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Friday, February 10, 2017

Vol. 77, No. 6

THE YEAR OF THE ROOSTER

Jericho presentation on health, wellness Guidance Dept. initiative BY RIKKI N. MASSAND

On Sunday, January 29th, the Jericho Public Library celebrated the Year of the Rooster with internationally acclaimed acrobat Li Liu. Adults and children of all ages enjoyed this spectacular performance!

Syosset Library celebrates Chinese New Year this weekend

On Saturday, February 11, from 2 to 3:30 pm the Syosset Public Library will help the community turn out to celebrate Chinese New Year with a special dose of cultural education plus arts and crafts, tailored for the youngest students in the area. Chinese New Year officially started on January 28. With very well-attended a performance extravaganza Saturday, February 4 held at Syosset High School and again this weekend at the library, momentum continues to be built on. Local parent Cindy Lin of the Chinese American Association of Syosset

(CAAS) advises that the 2017 Chinese New Year Children’s program will be held on the last day of the 2 week New Year’s holiday, called the Lantern (or Yuan Xiao) Festival, February the 11th. The event has gained so much attention after registration opened on January 19 that to date 13 kids have been waitlisted. In the past Syosset library hosted the Chinese New Year show as in 2016, when it attracted over 150 attendees. This year’s February 4 at Syosset High’s theater carried seating for 750 people, with nearly a full-house. The event See page 19

At its work session on Thursday, February 2, one week before the second budget-centric school board meeting, Jericho Public Schools’ administration and board of education listened to and engaged in talks on the evolution of guidance, social work and the student population’s needs. As part of the process at hand, Jericho administrators will request that at its February 9 meeting the school board approve a recommendation to establish a new Director of Guidance position and appropriate funds to hire a candidate. Superintendent of Schools Hank Grishman says the conversation starts with managing and assisting students and families under stress, and the role of the guidance division of Jericho Schools. This week presented an opportunity to tell the school board about programs and staff development within guidance, identify concerns and district needs, and how decisions can set a better agenda for all parties involved. John Castronova, Jericho Schools’ director for pupil personnel services, said encouraging Jericho’s students to be involved and do as much as they can in the school community remains a top goal, along with envisioning and assisting long-term (postsecondary) success. He says a proactive approach was formulated as Jericho Schools started shifting away from an individual student’s relationship into preventative measures and reaching out to larger groups, breaking a silent stigma of “students who are in crisis counseling.” “We looked at what we could do district-wide to put things in place for being preventive and providing students with the tools they need. The

culture of the district is its culture and we are not trying to change that. The last few years the collective effort has started out with the high school and the Mindfulness Ambassador Council (J-MAC, hosted Wednesdays in Room 126), a part-time thing at first, and I thought the concept was a great one. That’s just one example of opening things up to a broader audience,” Castronova said. Todd Benjamin is a social worker (LSCW) who has 31 years of experience working with Jericho Schools. He has served primarily as the social worker, crisis prevention specialist, and substance abuse counselor at Jericho High School. He says six years ago Jericho’s social work and guidance staff started seeing more stress at the high school level and in the world in general, relaying statistics that 1 in six students does have some form of mental health disorders. “We have to start thinking about a universal approach – when I first got here it was like a clinic and we’d see 20 kids a week. They would come for appointments and leave, and while we were helpful to them we knew there were hundreds of kids we weren’t reaching,” Benjamin said. Danielle Largotta-Smith, psychologist with the high school, said in recent years Jericho staff had child study team meetings that went in-depth. At one of them Jill Rathus, Ph.D from the Center for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and LIU-C.W. Post professor spoke to guidance counselors. Some of those conversations covered self-injurious behavior and eating disorders, but underpinnings of the therapies involved could be applied to helping the general student body. Out of that See page 20

International Night at Berry Hill School PAGE 21 Synagogue celebrates Rabbi installation PAGE 3


Friday, February 10, 2017

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Registration for Learn to Skate Series

Town of Oyster Bay residents are invited to “Learn to Skate” this March by registering for skating lessons at the Town of Oyster Bay Ice Skating Center, located at Bethpage Community Park, 1001 Stewart Ave, Bethpage, according to Oyster Bay Town Councilwoman Rebecca M. Alesia. “Throughout the year, the ice skating center offers classes for residents who enjoy skating. Whether you are interested in sharpening your skating abilities or just skating recreationally, these ‘Learn to Skate’ lessons may be just what you are looking for,” Councilwoman Alesia said. “Registration for Series 4 (March 6 through April 29) begins on Monday, February 13. Those interested can register at the rink, online (www. TheRinx.com) or by phone at (516) 7974126.” The “Learn to Skate” program offers group skating lessons to beginners through advanced levels. Skaters are paired based on age and skill, ranging from pre-school and basic skills through advanced levels. The program is for eight weeks with the exception of Sundays. Classes are for six weeks and all classes are 30 minutes in length. For residents, the fee is $149 for the session. For non-residents the fee is $189. The “Learn to Skate” schedule is: Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., Tuesdays & Thursdays 10:00

a.m. to Noon, Saturdays from 11:50 a.m. to 12:50 p.m. and Sundays from 12:15 p.m. to 12:45 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. There will be no classes on April 16 in observance of Easter Sunday. Registration costs include admission into the session for which you are registered on the day of the lesson. Membership in the United States Figure Skating (USFS) Basic Skills Program; USFS record book for new members, and stickers and USFS Badges upon mastering of each level. There will be no refunds or makeups and skate rental is not included in price. Helmets, gloves or mittens and warm layers are recommended for all skaters. “Students enrolled in the Rinx’s Skating School are guided by qualified professionals governed by US Figure Skating, USA Hockey and Professional Skaters Association. This group of professional instructors focuses on educating and learning the fundamentals of ice skating while placing a major emphasis on having fun,” Councilwoman Alesia said. “The Town is happy to provide excellent skating programs that are enjoyable for skaters of all ages.” For more information, visit www. oysterbaytown.com, www.TheRinx. com, or call the Rinx Office at the Town of Oyster Bay Ice Skating Center at (516) 797-4126.

Jericho Schools announce Adult ESL Classes

Adult ESL classes will resume this spring for parents of Jericho students. Federal funding offsets all costs for this program. The goal of this program is to improve communication between school and home. This is one of many steps that the district hopes will make all members of the community feel welcome in our schools. There are 2 Day Sessions planned – Level I from 9 :00 AM – 10:30 AM and Level II from 10:30 AM – Noon. The classes, which are held on

Tuesdays and Thursdays, begin February 28, in the Middle School Conference Room B, and will run until April 6. To register, please e-mail mstokel@ jerichoschools.org and indicate which class you are interested in attending and your child’s name. Please also include your name, email address and phone number in the email. Space is limited so enrollment is on a first come, first served basis. Unfortunately, childcare services are not available.

The Syosset Advance

Published every Friday by Litmor Publishing Corp. Periodical Postage paid at Hicksville, N.Y. 11801 Telephone 931-0012 - USPS 3467-68 Postmaster: Send Address Change to: The Syosset Advance, 821 Franklin Ave., Suite 208 Garden City, N.Y. 11530 Meg Norris Publisher

This Week at the Jericho Public Library Friday, February 10th at 2:00 PM

Movie: Our Little Sister (Comedy/ Drama) - This story revolves around three sisters who live in their grandmother’s home and the arrival of their thirteen-year-old half-sister. (Japan) English Subtitles. Rated PG. 2 hours, 8 minutes.

Monday, February 13th at 7:30 PM

Board of Trustees Meeting - The monthly meeting of the Board of Trustees will be held in the Meeting Room. The public is invited to attend.

Tuesday, February 14th at 2:00 PM

Larry Hart, My Funny Valentine with John Kenrick, Musical Theatre & Film Historian. Loved by everyone except himself, this gentle genius seemed bent on self destruction. His brilliant lyrics still delight listeners today. John Kenrick will discuss Hart’s life and career with videos and backstage stories.

Wednesday, February 15th at 7PM

Jump In! Long Island Water Program - with Matthew T. Rizzo, Project Manager, Grassroots Environmental Education. This outreach program is designed to inform consumers about the threats facing our ground and surface water, as well as possible solutions. Register online or at the Circulation Desk.

Thursday, February 16th at 2:00 & 7:00 PM

Movie: The Birth of a Nation (Biography/Drama/History) - Nat Turner, a literate slave and preacher in the antebellum south, orchestrates an uprising. Starring Nate Parker, Armie Hammer, Penelope Ann Miller. Rated R. 2 hours.

Friday, February 17th at 2:00 PM

Here’s Looking at You Humphrey Bogart – with Marc Courtade. Celebrate the life and career of Humphry Bogart.

Jericho High School Presents Anything Goes

Experience LIVE Theater at Jericho High School! Jericho High School Harlequin Players will present “Anything Goes” by Cole Porter at a free senior citizen performance scheduled for Wednesday, March 8, at the Jericho High School Little Theater at 10am. RSVP Required 516-203-3600 ext. 3226

for senior citizen preview. Public show times will be Thursday, March 9 at 6 p.m. and Friday, March 10 and Saturday, March 11 at 7:30 PM Tickets are on sale in Mr. Mankowich’s office for $10 in advance and $12 at the door. Please email TBM@ jerichoschools.org for more information and sponsorship opportunities.

Conversational, opinionated, idiomatic?

We are looking for writers in our community to compose news articles on local topics, opinions, reviews, worthy places to visit on Long Island, and even fiction. We aim to feature at least one new article and writer each week in our Discovery magazine section. E-mail submissions: editor@gcnews.com

• Attach article and any photos (1MB), along with your name and contact info. Articles must be between 1,500 - 3,000 words. • Each writer will be reimbursed a stipend of $25.⁰⁰

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On Friday January 27th, several hundred congregants, friends and family members joined together to honor Rabbi Rachel Maimin at her installation service held in our sanctuary. Although she has only part of our community for six months, Rabbi Maimin has already made a strong positive impression, with her warmth, intellect and interpersonal skills, developing deep and sustainable relationships with our congregants both young and old. She has seamlessly joined with our senior rabbi, cantor, religious school principal, nursery school director and staff to materially enhance the quality and variety of services, prayers and programs we offer at North Shore Synagogue. Rabbi Maimin brought a broad breadth of experiences to us, having previously been an Assistant Rabbi at the Isaac M. Wise Temple in Cincinnati, a faculty member at the URJ Kutz Camp in the Berkshires, a teaching assistant to the late Dr. Eugene Borowitz, a renowned leading Reform Jewish rabbi and professor of

Jewish theology, philosophy and ethics. While an intern for the Central Conference of American Rabbis, she served as chaplaincy intern at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. In addition to sharing responsibility for planning and leading worship services, teaching in the religious school, co-leading our youth groups, preparing B’nai Mitzvah students, engaging with nursery school children, and offering pastoral care, Rabbi Maimin has found time to prepare for and teach classes at the Institute for Adult Jewish Studies, a joint educational organization sponsored by many local synagogues. Friday’s installation services were presided over by Senior Rabbi Jamiee Shalhevet and Cantor Kyle Cotler with a special guest Rabbi Carole Balin. Rabbi Balin a Professor of Jewish history at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in New York, offered heartfelt words of welcome, and laudatory praises of her mentee Rabbi Maimin, describing the development of

Rabbi Maimin (far left) holds the Torah is joined by Rabbi Shalhevet (center), Cantor Cotler (far right) and her family and congregants in a celebratory song and blessing. their close relationship and professional interactions over

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Synagogue celebrates the installation of new associate Rabbi

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Friday, February 10, 2017

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Jericho Middle School’s Acosta wins Geography Bee

Frank Acosta, an eighth grade student at Jericho Middle School, won the school competition of the National Geographic Bee and advanced as a semifinalists eligible to compete in the 2017 New York State National Geographic

State Bee. The contest will be held on Friday, March 31. The school Bee, at which students answered questions on geography, was the first round in the annual National Geographic Bee. The runner up was Aditya Niwalkar.

And he wins...Frank Acosta!

2017 National Geographic Bee -Jericho Middle School Back row: Dr. Gately, Pradeep Kundu, Mr. Lawlor, Matthew Lecher, Dr. Sundberg, Mr. Wiener, Ms. Cantwell

Ms. Cantwell, runner up Aditya Niwalkar, and Mr. Niwalkar

2016 Champion Matthew Lecher crowning 2017 Champion Frank Acosta

Franklin Institute brings “Motion and Machines” to Berry Hill

Berry Hill Elementary fourth grade students were given an important physics lesson by The Franklin Institute with the interactive presentation of “Motion and Machines.” Students learned about Newton’s Laws of Motion, and then observed these laws in action in a

lever, pulley and hover car. The lesson also defined terms like force, gravity, friction, acceleration, work, simple machines and mechanical advantage. “Motion and Machines” was made possible by the Berry Hill PTA’s Cultural Arts Committee.

Berry Hill 4th graders really enjoyed The Franklin Institute’s interactive presentation.

A lucky Berry Hill student takes a ride on the hover car

The Franklin Institute uses a lever to explain mechanical advantage.


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Village School student council members and fifth graders wrapped gifts and assembled large bags with gifts, cookies, candy and large stockings stuffed with much-needed personal care items for 16 Mercy First residents. Photos courtesy of the Syosset School District.

Village School makes the holidays brighter for others

Village Elementary School in Syosset and Mercy First continued their partnership this holiday season through the school’s annual Sponsor-A-Child initiative, spearheaded by the Village School Student Council with support from the PTA’s Community Outreach committee. Village families, faculty and staff donated money to purchase toys to help make the holiday a happy one for 16 residents of Mercy First, a local organization that houses displaced children. “It’s important to make these children feel like a part of the larger community,” said Village Principal Jeffrey Kasper, whose school conducts multiple fundraisers year-round. “It’s also a valuable lesson of compassion and kindness for our students, who participate purely on a volunteer basis. Our gym is pretty packed so student partici-

pation is high.” During the school’s annual holiday workshop held in the gymnasium, student council members and fifth graders wrapped gifts and assembled them into 16 large bags along with cookies, candy and large stockings stuffed with much-needed personal care items. A few Mercy First residents a nd representatives stopped by the workshop to introduce students to three therapy dogs that serve as their valuable companions. Village students learned about the companionship that the dogs provide and also had the opportunity to interact with them. In keeping with another VillageMercy First tradition, the 16 sponsored residents were presented with their gifts during a joint breakfast at Celebrity Diner held just before the holidays.

Photos courtesy of the Syosset School District

Village School students pack bags of candy for their friends at Mercy First.

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Incidents that have occurred recently in the local area include: A 58-year-old woman from Jamaica was arrested and was charged with Shoplifting on Northern Boulevard in Manhasset at 3:45 p.m. on January 15. n

At 1:45 p.m. on January 16, a 27-yearold man from North Bellmore was arrested and was charged with Driving While Intoxicated on Corporate Drive in Westbury. n

A 25-year-old woman was arrested at 8:35 p.m. on January 16 & charged with Shoplifting from Macy’s in East GC. n

Between 12 noon on January 17 and 8 a.m. the next morning, unknown subjects dented the fuel tank of a victim’s rental vehicle as it was parked on Woodland Place in Great Neck. n

At Macy’s in East Garden City, two 32-year-old men from Flushing were arrested and charged with Shoplifting at 8:30 p.m. on January 17. n

Between 10 p.m. on January 17 and 8 a.m. the next morning, a vehicle that was parked on Bond Street and North Station Plaza in Great Neck Plaza was broken into and a Macbook laptop computer was stolen. n

At 11:25 p.m. on January 17, a 30-yearold man from Hartford, Connecticut was arrested at the Red Roof Inn parking lot on Dibblee Drive in Westbury. The subject was charged with Criminal Possession of Marijuana. n

An unattended cell phone was stolen from a location on Maple Avenue in Westbury at 9:05 a.m. on January 18. n

In a parking lot on Old Country Road in Carle Place, unknown subjects entered a victim’s vehicle at 6 p.m. on January 18 and removed his wallet with personal identification. n

At LA Fitness, located on Marcus Avenue in New Hyde Park, a victim’s unattended cell phone was removed from the treadmill he was using at 11:15 a.m. on January 19. n

At Planet Fitness, located on Great Neck Road in Great Neck Plaza, a victim has reported that unknown subjects entered her locker and removed her gym bag containing car keys and assorted clothing. The theft occurred between 4:30 and 6:15 p.m. on January 20. n

A 27-year-old man from Manhasset was arrested at 2:30 a.m. on January 21. He was charged with Driving While Intoxicated at the intersection of Roslyn Road and Railroad Avenue in Roslyn Heights. n

THE POLICE BLOTTER

At 3:44 a.m. on January 21, a 32-yearold man from Albertson was arrested and was charged with Driving While Intoxicated on Willis Avenue at Hillturn Lane in Roslyn Heights. n

At 9:17 a.m. on January 21, a 62-yearold woman from Queens was arrested and was charged with Shoplifting at the Shop Rite Supermarket located on New Hyde Park Road in New Hyde Park. n

On Monroe Avenue in Bayville, unknown subjects entered a victim’s vehicle and removed his power inverter between 5 p.m. on January 21 and 1:05 p.m. the next day. n

At 6:10 p.m. on January 21, a victim’s unattended wallet was stolen from her pocketbook while she was shopping at Periwinkle Boutique, located on Union Turnpike in North New Hyde Park. n

At The Source Mall parking garage, located on Old Country Road in Westbury, a parked vehicle was damaged by shattering the window and removing a purse with contents sometime between 8:45 and 9:30 p.m. on January 21. n

A victim has reported that unknown subjects smashed the driver’s side rear window and removed her purse with contents between 7:30 and 11:40 p.m. on January 21 at the Bertucci’s parking lot on Merrick Avenue in Westbury. n

At 10:15 p.m. on January 21, the window of a parked car was smashed and the victim’s pocketbook was stolen on Old Country Road at the Ruby Tuesday’s parking lot in Westbury. n

At 1:13 a.m. on January 22, a 29-yearold man from Cedarhurst was arrested and was charged with Driving While Intoxicated on Northern Boulevard in Manhasset. n

A man from Beverly Hills, 53 years old, was arrested and was charged with Driving While Intoxicated on Northern Boulevard at Pickwick Road in Manhasset at 4:35 a.m. on January 22. n

At 8:30 a.m. on January 22, unknown subjects pulled the driver’s side door handle from the victim’s vehicle at 8:30 a.m. on January 22. The damage occurred at the Shop Rite Supermarket parking lot, located on Jerusalem Avenue in Uniondale. n

On Old Country Road in Westbury, a 32-year-old man from Lindenhurst was arrested and was charged with Shoplifting at 3:30 p.m. on January 22. n

Criminal Possession of Marijuana was the charge brought against a 22-year-old man from Hempstead, when

he was arrested on Argyle Avenue at Davis Avenue in Uniondale on January 22 at 10:58 p.m. n

Between 12:15 and 8:15 p.m. on January 23, the rear driver-side window of a victim’s vehicle was damaged while parked on New Hyde Park Road in North New Hyde Park.

three were charged with Criminal Possession of Marijuana. n

While driving on the Long Island Expressway at Exit 37 in Roslyn Heights at 4:15 a.m. on January 25, a 34-year-old woman from Massapequa was arrested and was charged with Driving While Intoxicated.

n

n

On Imperial Avenue in New Hyde Park, a victim has reported that unknown subjects threw a vodka bottle at the front window of his building, causing damage, between 6 p.m. on January 24 and 7 a.m. the next morning.

