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Pusch Ridge

OCTOBER 2015

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by Community

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Lifestyle Letter

Hello, Neighbors!

OCTOBER 2015 publisher

Welcome to the premier issue of Pusch Ridge Lifestyle!

Renaissance Publishing, LLC

We are excited that our magazine will be coming to your home every month. This magazine is created for and about the people in the Pusch Ridge area. Our goal is simple and straight-forward: we hope to play a key role in helping our area flourish by producing a resource filled with interesting stories about people, businesses and organizations in the area. We want to report on special events that have taken place and give you a heads up about upcoming events. Each month we will introduce you to local people, families, business and organizations. No doubt some of them will be better known than others, but all will be interesting and a blessing to get to know something about. If you know someone we should meet, please let us know. We are always on the lookout for exceptional students, interesting businesses and organizations, and hometown heroes to feature. We would like to sincerely thank our advertisers for coming on board with us and for their enthusiastic support of our magazine. And we would like to thank you in advance for taking some time to spend with us every month. We will work hard each month to be a good steward of the time you spend with us.

editorial coordinator Janice Henry contributing writers Thomas Curtis, Erin Hayes Burt, James Jansen,  Kendra Mathewson, Tom Strongman

contributing photographers Katie McDonald, Tom Strongman

corporate team chief executive officer | Steven Schowengerdt chief sales officer | Matthew Perry chief financial officer | DeLand Shore director of marketing | Brad Broockerd art director | Sara Minor ad coordinators | Cyndi Vreeland, Chelsi Hornbaker, Lea Whitson lead layout designer | Nicole Sylvester copy editor | Kendra Mathewson executive assistant | Lori Cunningham application architect | Michael O’Connell

Wishing each of you all the best. See you around town!

web developer | Hanna Park it director | Randy Aufderheide

Janice Henry, Editorial Coordinator Janice.Henry@LifestylePubs.com

by Community ™

ON THE COVER Welcome to the premier issue

of Pusch Ridge Lifestyle. Everything about our magazine is inspired by the incredible people and places in our community. PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATIE MCDONALD 4

Pusch Ridge Lifestyle | October 2015

PuschRidgeLifestyle.com join us

talk to us

P.O. Box 12608 Overland Park, KS 66282-3214 Proverbs 3:5-6 Pusch Ridge Lifestyle™ is published monthly by Lifestyle Publications LLC. It is distributed via the US Postal Service to some of Pusch Ridge’s most affluent neighborhoods. Articles and advertisements do not necessarily reflect Lifestyle Publications’ opinions. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without written consent. Lifestyle Publications does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. Information in Pusch Ridge Lifestyle™ is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy of all information cannot be guaranteed.


A Law Firm

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6760 N. Oracle Rd., Suite 130, Tucson, Arizona 85704


October 2015

16

Departments 8

Around Town

10

Animal Tracks

11

Locally Owned

12

Parent’s Corner

26

Financial Fitness

28

Driver’s Notebook

32

Lifestyle Calendar

34

Parting Thoughts

11 At the Helm of Thomae Advertising

Lindsay Thomae advocates for local businesses.

16 Saving Steam Pump Ranch

Learn how this historical place connects us to the past.

22 Let's Build Little Free Libraries

Neighbors create uniquely constructed miniature book exchanges.

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12 Lifestyle Publications

Arizona | California | Colorado | Georgia | Idaho | Illinois | Kansas | Missouri | Montana | Oklahoma | Texas | Utah | Wisconsin

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Around Town

SCHOOL IS IN SESSION - STAY ALERT! After a summer of driving without parent or school bus drop-offs/pick-ups or hoards of kids walking to and from school, drivers can often forget the challenges of driving in school zones. So now is the time to adjust your driving habits to ensure you aren’t involved in a potentially fatal crash with a child. A few tips for driving in a school zone (especially during drop-off and dismissal times): • Slow down. The simplest thing any driver can do when there are new driving hazards is slow down. • Allow more time. As a new school year begins allow yourself more time to get where you are going until you can figure out the effects of increased traffic. • Stay alert! Make a mental note of any new bus stops or students walking to and from school. This way you won’t be surprised and will be prepared if you need to stop. • Learn the rules. Schools usually have places for parents to drop off and pick up children. If you are driving your child to school learn where these areas are and follow the procedures. If you need to go into the school ask where you can park your vehicle so traffic can continue to move smoothly. Never block pick and drop off areas. • Stop for school buses. When the red lights are flashing stop. It is against the law to pass a school bus when the lights are on.

