH HUNT Stephens County Deer season native deer/hogs Cabins, guides etc. 3 day hunts $1250 hunter. (214) 469-5031

TRUCKS FOR SALE DFW Area

ATVS, TRUCKS

2016 Ford F-250 XLT - 6.7L V8 Power Stroke Diesel - 4X4 Oxford White 32,665 Miles Stock #GEC71678 2010 Ford F-250 Lariat Truck Crew Cab 4x4 161,187 Miles Stock #AEB31411   2015 Ford F-250 Platinum Truck Crew Cab 4x4 6.7L V-8 cyl 53,873 miles Ruby Red Metallic Tinted Clearcoat Interior Black Stock #FEA57226   2017 Ford F-250 XLT - 6.7L V8 Power Stroke Diesel - 4X4 Oxford White Interior medium earth gray 22,587 Miles Stock #HEB59450   2012 Ford F-150 Platinum Truck SuperCrew Cab 4x4 Red Candy Metallic 56,201 Miles Stock #CFC20081   2013 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor Truck SuperCrew Cab 4x4 Oxford White Interior black 89,615 Miles Stock #DFB02345   2008 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LT w/2LT - 5.3L V8 - Z71 4X4 Summit White Interior ebony 96,801 Miles Stock #8G193016  

ATVs, UTVS, trailers, feed, new and used equipment and vehicles, guns, bows, exotics, blinds, feeders, hunts; Call for pricing on overstocked Rangers, Can Ams, and NatureBlinds. Call or text (512) 748-2810 or jwmaroney@gmail.com NEW 2016 White Chevy 3500 Silverado 6.6L V8 Duramax 4WD LTZ Diesel only $53,821.00 plus TTL NEW 2017 Pepperdust Metallic Chevy 1500 Silverado Z-71 4x4 Crew Cab Pepperdust Metallic $39,687.00 plus TTL savings of $10,000 after rebates PLUS $1000 TRADE ALLOWANCE Used New Holland 2015 L230 skid steer 193 hours, cab air, mech hand and foot controls for $44,500 Used F-150 4WD 88,602 miles; $22,881 and another used 2013 F-150, 83,000 miles; $25,000 jwmaroney@gmail.com Call or text (512) 748-2810

2014 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LTZ Truck Double Cab 4x4 Green 34,380 Miles Stock #EZ397690 Call Bobby (214) 632-7963 ATASCOSA 4-TON QUIK FEED TRAILER $7,500.00 will@goolsbytesting.com (281) 540-1255 1980 CJ7 HUNTING JEEP W/HIGH RACK rubber coated $4,500.00 will@goolsbytesting.com (281) 540-1255 ULTIMATE LEASE ACCOMODATIONS Damon Astoria Motor Coach 2011 360Hp 6.7L Isb Cummins Engine On a Freightliner Chassis, Air Bag Suspension, Exhaust Brake, 3 Slide-outs, Onan Diesel Generator, 2 Ducted Air Conditioners with Heat Pumps, Levelers, 4 Door Gas/110V Norcold Refrigerator with Ice Maker, Automatic Main Awning And Slide/Door Awnings, 1 Piece Washer/Dryer, Backup and Side View Camera, Satellite Dish, Outside Entertainment System, 3 TVs, DVD Player, Satellite Radio, Outside Shower, Fireplace, Central Vacuum, Convection Microwave and 3 Burner Range. M&G Brake System and Blue Ox Tow Bar. See it in the Houston area. (806) 438-3048

(210) 789-0607

(830) 896-6996

with scope and bolts complete package. Used for photo shoots. Retails at Cabelas for $750. Asking $550 Call (214) 361-2276