Between 3:30 and 5 p.m. on January 25, the parking lot of the Liquor Store on Nassau Road in Uniondale was the scene of Criminal Mischief to Auto, involving damage to the victim’s navigation screen.

n

n

At 11:25 p.m. on January 24, three individuals were arrested on Second Street in Mineola. Arrested were a 24-year-old man from Westbury, a 21-year-old man from Hicksville and a 24-year-old man from Freeport. All

On Merrick Avenue in Westbury, a 22-year-old man from Hempstead was arrested and was charged with Criminal Possession of Marijuana at 5:55 p.m. on January 25. Compiled by Kate and Meg Meyer

Syosset School Board meeting

There will be a meeting of the Board of Education on Monday, February 13, at 6:00 p.m. in South Woods Middle School, 99 Pell Lane, Syosset, New York. The Board of Education may immediately entertain a motion to convene an Executive Session. If that occurs, fol-

lowing the Executive Session, the Board of Education will reconvene for the Budget Information Meeting at 7:30 p.m. immediately followed by the Monthly Meeting of the Board of Education at 8:00 p.m. in South Woods Middle School Auditorium.

InspIrIng Women™ a free community health education program

The CardIovasCular deTeCTIve: unIque Clues for Women’s hearT healTh Please join us as Barbara J. George, EdD, RCEP, MSN, AGNP-C, Director, Center for Cardiovascular Lifestyle Medicine at Winthrop, discusses the following: • Signs and symptoms of heart disease & stroke unique to women • Prevention guidelines related to women’s risk and treatment options • How you can effectively identify, manage and improve your heart healthy lifestyle

Tuesday, February 28, 2017 Sign in: 6:45 PM Program: 7:00 PM Winthrop’s Research & Academic Center 101 Mineola Blvd. (Corner of Second Street in Mineola) Admission is free, but seating is limited For reservations: Please call (516) 663-8300 or email: inspiringwomen@winthrop.org For inclement weather and parking information call: 516-663-9761

Friday, February 10, 2017


Friday, February 10, 2017

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Jewelry buyers’ guide

You can’t buy love, but on Valentine’s Day those in love certainly like to treat the special people in their lives to some lavish tokens of affection. According to the National Retail Federation’s Valentine’s Day Consumer Spending Survey, Americans spend an estimated $19 billion on gifts, flowers, dinners, and more come Valentine’s Day. In addition to chocolates and flowers, jewelry is a popular Valentine’s Day gift. Since jewelry is often a personal taste, much like a fragrance, it can be challenging to find the perfect item. With so many different styles, colors and pieces, it’s no surprise that so many jewelry shoppers feel overwhelmed. Some expert advice can make the process go more smoothly and ensure you’re getting the best value for your money. The Federal Trade Commission suggests thinking before you shop. Since jewelry is a major purchase, shoppers should first establish a budget. Consider the gift recipient’s style and look at other jewelry he or she wears. The more informed you are before visiting the jewelry stores, the easier it will be to find a piece he or she will like and one that you can afford. Take the time to become educated about diamonds and other gemstones. Diamonds’ value is based on four criteria: color, cut, clarity, and carat (often referred to as “The 4 Cs”). Color ranges from the diamond being nearly white to graded down to yellow. The cut is the way the stone is fashioned. Clarity informs consumers if the stone is flawless or has specs or scratches inside of it. Carat refers to the weight of the diamond.

Jewelry is a common gift for Valentine’s Day. Customers should know before they buy to get the best value.

Diamonds and gemstones can form naturally or be manufactured in laboratories. Lab-created gemstones may look like natural gemstones but be of lesser value. Shop around and get referrals for reputable jewelry stores. You can consult the Better Business Bureau to see if any complaints have been lodged about a particular store. Many consumers are most comfortable purchasing jewelry made in-store so they can verify the merchandise and retailer. Check for the appropriate markings on gold, silver and platinum jewelry that indicate their authenticity. Make sure the jeweler will include certification or a grading report with the jewelry and your receipt. No matter how much research you do, realize that there’s a chance the jewelry you purchase will not prove the perfect fit. So make sure you understand the store’s return policy and if there is a charge to have rings or other items resized. Jewelry is a classic Valentine’s Day gift. With the right approach, shoppers can make the process of buying jewelry a lot less intimidating.

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Syosset Woodbury Chamber holds January Meeting

Thank you to Chamber Members Attorneys Charo Ezdrin and Brian Woods (Ezdrin & Woods, P.C.) for graciously hosting the Chamber’s January meeting at their new office, 93 Jackson Ave. Syosset. The evening’s Guest speaker was Assemblyman Charles (Chuck) Lavine. Mr. Lavine is currently running for Nassau County Executive with the hope of bringing credibility back to local government. He has been

Assemblyman Chuck Lavine speaks to Chamber audience

a leader in environmental protection, in the fight to protect Women’s rights, and is Chair of the Ethics Committee. The Chamber’s February meeting is scheduled for February 16 at Title Boxing Club Syosset, 170 Michael Drive, Syosset. Stop by and meet your Chamber! Owner Steven Spithoiannis is our host. For more info contact Tricia Shannon at 516-978-6832 or Tricia.shannon@elliman.com

Ken Robinson, Chanbir Kaur, Chuck Lavine, Charo Ezdrin and Brian R. Woods

Syosset Hospital gets new lobby, amenities

Northwell Health leadership and employees rededicated the lobby at Syosset Hospital, which includes hi-tech furniture and a new coffee shop, in a ribbon cutting ceremony recently. The newly renovated lobby now includes furniture, which is not only functional, but has USB accessibility built in. Ample outlets will allow visitors and patients to charge their phones and other electronic devices. The cosmetic upgrade also includes a new coffee shop, which serves Starbucks products and is open weekdays from 7 a.m.-6 p.m. The shop has sandwiches, soup, large pretzels and baked goods. “We wanted to give our patients and their visitors a greater variability of dining options,” said Michael Fener, executive director of Plainview and Syosset hospitals. The hospital’s pre-existing gift shop was relocated and refurbished. There is also a six-cubicle, private consultation space where patients and families can meet with physicians. The private consultation room leads into the new waiting room, which is more open and spacious for patients’ families and friends. Patients and visitors will also notice a new front awning and covered handicap-accessible ramp as well as new elevator cars that are faster and larger than their predecessors. “These changes to our front lobby area were in keeping with Northwell Health’s continuing focus on hospitality,” Mr. Fener said.

Northwell Health President and CEO Michael J. Dowling (far right) helps rededicate the Syosset Hospital lobby in a ribbon cutting ceremony.


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11 Friday,February 10, 2017

SCHOOL AND CAMP DIRECTORY 2017


Friday, February 10, 2017

12

What’s Happening February 10

“Our Little Sister”, a Japanese film with English subtitles, will be shown at 2 p.m. at the Jericho Public Library. Rated PG, 128 minutes long. At 2 p.m. at the Syosset Public Library, the film “Money Monster” will be shown. Rated R, the film runs 95 minutes.

February 11

Celebrate the Chinese New Year at the Syosset Public Library for children in grades Kindergarten to 5 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Children will hear stories about the traditions and enjoy making a craft project. Advanced registration is recommended.

February 13

The Board of Trustees of the Jericho Public Library will meet at 7:30 p.m. this evening. The public is invited to attend. From 7 to 8 p.m. at the Syosset Public Library, a “Valentine Craft” program will be held for children in grades Kindergarten through 2nd.

February 14

In a special program for Valentine’s Day, John Kenrick, musical theatre and film historian, will be at the Jericho Public Library at 2 p.m. to talk about Larry Hart, “My Funny Valentine”.

February 15

The Syosset Public Library will host “Current Events In Perspective” with Michael D’Innocenzo, Hofstra University Distinguished Professor Emeritus at 2 p.m. “Lego Fun” will be held at the Syosset Public Library from 4 to 4:45 p.m. for children in grades 3 to 5. The Long Island Water Program, with Matthew T. Rizzo, Project Manager of Grassroots Environmental Education, will be the subject of a session at the Jericho Public Library at 7 p.m.

February 16

The film “The Birth of a Nation” will be shown at 2 p.m. and again at 7 p.m. at the Jericho Public Library. Rated R, the film is 120 minutes long.

February 17

At 11 a.m. at the Syosset Public Library, Mary Milano Carter, MS, ANPBC, RN-BC will be sharing information on “Pain Management”. The Great Performers series at the Jericho Public Library will bring a program on Humphrey Bogart, “Here’s Looking At You” at 2 p.m. Senior Net will present a program on “The Cloud, Demystified” at the Syosset Public Library at 2 p.m.

February 20

The children’s film “Finding Dory” will be shown at the Syosset Public Library at 11 a.m. Rated PG and run-

ning 97 minutes, this is a movie for the whole family. The Teen Program at the Syosset Public Library will host a food preparation session with Rob Scott from 7 to 8 p.m. and “Stuff-a-Panini Pizza Sticks” will be the result. Please register in advance.

February 21

A special holiday program will be offered at the Jericho Public Library for children in grades Kindergarten and up at 11 a.m. Christopher Agostino will hold a program of “StoryFaces” to tell stories and use transformative face painting. Advanced registration is required. A program of “Tech Buddies For Adults” will match up a teen with an adult who needs help with mobile electronic devices and computers. The program runs from 2 to 3:30 pm. at the Syosset Public Library.

February 22

Professor Thomas Germano will be at the Jericho Public Library at 2 p.m. to discuss “The Art of the Mexican Revolution” in the continuation of the Library’s art lecture series. A German film with English subtitles will be shown at the Jericho Public Library at 7 p.m. “The People vs. Fritz Bauer” is rated R and runs 105 minutes.

February 23

“Phenomenal Physics With Mr. Fish” is a combination of science and circus skills that will be held for ages 4 and older at the Jericho Public Library at 11 a.m. Tickets will be available in advance of the performance. The Syosset Public Library presents “Bubblemania” at 2:30 p.m. for children in grades Kindergarten through 5th. Limited registration begins February 2.

February 24

“Genius”, a PG-13 rated film, will be shown at the Syosset Public Library at 2 p.m. 104 minutes long.

February 25

A cooking demonstration will be held at the Jericho Public Library at 11:30 a.m. with Lucy Van Horn. The program will be on “Table Top Adventure – Spa Cuisine”. Space is limited, so please register in advance.

February 26

“An Aesthetic Realism Cabaret About Love & Everyone’s Hopes” will be presented at the Jericho Public Library at 2 p.m. and tickets will be obtained through the Library.

February 27

“Queen of Katwe”, is the story of a Ugandan girl who is introduced to the game of chess and how it changes her life. The film is rated PG and is124 minutes long. Compiled by Meg Meyer

THE VIEW FROM HERE

Super Sunday BY BOB MORGAN, JR.

I don’t write that often about sports or the Super Bowl in this column, but last Sunday’s game in many ways was the tonic our nation needed. Ok, you might not think so if you live in the Atlanta area, and you find little to celebrate about a game where your team managed to lose a 25 point lead. You also will have some second thoughts about some of the play calls as Atlanta attempted to protect its big advantage, like a third and one pass play leading to a fumble and calls late in the game that took the Falcons out of field goal range. But even in the land of the Falcons, people can legitimately take pride in a team that thoroughly outplayed and befuddled an excellent New England team in the first half and totally took Tom Brady out of his comfort zone. The Atlanta quarterback, Matt Ryan, showed this year that he belongs in the top ranks at his position. But whether or not you like the Patriots, and most fans don’t, this was a game for the ages and for our time, and not just because it was the first Super Bowl (they have been playing them since 1967) that went into overtime. You have to admire the gutty performance of Tom Brady and his team facing adversity in the fourth quarter. Even trailing by 16 points, the Patriots really only had one path – score two touchdowns, convert on consecutive two point conversions, don’t give up any points and win in overtime. They methodically pulled it off, aided by a true miracle catch by Julian Edelman. And kudos to Bill Belichick. The man may be an evil genius and has been a part of too many scandals, but he seems to get his team prepared for the opponent better than any other coach in the history of the game, and is also a master of in-game strategy. But in this particularly polarized time, it was also good to have an opportunity to watch the game

together with family and friends and to debate issues like the play call strategy and penalty flags rather than immigration orders and the latest presidential tweet. And many of us appreciated Lady Gaga’s performance at halftime, and not just because she wisely decided to leave overt politics out. Lady Gaga’s obviously not of my generation (there’s an understatement) but she does have a great deal of energy and personal appeal that even those of a certain age can relate to. As I’ve occasionally mentioned, I throw two parties a year, a Belmont Stakes party and, relevant here, a Super Bowl party. This year’s even had about 80 guests and we have the game on 5 televisions, including a projection television wisely suggested by Ed Norris, my brother in law, that allows people to see the game from all angles in our living room. We have snacks like chili, cheese platters, salsa and carrot sticks throughout the game and then a halftime buffet with such fare as sliced turkey and ham sandwiches and pasta and green salads. And yes, we do serve beer and other libations. While my email invitation was entitled “Make the Super Bowl Great Again” and I described the event as “Huuuuge”, I made it clear in the invitation that this language was completely tongue in cheek and that the party was intended to be completely nonpolitical. And so it was. I do ask people to stand and be quiet for the national anthem and many people said kind things about President George H.W. Bush and Barbara Bush when they were present for the coin toss. Once the game began, some of the guests took a serious interest in every play, while for others the party is more of a social event. But mostly it was a time of being together and enjoying the game, and celebrating what we have in common rather than our differences.

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Friday, February 10, 2017

Heavenly Mountain Resort & Hard Rock Hotel Lake Tahoe: An Epic Combination BY DAVE E. LEIBERMAN & LAINI MIRANDA

Set along the south shore of Lake Tahoe straddling the California/ Nevada state lines, Heavenly Mountain Resort offers one of the most unique ski experiences anywhere, combining stunning views, epic runs, and purist California vibe with the casino hotels and nightlife of Nevada. Heavenly, which is one of the Vail

from Heavenly Mountain to the pure blue glacial lake on the California side, and the sweeping desert on the Nevada side are what most entices us city folk to Heavenly. We come to Lake Tahoe in December, of course, for the epic skiing. Heavenly straddles the California-Nevada state line and is a mountain for everyone, from hard-

desert vistas on the Nevada side. Intra-run breaks with beer, brats and sun-tanning at  Stein’s  at the foot of Powerbowl Express and BBQ at East Peak Lodge round out the experience. For us, the best way to start our day is to drive the seven or so minutes from Hard Rock Hotel, where we are staying, to the California Lodge parking area, stopping for a

and their staff is incredibly helpful. These days, with airline baggage fees and the hassle of transporting skis and snowboard equipment, renting at the ski destination is often a wonderful opportunity to test out the latest equipment. Once we have our boots, skis, helmets, and poles, we head right outside to the base of the Gunbarrel

The spectacular view of Lake Tahoe from Heavenly Mountain Resort (photo by Dave E. Leiberman/Travel Features Syndicate). Resorts, hosts on-mountain aprés ski parties with DJs, dancers, and “Heavenly Angels”, or you can enjoy the entertainment and gambling of the casino hotels at the base of the mountain. The unparalleled views

core tree skiers to pure vista-lovers which even beginner skiers can enjoy. On a single run, you will marvel at sweeping views of snowy mountains and the majestic Lake Tahoe on the California side, juxtaposed with

sumptuous, home-style breakfast at Driftwood Cafe in Heavenly Village. We suit up and secure our rental gear from the base lodge. Heavenly has rentals for the beginner, intermediate, and pro skier,

G O I N G P L A C E S N E A R A N D F A R

and take the Gunbarrel Express lift to head up the mountain. In mid-December a few of the slopes and ski-lifts are closed, but See page D2


Friday, February 10, 2017

D2

G O I N G P L A C E S, N E A R & F A R ....