STAYING SAFE ON THE TRAILS Fall is a great time to enjoy hiking in our beautiful area. Here are some tips to make sure you stay safe while having some outdoor fun: • Always hike, climb or pack in groups. • Stay on the trail. • Carry plenty of water and make frequent stops to drink. • Familiarize yourself with the area before you enter, and take someone with you who knows the area. 8

Pusch Ridge Lifestyle | October 2015

• Always be specific with friends or relatives about your planned route, and stick to it. • If you get lost, stay put. Stationary people are much easier to find especially in the dark. • Always check the weather forecast before starting your activity. Temperatures can drop several tens of degrees in a short period of time, even in late summer, and the summer monsoon storms seem to come out of nowhere, often causing flash floods. Things to take with you: butane lighter or matches in a waterproof container; map and compass; knife; spare clothing; plenty of water; whistle; first-aid kit; tarp or large plastic sheet, garbage bags for covering; flashlight and batteries; mirror.

MOST UNIQUE MILITARY RUN/WALK IN THE USA The Annual Desert Boneyard Run is held in the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) "boneyard," a one-of-a-kind specialized airplane storage site on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. The 309th AMARG provides depot-level maintenance, aircraft regeneration, storage and preservation, aircraft parts reclamation and disposal in support of the U.S. Department of Defense, allied warfighters and other government agencies. Runners have the rare chance to tread between the aircrafts that make up the largest air force fleet in the world, other than the United States Air Force. The 2,600acre site has nearly 4,000 aircraft and is typically only open to employees and the occasional bus tour. This unique event gives the general public an opportunity to see the boneyard's vast national treasures!  All of the event proceeds go to a Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) fund that directly supports the military men and women on Davis-Monthan AFB and their families. Kolb Rd and Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85730; October 31 at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base "Aircraft Boneyard;" 7:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. DMForceSupport.com or Active.com

DOGGIE DASH N' DAWDLE Join the Town of Oro Valley for the Doggie Dash n’ Dawdle! This is a run/walk event for you and your four-legged friends. Bring your

dog down to Riverfront Park and dash off in the two-mile run or take a leisurely onemile dawdle. After the race, you can enjoy fun, pet-friendly activities like the Halloween Costume contest for your pets, an obstacle course and yummy dog biscuit making. Please remember to have your doggie athletes leashed, and we will see you there! Saturday, October 31 at 8 a.m. to noon. Sponsored by Northwest Pet Clinic. Registration: $25 Early Registration by Oct. 10 (includes T-Shirt); $35 Late Registration through Oct. 31 (includes T-Shirt), including best Doggie Halloween Costume contest (prizes will be awarded). Canada Del Oro Riverfront Park, 551 W. Lambert Lane, Oro Valley, AZ 85737

ORO VALLEY HALLOWEEN SPOOKTACULAR Oro Valley Community & Recreation Center offers fun activities for the whole family, including a pumpkin carving contest, costume contest, Trick or Treating, Halloween Food Court and the movie “Hotel Transylvania” on the driving range at dusk. Adults $20; Children $10 (under 10 years old). Tickets can be purchased in advance or at the door. Buy your tickets in person at the Golf Shop or contact Kathy Gillespie at 520.229.5355 or email kgillespie@troongolf.com. Oro Valley Community & Recreation Center, 10555 N. La Cañada Drive, Oro Valley  85737.


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Animal Tracks

A Kind Heart THE STORY OF A GIRL AND HER DOG

ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHY JANICE METZINGER

Editor’s Note: We don't know who, but there is a beautiful soul working in the dead letter office who understands LOVE…