VEHICLES

South Texas - Rio Grande Valley Bay fishing for trout, redfish, and flounder. Call Captain Grady Deaton, PhD at captaingrady@dosgringosfishing.com. Please call me for a great fishing adventure (956) 455-2503 TROPHY BASS & BIRD HUNTING  Fish famous Lake Guerrero. Hunt Dove, Quail, Ducks. Please contact Lago Vista Lodge today! dickyn@lagovistalodge.com (713) 376-3938 or (281) 495-9296 TROPHY BASS FISHING ON PRIVATE LAKES  Exclusive access to 70+ lakes all over Texas. www.privatewaterfishing.com (214) 871-0044 HUNTING ON THE RIO GRANDE

White Wing & Dove Texasdovehunt.com (956) 542-2223

MISC. ARROWHEADS AND ARTIFACTS I buy and sell authentic Texas artifacts. Please call Nick. (210) 557-9478

2 issues minimum ADD A PHOTO $20 ALL BOLD LETTERS $10

2 EASY OPTIONS: CALL THE OFFICE (214) 361-2276, OR E-MAIL: LSONACCT@GMAIL.COM


Page 26

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

DATEBOOK JUNE 23-25

Great Outdoors Expo Midland Horseshoe Pavilion goetx.com

JUNE 24

Texas Deer Association American Wildlife Spectacular TDS Austin Savannah texasdeerassociation.com Ducks Unlimited Texas State Convention Sugarland Marriott Town Center (806) 598-9400 ducks.org Lone Star Bowhunters Association 43rd Annual Awards Banquet and Expo The REC of Grapevine (817) 682-3809 lonestarbowhunter.com

JUNE 25

Texas Shootout 3rd Annual Bass Champs tournament (817) 439-3274 basschamps.com Ducks Unlimited Wise County Gun Raffle Rooster’s Roadhouse, Decatur (940) 255–5034 ducks.org

JUNE 28-JULY 2

70th Annual Freeport Host Lions Club Fishin’ Fiesta Freeport Municipal Park fishinfiesta.com

JUNE 29

Coastal Conservation Association Matagorda Bay Chapter Annual Banquet El Campo Civic Center (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org

Ducks Unlimited Parker County Sheriff’s Posse, Weatherford (817) 907-3403 ducks.org National Wild Turkey Federation Southeast Texas Chapter Banquet Rockin’A Café, Beaumont nwtf.org

JUNE 30-JULY 1

C.A.S.T. For Kids Auction/Bass Fishing Tournament Lake Waco (210) 414-8048 castforkids.org

JULY 8

National Wild Turkey Federation San Jac Strutters Banquet Jones Campus, Coldspring (936) 628-1401 nwtf.org

JULY 21

JULY 21-23

Coastal Conservation Association Southwestern Chapter Banquet Willie DeLeon Civic Center, Uvalde (713) 626-4222 ccatexas.org

Texas Dove Hunters Association Rio Grande Valley Hunters & Sportsman Expo, McAllen texasdovehunters.com Texas Hunters/Sportsman’s Expo McAllen Convention Center (956) 664-2884 texashunterassociation.com

National Wild Turkey Federation Blunt Spurs Banquet Knights of Columbus Hall, Palestine (903) 229-3883 nwtf.org

JULY 25

National Wild Turkey Federation North Texas Upland Game Bird Chapter Banquet The Courses at Watters Creek (972) 496-1141 nwtf.org

JULY 21-22

Trophy Game Records of the World 39th Annual Awards Banquet Inn of the Hills Resort and Conference Center, Kerrville (830) 315-4868 trophyrecords.org

JULY 26-30

John Uhr Memorial Billfish Tournament Rockport rockporttournament.com

JULY 13

Houston Safari Club Dinner and Topgolf (281) 406-3176 houstonsafariclub.org

OUTDOOR PUZZLER Solution on Page 22

1

JULY 13-16

Texas Wildlife Association Annual Convention JW Marriott Hill Country, San Antonio (210) 826-9453 texas-wildlife.org