Heavenly Mountain Resort & Hard Rock Hotel Lake Tahoe: An Epic Combination Continued from page D1

we are still able to explore most of the mountain, thanks to some incredible snow dumps early in the season. There is a great mix of blue and black runs at Heavenly, with the easier greens still exhilarating because of the incredible views.  Ridge Run  on the California side is spectacular for cruising and sightseeing;  Skyline Trail, a relatively easy blue starting at 10,040 ft elevation, takes you over to Nevada and is one of our favorite runs for its desert views. We start off with spectacular views of the lake and the snow-capped mountains in the distance. We ski along the ridge of the mountain and suddenly end up with the sweeping panorama of the Nevada desert and big open sky in the distance. It is truly breathtaking to have this expansive view of such opposite terrains within seconds of each other. Advanced skiers can dip into  Milky Way Bowl  where — even if you are en route to the experts-only Mott Canyon — it’s hard to not pause to take in the otherworldly environment. The action continues in Heavenly Village, where we find apres ski cocktails, live music, and incredible pizza. Basecamp Pizza offers inventive and delectable pies, fire pits, craft beer with great happy hour specials, corn hole, and an Americana band tonight. The vibe is great and the place is packed, even the high-tops by the bar. We luck out and snag one just as a family leaves, and we enjoy the multi-sensual experience. The “Base Camp” specialty pie couldn’t

more perfectly hit the spot, even for a couple of New York pizza snobs. Nightlife Abounds at Hard Rock Hotel We arrive at the Hard Rock Hotel on the Nevada side of south Lake Tahoe after a long and exhilarating day skiing at Heavenly Mountain Resort. On your way to our room, we are greeted by a wall-sized photo of a huge concert audience opposite the elevator, placing us in the role of performer as soon as the doors open. That is nothing compared to the breathtaking view we have from our room on the 12th floor. From this height we have a 300 degree view of Lake Tahoe and the panorama of mountains behind. In early December it is surprisingly warm enough for us to watch the sunset from our private balcony. The room itself is spacious and newly renovated. The room decor continues to make you feel like you’ve just left a rock concert–swanky, sleek, and edgy. The extremely comfortable king size bed and the big flat screen TV are perfect for unwinding after an active day on the slopes. Then it’s time to explore. The Hard Rock Hotel is filled with Rock memorabilia, and it is fun to search around for autographed guitars from the Monkeys, the Sex Pistols, and Paul McCartney among others, glass cases with famous outfits from tours and other paraphernalia from popular performers. Our favorite part of the Hard Rock Hotel (besides the room) is The Oyster Bar (the first-ever raw seafood bar of

Basecamp Pizza (photo by Laini Miranda/Travel Features Syndicate) its kind on Tahoe’s South Shore!). We are amused by the fact that, as New Yorkers accustomed to consulting Yelp to find a top restaurant, the Hard Rock’s Oyster Bar is what came up. The Oyster Bar has amazing reviews, and a perfect location on the first floor of Hard Rock Hotel. With only about 20 seats at the horseshoe-shaped bar, there is often a line to get seated. We are lucky both times we visit and are seated right away (yes, we are at Heavenly for two nights and we eat dinner here twice, it is that good). The seafood-packed Bouillabaise is insanely flavorful and big enough for two

Sunset over Lake Tahoe from our balcony at the Hard Rock Hotel (photo by Laini Miranda/Travel Features Syndicate)

to share. Even coming from spending a month in New Orleans, this is perhaps the best Bouillabaisse we’ve ever had. The New England Style Clam Chowder is perfectly creamy and clammy, the Caesar Salad (also huge) has a hint of lemon and is delicious even without the optional added protein, and the Lump Crab Cocktail with Dijon Aioli is perhaps the most generous portion of fresh crab this Baltimore girl has seen. The food is so good it makes you forget that you’re sitting about 5 feet from slot machines. It should also be mentioned that the prices here are extremely reasonable, or even cheap considering the portions. It is in a casino, after all. The Hard Rock also offers Prime, a modern steakhouse complete with a sophisticated bar, live music, stylish atmosphere and premium dishes. The Park Prime menu was inspired by the Park family, owners of the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Lake Tahoe and cattle ranchers in northern Nevada, and features local grass-fed, free-range beef, premium seafood, shareable appetizers, an approachable wine list and specialty cocktails in a cozy lounge and bar setting. The Hard Rock Hotel also has one of Lake Tahoe’s South Lake Tahoe’s newest and hoppingest casinos: 25,000 square feet of  casino floor featuring more than 500 state-of-the-art video gaming machines and table games, including Blackjack, Craps, Roulette, Ultimate Texas Hold’em, Three Card Poker, Pai Gow. The lively casino fills the ground floor with energy any time of night. It also offers a major entertainment venue with a calendar chock full of events. There is a large heated outdoor pool, which, alas closes at 5pm so we weren’t able to use it ourselves. The Hard Rock Hotel is well located in


D3

South Lake Tahoe, walking distance to Heavenly Village (and most importantly, the central Gondola that whisks you up to Heavenly Mountain with a spectacular view down to Lake Tahoe), and about a 7 minute drive to California Lodge. For us, because we have a car, the California Lodge is the easiest and quickest way to get to the mountain and affords us the convenience of parking our car just a few yards away from the lift. (Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Lake Tahoe, 50 Highway 50, Stateline, NV 89449, 844588-7625,  hardrockcasinolaketahoe.com. Inside secret: the Hard Rock Hotel has a special department that offers discounted ski-and-stay packages, 877-518-7768, but the allotment sells out.) Zalanta Luxury Condo Opens this Season After our last day on the slopes, we are lucky to get a sneak peak of  Zalanta  Resort at the Village, Heavenly’s new luxury ownership condominium development right in the center of town, scheduled to open February 2017, which is also the first lodging in South Lake Tahoe to come under Vail Resorts management. Just across the street from the Heavenly Gondola, Zalanta’s central location and lodge-like architecture feels perfectly integrated into the fabric of Heavenly Village. On the bottom floor of the property, there is a storefront with about 20,000 square feet of retail space that fits right in with the stores along Lake Tahoe Boulevard, as well as an 8,000 square foot restaurant. Residents and guests

Friday, February 10, 2017

G O I N G P L A C E S, N E A R & F A R ....

It’s fun to discover the rock memorabilia around the Hard Rock Hotel Lake Tahoe (photo by Laini Miranda/Travel Features Syndicate) enter through the spacious lobby with windowed facades showcasing both the lobby and pool area out back. Also on the first floor is a large yoga and workout room that shares beautiful views to the pool oasis. The units are incredibly spacious and range in size from pool-view 2-bedroom suites to 4-bedroom suites with wraparound decks and mountain views. At the time of our tour, there were slated to be 20 two-bedroom units ranging in square footage from 1140 to 1700 sq. ft.; six 3-bedroom units between 1600 to 1800 sq. ft., and two 4-bedroom units around 2290 sq. ft. Every unit has washer/dryer, at least one fireplace, and almost all

have a private deck. Most of the units have an open plan kitchen and living room with 18 foot ceilings at the tallest peak and 10-ft ceilings in the kitchen and bedrooms to create a cozier home ambiance. In keeping with the luxury lifestyle feeling of the development, each unit is complete with high-end finishes. The kitchens each have beautiful hard wood cabinetry, marble backsplash, grey slate countertops, and energy efficient Kitchenaid appliances. Every aspect of the climate and location has been taken into consideration during the planning stages of the condominium. The 2nd floor carpeting, 3rd floor wood flooring,

and double-paned glass windows in each unit offer maximum insulation and shield against the noise from the bustling Heavenly Village outside. There are even heated sidewalks throughout the property. On the opposite side of the building from Heavenly Village, the pool area creates a quiet oasis away from the action of the town. The pool area, open year-round, features 2 wading pools, 2 hot tubs, and of course a large central heated pool. There is also a private lakeside beach just 3 blocks away, to which all owners and guests have access. See page D5

W R I T E R’S C O R N E R BY JIM CONNORS It’s been a long journey, you might say a long slog. At times it seemed improbable, but fate has been overly kind, along with advances in medical care to enable me to make it to the octogenarian stage in life. There have been a number of helpers along the way for which I am forever grateful. For openers, my parents planted a work ethic which assisted me when the going got rough from time to time. Coming from a struggling poor family, there was a lot of insecurity to deal with. I was able to cultivate the friendship and support of kind and knowledgeable mentors who encouraged me to stay the course and pursue my goals. The first mentor was my favorite uncle who was the first college graduate in my immediate family. He was sports minded and would come to see me play baseball and basketball in high school and college and give me advice as to how to make as good a life as possible. There is a slight sense of accom-

Life at 80

plishment for taking the time to be prudent and adhering to a reasonably healthy lifestyle so as to survive to see 80. On the other hand, we know of many others who were meticulous in their living only to die much too soon. Live is not always fair, so fate plays a role in achieving longevity. Companionship is extremely important in sustaining a meaningful life. I am fortunate to have a stable marriage and a wife who is my best friend and an outstanding and compassionate mother and grandmother. Among her many contributions to our marriage and family was to work at her civil service employment above and beyond the call of duty for 39 years when she didn’t have to but volunteered for the sake of our family. Life at 80 is quite good and much better than I deserve. The major battles have been fought and won. As civil servants we both have better than average pensions along with social security and some good investments. All of this gives us a solid financial position to live comfortably and help others less comfortable.

Our daughter is well educated, gainfully employed and happily married. She has given us two healthy and beautiful grandkids. We live in a half acre home in Syosset that is fully paid for. There is much to be grateful for and we are very mindful of this. On the other hand, aging has brought some harsh realities to the surface. In the past few years there have been some relatively serious medical issues that have proven to be challenging. A back condition diagnosis as spinal stenosis, a form of arthritis, which made it painful to walk and led to some down time for a period of time was able to get some excellent medical help at an orthopedic and sports center, along with some excellent physical therapy. Till this day I do some morning exercises to deter any recurrence. Skin cancer has been an intermittent problem for me and recently I had a serious development that required some coordinated work by the dermatologist and a plastic surgeon. Fortunately they were able to patch me up and keep me from becoming a recluse. Access to good medical care is

another benefit which is well appreciated. Health matters at my age require constant monitoring. In conclusion, I have been very fortunate in my long journey. The Lord has been good to me. With considerable effort I have been able to do most things I have sought. Starting out as an athlete, I was able to play both baseball and basketball in high school and college and was fortunate to be the recipient of a baseball scholarship to college. I was a high school teacher for over 33 years and after retirement was able to pursue some lifelong pipe dreams. I did some freelance writing as a reporter and human interest writer for 16 years and had over 200 articles published. Long a frustrated singer, I was able to sing with a senior group from the Town fo Oyster Bay and have been doing solos for many years. To be clear, I have no more than a modicum of talent in any of these ventures other than a dose of perseverance. I was offered a comfortable platform and was able to take advantage of this. My cup runneth over.


Friday, February 10, 2017

D4

Y O U R S O C I A L S E C U R I T Y

My Advice: Don’t Play by the Rules BY TOM MARGENAU

Well, let’s see if I get in trouble again! Today’s question comes from a retiree who plans to return to work and is worried about how his earnings might jeopardize his eligibility for his Social Security benefits. It’s a question I’m often asked. And my usual answer doesn’t exactly follow the Social Security Administration playbook. In the past, I’ve gotten into trouble with some of my former colleagues at SSA who took me to task for encouraging people to bend the rules. But I still think I’m handing out good advice. Before I get to the question and my apparently controversial answer, let me first explain the rules. Once you are 66 years old, you can make as much money as you want and get all of your Social Security checks. But if you are on Social Security and you are under that magic age and you return to work, then the law says that for every two dollars you earn over $16,920, one dollar must be withheld from your Social Security benefits. It sounds simple enough. But the reason it gets complicated has to do with the mechanics of how the law is administered. Let’s follow an example. Jack is 64 and getting Social Security. He starts working and dutifully reports his earnings to Social Security (after waiting on hold for 45 minutes). He is told that based on his reported earnings, he isn’t due any benefits for the next five months. After a couple of months’ processing delay, SSA finally stops his checks. And being a good citizen, Jack had returned the two checks he received before his benefits were stopped. But then a month later, Jack got an overpayment letter from SSA telling him he owed an amount equal to the two benefits checks he already returned. It took several more months to straighten that out. Then later in the year, Jack learned he was getting a raise and was asked to work more hours. So now he was expecting to make several thousand dollars more than the first estimate he gave SSA. Once again, he reported this. And that report led to another overpayment letter advising him of benefits he was now not due based on his new estimate. Then, at the beginning of the next year, when he got his W-2, it turned out that he didn’t make quite as much as he had previously reported to SSA. So now, the agency owed Jack some of that money they had asked him to repay last year. But at the same time, Jack reported his anticipated earnings for the new year, and this led to another round of benefit reductions and overpayment letters. And on and on it goes! And this is not an exaggerated example. It is fairly typical of what happens to folks when they get wrapped up in the administrative nightmare of dealing with Social Security’s earnings penalty rules. So now let’s look at today’s question and how I suggest that slightly bending

those rules can save you a lot of heartache. Q: I am 63 and have been getting Social Security benefits since last year. I have just been offered a job as a courtesy shuttle driver for a local car dealership. I am really not sure yet how many hours I will work. But I am pretty sure I will make about $20,000 or more this year. How do I go about stopping my Social Security checks? A: Well, you could play by the rules, like Jack did in the example I cited above. But look where that got him! In other words, you could contact SSA and report your anticipated earnings. They will eventually stop your benefits. Then you could just cross your fingers that you keep your job, earn exactly as much money as you initially reported, and don’t get slapped with any overpayment letters. Or you could do what I’ve been advising people in your situation to do for years. And that is to do nothing. Just let your Social Security checks continue to flow into your bank account -- remembering all along that you aren’t due all of those benefits and will eventually have to pay some of them back. At some point down the road (it might be later this year, or it may even be early next year), SSA will learn that you have been working -- either because of earnings reports from your employer or through a computer data exchange with IRS. Once they learn you had been working and the precise amount of your earnings, they will send you an overpayment letter. But you will be expecting it and, assuming you didn’t lose all the proceeds of your Social Security checks in a wild gambling spree in Las Vegas, you will have the money sitting in your bank account ready to pay them back. (And by the way, they don’t charge interest.) There are two advantages to doing things this way. One: You can pocket what little interest you might have earned on those benefit payments before they were stopped. And two: You avoid all the back-and-forth hassle with SSA -- the calling and waiting on hold and starting and stopping of Social Security checks that Jack experienced. What I am suggesting you do isn’t exactly kosher, but it’s not illegal. You’d simply be bending the rules a bit. As long as SSA eventually gets its money back, they’ll be satisfied. And as a side note: Here is a message to any of my readers under age 66 who are getting Social Security checks and decide to return to work, thus forcing a suspension of those checks. Once you reach age 66, you will get credit for those months in which you did not receive a benefit -- in the form of an adjustment to your initial benefit reduction. Here is an example. Mike started his Social Security benefits at age 62. Those benefits came with a 25 percent reduction. In other words, his monthly checks were 75 percent of his

full retirement (age 66) rate. At age 63, Mike returned to work and his benefits were suspended. He kept working even beyond age 66. But at 66, his Social Security checks were reinstated, because at that point the earnings limit rules no longer applied to him. At about the same time, SSA recalculated his benefit rate to give him credit for the three years he didn’t get any Social Security checks. So, instead of a 25 percent re-

duction, they applied only about a 7 percent reduction -- for the first 12 months he received Social Security benefits before the suspension. Mike doesn’t have to request this readjustment procedure. It is done automatically after he turns 66. If you have a Social Security question, Tom Margenau has the answer. Contact him at thomas.margenau@comcast.net. COPYRIGHT 2017 CREATORS.COM

C R O S S W O R D P U Z Z L E

Answers on page D5


Heavenly Mountain Resort & Hard Rock Hotel Lake Tahoe: An Epic Combination C ontinued from page D3 Zalanta, which means “spiritual mountain”, embodies the Heavenly experience, at once luxurious and rustic,

Resorts so you can seamlessly keep track of your vertical feet, days skied, special accomplishments. Jet Blue from JFK to Reno/Tahoe It is easier than ever to get to Heavenly

The incomparable view skiing down California Trail on Heavenly Mountain (photo by Laini Miranda/Travel Features Syndicate)

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Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/16/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

The spectacular view of Lake Tahoe from Heavenly Mountain Resort (photo by Dave E. Leiberman/Travel Features Syndicate). majestic and cozy, the best of all worlds. EpicMix Time Expands to Lake Tahoe This season, Vail Resorts expanded its  EpicMix™ Time  to Heavenly Resort, Northstar and Kirkwood (also Lake Tahoe), as well as Park City Utah, which let’s you access  real-time lift line wait times so you can better navigate the mountain and make the most out of your ski and ride experience. EpicMix Time uses proprietary technology to calculate and display up-to-the-minute chairlift and gondola line wait times. This innovative  application of crowdsourcing technology debuted last year at the Vail Resorts’ four Colorado resorts, Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge and Keystone. EpicMix is an online and mobile application that allows you to digitally capture your ski and ride experience, and share it with friends and family. This is all possible through radio frequency (RF) technology loaded onto all hard card passes. State-of-the-art RF scanners are installed at all 10 Vail

from the New York area: JetBlue offers a nonstop direct flight from JFK into Reno-Tahoe Airport (RNO), which is 40 See page D6

Crossword Answers

Saturday Only 25% Off Entire Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Sunday Only 30% Off Entire Dinner Check

Cash Only • Alcohol not included • Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/16/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined 9/any other offer

Monday Only 30% Off Entire

Tuesday Only 30% Off Entire

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/16/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/16/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Wednesday Only 25% Off Entire

Thursday Only 25% Off Entire

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/16/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/16/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

190 Seventh St., Garden City 742-0574 • www.leosgardencity.com

D5 Friday, February 10, 2017

G O I N G P L A C E S N E A R & F A R


Friday, February 10, 2017

D6

G O I N G P L A C E S, N E A R & F A R ....

