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Monthly Report

January 2020

Limbe Wildlife Centre: January 2020 by Guillaume LE FLOHIC Manager (Limbe Wildlife Centre) & Country Director (Pandrillus Cameroon)

Published in February 2020 Limbe Wildlife Centre, P.O. Box 878, Limbe, Republic of Cameroon

Limbe Wildlife Centre is a collaborative effort between the Pandrillus Foundation and the Republic of Cameroon, Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife, MINFOF Pandrillus Foundation is a non-profit making NGO specialized in the protection, rehabilitation and reintroduction of primates, as well as management and sustainable financing of conservation projects in Africa Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife is in charge of implementing the national forest policy for ensuring sustainable management and conservation of wildlife and biodiversity over the national territory as enacted by forestry law No. 01/94 of 20 January which regulates all forestry, wildlife and fisheries activities

guillaume@limbewildlife.org limbewildlifecentre

+237 681 991 590 limbewildlife

ALL OUR REPORTS ARE AVAILABLE

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limbewildlife.org limbewildlife


Monthly Report

January 2020

Content JANUARY 2020 HIGHLIGHTS ACHIEVEMENTS JANUARY 2020 & OBJECTIVES FEBRUARY 2020 1. Pandrillus-GoC Partnership| Public Relations| Project Management 2. Infrastructures and development| Material & Equipment 3. Capacity building 4. Community Conservation, Environmental Education & Ecotourism 5. Management of animal population and well-being 6. Rehabilitation and release programme 7. Research, Monitoring & Health Safety rules 8. Communication & Visibility 9. Revenues generated

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Monthly Report

January 2020

Foreword

Dear Friends and Supporters, Happy New Year 2020! This month, the kids of the Saturday Nature Club joined together with our educators and volunteers to clean Limbe’s Down Beach! Through them, we aim to raise awareness about the importance of keeping Limbe clean and to engage Limbe’s community, businesses, and local administrations. Plastic pollution, one of the largest global environmental challenges, has a huge impact on African littoral areas. Not only does it scar the natural beauty of our landscapes but impedes the development of high-quality ecotouristic activities and greatly detriments human quality of life. Most saliently, plastic pollution is a huge burden on marine wildlife. Marine plastic pollution is estimated to be responsible each year for 100,000 deaths of marine mammals and turtles and 1 million sea birds. In total over 690 megafauna species (ie marine

mammals, turtles and seabirds) fall victim to entanglement, ingestion or contamination. In addition, mass deaths in fish populations threaten the livelihoods of 540 million people. I would like to thank Hysacam, the sanitation company and the Limbe City Council for supporting this initiative. Thank you also to all of the SNC children and their parents for being true role models! The ongoing rehabilitation efforts for the rescued endangered African grey parrots continue to proceed very successfully. I would like to thank Zoo Landau in der Pfalz, Zoo de la Boissière du Doré, the Zoological Society for the Conservation of Species and Populations (ZGAP), Vogelpark Marlow and the Parrot Wildlife Foundation for providing the support and emergency funding to help feed and care for the rescued parrots. I also thank all individual donors for their trust in our expertise. This month, our team mainly focused on collecting and organising as much medical

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Monthly Report

January 2020

data as possible to assess the success of our procedures. Our goal is to optimize our efficiency and identify areas of improvement as regards our specialised diet, medical treatment, monitoring and structural enrichment. Along with health checks, blood samples are collected for haematological and stress analysis. Body and feather condition are also recorded, while each death is thoroughly investigated and post mortems systematically completed. In the past 3 months, we have generated an important and valuable dataset that will require multivariate analysis. This will greatly help to professionalize our methodology, constituting another means

by which we can continually improve our success in rehabilitating our confiscated African grey parrots. All departments were very busy this month: the construction team made great progress in restructuring the chimpanzee Special Care & Rehabilitation Section; the quarantine section provided first care to several new arrivals, including a juvenile Drill; and the Chimpanzee section continued the integration of Chinoise to the Mainland group! Thank you as always for your unfailing support,