JULY 14

Dallas Safari Club Wine Pairing Dinner Chamberlain’s, Dallas biggame.org

L

2

P P

I

3

4

N G

L

10 13

8

U

5

T

V

16

R

R U G E R I

R

G

23

G

S

E

C

R

A

31

D

18

Z

11

20 24

S H R

29

K

U

A

H O

21

O

25

26

I I

32

N G

34

F

W

L

S

W

33

N A S P

N

Z

T

N

G

Z

O

D

L

X

Give a Heart for J D Green Benefit Tournament Lake Palestine (903) 922-9551

D

R 41

T U L A R E M I

E

H O N O R

Across

40

I I

1. Picking up the bas our of the water [LIPPING] 4. A hook manufacturer [TROKAR] 9. Slang for a saltwater catfish [HARDHEAD] 10. The brown lab [CHOCOLATE] 11. A disease in cervids [CWD] 14. A water buffalo-hunting destination [AUSTRALIA] 16. A rifle manufacturer [RUGER] 17. Type of fly [DRY] 18. A favorite baitfish for bass [SHAD] 22. These birds can show the way to the fish [HERONS] 24. A favorite food for speckled trout [SHRIMP] 26. Member of the jack family [POMPANO] 30. Shotshell brand [RIO] 31. Steady ____ is important in accurate shooting [BREATHING] 33. Fastest growing group of hunters [WOMEN] 34. Rabbit fever [TULAREMIA] 35. Shoulder hide on a deer [CAPE] 38. Archery organization in schools [NASP]

A

D R Y

M

G

A

17

30

H

R

N

D

T

E

I O

R

W O M E N

I

E

L

15

A

28

E

R

35

A

36

C A P E

39

U

T R A

E I

V

L O N G L E A F

N G

Down

S

H E R O N S

R

27

I

22

B

P O M P A N O

F

B R E A T H B

R

7

B

H A R D H E A D

A U S T R A L

I M P

I

U

14

S H A D

D

12

9

C W D

B 19

6

T R O K A R

C H O C O L A T E

38

JULY 16

I

37

S P

L E R U C E

2. A shorebird species [PLOVER] 3. Protection from stingrays while wading [GUARDS] 5. A spiral-horned antelope [KUDU] 6. A type of fishing line [BRAID] 7. The water dog [SALAMANDER] 8. Invasive mussel found on Canyon Lake [ZEBRA] 12. An offshore species [WAHOO] 13. Squeeze, don't pull [TRIGGER] 15. A dove-hunting destination [ARGENTINA] 19. The underwater island [HUMP] 20. Method of fishing while moving [DRIFTING] 21. Leaves and twigs of woody plants, for deer [BROWSE] 23. Rifle case attached to a saddle [SCABBARD] 25. The sharp part of the fish hook [POINT] 27. Deer corn should be free of ____ [AFLATOXIN] 28. Command to stop a pointing dog [WHOA] 29. A fish big enough to take home [KEEPER] 30. Bow that bends back against its natural bend [RECURVE]

Puzzle solution from Page 20


LSONews.com

LoneOStar Outdoor News

June 23, 2017

Page 27

Testing exposed turret scopes Continued from page 1

But not before some learning — and a quick course in math. Minutes of angle (MOA) or millradians (MIL), are both measurements of arc. It become simple to make distance adjustments once one becomes familiar with how to adjust at various ranges. The turret allows the shooter to quickly dial to the distance of the shot. MOA is what most U.S. hunters are familiar with, and can roughly be calculated as a 1-inch variance at 100 yards (actually 1.047), 2 inches at 200 yards, etc. MIL is based on the metric system. The calculations are more complicated with many more decimals, and even Pi was used, a term the seven shooters hadn’t heard since high school, making their eyes gloss over. “If you weren’t in the military, a range expert, or if you aren’t from Europe, go with the MOA scope and forget about the MIL,” Omans said. “If you tell me the temperature in Celsius and tell me distances in centimeters, MIL is for you.” For hunters, shooting at long distances is the ultimate confidence booster. “We aren’t trying to teach you to shoot animals at 700 yards,” Omans said. “We’re teaching you to have complete confidence at 300 and 400 yards.” Brent Vogler of Abilene sells the scopes across West Texas, and said two goals were accomplished by the training and shooting.