Heavenly Mountain Resort & Hard Rock Hotel Lake Tahoe: An Epic Combination C ontinued from page D5 minutes drive away (will be cut down to 20-30 minutes when the high-speed highway is completed); local companies offer shuttle service. The flight departs JFK at 7:30 pm, arriving RNO at 11:01 pm and returns RNO at 11:52 pm, arriving

JFK at 7:59 am; the flight is not daily so check jetblue.com for schedule. For more information, visit  www. skiheavenly.com, where links help you plan your trip and prearrange  Lodging,    Lift Tickets,  Lessons and Ski School,,  Child Care,  Equipment Rentals, and  Ground Transportation.(

http://www.skiheavenly.com/plan-yourtrip/plan-your-trip.aspx) For more information or to book trips at any of the Vail Resorts mountain destinations, visit snow.com. ____________________ © 2017 Travel Features Syndicate, a division of Workstyles, Inc. All rights

reserved. Visit  goingplacesfarandnear. com  and  travelwritersmagazine.com/ TravelFeaturesSyndicate/. Blogging at  goingplacesnearandfar.wordpress. com  and  moralcompasstravel.info. Send comments or questions to FamTravLtr@ aol.com. Tweet @TravelFeatures. ‘Like’ us at facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures

Former Mayor, Now Artist RJ Rosegarten Returns to Great Neck With ‘Lost & Found: the Art of Assemblage’ Exhibit BY KAREN RUBIN When RJ Rosegarten left Great Neck 17 years ago, where he had gone to school, raised a family, had a career in advertising and served as Mayor of the Village of Great Neck Plaza, he was finally free to pursue an ambition from childhood: to be an artist. He returns to the Gold Coast Arts Center in Great Neck Plaza – which as mayor he helped bring fruition with a show, “Lost & Found: the Art of Assemblage” which draws upon his strong sense of design and construction. The exhibition is on view through March 12. “Assemblage involves the thoughtful combination of elements to create something new and original,” states Jude Amsel, the curator who installed the massive exhibit of some 50 works. RJ Rosegarten (better known by Great Neckers as Bob) claims that the pieces are not intended to hammer home a theme or message or story, that he approaches the work from the point of view of design, color and form, meticulously choosing objects that together form the image he has conceptualized in his mind. At the end of it, he says, he comes

up with a title. “That’s often the most difficult part,” he says. His humor comes through with the titles (“it’s Great to be King”), but don’t read in a theme or moral – it’s for the beholder to find your own meaning. But if the piece is built around an aesthetic, the choice of objects – each with their own meaning – the title, in fact, broadcasts a mood, emotion or message even if was subconsciously in Rosegarten’s mind, or resounds in the viewer’s own head. It is human, after all, to see patterns which become themes, stories and messages. The design captures your attention, but then you keep going back to explore and discover and your head forms its own patterns and themes. These aren’t objects. These aren’t randomly selected. Each element is meticulously chosen – sometimes involving longtime searches. He describes his effort obtaining just the right red delicious apples (so realistic you think they are actual fruit), for his piece, “Legacy of the Red Apple,” (2016). He had two heads that he fused into one, like Siamese twins. Why apples? “In the Garden of Eden, the Tree of Knowledge had fruit.” He can tell you the provenance of

each object in the piece – where he obtained the silver head in “Sarah Silverstone Presents” and how it took a long time before he found just the sunglasses he wanted for the piece, how the drawer it is assembled in came from a factory (the writing is on the side). He sees Sarah as a person, referring to Sarah as “her”. Indeed, the two gauges and thermometer evoke her personhood, even symbolically. There is a story behind every piece – about how I got there, where the pieces came from – can tell you where every piece came from – glasses – looked for it a long time – looked for a long time where to put – fit on Sarah – gauge, knew where it would go – design them, lay them out, do not glue them, leave for a week, come back and keep looking at them, move around, put pieces in/out, then glue, last stage – once glue, sign name, over – can’t go back and say I wish I put a ball in there.

“Sarah Silverstone has a twin sister,” he says, explaining that he bought two of the metallic faces. “Sarah represented to me the absolute woman, a sexy woman; her sister is so sexy, every time I pass her, I talk to her, ‘Hope you have a nice day.’” He has the same personal connection with the “Wizard of Odd” and the “Thought Collector”. The personal connection is manifest in his work, Dorzi/Dorzi, built around a vinyl record, but not just any 1950s 45rpm. His friend made the label to suggest it was made by the Bobby Randall 3 band. You learn that Bobby Randall, he explains   was non-ethnic name Rosegarten was going to use when got out of college and was going into advertising. (He was discouraged from changing his name by his grandmother.) There are 3 hands – for the three band members, in a pose as if they are snapping their fingers to the beat.

Artist RJ Rosegarten with Jude Amsel, curator of ‘Lost & Found: the Art of RJ Rosegarten’s paintings and assemblages are on view at the Gold Coast Arts Assemblage’ at the Gold Coast Arts Center, Great Neck © 2017 Karen Rubin/ Center, Great Neck, Long Island through March 12 © 2017 Karen Rubin/ goingplacesfarandnear.com goingplacesfarandnear.com


&

Schools Education A Litmor Publications/Blank Slate Media Special Section

Friday, February 10, 2017


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The Litmor News Group Friday, February 10, 2017

STEM taking schools by storm An increased focus on STEM education is one of the most influential initiatives to reach schools in recent years. STEM is an acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. The world has become increasingly complex and competitive, and today’s youth need to be equipped with the knowledge and skills to evaluate ideas and turn them into productive applications. These are two of the key hallmarks of STEM. According to the National Science Foundation, STEM subjects include chemistry, computer and information technology science, engineering, geosciences, life sciences, mathematical sciences, physics and astronomy, social sciences (anthropology, economics, psychology and sociology), and STEM education and learning research. Recognizing that more and more students are gravitating toward STEM-focused fields and that projected STEM job rates are rising steadily, schools have begun to beef up their offerings with regard to STEM subjects. Jobs in mathematics, computer system analysis, systems software, and biomedical engineering are just some of the careers in which anywhere from a 15 to 62 percent increase between 2010

and 2020 is predicted, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Individuals may believe that STEM study begins in high school, but the success of older students in STEM subjects is often shaped much earlier on. That’s why parents and educators can do much to cultivate an interest in natural and social sciences as well as in math as early as possible. Here are a few ideas to do just that. • Encourage participation in the community. Various national clubs and science-based organizations have begun to pay more attention to STEM and offer activities that foster a greater love of science, engineering and math. By joining such clubs and organizations, students can learn more about these subjects and reinforce their enjoyment. • Set up an internship or meet-andgreet. Take students to STEM-centered places of employment so they can get a firsthand experience from within the STEM trenches. Provide opportunities for students to chat with people in the field and ask questions about the type of schooling necessary to pursue a particular degree, and if any hobbies and other activities promote STEM learning.

• Investigate school-based opportunities. Schools are broadening course offerings and also establishing STEMbased clubs. Students have the opportunity to get involved with other like-minded classmates. If a club isn’t already available, a teacher or a parent

can consider volunteering to serve as the head of the club. STEM is a hot topic of discussion in the world of education. Students can expect to get plenty of exposure to science- and math-related topics both inside and out of the classroom.

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Music is everywhere: on the radio, in movies and television shows and as a backdrop when shopping or celebrating milestones. Music is an integral part of cultures all over the world. Music can express emotions not easily conveyed otherwise. It also provides a sense of community and belonging and can help unite the divided. Playing musical instruments or singing has a number of benefits. From the earliest days after their birth, children can be calmed by music. Music helps people work out their feelings and can be uplifting and comforting when people need a boost. While many people are familiar with the mood-enhancing benefits of music, they may not know that music also has developmental benefits. According to Don Campbell, internationally known educator and author of “The Mozart Effect for Children,” music enhances intelligence, coordination, emotional expression, creativity, and socialization skills. Studies have suggested that music and movement affect all areas of development. Music can bolster listening skills, improve motor skills, assist with problem solving, and promote spatial-temporal rea-

soning. Many others say that music can calm and focus the mind, which is why it so often employed by therapists. In the book, “The Importance of Music,” author Ellen Judson cites a 10-year study that tracked more than 25,000 middle and high school students. The study showed that students in music classes receive higher scores on standardized tests than students with little to no musical involvement. In addition, singing and engaging in musical appreciation sharpens one’s ability to communicate. Learning a piece of information attached to a tune will more readily embed that information in the brain. For example, many children learn the alphabet via song. Pairing lessons with song can help anyone retain information more easily. Music also is fun, so much so that kids may not realize they’re actually learning while singing. Matthew Freeman, development manager of “Sing up,” a national singing project to help enhance music in children’s education, states that children don’t think of singing as work and may be more willing to participate. Song can be used to reinforce all different subjects, from language arts to mathematics. Children or adults who are appre-

hensive about meeting new people can use music as a means to open the door to new friendships. Joining a choral group will immediately introduce people to others who enjoy music as well. Group singing is less intimidat-

Join Us For An Open House Sunday, March 19th, Sunday, April 30th, Noon to 3:00 pm

LuHiSummerCamps.org 516-626-1100

Friday, February 10, 2017 The Litmor News Group

How music and singing benefits children

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ing than singing alone, so it takes some of the pressure off of a person and can staunch performance anxiety. Music is beneficial throughout one’s life and can be an enjoyable way to make learning more fun.


The Litmor News Group Friday, February 10, 2017

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This Summer, Explore Career Paths and Experience College Life Through the NYUSPS High School Academy Career Edge Program students from across the country and around the globe, Career Edge offers a diverse perspective and helps high school students to cultivate relationships and explore ideas that open their minds to new ways of thinking.

High school students from the tristate area, across the country, and around the globe can strengthen their college portfolio, explore career paths, and experience college life on a university campus through the NYU School of Professional Studies (NYUSPS) High School Academy Career Edge Program. One-week, professionally oriented intensive courses taught by industry experts allow students to “try on” various careers as they gain the competitive edge when applying for college. Four sessions are offered during July and early August. Students can sign up for one or multiple weeks and enjoy a truly stimulating classroom experience that allows them to delve into areas they may be considering as a profession. Guest lecturers and field trips enhance the curricula and provide a behind-the-scenes look at a diverse range of fields including digital filmmaking, finance, fashion design, marketing, photography, real estate development, and special events, among others.

Photo credit: ©NYUSPS/Mark McQueen

“It was a great experience learning from the best in the industry.” —Dylan Guo, student Jericho, NY

the emerging fields that are rooted in New York City. Students are Since its inception three summers immersed in subject matter that ago, NYUSPS High School Academy is cutting edge and that provides Career Edge has grown to encompass them with a glimpse of the working programs that represent many of world. Because the program attracts

Students who have previously participated in Career Edge courses have provided rave reviews! “I learned more in this one-week program than I learned in an entire semester in high school,” asserted Hadil Dayri from Cairo, Egypt. For Jericho, NY high school student Dylan Guo, being taught by professionals was the highlight of the program. “It was a great experience learning from the best in the industry.” This summer, new offerings include “Applied Arts for Social Justice;” “Becoming A Sports Writer;” “Computer Information Systems: Cyberdefense;” “Criminal Justice: From Crime Scene to the Courtroom…and Beyond;” “Exploring Visual and Graphic Design;” “Introduction to Computer Science Using Java;” “Introduction to Mandarin Chinese in NYC;” “Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship;” “Journalism: The Who, What, Where, Why, and How of Writing Feature Stories;” “Music Video Production;” “The New Golden Age of Television: From The Sopranos to Game of

“I learned more in this one-week program than I learned in an entire semester.” —Hadil Dayri, student Cairo, Egypt

Thrones and Scandal;” “Restaurant Entrepreneurship: Examining the Business of Restaurants;” “Sabermetrics: The New Statistical Genetic Code of Baseball;” “Seeking Cybersecurity: Exploring Crime, Terrorism, Espionage, and the Use of Weapons in Cyberspace;” “Sports Branding and Sponsorship;” and “Web Design: From Concept to Completion.” The NYUSPS High School Academy Career Edge Program affords high school students the opportunity to experience university life by staying in an NYU dorm (optional). They can enjoy the use of NYU facilities, while they take in all that NYC has to offer. The deadline to apply is June 1, 2017 for residential students and July 1, 2017 for commuter students. Space is limited.

For a list of all courses running this summer and to apply, visit sps.nyu.edu/hsacademycareeredge04 For questions, email sps.hsacademy@nyu.edu or call 212-998-7006 Photo credit: ©NYUSPS


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That Can Change

HIGH SCHOOL ACADEMY CAREER EDGE PROGRAM

Your Child’s

This summer, the NYU School of Professional Studies will offer high school students the opportunity to live and learn in the heart of New York City, the cultural and financial capital of the world. One-week, professionally oriented intensive programs of study allow them to explore career options and to gain the competitive edge when applying for college. They will experience university life by staying in an NYU dorm (optional), while enjoying all that NYC has to offer during the summer.

2017 STUDY OPTIONS

ENROLL THEM IN ONE OR MULTIPLE SESSIONS SESSION DATES Session Session Session Session

1: July 10–14 2: July 17–21 3: July 24–28 4: July 31–August 4

Students must attend mandatory Sunday orientation.

APPLICATION DEADLINES Domestic Residential Students: June 1 Domestic Commuter Students: July 1

FOR PROGRAM DETAILS AND APPLICATIONS, VISIT: sps.nyu.edu/hsacademycareeredge04

FOR INFORMATION EMAIL: sps.hsacademy@nyu.edu OR CALL: 212-998-7006 New York University is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. ©2017 NYU School of Continuing and Professional Studies.

Session 1: July 10–July 14

Session 3: July 24–July 28

Applied Arts for Social Justice (NEW) Art History: New York’s Masterpieces Destination Marketing: A Spotlight on New York City–Tourism Capital of the World Digital Journalism: Spreading the News Through New Media Finance NYC: An Insider’s View Integrated Marketing: Innovation and Strategy Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship (NEW) Photographing NYC: Through the Mind’s Eye and the Camera Lens Real Estate NYC: From Design to Development Screenwriting–Visual Storytelling: From Short to Feature-Length Films Sports Branding and Sponsorship (NEW) Video Game Design: From Concept to Completion

Creative Writing: Finding Your Muse in the Metropolis Digital Filmmaking: Telling the Story through Technology Fashion Design in New York City Finance NYC: An Insider’s View Hit Songwriting: Creating, Recording, and Marketing Your Music Interior Design Studio: From Concepts to Color Theory and Beyond Journalism: The Who, What, Where, Why, and How of Writing Feature Stories (NEW) Pre-Law Bootcamp Sabermetrics: The New Statistical Genetic Code of Baseball (NEW) Web Design: From Concept to Completion (NEW)

Session 2: July 17–July 21

Becoming A Sports Writer (NEW) Climate Change, Sustainable Development, and Universal Rights Exploring the Wonderful World of Special Events in New York City Introduction to Computer Science Using Java (NEW) Introduction to Mandarin Chinese in NYC (NEW) Investment Banking Fundamentals The Music, Literature, and Art of New York City: The Jazz Age to the 1980s Music Video Production (NEW) The New Golden Age of Television: From The Sopranos to Game of Thrones and Scandal (NEW) Seeking Cybersecurity: Exploring Crime, Terrorism, Espionage, and the Use of Weapons in Cyberspace (NEW)

Computer Information Systems: Cyberdefense (NEW) Creating and Writing a Television Series Creative Writing: Finding Your Muse in the Metropolis Criminal Justice: From the Crime Scene to the Courtroom...and Beyond (NEW) Debates in Global Affairs: The Ethics of Justice Digital Filmmaking: Telling the Story Through Technology Discovering New York City Architecture: A Foundation in Design, Theory, and Practice Exploring Visual and Graphic Design (NEW) Finance NYC: An Insider’s View From Writer to Reader: The Art of Editing Books Integrated Marketing: Innovation and Strategy Restaurant Entrepreneurship: Examining the Business of Restaurants (NEW)

Session 4: July 31–August 4

NYUSPS Office of Strategic Marketing and Communications Job Number: a1616-0638

Pub/Issue Date: BlankStateMedia - 02/10/17

Friday, February 10, 2017 The Litmor News Group

One Summer Week


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TheThe Litmor News Group Friday, February 10, 2017

How to earn a college scholarship The cost of a college education continues to rise. The College Board says the average cost of tuition and fees for the 2015-2016 school year was $32,405 at private colleges, $9,410 for state residents at public colleges, and $23,893 for out-of-state residents attending public universities. In 2013 and 2014, the average cost of a year’s tuition at a Canadian university was $5,772. The high cost of education compels many students to find ways to finance their education. For many, that means exploring available scholarships. Scholarships come in different forms and are usually offered to students as a gift to be put toward college or university costs. Some schools offer scholarships, while other scholarships are sponsored by outside organizations. Students who meet certain requirements may be eligible for scholarships. While academic or athletic skills are the first criteria associated with scholarships, they are not the only avenues by which students can pursue scholarships. Scholarships may be offered to students of certain ethnic groups; children of employees at particular companies; or to students who live in particular states. Local branches of organizations like the Rotary Club or Kiwanis also may give out scholarships. To improve one’s odds of getting a scholarship, consider the following tips. • Get involved with the community. Many scholarship sponsors seek individuals who are committed to volunteerism. Plus, volunteering for

various groups puts students in the path of information about scholarships from these organizations. • Use scholarship search engines. Those who search for scholarship sponsors should find plenty of results if they peruse scholarship search engines such as Scholarships.com, CollegeBoard. com and FastWeb.com. • Check the local newspaper. The coupon section of the Sunday newspaper may feature scholarships, as might the classified section. This is a great resource for finding locally based scholarships. • Use networking contacts. Students should ask anyone they know if they are aware of any scholarship opportunities. Students who develop a rapport with guidance counselors or the financial aid department at their prospective colleges or universities may learn about scholarship opportunities that are not highly publicized. These people may have the inside track on scholarship information. • Apply for all available scholarships. Now is not the time for students to become lazy. Students should apply for as any scholarships for which they meet the eligibility requirements. Scholarships can help students offset the rising costs of a college education. Those who are willing to put in the research, time and effort to apply may find a wealth of scholarship opportunities at their disposal.

305 North Service Road. Dix Hills, NY 11746

PERFORMING SINCE 1972 Audio Recording • Business • Childhood Education • Film/Video • Jazz/Commercial Music Liberal Arts • Mass Communication • Music Education • Theatre Arts • Graduate Degrees

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Scholarships are available for those who are willing to put in the time to research their options.

Five Towns College For over 40 years, Five Towns College has served as a niche-type, regionally accredited college offering professional performing arts degrees. The college offers associate, bachelor and master’s degrees; also, a doctor of musical arts degree is an esteemed accomplishment here. Last year, the Five Towns College Board of Trustees reduced full-time undergraduate tuition to $9,490 per semester or $18,980 per year. Serious about making a private college attainable for students from middle class families, Five Towns College is now the most affordable private residential college in Suffolk County, Long Island. Students who are passionate about jazz/commercial music, film/video, and business management with concentrations in audio recording technology and music business, music education, theatre arts, and mass communications with concentrations in broadcasting and journalism, immerse themselves in college life here. The College’s faculty is superbly credentialed, have outstanding accomplishments in the entertainment industry, and bring their unique expertise into the classrooms.

Students experience the pedagogy of critically acclaimed musicians, published writers, talented educators and professionals in many related fields. Most students who attend Five Towns College enjoy the small and beautiful campus. Transfer students, who may have gotten lost in the crowd at a big university, finally get to connect and enjoy the personal relationships formed here. There are four relatively new residence halls that house 200 students in double rooms with a private bathroom. There are ongoing opportunities to participate musically, cinematographically and dramatically. Also, Five Towns College students learn about practical applications to the business world. The Career Services Department helps students network and connect with internships and jobs, develop interview skills, format resumes and serves as a wonderful resource throughout their college years and as alumni. Please visit www.ftc.edu and/or call the Admissions Office at (631) 656-2110 for more information. We can’t wait to help you perform in the world of higher education!