With very best wishes, Limbe, 31 January 2020

Guillaume LE FLOHIC LWC Manager, Pandrillus Foundation

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January 2020 Highlights

□ MINFOF-Pandrillus joint operation to rescue a juvenile male Drill in Manyu Division (South WestRegion) □ Special event: On 18 January, the LWC organised a Beach Clean Up with the kids of the Saturday Nature Club. □ Rescued 1 vulnerable Home's hinged tortoise □ Media coverage: 5 local reports made


January 2020

Monthly Report

Achievements January 2020 & Objectives February 2020 1. Pandrillus-GoC Partnership| Public Relations| Project Management □ MINFOF-Pandrillus joint operation to rescue a juvenile male Drill in Manyu Division (South West-Region)

February 2020 objectives: □ Validate internal rules and regulations (pending) □ Staff self-assessment and annual performance review (postponed)

2. Infrastructures and development| Material & Equipment □ Maintained the visual obstacles and bamboo enrichment structures in the Drill enclosure (Images 1-2) □ Continued to build the new quarantine cages (Images 3-4) □ Started the re-structuration of the chimpanzee Special Care and Rehabilitation Section (Images 5-10) □ Maintained 1 sliding door and rail in Gorilla Group 1

Image 1. Replacement of broken bamboo in the Drill enclosure.

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Image 2. Replacement of broken bamboo in the Drill enclosure.


January 2020

Monthly Report

Image 3. Assembling of new quarantine cages.

Image 4. Final concreting and welding of the rod mesh panel for the new quarantine cages.

Image 5. Bending of the metal flat bar for re- Image 6. Welding of metal plate and structuring the chimpanzee Special Care flat metal bar for re-structuring the and Rehabilitation Section. chimpanzee Special Care and Rehabilitation Section.

Image 7. Digging of pillar hole and foundation of the chimpanzee Special Care and Rehabilitation enclosure.

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Image 8. Concreting of pillar pole for the chimpanzee Special Care and Rehabilitation enclosure.


January 2020

Monthly Report

Image 9. Foundation concreting of the chimpanzee Special Care and Rehabilitation enclosure.

Image 10. The finished concrete foundation of the chimpanzee Special Care and Rehabilitation enclosure.

February 2020 objectives: □ Complete the building of the new quarantine cages □ Continue the re-structuration of the chimpanzee Special Care and Rehabilitation Section □ Renovate the Nile crocodile enclosure

3. Capacity building □ Continue the new manual of standard operation procedures (SOP) for the African grey parrots

February 2020 objectives: □ Continue with the above ongoing activities □ Organise monthly staff workshop: Why the Protect Wildlife Campaign in Limbe? Outcomes, partners and future steps, by Cyril Delfosse (Pandrillus Community Awareness & Education Programme Coordinator)

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January 2020

Monthly Report

4. Community Conservation, Environmental Education & Ecotourism □ School outreach programme: Continued the 2019-2020 programme: 10 schools, 24 classes and 1,488 schoolchildren; monthly efforts: 68 men.hours (Image 11). □ Saturday Nature Club: 2019-2020 Nature Club continued: 657 kids registered; monthly attendance: 273 kids (Images 12-18). Sessions:

- Plastic Pollution (Drawing): 95 attendees, 5 new kids. - Beach Clean-Up (Cleaning Downbeach Limbe): 150 kids. - Art with Recycled Materials (Crafting Bracelets): 28 attendees, 4 new kids. □ Special event: On 18 January, the LWC organised a Beach Clean Up with the kids of the Saturday Nature Club. The goal was to sensitize the population, decision-makers and local businesses to the importance to take actions to keep the beauty of Limbe, to promote eco-tourism in the city and the South-West Region, protect human health and wildlife. The garbage collection service of the city, Hysacam, gently took part in the action and collected all the plastic trash the kids had picked up (Images 14-18).