O

ur 14-year-old dog Abbey died last month. The day after she passed away, my 4-year-old daughter Meredith was crying and talking about how much she missed Abbey. She asked if we could write a letter to God so that when Abbey got to heaven, God would recognize her. I told her that I thought that we could, so she dictated these words: Dear God, Will you please take care of my dog? Abbey died yesterday and is with you in heaven. I miss her very much.  I'm happy that you let me have her as my dog even though she got sick. I hope you will play with her. She likes to swim and play with balls. I am sending a picture of her so when you see her you will know that she is my dog. I really miss her. Love, Meredith We put the letter in an envelope with a picture of Abbey and Meredith, addressed it to God/Heaven. We put our return address on it. Meredith pasted several stamps on the front of the envelope because she said it would take lots of stamps to get the letter all the way to heaven. That afternoon she dropped it into the letter box at the post office. A few days later, she asked if God had gotten the letter yet. I told her that I thought He had. Yesterday, there was a package wrapped in gold paper on our front porch addressed, 10

Pusch Ridge Lifestyle | October 2015

'To Meredith' in an unfamiliar hand. Meredith opened it. Inside was a book by Mr. Rogers called, 'When a Pet Dies.' Taped to the inside front cover was the letter we had written to God in its opened envelope. On the opposite page was the picture of Abbey and Meredith and this note: Dear Meredith, Abbey arrived safely in heaven. Having the picture was a big help and I recognized her right away. Abbey isn't sick anymore. Her spirit is here with me just like it stays in your heart. Abbey loved being your dog. Since we don't need our bodies in heaven, I don't have any pockets to keep your picture in so I'm sending it back to you in this little book for you to keep and have something to remember Abbey by. Thank you for the beautiful letter and thank your mother for helping you write it and send to me. What a wonderful mother you have. I picked her especially for you. I send my blessings every day and remember that I love you very much. By the way, I'm easy to find. I am wherever there is love. Love, God


Locally Owned

The Woman Behind

Thomae Advertising A STRONG ADVOCATE OF THE LOCAL BUSINESS MOVEMENT ARTICLE JAMES JANSEN | PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED

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homas Advertising Owner Lindsay Thomae hails from a multi-generation Tucson family that has had a presence in the Old Pueblo for a long time.  Tucson natives, Lindsay and her mom bear the unique distinction of having been delivered by the same obstetrician at the same hospital. A graduate of Catalina High School and the University of Arizona, Lindsay and her husband, Eric Thomae, a local attorney and part of the broadcast team for University of Arizona football, are ardent Wildcat fans. After graduating from the U of A with a communications degree, Lindsay worked as an assignments editor at KGUN 9/11 and after working there for a few years left a mere 3 days before 9/11.  She later twent to work for the sales department at KOLD Channel 13 and loved being in front of people with a great product.  Five years later, with the pending arrival of her daughter Ava, she left to become a full-time mom, by far her favorite “job.” A few years later, yearning to get back in the workplace in some capacity, Lindsay gave considerable thought to what would be the best use of her talents. Knowing that she loved working with people, remembering the influence impactful advertising had while she was at KOLD 13, and given her academic training and it in communications, advertising was a logical and natural choice. It provided the inherent flexibility she needed and wanted with a toddler. Lindsay has a passion for excellence and strong stewardship of her clients’ best interests.  Her corporate philosophy for Thomae Advertising is that “advertising is not an art, it’s a science.”  She believes strongly in tracking and making sure that advertising efforts produce the desired results. To be the best possible creative advocate for her clients, Thomae spends considerable time listening to her clients in order to understand their brand and business needs. Through this personalized approach, Thomae crafts uniquely creative ideas for the client as part of an overall cohesive marketing and media plan.

Considered to be open and approachable by clients, Thomae has been successful in helping clients maximize their business potential by creating effective marketing initiatives, and as a result, has built many loyal and long-lasting client relationships. Thomae generously shares her creative marketing skills with several non-profit organizations helping them reach out to people and raising their visibility with the public. Her involvement in assisting non-profits has included, but is not limited to, Tu Nidito Children and Family Services, Tucson Ladies Council and Local First Arizona.  Considering herself a “localist,” Thomae enjoys doing all she can to help local businesses thrive and prosper.  She and Eric are very proud of the Oro Valley community and consider it to be a wonderful place to raise a family. Lindsay and her husband Eric are very thankful to have the privilege of being Ava’s parents and make sure that no matter what they’re doing in the advertising, legal, or broadcasting worlds, that Ava remains the top priority.  Pusch Ridge Lifestyle salutes Lindsay Thomae of Thomae and Advertising as an outstanding corporate citizen as a locally owned business in a community of which we’re all very proud.