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There are seven affiliated offices across Long Island, with the Lake Success office being conveniently located next to LIJ on Lakeville Road. All offices offer flexible hours and scheduling including evenings as well as Saturdays. It is also one of the only private practices that participates with most major health insurance companies. Janine Stiene, former Speech Pathologist of the Hauppauge School District, has had her rapidly growing business for ten years. Her well equipped staff of LIcensed speech Pathologists and Myofunctional Therapists come from diverse educational backgrounds and top schools such as Long Island University, St. John’s University, Hofstra University, Adelphi University, and more. Open: Monday through Saturday, Daytime and Evenings. Please call for appointment availability. PARTICIPATING WITH MOST MAJOR HEALTH INSURANCES.

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IN KNOWLEDGE THERE IS OPPORTUNITY

Court reporters create word-for-word transcriptions at trials, depositions, administrative hearings, and other legal proceedings. Some court reporters provide captioning for television and real-time translation for deaf or hard-of-hearing people at public events, at business meetings, and in classrooms. Communication Access Real-Time Translation providers or CART providers, are court reporters who work primarily with deaf or hard-of-hearing people in a variety of settings turning speech into text so that the deaf or hard of hearing can interact with the world around them. For example, CART providers who use a stenography machine may caption high school and college classes and provide an immediate transcript to students who are hard-of-hearing or learning English as a second language. Computer-aided transcription, or “CAT,” is technology that utilizes highly specialized software to interpret the strokes made by a court reporter on a stenography machine. As the court reporter presses applicable keyboard combinations, the software immediately translates the machine shorthand into English. Realtime writing refers to computer-aided transcription which is performed by court reporters and can be instantly read on a monitor. Growth of the elderly population also will increase the demand for court reporters who are Communication Access Real-Time Translation (CART) providers or who can accompany their clients to doctor’s appointments, town hall meetings, and religious services. In addition, theaters and sports stadiums will provide closed captioning for deaf or hard-of-hearing customers. If you would like to gain the knowledge and skills required of a Court Reporter contact Long Island Business Institute (www.libi.edu) (631-499-7100).

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Friday, February 10, 2017 The Litmor News Groupoup

ADVERTORIAL

Janine Stiene, Speech-Language Pathologist, is owner and operator of the Suffolk Center for Speech And Myofunctional Therapy and Long Island Speech. Along with her exceptional group of therapists, she supports families and children across Long Island and Queens, specializing in: PROMPT, Myofunctional Therapy, Voice Disorders, Fluency, Augmentative Communications, Articulation, Auditory Processing Disorders and Expressive/Receptive Language Disorders (adults and children). Also offered is Feeding Therapy for individuals who suffer from texture and consistency aversions.


The Litmor News Group Friday, February 10, 2017

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Decoding dysgraphia, a lesser-known learning disability

Many people are familiar with or have at least heard of dyslexia, a condition that can affect a person’s ability to read and comprehend the written word. Few may be as knowledgeable about dysgraphia, another learning disability that can affect language skills. Dysgraphia is a deficiency in the ability to write. While dysgraphia is mostly associated with impaired handwriting, it also can involve an inability to store and process written words and then elicit the proper finger sequences and muscle movement to actually write words down on paper. The word “dysgraphia” comes from the Greek words “dys,” meaning “impaired,” and “graphia,” meaning “writing by hand.” The Learning Disabilities Association of America says a person with dysgraphia may have problems with inconsistent spacing, poor spatial planning on paper, poor spelling, and difficulty writing, as well as thinking and writing at the same time. Experts aren’t sure what causes dysgraphia. There might be a delay in the retrieval of information from short- or long-term memory and organizational

abilities before beginning to write. A genetic component also may come into play. This specific learning disorder may appear separately or occur in conjunction with dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Whether or not dysgraphia is accompanied by other learning disabilities may determine the types of presentation. • Dyslexic: Those with dyslexic dysgraphia produce illegible, spontaneously written work. They may be able to copy work well, but not write legibly on their own. • Motor: A person with motor dysgraphia has poor fine motor skills, poor dexterity and poor muscle tone. Letter formation may be fine in short writing samples, but that formation deteriorates when asked to write lengthier assignments. Motor dysgraphia can cause arthritis-like tensing of the hand. This type of dysgraphia typically stems from problems with fine motor skills. • Spatial: An individual with spatial dysgraphia cannot understand space well. Written work may be improperly spaced and illegible. Drawing abilities

also may be compromised. Certain indications of dysgraphia may become evident when a child begins to learn how to read and write. This is when the condition may first be noticed, but it could be mistaken for another issue unless educators and doctors are knowledgeable about dysgraphia. Some signs to look out for include: • illegible printing and cursive writing; • unfinished words or letters; • omitted words in writing assignments; • inconsistent spacing between words and letters; • inconsistencies in writing style, including mixtures of print and cursive letters, upper and lower case words, and irregular shapes or slants of letters; • difficulty visualizing letter formation prior to writing; and • strange wrist, body or paper positions Parents, therapists and educators must work together to accommodate the needs of a student with dysgraphia. Reducing copying aspects of work, allowing recorders or note takers and having

Resources for special-needs families The term “special needs” is a broad classification of individuals who may be diagnosed with physical, mental or developmental deficits in various areas. Not at all incapable, special needs children and adults simply may need some modifications, whether in school, at work or at home, to help them be successful through their daily lives. Millions of people across the globe may have a condition that qualifies them for some assistance. Statistics vary depending on the learning disability or health condition. People dealing with anything from attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder to autism to hearing impairments to mobility issues should know there are resources available to them. Families might be overwhelmed when a child is diagnosed with a disability. Changes may need to be implemented over time, or there may be immediate concerns that must be addressed right away. Navigating the waters of assistance can be emotionally and financially taxing, and many parents do not know where to begin. Information regarding special needs assistance and support is more readily available and accessible than it was in the past thanks to the global climate of online communities. Today, information and connections to others in similar situations is available at a keystroke. There also are many other resources available. • Speak with your doctor. A diagnosing doctor is a reliable resource for special needs families. He or she can point a family in the right direction and will likely have literature in his or her office. The doctor also can refer

families to organizations or groups that specialize in certain conditions or disabilities. • Learn more at school. Teachers or education specialists are often the first people to recognize signs of a learning disability. Many school districts have plans in place and assessment teams that can work with families to develop individualized education programs (IEPs). An IEP is a written statement of the education program designed to meet a child’s individual needs. The school also may be able to refer families to various therapists or additional educational programs that can assist with learning. • Conduct an online search. Simply searching for a condition or an issue online can bring up a host of available resources and information. In turn, there may be groups that you can contact. Knowing you are not alone can be the extra push you need to wade through the abundant and sometimes confusing literature. • Investigate financial support. It’s not always necessary to pay out of pocket for services or supplies related to special needs. Some resource centers may know of affordable financial professionals who can guide you through setting up budgets and learning about the resources available to you. Families may even qualify for financial aid. Organizations may have grants available, or the government may subsidize certain programs. Speak with a financial consultant to learn more. Special needs families can get organized and in touch with the right resources to put a plan in place to secure the future of their families.

students take oral exams can help. An increase in the use of tablets and laptops in the classroom also may assist those with dysgraphia, as such assignments have reduced reliance on written work.

How art benefits young brains

Art enriches lives and can be used to connect people from all walks of life. Among the many additional benefits of art is its effects on young people and the development of their brains. The American Association of School Administrators notes that neuroscience research has shown that the effects of the arts on a young brain’s cognitive, social and emotional development can be profound. • Art helps to wire the brain. The AASA notes that especially young children spend much of their time playing, and that play often includes forms of art such as singing, drawing and dancing. These artistic activities engage various senses and help to wire the brain so it can learn. As children age, these seemingly basic activities remain essential for young brains. • Art helps children develop their motor skills. Dancing and other movements that might be prompted by exposure to art help children develop motor skills. Motor skills are necessary for kids to perform important and necessary daily tasks while also promoting independence. • Art helps kids learn to think. The AASA notes that art can be a valuable tool in instilling essential thinking tools in children, including the ability to recognize and develop patterns, the ability to form mental representations of what is observed or imagined, and the ability to observe the world around them. • Art can improve memory and focus. The AASA cites studies that listening to music can stimulate parts of the brain responsible for memory recall and visual imagery. In addition, background music played in a classroom has been shown to help students remain focused while completing certain learning tasks. • Art can positively affect how students approach other courses. Studies have shown that incorporating arts into core curriculums can have a number of positive effects on students’ overall academic performance and benefit students socially. Studies indicate that students involved in such integrative programs are more emotionally invested in their classes and work more diligently than those not studying in such conditions. In addition, students may learn more from one another when the arts are integrated into core curriculums than when they are not. Art is often mistakenly seen as a strictly fun component of children’s education. But the effects of art on young brains is considerable, helping young people develop in ways that may surprise many men and women.


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His grandmother and grandfather appear again in small photographs that are embedded into a series of four “Junk Drawer” works. Junk Drawers may look like a hodgepodge, but are not random, he says. “I visualize what junk drawers have,” he says. “Everyone has junk drawers – in bedrooms, kitchens, desk drawer, basement.” He chooses the items that fill the drawers (which he builds) independently, and over time, lays them out and photographs them. “Then I take everything out and glue back the items one by one.” The Junk Drawer series each has a photograph of grandmother and grandfather at Rockaway Beach. One of the boxes has a plastic Howdy Doody figure, while another has the Princess character from the show. He says he goes for colors, shapes and looks for holes. “It’s not nostalgia,” he insists. But as he knows the provenance of every piece – some have personal connection, like the photos of his grandparents and a John Lennon/Imagine photo. “Every time you look, you see something else.” Or actually, you “find” something new. But looking at the items, it is hard not to become nostalgic as you find items that spark memories of your own past. The Junk Drawer series and

his Americana series are like miniSmithsonians of American cultural icons of the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s and so forth. Rosegarten says he loves making the Junk Drawers and would customize for someone on commission. “I would go to your house and if you didn’t have the elements I wanted, I would ask if I could use some of mine.” The pieces he chooses are specific – he combs particular shops (he has his favorites for manikins in the Garment District), antique stores, flea markets, garage and barn sales, which “are entertainment in the country and have become an essential part of my new work with found objects. One day I might find a rusted scythe with a broken wooden handle; the next day a box of glass dolls’ eyes or a red View-Master. I put the material in labeled boxes and store them to be rediscovered. “When I select objects for a new composition, I may sit with them for days, moving them around like pieces on a chessboard until they take shape. Placement and balance are key. I remove pieces; add others, balancing shadows, shapes, textures and color until I know instinctively that the work is completed: the new composition has taken on another dimension, a unity of its own and gained strength and character.” Rosegarten, who grew up in Great

Neck (he graduated high school with movie director Francis Ford Coppola), now lives “in the country” in upstate New York, in a house he built 17 years ago where he has a 30 x 30 ft studio off his bedroom that opens to a deck and pond, and a 2500- sq ft basement work area. His collected objects are neatly organized in labeled tubs under tables – machine parts, metal parts, extra toys, manikin hands.“Everything has a place, a place for everything.” Often, he visualizes the entire piece in his head before he starts his assemblage. “I just finished a piece Thursday. It doesn’t have a name (or does it have a name): The Quick Brown Dog Jumps Over the Lazy Fox. Why? Because part of the visual – a box,with 2 white hands, at the top has the keyboard of a very very small typewriter –a  vertical piece, a piece at bottom, a nodule on top hands,. The sense of design is perfect. It was in my head.” “I never went to art school, except for a month at the Art Students League, Bruce Dorfman, teaching there since early 60s – he said, push the envelope. It’s ok if off-center, if you don’t have anything there and want it to sit there.” Indeed, it is so ironic considering that most people move to Great Neck from New York City because of the public schools, that his big regret is

that when his family was still living in the Bronx, he was accepted into Music & Art, but before he could attend, his family moved to Great Neck. “I should have gone to Music & Art. I would have had an art background and the chances are I would have gone to Pratt, School of Visual Arts, or Cooper Union.” He said his father was not keen on Rosegarten going into advertising, but had he had an art background, he would have been on the creative side, instead of a “suit.” “I would have been more Don Draper than the account guy.” He was doing painting until 1990s, then, around 2000, he went to an antique show on 6th Avenue and came upon wooden patterns which were used to make metal parts in the early 1900s. “I bought 20 of them –they were inexpensive – I didn’t know what I would do with them. I washed them off, That’s when I started.“ It fit into his overarching philosophy of reuse, repurpose, renewal – “an ability to use things that have been tossed away and have them come back and serve another purpose – Lost and Found (is what I call it). I’m not interested in what is sold in dollar store but things that have age, patina, character. Snapshot” is built around an antique folded camera and tractor parts. See page D12

Artist RJ Rosegarten with Gold Coast Arts Center Founder/ Executive Director Regina Gil and his piece, “Legacy of the Red “It’s Great to be King” by RJ Rosegarten © 2017 Dorzi/Dorzi by RJ Rosegarten © 2017 Karen Rubin/ Apple.” © 2017 Karen Rubin/ goingplacesfarandnear.com Karen Rubin/goingplacesfarandnear.com goingplacesfarandnear.com

Two in RJ Rosegarten’s “Americana” series © 2017 Karen Rubin/ goingplacesfarandnear.com

RJ Rosegarten with one of the Americana series on view in ‘Lost & Found: the Art of Assemblage’ at the Gold Coast Arts Center, Great Neck © 2017 Karen Rubin/ goingplacesfarandnear.com

Friday, February 10, 2017

G O I N G P L A C E S, N E A R & F A R ....


Classifieds Friday, February 10, 2017

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CLASSIFIEDS

...a sure way to get results. Call 294.8935

ONE CALL TO 516-294-8900 AND YOUR AD WILL APPEAR IN 11 LOCAL NEWSPAPERS. CALL TODAY FOR OUR VERY LOW RATES. FAX: 516-294-8924 www.gcnews.com Garden City News • Great Neck News • Mid Island Times Bethpage Newsgram • Syosset Advance Jericho News Journal • Williston Times - Mineola Edition New Hyde Park Herald Courier • Manhasset Times Roslyn Times • Port Washington Times DEADLINE FOR CLASSIFIED ADS IS TUESDAY AT 1:00PM. 3 EASY WAYS TO PLACE ADS: 1) Directly on website: gcnews.com & click on “Classified Order” 2) Email Nancy@gcnews.com 3) Fax 516-294-8924 Please include your name, daytime phone number, address and ad copy. Visa and MasterCard Accepted

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CHILD CARE P/T Seeking part time child care for my family in Garden City. Monday-Thursday 2:15​ — ​ 5 :30pm. Will need to have your own transportation and be able to provide references. Please contact Erin: 917-846-5323

EMPLOYEES AND SUBSTITUTES P/T TEACHER AIDE East Williston School District is seeking P/T School Security Aide (NYS Security Guard Lic required, Ret. LEO preferred) and P/T School Monitors beginning January 2017. Additionally seeking P/T Substitute Cleaners, P/T Substitute clerical and P/T Substitute Bus Drivers for an on call basis. Bus drivers must meet A-19 requirements plus CDL class B with P & S endorsement. Send resume and letter of interest to: EWSD Jacqueline Pirro, Assistant Superintendent for Business, 11 Bacon Road, Old Westbury, NY 11568 nor fax 516-333-1937

DISPLAY ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE: Blank Slate Media, a fast growing chain of 6 award winning weekly newspapers and website, is looking for an energetic, service oriented professional with good communication skills to sell display, web and email advertising. Earn up to $60,000 in the first year representing 6 Blank Slate Media publications and website as well as 5 publications and 1 website owned by Blank Slate Media’s partner, Litmor Publications. We are looking for an enthusiastic and service oriented sales professional with good communication skills. Requirements: minimum 2 years outside sales experience. Newspaper sales experience a plus. Must have your own car. Exclusive protected territory. Opportunity to sell both print and online programs. A collegial, supportive sales team. Award-winning editorial coverage. A separate newspaper for each community allowing advertisers to target their markets. And you to provide the most cost-effective way to advertise. Represent media that produce superior response for clients. Compensation: Salary plus commission, health. To apply please email resume and cover letter to sblank@theislandnow.com or call Steven Blank at 516-307-1045 ext 201

Our Service Directory is sure to bring results. Call 294-8935 for rates and information.