“We learned and better understood the MOA and MIL systems,” he said. “All of us were somewhat familiar with it. We can now better explain it to consumers when working shows and promotions. Often it’s as simple as asking the customer whether their rangefinder is set in yards or meters. If they say meters, we’ll sell them a milrad (MIL) scope.” The second goal involved running the new scopes through the ringer. “We all fired several hundred rounds,” Vogler said. “You justify a product by going out and testing it. I was most impressed with the tracking ability of the scope. We went back and forth from 100 to 800 yards all day for two days and never had an issue with the scope shifting off of zero — and you always know a click is a click.” The team shot Montana Rifles, six in 6.5 Creedmore and one in .300 Win Mag. Being able to use the crosshairs to line up a distant target is a big selling feature of the scopes, but holdovers aren’t eliminated. “It’s very multifaceted,” Vogler said. “You can use the crosshairs or use the hash marks as a BDCtype reticle. I still know the hash marks stand for a certain distance, and in a quick scenario, I can use one of the hash marks and hold over for windage. It’s the best of both worlds.” Gathering the information on your rifle and bullet is para-

C o r po r at e Par t ners

mount, and apps like Nikon’s Spot On Ballistic Match Technology make it easy. “It gives you the number of clicks needed for your gun and bullet,” Vogler said. “It beats having a cheat sheet with the information on the gun stock or wearing an arm band like a high school quarterback.” Omans said the app and scopes make the guns super-accurate. “You make the adjustments, put the crosshairs on the target and pull the trigger,” he said. “The more you get into precision shooting, the more you want to use the additional information and dial to that specific yardage.” There is one Achilles’ heel of long-range shooting, though. Wind. “It’s the killer,” Vogler said. “Where we shot, it felt like there was no wind, but it was open terrain at 800 yards, and the wind was full value. We had to hold at 1-2 MOA even though it felt calm.” Omans said even if you study the grass and trees between you and the target, sometimes the best judge of the wind effect is a test shot. “You can see where the wind takes it and hit it with the second shot,” he said. “You can have the best of everything and the wind can still mess you up.” Omans recommends owning good quality optics and using good shooting fundamentals, but said shooting the rifle will tell

you more than anything. “You can spend $6,000-$7,000 on equipment, go on a $50,000 sheep hunt and buy $10,000 worth of clothes and gear,” he said. “But you’re still relying on a $2 bullet. If you have the time and money for the hunt, I hope you make the time to shoot 20 or 30 bullets at different distances.”

Sales representatives for Nikon Sport Optics test the Nikon Black scopes and learn how to best communicate the scopes’ operation to dealers and consumers. Photos by David J. Sams, Lone Star Outdoor News.


Page 28

June 23, 2017

LoneOStar Outdoor News

LSONews.com

NEW

LONG-RANGE PRECISION Legendary optical performance, durability and mechanical precision are core values used to develop the BLACK X1000 precision riflescope. Combined with 100 years of optics building experience and Nikon’s lifetime No Fault Policy, this is the riflescope you can trust to deliver every shot with confidence. Four models available. — Specialized glass-etched reticles with matched turrets for long-range dialing — Ultra-rugged, aircraft grade aluminum 30mm main body — Illuminated Reticle models feature 10 brightness levels with intermittent off

All Nikon trademarks are the property of Nikon Corporation.

BLACK X1000 Reticles

MOA

MRAD

Built and Backed for a lifetime of performance.

Become Unstoppable. Use BLACK mounts for total precision.

NikonSportOptics.com

June 23, 2017 - Lone Star Outdoor News - Fishing & Hunting  

Daily fishing and hunting news with weekly fishing reports, game warden blotter, fishing and hunting products, events calendar, fishing and...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you