□ Community-based Green Economy: 15 ex-hunter members sustainably harvesting wild herbaceous plants: 799.5 kg of Aframomum stems and 481 kg of Costus stems; 36 women members harvesting crop by-product: 802 kg of cassava leaves, 2,339 kg of papaya leaves, 2,080 kg of potato leaves, 380 kg of invasive Trumpet wood shoots, corresponding to 85 trees hand-cut; 852,230 XAF (€1,301) paid directly to the local community association this month; 852,230 XAF (€1,301) contributed to alleviate local poverty in 2020.

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January 2020

Monthly Report

Image 11. Our educator Yvette SOUKOUDJOU teaching in one of the 24 classes our educators visits each week. This month, Yvette taught the children about the ecosystems.

Image 12. Our educator Alvin MUMA explaining the impacts that can induce plastic pollution on different aspects: wildlife, landscape conservation, tourism, etc.

Image 13. During that month dedicated to plastic pollution, we also show the kids how to use recycled material to do art. Kids made bracelets with plastic bottles and leftover fabric collected to the tailors of Limbe.

Image 14. Down beach is certainly one of the most polluted beaches in Limbe. All these trash are mainly carried by the tides day after day and have an impact on both the aesthetic, and attractiveness of the town of friendship, but also on wildlife and human health.

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January 2020

Monthly Report

Image 15. 150 kids participated in our first beach clean-up.

Image 16. The trash collect service Hysacam has been invited to partner on this initiative to collect the plastic bags filled up by the kids.

Image 17. After the beach clean-up, Downbeach looked more cleaned and pleasant.

Image 18. Family picture of participants to our first beach clean-up.

February 2020 objectives: â–Ą Continue with ongoing programs â–Ą Celebration of the World Pangolin Day

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January 2020

Monthly Report

5. Management of animal population and well-being Ongoing activities □ Maintained frequency and diversity of enrichments in each section

Specific activities □ Putty-nosed monkey: Started to integrate Bamenda, Eboti and Tanyi to the Puttynosed monkey group (Image 19)

□ Vet cares (January 2020): ◌ 28 Primate individuals treated; 5 anaesthesia performed; 7 individuals sampled (5 blood samples for haematology analysis, 2 faecal samples for coprology analysis); 5 contraceptions; 0 identification with microchip; 2 laceration repairs; 0 major surgery; 39 drug therapies: 33% antibiotics, 23% antiinflammatories,

10%

dietary

supplements,

5%

antiparasitics,

5%

arthritis

supplements, 5% fluid therapy, 19% others; 3 health checks: Chimpanzee (1), Mandrill (1), Tantalus monkey (1, Image 20); 2 deaths: Mandrill (adult female Nko, multi-organ failure), Tantalus monkey (senescent female Ngie, old age ◌ African grey parrots: 55 health checks performed; 15 individuals received intensive care treatment with 3rd generation antibiotic treatment, antiinflammatories and supportive treatment; 33 deaths (Image 21)

Image 19. Three putty-nosed guenons, Bamenda, Tanyi, and Eboti, are being introduced to a group of conspecifics

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January 2020

Monthly Report

Image 20. Malabar, a female tantalus monkey, was struggling with a chronic cough. She was anaesthetised to perform a thorough examination of the lungs and airways

Image 21. During health checks, blood samples are taken, the presence of ectoparasites is checked, and feather and body condition are assessed under anaesthesia. Then, the bodyweight is measured and analysed together with the feather and body condition to determine the recovery progress for release.