IT: COPILOT PROVIDER SUPPORT SERVICES, INC. in New Hyde Park, NY seeks Sr. Web Dvlpr to design, code & modify website layout, functions, apps & content, enhance existing sites, programs to ensure data processing productions sys continue to meet end user needs, dvlp appropriate code structures to test, maintain & implement pages, app & contingency plans, extend existing app through enhancement & upgrades to ensure sys’s continue to meet co. req’ts, assist & support in routine maint., upkeep & dvlpmt of websites, research & propose software programs compatible w/ co’s goal & future dvlpmt, assume ownership of code throughout dvlpmt, staging, testing, production & post-production, prep & coord, intranet web updates & website changes. Must have Master’s in Web Design or CS, plus 6 months exp in web design. Mail resume: Copilot Provider Support Services Inc., 1981 Marcus Ave. #C130. New Hyde Park, NY 11042 (ATTN: Vanessa Mariacher)

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

HELP WANTED

SITUATION WANTED

SITUATION WANTED

ATTN: MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS! Sanford Brown graduate available to do your medical billing coding. Please call 516-384-0852

FULL TIME LIVE IN HOUSEKEEPER​/​ELDER CARE Reliable & dedicated mature woman available for live in position 5 days a week for housekeeping, meal prep and also elder care. Non driver. 30+ yrs experience. Excellent references. Please call Phyllis 917-412-3418

LACROSSE COACHES Twenty Four Lacrosse, LI’s fastest growing youth lacrosse program has several coaching positions open. Earn as a team coach or by running a camp, clinic, personal training. Experience wanted at College & Professional level. Also seeking Dad coaches interested in building a team around a core group of their players. 24Lax offers registration​/​marketing​/​web support to build your program. Access to Nassau’s best grass​/​turf field facilities provided. Contact: info@24lax.com or 516-712-2424 OFFICE MANAGER: Full time, small Roslyn construction company. Must be experienced in Word, Excel, Data Entry. Requirements consist of light bookkeeping, appointment scheduling, general office duties. Good telephone skills a must. Email resume to: submitresumes3@gmail.com PARISH ADMINISTRATOR: Looking for a welcoming, detail-oriented, organized, computer savvy team player for weekday part time (18 hours) position. Please email Mother Christina van Liew at revxina@ gmail.com for copy of job description and compensation. TEACHER PRE-SCHOOL: Immediate hire! Well known program in Roslyn area seeks teacher with minimum 2 years pre-school experience. 8:30-1:30 or 8:00-5:00. Send resume growing00@aol.com

SITUATION WANTED AIDE​/​CARE GIVER: CARING, EFFICIENT, RELIABLE Available Mon-Fri live in to care for your sick or elderly loved one. Cooking, light housework, personal grooming, administer medications . 14 years experience. Just ended 7 years with previous patient. References available. Please Call 516-448-0502

BABYSITTING: COLLEGE STUDENT Experienced babysitter available to work Mondays, Tuesdays & Fridays. Extensive experience in the Garden City area. Solid references. Licensed driver with car. Call 516-404-1045 CAREGIVER: Seeking a patient, experienced care provider to care for your elderly loved one? If so, please contact me. I would be happy to assist. Call Marva 917-302-5482 CERTIFIED HHA, PCA seeks weekend position, live in or live out. 17 years experience with Parkinsons, Alzheimers, dementia, cancer patients. References available upon request. Call Doreen 516-302-7564 CLEANING LADY AVAILABLE Cleans, organizes your home, office or garage. English speaking, honest, reliable. Excellent references. Own transportatio n. Animal friendly. Free estimates. Call 516-225-8544 COMPANION​/​HOME HEALTH AIDE With 20 years experience in home care & nursing homes seeking position to care for the sick​/​elderly. Experience with Parkinsons, Alzheimers, Dementia, Stroke. Licensed driver able to transport to appointments, etc. References available. English speaking. Please call 347-546-4133 ELDER CARE COMPANION: Mature woman with car available for shopping, errands, activities, cooking meals, doctor appointments, home organization. Trustworthy, reliable, compassionate, flexible. Please call Neila Rosenberg 347-3876798

SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS AND NURSES GARDEN CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS IMMEDIATE OPENINGS Substitute teachers - all grades and subjects, must have NYS certification Substitute nurses - must have RN license Interested candidates please call the Personnel Office at (516)478-1020 to request an application

HOME CARE AVAILABLE: Seeking FT or PT private duty home care​ /​ personal care position for the sick​ /​ elderly. 10 years experience. References available. Call Beverly 516-3858545 or 516-838-9772 HOUSE​/​OFFICE CLEANING I clean houses and offices. I have affordable rates and great references. I do it all​—​move ins and move outs, all rooms and facets of home and office cleaning. No job too big or small. Contact Milagros 516-450-6452 NANNY​/ BABYSITTER Experienced Babysitter available FT​ /​ PT. Trustworthy, responsible, active, creative and fun! Child development background. Excellent references. Licensed driver. Call Doris 516-330-0230 or email: dorischris910@gmail.com

CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE CAREERS Start here. Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866296-7093

ANNOUNCEMENTS

CONVENTIONAL & BANK RATE FINANCING, Fix’n Flips, Hard-Bridge Loans, No Documents-Stated Income Programs, $100K-$100 Million, Purchase-Refinance, SFH-1-4, Multi-family, Mixed Use, Commercial. 888-565-9477


MARKETPLACE

MARKETPLACE

EXERCISE EQUIPMENT FOR SALE Elliptical Sole e95 $1,100 Powertec adjustable Workout Bench w/ leg and bicep attachments, Olympic and bicep bar and assortment of weights $900 Speedbag setup $100 Call 516-659-0665 INVITED SALES BY TRACY JORDAN Consignment Shoppe and Auction House Open 7 Days a Week Consignments by Appointment Monthly Live & Online Auctions Tag Sale, Appraisals and Estate Sale Services Complete House Cleanouts Moving Services Home Staging Services 839 Stewart Avenue Garden City, NY 11530 516-279-6378 www.invitedsales.com OFFICE FURNITURE SALE Saturday, February 11th 9am to 12noon 1050 Franklin Ave, Suite 304 Garden City, NY 11530 Selling contents of 3,000 sq. ft. professional office. File Cabinets, secretarial stations, conference table and chairs, art work, etc. All in excellent to good condition. CASH ONLY PRIVACY HEDGES LIMITED SUPPLY. 3’ ARBORVITAE, Limited Supply! Regularly $49.95, now only $12.95! Also Apple, White Birch, Cherry, Blue Spruce, Forsythia: $7.99 each, FREE DELIVERY! 844-5923327 www.GrandIsleFarm.com

Our Service Directory is sure to bring results. Call 294-8935 for rates and information.

Call 294.8935

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MARKETPLACE

AUTOMOTIVE

WANTED TO BUY

TAG SALE

AUTO FOR SALE

LOOK! Old clocks and watches wanted by collector regardless of condition. Highest prices paid. 917-748-7225

INVITED SALES BY TRACY JORDAN Tuesday, February 14 10:00 am 145 Windsor Avenue Rockville Centre, NY 11570 Mid century furniture, vintage items, games, toys, posters, crafting buttons, tools, garage and basement PACKED!!...Visit www.invitedsales.com for pictures and details !

HONDA PILOT EX 2010: 4WD, 89,250 miles, good condition. $11,250. 516-263-0598

LOOKING TO BUY! Oriental items, clothing, art, old & modern furniture, estates, jewelry, silver, glassware, dishes, old photos, coins & stamps, flatware. Call George 718-3861104 or 917-775-3048 OLD TOOLS, toys, trains, coins, antiques, sterling, costume jewelry. Pleasant and courteous treatment. In business over 54 years. Immediate payment. Immediate removal. 347-256-7981 TOP CASH PAID: JEWELRY, Furniture, Art, etc. Please call 718-598-3045 or 516-270-2128. www.iBuyAntiquesNYC.com

TAG SALE *BROWSE *SHOP *CONSIGN A.T. STEWART EXCHANGE CONSIGNMENT SHOP China, Silver, Crystal, Jewelry, Artwork, Furniture, Antiques, Collectibles Tues-Fri 10-4 Sat 12-4 Every Tuesday: 10% Senior Citizen Discount. All proceeds benefit The Garden City Historical Society 109 Eleventh Street Garden City 11530 516-746-8900 email: store@atstewartexchange.org www.gardencityhistoricalsociety. org GARDEN CITY MOVING Friday, 2/10 1:30pm to 5pm Saturday, 2/11 9:00am to 2pm 146 Kensington Road Contents of home including Art Deco antique Dining Room, Baby Grand Piano, Martha Stewart bed, home office items and power tools.

AUTOS WANTED DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefitting Make-a-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 631-317-2014 Today!

PETS PET SERVICES A GARDEN CITY ANIMAL LOVER doesn’t want to leave your precious pooch or fantastic feline alone all day. I’m reliable, dependable and will walk and feed your pet while you work or travel. Please call Cheryl at 516-505-9717 DO YOU HATE KENNELS? OR STRANGERS IN YOUR HOUSE? HOME AWAY FROM HOME will care for your dog in my Garden City home while you are away. Dog walking also available. Pet CPR & first Aid Certified. Numerous referrals and references. Limited availability. Book early! Annmarie 516-775-4256 MYA’S K9 CAMP Full Service Pet Care Professional Dog Training Grooming Boarding Walking GC Resident 516-382-5553

LATE 19th CENTURY GAS CHANDELIER

refurbished and electrified by Conant Custom Brass of Burlington, Vermont. 45 inches high by 25 inches wide, perfect for large entry ways or high ceiling dining rooms. Original price was $17,000 $5,000 asking price or best offer. (516) 314-4480

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT APARTMENT FOR RENT

Friday, February 10, 2017 Classifieds

CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT BY OWNER: FLORAL PARK VILLAGE 2nd floor apartment- completely renovated 2 BRM /1 Bath. includes EIK with SS appliances, granite counter and D/W. Large MBRM with W/I closet. Hardwood floors thru-out + Laundry room with W/D and 1 car garage, near shops and LIRR. Asking $2150 +utilities. For more information: Call Rose @ 516 655-7501 GARDEN CITY BORDER APARTMENT: Spacious, bright 1 bedroom with dining area + outdoor balcony, gated parking, laundry, A/C, hardwood floors. NO BROKER FEE, near LIRR. $1,500 + electric. ALSO Studio, $1,275.00. Available approximately March 1. www.gcbapts. com or 516-742-1101

GET RESULTS! Place an ad in our Classifieds for reasonable rates and prompt results. Call the G.C. office at 294-8935 for more information.


Classifieds Friday, February 10, 2017

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CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

APARTMENT FOR RENT

HOMES FOR SALE

GARDEN CITY New EIK & tiled Bath, One Bedroom, LR​/​DR combo, wood floors, elevator, doorman. $2,400 Sunny​—​Quiet 3 rooms; 1 Bedroom, EIK, LR​/​DR combo, parking included. Occupancy open. $2,300 Garden City Properties 516-746-1563 / 516-313-8504

OFFICE SPACE GARDEN CITY Single Window Corner Office Overlooking Franklin Avenue, approximately 16’5” x 14’. Perfect for Psychologist, Therapist, CPA, Attorney or other professional. ELEVATOR, shared waiting area, kitchen, WiFi, Unlimited use Conference Room. $1500​/​month Tom 516-877-7410 ext 101

VACATION RENTAL SOUTH JAMESPORT SUMMER RENTAL Newly renovated, on Peconic Bay, sandy beach. 3 BR, 2 Bath, all amenities, sleeps 6. Single family, no pets, no smokers. $14,000​/​month + security. Call 516-456-8808

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE GARDEN CITY FOR SALE BY OWNER Quiet block. Northeast Section. 3 BR, everything renovated. SD#18. Call for pricing and appointments. NO BROKERS. 516456-3135

Our Service Directory is sure to bring results. Call 294-8935 for rates and information.

GARDEN CITY STUNNING TUDOR CENTER HALL COLONIAL 107 Chestnut Street 6 Bedrooms/5 Baths. Family Room w/French Doors to Patio, Landscaped Backyard. Sunroom, Stainless​/​Granite Eat in Kitchen, Large DR, LR w/ Fireplace, Master Bedroom w/ Bath. 4 BR on Second Floor. Third Floor: 2 BR​ /​ Full Bath. Finished Basement w/Storage. Hardwood Floors​ / ​ M oulding Throughout. Fully Alarmed, Sprinkler, Detached Garage. Garden City Schools. A Must See!!! $1,375,000. Call 516-526-7193

LOTS FOR SALE LENDER ORDERED SALE! 39 acres $89,900. Assessed for $96,000! Pay CASH and pay just $84,900! Catskill Mtn setting w/ view, woods, spring, stonewalls! Stunning land! Financing available! 888-479-3394 newyorklandandlakes.com

OUT OF TOWN REAL ESTATE JUST REPOSSESSED! 21 acres​—​$39,900. Orig sold for $49,900! Fields, woods, exceptional views! Just off the Thruway! 30 mins to Albany! Terms avail. Call 888-905-8847 SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA (EAST COAST) Beach Cove is an Age Restricted Community where friends are easily made. Sebastian is an “Old Florida” fishing village with a quaint atmosphere yet excellent medical facilities, shopping and restaurants. Direct flights from Newark to Vero Beach. New manufactured homes from 89,900. 772581-0080; www.beach-cove.com

SERVICES

NEW YORK MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPISTS: Joan Atwood, Ph.D. An experienced therapist makes all the difference. Individual, couple, family therapy and anger management. 516-764-2526. jatwood@optonline.net www.NYMFT.com

GET RESULTS! Place an ad in our Classifieds for reasonable rates and prompt results. Call the G.C. office at 294-8935 for more information.

Call 294.8935 SERVICES

SERVICES

SERVICES

TAX & ACCOUNTING: Winnie Malone, CPA, MBA. Smart Allied Accounting & Tax Services. Individual & Business Taxes. Tax Problems Resolved, Financial Statements. Year-Round Accounting. Bookkeeping & Payroll. 516-626-0711. www.smartallied.com. winnie@smartallied. com

TUTORING

INSTRUCTION

CHEMISTRY TUTOR: Call Jonathan, Ivy League Ph.D. AP, SAT II, Regents. I also tutor Biology, Physics, Earth & Environmental Science. itutorchem@gmail.com or 516669-0587

PIANO, TRUMPET & TUBA LESSONS given by very patient teacher, very reasonable rates. Flexible hours. All ages welcome. References available. Call 516-746-8349

HOME IMPROVEMENTS AMBIANCE PROFESSIONAL SERVICES *Handyman & Remodeling *Kitchen Installations *Furniture Assembly *Finish Carpentry *Minor Electrical & Plumbing 23year GC Resident Lic & Ins H18E2170000 Call BOB 516-741-2154 LAMPS FIXED $65 In home service. Handy Howard. 646-996-7628

PAINTING & PAPERHANGING INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING Plastering, Taping, Sheetrock Skim Cutting, Old Wood Refinish Staining, Wallpaper Removal & Hanging, Paint Removal Power Washing, Wood Replacement JOHN MIGLIACCIO Licensed & Insured #80422100000 Call John anytime: 516-901-9398 (Cell) 516-483-3669 (Office) JV PAINT HANDYMAN SERVICES Interior-Exterior Specialist Painting, Wallpapering, Plastering, Spackling, Staining, Power Washing. Nassau Lic#H3814310000 fully Insured Call John 516-741-5378

PARTY HELP LADIES & GENTLEMEN RELAX & ENJOY Your Next Party! Catering and Experienced Professional Services for Assisting with Preparation, Serving and Clean Up Before, During and After Your Party Bartenders Available. Call Kate at 516-248-1545

ENGLISH TUTOR: Diane Gottlieb M.Ed., M.S.W. SAT​ /​ ACT, College Essays, AP, Regents, ELA Test Prep, Reading comprehension and writing proficiency. 917-599-8007 or email: dianegot@gmail.com LongIslandEnglishTutor.com Providing one-on-one professional support to build confidence, knowledge and skills in every student. MATH, SAT, ACT TUTOR: Algebra, Geometry, Algebra 2 plus Trig, Pre-Calc, AP Calculus. Norm 625-3314 ENGLISH, ACT, SAT TUTOR: 25+ year experience Critical Reading, Writing, Grammar, Essays. Lynne 625-3314 SPANISH TUTOR: Spanish Grammar-Literature, FLACS A -FLACS B, Exam Preparation​ /​ Comps. William Cullen, M.A., Spanish, S.D.A. Chaminade HS, Fairfield University Alumnus. 516-509-8174. wdctutor06@aol. com. References furnished upon request.

INSTRUCTION BASEBALL INSTRUCTION Top rated on Long Island New York State Certified Go to: coachup.com​/​coaches​/​johns-22 for reviews and info. PIANO LESSONS By Ira Baslow. Experience the joy of playing the piano. Private lessons in your home, free no-obligation piano lesson, all levels, all styles, all ages. Beginners a specialty. 516-312-1054 www.iwantmypianolessons.com

CLEANING MARIA’S CLEANING SERVICE Our excellent cleaning team will get your home or office spotless! Available Monday thru Friday 7am to 6pm Supplies provided if needed Own transportation Excellent references provided CALL 516-849-2026 STRONG ARM CLEANING: Residential and commercial cleaning specialist, post construction clean ups, shipping and waxing floors, move ins and move outs. Free estimates. Bonded and insured. 516-5381125 www.strongarmcleaningny.com

SERVICES A & J MOVING & STORAGE: Established 1971. Long Island and New York State specialists. Residential, Commercial, Piano & Organ experts. Boxes available. Free estimates. www. ajmoving.com 516-741-2657 114 Jericho Tpk, Mineola NYDOT# 10405 COLLEGE ARTS ADMISSIONS: College Counseling in the Visual and Performing Arts. Dance, Musical Theatre & Drama. Film, Instrumental & Vocal Music. Audio Recording & Production. Theatre Technology & Production. Visual & Graphic Arts. Resume, Essays, Repertoire Lists. Michele Zimmerman. 516-353-6255 CollegeArtsAdmissions@gmail.com www.CollegeArtsAdmissions. com

Our Service Directory is sure to bring results. Call 294-8935 for rates and information.

DONATE YOUR CAR

Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Suffolk County or Metro New York WheelsForWishes.org

*Free Vehicle/Boat Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *Fully Tax Deductible

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Call: (631) 317-2014

Metro New York

Call: (631) 317-2014

* Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or financial information, visit www.wheelsforwishes.org.


SERVICES

COMPLETE JUNK REMOVAL​/​DEMOLITION SERVICE: Strong Arm Contracting Inc. We haul anything and everything. Entire contents of home or office. We clean it up and take it away. Residential​/​Commercial. Bonded​/​Insured. Free estimates. 516-538-1125 OLD VILLAGE TREE SERVICE: Owner operated since 1989. 24 hour emergency service. Licensed​/​insured. Free estimates, member LI Arborist Assoc. Please call 516-466-9220

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SHOPPING FOR SUPPORT

Clipping pet item coupons for Last Hope is a great and easy way to give your support. Every coupon we receive helps to defray our costs, particularly for dog and cat food. They can either be dropped off at our adoption center at 3300 Beltagh Avenue in Wantagh, or mailed to Last Hope, PO Box 7025, Wantagh 11793. Please share our need with your friends and family. Thank you! Visit http://lasthopeanimalrescue.org to read about Last Hope’s programs and to see the fabulous array of fantastic felines eagerly awaiting adoption into their forever homes!

OVERWHELMED by inefficient use of living space? Drowning in an ocean of paperwork? We create order out of Chaos. Free Consultation. Neat Freaks Lisa Marx and Randi Yerman. 917-751-0395 www.neatfreaks1976.com Instagram:organizethisnthat PSYCHOTHERAPY: Efrat Fridman, LCSW. Individual, couple and family therapy. effiefrid@gmail.com 2 Pinetree Lane, Old Westbury, NY 11568. 516-224-7670 or 225 West 35th Street, NY 10001 718-887-4400

Our Service Directory is sure to bring results. Call 294-8935 for rates and information.

