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Condovoice Condovoice is published four times per year – Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter, by Association Concepts on behalf of the Canadian Condominium Institute Toronto & Area Chapter. EDITOR: Marc Bhalla ADVERTISING: Nina Simatos ART DIRECTION & DESIGN:

Atlanta Visual Communications Inc. All advertising enquiries should be directed to Nina Simatos at (416) 491-6216 Ext 129 or nina@associationconcepts.ca If you are interested in writing articles for Condovoice magazine, please contact Nina Simatos at (416) 491-6216 ext 129 or at nina@associationconcepts.ca. Article topics must be on issues of interest to Condominium Directors and must be informative rather than commercial in nature. The authors, the Canadian Condominium Institute and its representatives will not be held liable in any respect whatsoever for any statement or advice contained herein. Articles should not be relied upon as a professional opinion or as an authoritative or comprehensive answer in any case. Professional advice should be obtained after discussing all particulars applicable in the specific circumstances in order to obtain an opinion or report capable of absolving condominium directors from liability [under s. 37 (3) (b) of the Condominium Act, 1998]. Authors’ views expressed in any article are not necessarily those of the Canadian Condominium Institute. All contributors are deemed to have consented to publication of any information provided by them, including business or personal contact information. Consider supporting the advertisers and service providers referred to in this magazine, recognizing that they have been supporters of CCI Toronto. Advertisements are paid advertising and do not imply endorsement of or any liability whatsoever on the part of CCI with respect to any product, service or statement.

Publications Mail Agreement #40047055 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to Circulation Dept. 2800 14th Avenue, Suite # 210 Markham, ON L3R 0E4

From the Editor

The Line Many condominium communities go beyond what is required at law and have a by-law in place which extends their directors’ qualification requirements. Often, this includes a minimum threshold of participation from each member of the Board, such as a clause that relieves a director who misses three Board meetings in a given year from their duties (unless the rest of the Board excuses the absence). The idea, amongst other things, is to establish a standard that ensures quorum can be achieved to conduct business on a regular basis and provides a clear expectation of what is required from directors upfront. While many directors are involved above and beyond such a minimum standard, whether their community has such a by-law in place or not, there is a fine line between being involved and getting in the way. A recent example of a condominium director being perhaps too dedicated involved a community with a paint project. One Board member helping to oversee the work was spotted watching paint dry on a wall… literally! While staring at a wall of paint may be relatively harmless, the reality is that the overinvolvement of directors may risk doing more harm than good. Consider a micromanaging director getting involved in instructing tradespeople on site, adding potential liability to the condominium corporation for the project, or a Board member spending time behind a security desk and potentially breaching the privacy of residents by gaining access to video surveillance footage. Property management is required to take direction from the Board and carry out such instructions between meetings. If a manager

finds that they spend too much time taking direction from, answering to or otherwise communicating with individual directors in the course of going about their daily activities, it may be a challenge for the manager to properly focus on the job at hand. While this poses the obvious risk of inefficiency, further challenges arise when it is only one or two members of the Board taking part in such “extra-curricular” activities. The manager may become more involved in the politics of the community than they should be, perceived to be under the command of the directors with whom they interact with most (rather the Board as a collective governing body) or tempted to pacify individual Board members rather than serve the community as a whole. Against this, of course, is the aim to keep tabs on the activities of those serving the community, to ensure that the best job possible is done. Establishing a level of trust between all involved in the operation of a condominium tends to be an effective approach. Clear guidelines as to expectations that can be measured without a “back seat driver” can be helpful, too. All condominium Boards can benefit from establishing boundaries to guide what is considered to be appropriate behaviour of directors and others. A volunteer willing to put in more time than is required can be a considerable asset… so long as their energies and efforts are aligned with what best serves the community.

Marc Bhalla, BA, C. Med, Q. Arb, MCI Arb CONDOVOICE FALL 2018

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Profile for LS Graphics

CCi-T Condovoice - Fall 2018  

CCi-T Condovoice - Fall 2018

CCi-T Condovoice - Fall 2018  

CCi-T Condovoice - Fall 2018