February 2020 objectives: □ Continue with the ongoing activities □ Putty-nosed monkey: Continue to integrate Bamenda, Eboti and Tanyi to the Puttynosed monkey group □ Vet cares: 1st and 2nd quarantine health check: Drill (Mbigou, juvenile male); General health checks: African grey parrots (40+); Contraception: Drills

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January 2020

Monthly Report

6. Rehabilitation and release programme Arrival & quarantine □ Rescued 1 male juvenile endangered Drill (Images 22-23) □ Rescued 1 vulnerable Home's hinged tortoise □ Rescued 7 Black-hinged terrapins (Images 24) □ Rescued 1 Fraser’s eagle-owl (Images 25) □ Rescued 1 Barn owl

Behavioural rehabilitation □ Drill: Started the behavioural rehabilitation of the juvenile male Drill

Social rehabilitation □ African grey parrot: Introduced 27 individuals to the group of 29 in the new rehabilitation aviary □ Chimpanzee: Continued the social integration of Chinoise (subadult female) into the Mainland group: introduced to adult male Carlos and AJ (Image 26a&b)

Release (ecological & environmental rehabilitation) □ None

Image 22. Orphaned juvenile male Drill at arrival was tied up in a transport cage.

Image 23. He settled into his new temporary home in our Quarantine

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January 2020

Monthly Report

really well and immediately started eating, playing, foraging, and climbing around.

Image 24. The Fraser’s eagle-owl is fed twice a day and already grew and put on weight. She will be released after a rehabilitation period.

Image 25. Seven black-hinged terrapins were confiscated and will be released soon.

Image 26a&b. Chinoise’s (female subadult) integration is ongoing well indoor. Five individuals (out of 11) are already with her day and night. After integrating another adult female, Baly, who display the most negative behaviour towards Chinoise, the group will enjoy outgoings in the Mainland enclosure. February 2020 objectives: □ African Grey Parrots: Continue the rehabilitation process of the rescued individuals □ Chimpanzee: Continue social integration of Chinoise (subadult female) into the Mainland group

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January 2020

Monthly Report

7. Research, Monitoring & Health Safety rules Ongoing activities □ Continued the scientifically-sound behavioural monitoring of the Mainland chimpanzees to assess the group cohesion and individual welfare before, during and after social integration of Chinoise (subadult female) □ Continued the thorough assessment of the health and welfare of rescued African Grey Parrot during rehabilitation □ Continued to build the dataset of haematological analysis performed during general health checks in order to analyse the standard values for the endangered Drill

Activity achievement □ None

Data analysis □ None

February 2020 objectives: □ Continue with the above ongoing activities

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January 2020

Monthly Report

8. Communication & Visibility â–Ą Digital communication (Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter): January was a good month for social media outreach as our work rescuing and rehabilitating African grey parrots got good media attention made our monthly reach and engagement go up: total reach on posts was 102,101. â–Ą Media coverage: 5 local reports made o TV News: Raising awareness to keep our environment clean: #STOP Plastic Pollution and #ProtectWildlife, LTM tv, 22 January 2020, starting 09:50 (available here) o TV News: Importance of Keeping Environment Clean and Protection of Wildlife, Media Prime News, 22 January 2020, starting 50:42 (available here) o Newspaper:

FCFA 30 Million needed to sustain 360 endangered African

grey parrots rescued from traffickers, The Star, 27 January 2020 o Newspaper: Limbe Wildlife Centre rescues 275 endangered African grey parrots, The Guardian Post, 22 January 2020 o Newspaper: Limbe Wildlife Centre rescues another 275 endangered African grey parrots, The Sun Newspaper, 29 January 2020

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January 2020

Monthly Report

February 2020 objectives: □ Continue advocating the missions of the LWC within the Central African Conservation Landscape in Cameroon □ Launch the T-shirt fundraising campaign on World Pangolin Day

9. Revenues generated □ Entrance fees (January 2020): XAF 1,498,400 (3,281 visitors; 38% children, 98% Cameroonians) 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 Jan-19 Feb-19 Mar-19 Apr-19 May-19 Jun-19 Adult Nationals Children Nationals

Jul-19 Aug-19 Sep-19 Oct-19 Nov-19 Dec-19 Jan-20 Adult Foreigners Children Foreigners

Figure 1.Visitor statistics January 2019- January 2020

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January 2020

Monthly Report

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Profile for limbewildlife

Limbe Wildlife Centre: January 2020  

Limbe Wildlife Centre: January 2020  

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