D11

Cat Lovers Needed Our Last Hope adoption venue at PetSmart on Route 110, Huntington Station currently has openings for volunteers who are able to cover morning and evening cleaning/feeding shifts as well as midday meet/greet ones. If you enjoy interacting with and helping cats, this is the perfect volunteer job for you! During the year, we have friendly adult cats and kittens that are in our adoption center, eagerly awaiting their forever homes. If you’re interested in helping our furry felines, please email Lauren at lasthopepetsmartvolunteers@gmail.com Our main adoption center is located at 3300 Beltagh Avenue, Wantagh. Please visit our web site – http://lasthopeanimalrescue.org to read more about our organization and to see photos and information about all of our fabulous felines who are waiting in our various venues for loving families of their own.

Friday, February 10, 2017 Classifieds

CLASSIFIEDS


Friday, February 10, 2017

D12

GOING PLACES, NEAR & FAR....

‘Lost & Found: the Art of Assemblage’ Exhibit C ontinued from page D12 “I take individual pieces that by themselves are utilitarian and they become a “body” – a personality. Each has its own personality.” The exhibit also includes Rosegarten’s paintings, which have the look and vibe of Pop. “Just as I have reinvented myself a number of times in the past 30 years, so too has my art undergone a metamorphosis. Over the last ten years, it has moved from post-Pop paintings to a more muscular sculptural medium, where form and design take precedence over color.” Regina Gil, Founder/Executive Director of the Arts Center, writes in her introduction to the catalog, “In this latest chapter of his creative life, RJ Rosegarten draws upon the rich fabric of his imagination, strong art and design skills, and solid knowledge of carpentry that lets him execute what he already sees in his mind fully formed. And the results are impressive. .. “It was only when he left the town again, retiring from public life that he began to fully realize his longtime dream of being an artist in his own right. And he is an artist in the fullest sense of the word. Not only are his technical skills the very best; but his thoughts, ideas and vision are on display, inviting the viewer to enter his carefully constructed world; challenging the viewer to understand his point of view, to embrace it or to disagree.  A lifetime of thinking and living, of humor and wit, of deep, serious emotion and also of playfulness; the full range of the human experience in a construction of wood and found objects. “As a longtime friend, I am delighted to see RJ ‘Bob’ Rosegarten come home to Great Neck. Without his friendship and assistance, mentoring another dreamer through the shoals of politics, fundraising, and community engagement, it is doubtful that this Gold Coast Arts Center could have found its home here. It seems fitting that we honor him with this exhibit that introduces the people he served as mayor to the man he is now --  the artist.” “RJ Rosegarten, Lost & Found: The Art of Assemblage” is on view through March 12 at The Gold Coast Arts Center, 113 Middle Neck Rd, Great Neck, NY, 516-829-2570 or www. GoldCoastArts.org. ____________________ © 2017 Travel Features Syndicate, a division of Workstyles, Inc. All rights reserved. Visit  goingplacesfarandnear. com  and  travelwritersmagazine.com/ TravelFeaturesSyndicate/. Blogging at  goingplacesnearandfar.wordpress. com  and  moralcompasstravel.info. Send comments or questions to  FamTravLtr@ aol.com. Tweet @TravelFeatures. ‘Like’ us at facebook.com/NewsPhotoFeatures


SERVICE DIRECTORY 

13 Friday,February 10, 2017

MOVING SERVICE

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TREE SERVICE

CLEANING RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL

Serving the community for over 40 yrs

BRIAN CLINTON

MOVERS

One Piece to a Household/ Household Rearranging FREE ESTIMATES

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Licensed & Insured Licensed #T-11154 175 Maple Ave. Westbury, NY 11590

CARPENTRY

MOVERS

SWEENEY CUSTOM CARPENTRY and PAINTING

Renovations Custom Closets Sheetrock Repairs Interior/Exterior

New Doors New Windows New Moldings Free Estimates

26

516-884-4016 Lic# H0454870000

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

HOME HEATING OIL

CONSTRUCTION

ACPM CONSTRUCTION CORP RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

ALL TYPES OF MASONRY Concrete • Bluestone • Pavers • Cultured Stones Blacktop • Patios • Stoops LICENSED & INSURED OFFICE 516-328-9089

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To schedule a FREE estimate, contact us today! • Complete Landscape Maintenance • Mulch Installation • Seasonal Floral Displays • Landscape Installation • Lawn, Tree & Shrub Fertilization • Plant Health Care Programs • Tree Pruning, Cabling & Bracing • Tree Removal & Stump Grinding • Storm Damage Clean-up • Tree & Landscape Consultations Licenced & Insured

(516) 481-8800

ContactUs@HarderServicesInc.com Visit our website for more information: www.HarderServicesInc.com

Members of TCIA, PLANET & OSHA Compliant


Friday, February 10, 2017

14

SERVICE DIRECTORY  PAINTING/POWER WASHING

SWEENEY PAINTING and CARPENTRY

Interior B. Moore Paints Dustless Vac System Renovations

Exterior Power Washing Rotted Wood Fixed Staining

516-884-4016 Lic# H0454870000

DEMO/JUNK REMOVAL

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PAINTING & WALLPAPER est. 1978

Interior and Exterior • Plaster/Spackle Light Carpentry • Decorative Moldings Power Washing www.MpaintingCo.com 516-385-3132 New Hyde Park

516-328-7499 Licensed & Insured

ROOFING

“PAULIE THE ROOFER” - Stopping Leaks My Specialty -

• Slate & Tile Specialists • All Types of Roofing LIC & INSD “MANY LOCAL REFERENCES”

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HOME/OFFICE ORGANIZER

Overwhelmed by inefficient use of living space? Drowning in an ocean of paperwork? We Create Order Out Of Chaos.

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TREE SERVICE

For Rates and Information


Call 294.8935

Call 294-8935 and let us begin listing you in our Professional Guide and Professional Services pages. Deadline is Monday, 12 Noon COMPUTER SPECIALIST

ELDER CARE

COLLEGE COUNSELING

Joan D. Atwood, Ph.D.

New York Marriage and Family Therapists An experienced therapist makes all the difference Individual, Couple, and Family Therapy and Anger Management

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ELDER CARE Mature Woman With Car Available for: • Shopping & Errands • Activities • Cooking Meals • Doctor Appointments • Home Organization

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SUSAN MURPHY, LCSW Individual and Family Therapist Child • Teen • Adult

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LAW

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WWW.DANGELOLAWASSOCIATES.COM PSYCHOTHERAPY/WOMEN’S GROUPS

101 Hillside Avenue Williston Park, NY

HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT

FAMILY THERAPIST

Elder Care Companion

19 West 34th St. New York, NY

Marion Cohen

Real Estate Salesperson, CBR "Your agent, your neighbor"

350 Main St., Port Washington, NY 11050 cell: 917.434.2941 o: 516.883.2900 ext. 312 Email: marioncohen@danielgale.com Web: marioncohen.danielgale.com Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity

CHEMISTRY TUTOR

Family Care Connections,® LLC Dr. Ann Marie D’Angelo, PMHCNS-BC Doctor of Nursing Practice Advanced Practice Nurse Care Manager Assistance with Aging at Home / Care Coordination Nursing Home & Assisted Living Placement PRI / Screens / Mini Mental Status Exams 901 Stewart Ave., Suite 230, Garden City, NY 11530

(516) 248-9323

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Efrat Fridman, Individual, couple and family therapy

LCSW

PSYCHOTHERAPY

effiefrid@gmail.com 516-224-7670 2 Pinetree Lane Old Westbury NY 11568

718-887-4400 225 W. 35th St. New York, NY 10001

TAX AND ACCOUNTING

Sandra Lafazan, LCSW Psychotherapist

Individual, Couple & Family Counseling Women’s Groups SLafazan@Hotmail.com 516-375-3897 TUTORING

Woodbury By Appointment

call

Jonathan, Ivy League Ph.D.

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SPANISH TUDOR

SPANISH TUTOR SPANISH GRAMMAR/LITERATURE FLACS A - FLACS B/ Intensive Review of prior exams. This includes: Speaking, Listening Comprehension, Reading and Writing

William Cullen,

M.A., SPANISH, S.D.A.

Chaminade HS / Fairfield University Alumnus

516-509-8174 / wdctutor06@aol.com References furnished on request

TAX PREPARER

TAX PREPARATION IRS & NYS REGISTERED TAX PREPARER Individual & Small Business Returns

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YOUR SERVICE HERE Call 294.8935 For Rates and Information

15 Friday,February 10, 2017

PROFESSIONAL GUIDE 


Friday, February 10, 2017

16

Syosset third-grader’s essay brings a duck to school A.P. Willits Elementary School third-grader Sophie Kil is one of just four winners in the Long Island Ducks’ “Take a Duck to Class” essay contest, sponsored by TD Bank and the baseball team. As a result of her work, beloved Long Island Duck mascot QuackerJack stopped by her school for a special schoolwide assembly. Sophie wrote an essay about the important role police officers play in the community in accordance with the contest theme “Who is a hero in your community and why?” Nassau County Second Precinct police officer Matthew McCartin and representatives from the Ducks organization and TD Bank joined QuackerJack for the visit. Syosset Superintendent of Schools Dr. Tom Rogers also stopped by to congratulate Sophie. Following the assembly, Sophie and her classmates in Kathryn Crown’s class were treated to a special visit from QuackerJack, in which he presented every class member with a special Long Island Ducks gift bag filled with prizes. Sophie also received a Visa gift card from TD Bank for her award-winning essay. According to the bank representatives, approximately 1,000 essays were submitted to this year’s contest.

From left, A.P. Willits Elementary School teacher Kathryne Crown, Principal James Connolly, Superintendent of Schools Dr. Tom Rogers, L.I. Ducks mascot QuackerJack and Nassau County Second Precinct police officer Matthew McCartin congratulate parents Ryong and Byung Kil, daughter Sophie and son Andrew on Sophie’s award-winning essay, along with TD Bank representatives Olivia Soltan and Eric Fishon.

Photo courtesy of the Syosset School District

Robert Seaman Elementary School hosts author Brian Heinz BY VERA JAIN

Once again, Robert Seaman School opened its doors for a well known children’s author, Brian Heinz. Mr. Heinz is a regular visitor to the elementary schools, sharing his experiences and knowledge through Writers’ Workshops and enthusiastic presentations. Kids are no strangers to his writing. Books, such as Kayuktuk, Nanuk, and The Wolves, can be found on the shelves in many classrooms. Third graders eagerly settled at the author’s feet to experience every book’s journey from start to finish. The guest author spared no effort to bring the kids out to the noise-filled canyons of American West, the snowy tundra at the edge of Alaska, small country farms,

All eyes are on Brian Heinz

and even an inner city. Every story was delivered in the most rich and colorful way. Little listeners were consumed by every detail and thrilled to see that amazing writing can start in a simple notebook in one’s backpack. Imagination ran wild in hopes of meeting mustangs or polar bears. Above all, the students were inspired to pick up their pencils and create. After the third grade assembly, Mr. Heinz worked with each class individually in a writers’ workshop. Students got a chance to go over research and writing essentials. I am sure that many young authors came home prepared to publish that day. Tremendous thanks to the PTA committee for making this visit possible.

Alaska, here we come.


17 Friday, February 10, 2017

It’s a Strike - Berry Hill goes bowling

Berry Hill students and their families enjoyed an afternoon of bowling at AMF Syosset Lanes. Sponsored by the PTA, the afternoon of bowling was a great way for the families of Berry Hill to spend time together. Berry Hill’s afternoon of bowling is always one of the most popular PTA events during the school year.

Berry Hill Principal Mary Kolkhorst showed her support for the event and her students were thrilled to spend some weekend time with her!

These Berry Hill fourth grade girls couldn’t think of a better way to spend their Sunday afternoon.

This Berry Hill first grader had the best bowling partner - her Dad!

These Berry Hill kindergarten students enjoyed their first Berry Hill bowling party.

Alyce Panico and Tara Levine - Berry Hill PTA Committee Chairs hosted a fun-filled afternoon of bowling.


Friday, February 10, 2017

18

LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF SALE Supreme Court County Of Nassau The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWMBS, Inc., CHL Mortgage Pass-Through Trust 200530, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-30, Plaintiff AGAINST Steven Hershkowitz, Evelyn Hershkowitz, et al, Defendant Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 9/16/2016 and entered on 10/3/2016, I, the undersigned Referee, will sell at public auction at the Courtroom of the Supreme Court Mineola, 100 Supreme Court Drive, The Calendar Control Part (CCP), Mineola, NY on February 21, 2017 at 11:30 AM premises known as 23 Eaton Road Syosset, NY 11791. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Nassau, State of New York, SECTION: 12, BLOCK: 358, LOT: 47. Approximate amount of judgment is $842,895.34 plus interests and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index # 013812/2012. Justin B. Perri, Referee FRENKEL LAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON LLP 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, NY 11706 SYO 4018 4X 01/20, 27, 02/03,10 SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF NASSAU EMIGRANT BANK, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH EMIGRANT SAVINGS BANK-LONG ISLAND, Plaintiff -against- GAYLE ASCHENBRENNER, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered herein on January 29, 2016, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at (CCP) Calendar Control Part Court Room of the Nassau Supreme Court, 100 Supreme Court Dr., Mineola, NY on February 28, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being at Woodbury, Town of Oyster Bay, County of Nassau and State of New York, known and designated as Section 15 Block 175 and Lot 67. Said premises known as 22 ROSEANNE DRIVE A/K/A 22

ROSANNE DRIVE, WOODBURY, NY Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment and Terms of Sale. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Index Number 015291/2013. KEITH BROWN, ESQ., Referee STAGG, TERENZI, CONFUSIONE & WABNIK, LLP Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 401 Franklin Avenue, Suite 300, Garden City, NY 11530 SYO 4019 4x 01/27,02/03,10,17 SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF NASSAU EMIGRANT SAVINGS BANK-LONG ISLAND Plaintiff -against- ADELAIDE DEWHURST RICKERT a/k/a ADELAIDE RICKERT and MARIANNE MANSOOR,, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered herein and dated January 8, 2014, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at (CCP) Calendar Control Part Court Room of the Nassau Supreme Court, 100 Supreme Court Dr., Mineola, NY on March 7, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. All that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Incorporated Village of Oyster Bay Cove, Town of Oyster Bay, County of Nassau and State of New York; known and designated as Section: 27 Block: D Lots: 30 & 31. Said premises known as 30 COVE WOODS ROAD, OYSTER BAY, NY Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment and Terms of Sale. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Index Number 22826/2010. RALPH MADALENA, ESQ., Referee STAGG, TERENZI, CONFUSIONE & WABNIK, LLP Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 401 Franklin Avenue, Suite 300, Garden City, NY 11530 SYO 4020 4X 02/03,10,17,24 PUBLIC NOTICE OF COUNTY TREASURER’S SALE OF TAX LIENS ON REAL ESTATE Notice is hereby given that I shall on the 21st day of February, 2017 through the 24th day of February, 2017, beginning at 10:00 o’clock in

the morning each day, in the Legislative Chambers, First Floor, Theodore Roosevelt Executive and Legislative Building, 1550 Franklin Avenue, Mineola, New York, sell at public auction the tax liens on certain real estate, unless the owner, mortgagee, occupant of or any other party in interest in such real estate shall have paid to the County Treasurer by February 17th, 2017 the total amount of such unpaid taxes or assessments with the interest, penalties and other expenses and charges against the property. Such tax liens will be sold at the lowest rate of interest, not exceeding 10 percent per six month period, for which any person or persons shall offer to take the total amount of such unpaid taxes as defined in Section 5-37.0 of the Nassau County Administrative Code. Effective with the February, 2017 lien sale Ordinance No. 175-2015 requires a $125.00 per day registration fee for each person who intends to bid at the tax lien sale. Ordinance No. 175-2015 also requires that upon the issuance of the Lien Certificate there is due from the lien buyer a Tax Certificate Issue Fee of $20.00 per lien purchased. A list of all real estate in Nassau County on which tax liens are to be sold is available at the website of the Nassau County Treasurer at http://www.nassaucountyny.gov/DocumentCenter/ View/17674 A list of local properties upon which tax liens are to be sold will be advertised in this publication on or before February 16th, 2017. Nassau County does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission to or access to, or treatment or employment in, its services, programs, or activities. Upon request, accommodations such as those required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) will be provided to enable individuals with disabilities to participate in all services, programs, activities and public hearings and events conducted by the Treasurer’s Office. Upon request, information can be made available in Braille, large print, audio-tape or other alternative formats. For additional information, please call (516) 571-2090 Ext. 13715. Dated: January 2017

THE NASSAU COUNTY TREASURER Mineola, New York TERMS OF SALE Such tax liens shall be sold subject to any and all superior tax liens of sovereignties and other municipalities and to all claims of record which the County may have thereon and subject to the provisions of the Federal and State Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Acts. However, such tax liens shall have priority over the County’s Differential Interest Lien, representing the excess, if any, of the interest and penalty borne at the maximum rate over the interest and penalty borne at the rate at which the lien is purchased. The Purchaser acknowledges that the tax lien(s) sold pursuant to these Terms of Sale may be subject to pending bankruptcy proceedings and/ or may become subject to such proceedings which may be commenced during the period in which a tax lien is held by a successful bidder or the assignee of same, which may modify a Purchaser’s rights with respect to the lien(s) and the property securing same. Such bankruptcy proceedings shall not affect the validity of the tax lien. In addition to being subject to pending bankruptcy proceedings and/or the Federal and State Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Acts, said purchaser’s right of foreclosure may be affected by the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act(FIRREA),12 U.S.C. ss 1811 et.seq., with regard to real property under Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation(FDIC) receivership. The County Treasurer reserves the right, without further notice and at any time, to withdraw from sale any of the parcels of land or premises herein listed. The Nassau County Treasurer reserves the right to intervene in any bankruptcy case/litigation where the property affected by the tax liens sold by the Treasurer is part of the bankruptcy estate. However, it is the sole responsibility of all tax lien purchasers to protect their legal interests in any bankruptcy case affecting their purchased tax lien, including but not limited to the filing of a proof of claim on their behalf, covering their investment in said tax lien. The Nassau County Treasurer and Nassau County and its agen-

cies, assumes no responsibility for any legal representation of any tax lien purchaser in any legal proceeding including but not limited to a bankruptcy case where the purchased tax lien is at risk. The rate of interest and penalty at which any person purchases the tax lien shall be established by his bid. Each purchaser, immediately after the sale thereof, shall pay to the County Treasurer ten per cent of the amount for which the tax liens have been sold and the remaining ninety per cent within thirty days after such sale. If the purchaser at the tax sale shall fail to pay the remaining ninety per cent within ten days after he has been notified by the County Treasurer that the certificates of sale are ready for delivery, then all amounts deposited with the County Treasurer including but not limited to the ten per cent theretofore paid by him shall, without further notice or demand, be irrevocably forfeited by the purchaser and shall be retained by the County Treasurer as liquidated damages and the agreement to purchase shall be of no further effect. Time is of the essence in this sale. This sale is held pursuant to the Nassau County Administrative Code and interested parties are referred to such Code for additional information as to terms of the sale, rights of purchasers, maximum rates of interest and other legal incidents of the sale. Dated: January 2017 THE NASSAU COUNTY TREASURER Mineola, New York SA 4021 2X 02/03, 02/10 LEGAL NOTICE SW BROTHERS LLC Articles of organization. Filed NY Sec. of State(SSNY) 10/24/2016. Office in Nassau County. SSNY design, agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to THE LLC 315 Oak Street, Uniondale, NY 11553 Purpose: Any lawful purpose. JNJ 7836 6X 02/03,10,17,24,03/03,10 NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF NASSAU Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, d/b/a Christiana Trust, not individually but as trustee for Pretium Mortgage Acquisition Trust, N.A., Plaintiff


AGAINST Rohit Bedi; et al., Defendant(s) Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated November 3, 2016 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction in the Calendar Control Part (CCP) 100 Supreme Court Drive, Mineola, New York, 11501 on March 7, 2017 at 11:30AM, premises known as 1639 Cedar Swamp Road, Brookville, NY 11545. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Incorporated Village of Upper Brookville, County of Nassau and State of NY, Section 18 Block A Lot 957 A & 957 B. Approximate amount of judgment $1,128,794.29 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 14-007763. Lisa Anne Leimbach-Gutman, Esq., Referee Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC Attorney(s) for the Plaintiff 175 Mile Crossing Boulevard Rochester, New York 14624 (877) 759-1835 Dated: January 11, 2017 JNJ 7837 4X 02/03,10,17,24 PUBLIC NOTICE OF COUNTY TREASURER’S SALE OF TAX LIENS ON REAL ESTATE Notice is hereby given that I shall on the 21st day of February, 2017 through the 24th day of February, 2017, beginning at 10:00 o’clock in the morning each day, in the Legislative Chambers, First Floor, Theodore Roosevelt Executive and Legislative Building, 1550 Franklin Avenue, Mineola, New York, sell at public auction the tax liens on certain real estate, unless the owner, mortgagee, occupant of or any other party in interest in such real estate shall have paid to the County Treasurer by February 17th, 2017 the total amount of such unpaid taxes or assessments with the interest, penalties and other expenses and charges against the property. Such tax liens will be sold at the lowest rate of interest, not exceeding 10 percent per six month period, for which any person or persons shall offer to take the total amount of such unpaid taxes as defined in Section 5-37.0 of the Nassau County Administrative Code. Effective with the February, 2017 lien sale Ordinance No.

175-2015 requires a $125.00 per day registration fee for each person who intends to bid at the tax lien sale. Ordinance No. 175-2015 also requires that upon the issuance of the Lien Certificate there is due from the lien buyer a Tax Certificate Issue Fee of $20.00 per lien purchased. A list of all real estate in Nassau County on which tax liens are to be sold is available at the website of the Nassau County Treasurer at http://www.nassaucountyny.gov/DocumentCenter/ View/17674 A list of local properties upon which tax liens are to be sold will be advertised in this publication on or before February 16th, 2017. Nassau County does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission to or access to, or treatment or employment in, its services, programs, or activities. Upon request, accommodations such as those required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) will be provided to enable individuals with disabilities to participate in all services, programs, activities and public hearings and events conducted by the Treasurer’s Office. Upon request, information can be made available in Braille, large print, audio-tape or other alternative formats. For additional information, please call (516) 571-2090 Ext. 13715. Dated: January 2017 THE NASSAU COUNTY TREASURER Mineola, New York TERMS OF SALE Such tax liens shall be sold subject to any and all superior tax liens of sovereignties and other municipalities and to all claims of record which the County may have thereon and subject to the provisions of the Federal and State Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Acts. However, such tax liens shall have priority over the County’s Differential Interest Lien, representing the excess, if any, of the interest and penalty borne at the maximum rate over the interest and penalty borne at the rate at which the lien is purchased. The Purchaser acknowledges that the tax lien(s) sold pursuant to these Terms of Sale may be subject to pending bankruptcy proceedings and/ or may become subject to such proceedings which may be commenced during the period

in which a tax lien is held by a successful bidder or the assignee of same, which may modify a Purchaser’s rights with respect to the lien(s) and the property securing same. Such bankruptcy proceedings shall not affect the validity of the tax lien. In addition to being subject to pending bankruptcy proceedings and/or the Federal and State Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Acts, said purchaser’s right of foreclosure may be affected by the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act(FIRREA),12 U.S.C. ss 1811 et.seq., with regard to real property under Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation(FDIC) receivership. The County Treasurer reserves the right, without further notice and at any time, to withdraw from sale any of the parcels of land or premises herein listed. The Nassau County Treasurer reserves the right to intervene in any bankruptcy case/litigation where the property affected by the tax liens sold by the Treasurer is part of the bankruptcy estate. However, it is the sole responsibility of all tax lien purchasers to protect their legal interests in any bankruptcy case affecting their purchased tax lien, including but not limited to the filing of a proof of claim on their behalf, covering their investment in said tax lien. The Nassau County Treasurer and Nassau County and its agencies, assumes no responsibility for any legal representation of any tax lien purchaser in any legal proceeding including but not limited to a bankruptcy case where the purchased tax lien is at risk. The rate of interest and penalty at which any person purchases the tax lien shall be established by his bid. Each purchaser, immediately after the sale thereof, shall pay to the County Treasurer ten per cent of the amount for which the tax liens have been sold and the remaining ninety per cent within thirty days after such sale. If the purchaser at the tax sale shall fail to pay the remaining ninety per cent within ten days after he has been notified by the County Treasurer that the certificates of sale are ready for delivery, then all amounts deposited with the County Treasurer including but not limited to the ten per cent theretofore paid by him shall, without further

Syosset Library celebrates Chinese New Year

Friday, February 10, 2017

LEGAL NOTICES

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From page 1 received high praise from attendees after tremendous efforts from the students of the Syosset High School Chinese Cultural Society and CAAS’ leadership team. Families enjoyed over two hours of programming and entertainers, with performances ranging from the Syosset Senior Choir providing melodies to small children on stage and in yellow, fully feathered costumes for “The Chicken Dance” and other routines for the Year of the Rooster. A rest area and refreshments were made available. During the event Syosset Public Schools administrators were seated in the front rows and adorned with sparkling Lunar New Year attire. Much lighter of a programming day is expected a week later, but with the same enthusiasm. Syosset’s Assistant Library Director Pam Martin has been a tremendous supporter of CAAS. The crafts and story program comes almost two years after broader diversity initiatives were planned, and advancing media and reading materials to accommodate Syosset’s residents of all cultural backgrounds took shape. The Syosset Library made part of its recent upgrades for materials/catalog planning to include items preferred by senior Chinese-Americans, often new to this country, likely retired and have childcare responsibilities for their school-age grandchildren in this area. But the library program this weekend is more geared towards young families. CAAS appreciates all the library staff’s dedication. “Sue Ann Reale, Head of Children’s Services. Syosset Public Library, is the one we have worked closely with to put the CAAS Chinese New Year Children’s program together. She has been an amazing partner and instrumental in making the craft portion of the program happen by buying the majority of materials needed for the craft project. We will have six CAAS teen volunteers to help the 30 pre-registered K-5 children make their own rattle drums,” said CAAS board member Cindy Lin. The February 11 program starts off with a story-telling portion where CAAS volunteer Dr. Wei Fang, will read aloud two books about Chinese New Year culture and traditions to the children in English – Sam and the Lucky Money by Karen Chinn and the Race for the Chinese Zodiac by Gabrielle Wang. Following stories will be the crafts’ portion where children will get to make and decorate their own rattle drums (pictured). Lin details the concept’s history with a New Year backdrop. “The rattle drum’s origins can be traced back to a percussion instrument used as early as 475 BC in ancient China. During the Song Dynasty (960-1279 AD) it became more widely used in rites, music, business activities and as a children’s toy. Today it is a popular children’s toy given to children around the holidays, especially Chinese New Year. According to Chinese tradition, the rhythmic beating of the drum helps to ward off bad luck and evil spirits of the old year and welcome in good luck and good spirits for the new year,” she explained in an email to the Syosset Advance. For more information on the February 11 event, contact Syosset Public Library at 516-921-7161. Carol Cheng, a past Village Elementary PTA president and new candidate for Syosset’s Board of Education, is serving as the coordinator for the library event. Cindy Lin is CAAS’ public relations person, and CAAS co-founder Wanda Lee Struhl compliments all the team members for their efforts to organize the past two weeks and beyond. CAAS is proud to announce that in partnership with Syosset Central School District and Superintendent of Schools Dr. Thomas Rogers, the first “Syosset Bilingual Town Hall (English/ Mandarin) will be taking place on Friday, March 17 -- St. Patrick’s Day – at 7pm at the H.B. Thompson Middle School auditorium. Translation service will be duly provided and Q & A with Superintendent Rogers will be part of the format for the evening, centered around the district’s aging facilities and capital investment strategy with this spring’s budget and bonding process. With a New Year comes new opportunities for all Syosset residents to connect.


Friday, February 10, 2017

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Jericho presentation on health, wellness Guidance Dept. initiative

From page 1 discussion the foundation was laid for the district’s recent push in “Mindfulness.” Smith also spoke about the kindergarten through eighth grade program “Mind-Op” and adapting a programming portion for the high school population, including teachers’ training and a ‘Lunch and Learn’ series on how teachers can cope with their own stresses as well as working with kids.

Mindfulness exercise

At the January 19 school board meeting, Cantiague Elementary School students led by Principal Gina Faust were able to demonstrate a mindfulness exercise. But applying the stress-reducing measures across all grades and in group formats is one example of a greater responsibility Jericho Schools hopes to advocate for: safety and well-being for all in the district. The “Learn to Breathe” program, Smith said, entered its fourth year in the district and it has been expanded with yoga class. “We are fortunate that John has given us a lot of support for guidance to get training (staff development). We started a mindful ambassadors club, now we are going to go the middle school and Cantiague and Jackson to collaborate with the student leadership groups there. Kids want to learn from kids rather than hearing it from grown-ups as much,” Smith explained. At the February 2 work session School Board Trustee Gina Levy reminded her colleagues that district parents feel their own pressures and competitions, and the kids have had high anxiety and stress with rigors of academic performance. But at times the parents and families aren’t interacting with the district staff and for various reasons, understanding the mix of each child’s situation is unclear. She hopes for more two-way communications. “A lot of families and parents just don’t know how to reach out or what to do. But if a teacher sees a kid is constantly coming into class stressed out, is there a system where a teacher can approach administrators or the guidance counselor can check with them regularly. I know there are some kids who aren’t stressed from parents but just themselves with keeping up. They feel weaker or that they are letting their families down if they go for help with guidance or social workers – kids are still kids at the end of the day and there is peer-to-peer competition,” Levy explained. Danielle Smith says that the Jericho guidance team goes to classrooms and asks students questions, with discussions getting to the core of where exactly their pressures is coming from. “We have seen a little of a shift in that with it going more towards peer pressure. In the past a lot of it was family pressure, but we have seen a lot of peer-to-peer

if students see their friends taking AP classes or otherwise. A lot of referral sources do come to guidance as teachers do speak with guidance counselors, then the kids come to us. We try to look at it from their perspectives or as a parent myself, how to help the child. IT takes a lot of empathy,” she told Levy and the board members. One main conundrum identified in the student-guidance counselor relationship was the fact that some students may be unwilling to share their issues with counselors because that may be seen as a layer of authority in the high school, and a way of bringing more obstacles into a busy teenage life. The guidance counselor is traditionally very influential in college applications and decisions of that regard. Castronova explained a departmental strategy change. “Since the checkbook (budget) is open it would be easy for me to say we need another psychologist or social worker. The truth is we have nine guidance counselors and if we could re-shape our approach to train them to do a lot of the early identification and develop relationships with students where counselors become a go-to person, then we’d have other things in place then that would be ideal. If we revamp that model it would make a lot of sense,” said Smith says that traditionally guidance has seen teens being “great racecars without brakes.” The difficulty of high school administration is to provide the students with a prefrontal cortex that they need. She explained that developmentally, adolescents have the ability to think all their actions through but they may lack the part of the brain that schedules breaks. School Board President William Ferro stated the serious intent of reaching out to students, saying as the district has its staff and resources in place the Jericho community cannot afford to lose one student to anything life threatening because they felt overwhelmed. Levy said the freshman introduction to JHS guidance may not be an ideal starting point as middle school can be the better focus as accelerated programs and coursework begins there in Jericho. Smith told her the universal approach for the guidance division outlines putting more resources into students’ mental health and wellness at a young age and that develops into less kids struggling as they grow older and reach higher grades. Castronova cited the current operations, and hinted at a few personal student concerns from the start of the 2016-’17 school year. “We are working both ends. We are trying to bring the program through so that we have preventative measures in place and hopefully we have less of these major episodes at the high school; right now we’re doing both,” he said.

No further discussion on the nature of “major episodes” with students took place last week at the board’s work session. Looking at the big picture, School Board Trustee Barbara Kreiger wonders if the issues involving the guidance department functions have become a cyclical exercise. “If you go back in time to when we did not have as many psychology and social work employees, guidance was more guidance and less of ‘college advisors.’ Then we had a lot of pressure from the community that they wanted college advisors. We re-directed our guidance counselors and started sending them out to meet more with colleges and gain a lot more information. It sounds to me like we’re trying more to get them back focused on students and wellness. Is it going to be a cycle or at some point does the district need to divide up ‘college advising’ and guidance?” she asked.

How to best serve families

Superintendent Grishman said the administration has had conversations on how to best serve kids and families. “We keep on coming back to the thought of having a guidance counselor know a kid, siblings, families and being a full-service guidance counselor made the most sense to us. Some big city high schools have three counselors in place, one for college admissions, one for diplomacy and others for pupil services. Based upon the size of our high school and ‘guidance people’ the full service to families is what we practice,” Grishman said. Ferro says as the school district interviews for a full-time Director of Guidance the hope would be for a candidate to fill the full-service model with connections to colleges and the counselors may not need to be targeted

towards just that process. Grishman clarified the plans. “As the recommendation has matured to look at filling the position of Director of Guidance, the needs of the skill set for that person and having the background experience and skills to help us move in the direction we need to is our utmost priority in their screening. We are looking for somebody who has a proven track record and shows expertise in different areas, especially areas where we need to establish growth,” he said. School board trustee Daborah Lee said some of the reasons guidance evolved to more college advising was because of changing demographics and more Asian American families in the district, with a population heavily interested in their children attending Ivy League and the most prestigious schools. Her fellow board members, however, tell her that the demand from parents in Jericho and among top Long Island districts has been going on since well before the shift in demographics. Grishman said it goes well beyond community input and into the perceived evaluation of staff positions. “Just as with the academic focus of our AP teachers shifted to take the class load and get as many students ‘scoring a 5 on the standardized exam as they can,’ we have matured in our guidance department to where there is a perception of them being evaluated based on their college acceptance rate and that the primary job is based upon how many kids they got into Ivy, first tier, the students’ first choice. As a guidance counselor that’s what they become most proud of and that’s their reputation. As we are seeing that the reality is more to providing guidance services than numbers of kids going on to attend the University of Michigan, Wisconsin, etc.” he said.

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Students and their families enjoyed a night of culture, music and cuisine at Berry Hill’s International Night. The school’s gym was transformed into a world’s fair that featured countries including Argentina, China, Columbia, France, Greece, Israel, Italy, Poland, Turkey and the U.S. A DJ was also on hand to play music from each country. Hosted by the Berry Hill PTA, International Night provided a window to the world, fostering greater student awareness and appreciation of cultures different from their own.

Some choristers fill the halls with Christmas music.

The Mercan family represented Turkey on International Night. Kate Lucano, Fernanda Vudrag, Melissa Cuoco and Melissa Casabianca - the Berry Hill PTA’s International Night Committee Chairs - put together an amazing event.

Berry Hill fifth graders enjoyed the wide selection of music from the DJ.

These 2nd graders did a great job representing the US and serving hot dogs to their friends!

China’s display was informative, colorful and fun.

Berets and best friends - Berry Hill fourth grade girls adore France!

Berry Hill’s International Night was enjoyed by parents and children alike.

The Di Stefano family represented Italy on Berry Hill’s International Night.

Friday, February 10, 2017

International Night at Berry Hill Elementary

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22 Friday, February 10, 2017

4 Wendy Road, Syosset

Sold Price: $1,125,000 Date: 12/21/2016 4 beds, 3 Full/1 Half baths Style: Contemporary # of Families: 1

Lot Size: 80x130 Schools: Syosset Total Taxes: $23,465 MLS# 2884089

162 Southwood Circle, Syosset Sold Price: $975,000 Date: 12/20/2016 4 beds, 2 Full/1 Half baths Style: Colonial # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 65x100 Schools: Syosset MLS# 2885736

22 Bluebird Drive, Syosset

32 Crestwood Street, Syosset

Sold Price: $990,000 Date: 12/14/2016 5 beds, 3 Full baths Style: Colonial # of Families: 1

Sold Price: $890,000 Date: 12/20/2016 4 beds, 3 Full baths Style: Ranch # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 100x200 Schools: Syosset Total Taxes: $24,879 MLS# 2885909

Lot Size: 65x100 Schools: Syosset MLS# 2883749

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Friday, February 10, 2017

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Friday, February 10, 2017

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The Syosset Advance