October 2015 | Pusch Ridge Lifestyle

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Parent’s Corner

Encouraging the Artist in Your Child at Home ARTICLE KENDRA MATHEWSON

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rtist and author Sally Warner says that encouraging the artist in your child is really about nurturing creativity. In her book, “Encouraging the Artist in Your Child,” she explains creativity as “an inner resource that can enrich every aspect of our lives. The potential for creativity (the act of making something new) lives in each of us. Creativity isn’t taught, but as parents we can facilitate it. Children are already creative, and the best creative environment for encouraging creativity in children is relaxed and non-critical. It encourages children to be playful or silly, to be alone or bored sometimes, to explore or even fail sometimes.” DISPELLING MYTHS OR FEARS

You do not have to teach your children “art.” Just provide time, space and simple materials. Keep your child company if they want. Assist with any procedures beyond their grasp. Help them overcome distractions and learn to work for longer periods of time. Encourage your child to talk about his or her art. But you don’t have to “teach” them. You do not have to sit down and do art yourself.  Doing it with them can emphasize a “right” way to do a project and encourage copying our work instead of expressing their own ideas. Just be in the vicinity to help and encourage. Your house does not have to get messy.   Your child will learn where to work and how to use the materials. They can help set up each project and help clean up afterward. Take time to teach those habits. Creativity doesn’t mean chaos. HOW AND WHY THE OLDER CHILD MAKES ART

From age 6, art becomes a means of self-expression: the expression of one’s inner self, which is made up of thoughts, feelings, dreams and vision. Home is the best place to explore art and try new things away from the critical eye of others. Older kids feel a project is successful if they like the way it looks when they’re done, they don’t really care how they got there. “Failure-proof” projects are an important safety net at this time that helps develop self-esteem. 12

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Even if you don’t like the art your child chooses to make, what’s important is that he or she is making it. The process is going on. WHAT MAKES AT-HOME ART “FAILURE PROOF”

• Choices are available to your child, even within structure • Flexibility is encouraged during the creative process • There is an openness as to what the finished project will look like HOW TO ENCOURAGE CREATIVITY

Don’t leave art only to the experts. It’s not an activity that should be isolated from our everyday lives; give it a chance at home. Don’t buy into the idea that your child is “gifted in art” or “not gifted.” Art is for every child, and it’s easy. Give your children the frequent opportunity to experience freely a variety of art activities at home. Then let your children do them again and again (drawing, painting, collage, yarn art, sculpture). Help your child build his or her own decision-making capabilities through art. Offer choices, but limit choice to begin with. Art is about making decisions, even if they are small ones. Try to respect and nurture the artist and the “art spirit” that lives in your child--not the things a child makes or the skills a child learns, but the artist in him--or her--self. You can encourage your child simply by providing paper and/or materials when they express interest in something. Don’t worry about originality or “good taste” at this point. Just try to keep art alive at home in any way you can. Free drawing is at the heart of art at home. All you have to do is provide the materials. Have black fine-point nonpermanent markers and blank pieces of paper around. Encourage your children to draw often and much.

THE MOST VALUABLE THINGS CHILDREN GET FROM ART

Art offers our lives so much more than just bringing beauty into our world. At a time when programs like art are being reduced or even cut from our schools, art is such an important way to help children become well-rounded people. The most valuable things children get from experiencing art are things they will bring to any creative endeavor in any area of their lives: flexibility, decision-making, con-

fidence in their intuition/”inner voice” and the feeling of celebration. Art-at-home is a unique gift only we as parents can give. It enables each child to see that his or her own creativity is something that is valued by the family and is an integral part of who that child is. ADAPTED FROM THE BOOK, Encouraging the

Artist in Your Child (Even If You Can’t Draw): 101 failure-proof, home-tested projects for kids, by

Sally Warner. Visit SallyWarner.com.


Saving Steam Pump Ranch

The story of how this community's connection to the past was preserved. ARTICLE ERIN HAYES BURT PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED George Pusch Sr.

T

here was a moment in 2004 when all of this nearly became just another strip mall. We were that close. The sweeping views, the stables built to accommodate the many horses used on the movie sets, the lavish guest homes that housed early movie stars, the pump house that made Tucson a hub of trade. In a town that’s younger than most of its residents, one of the only connections to the past in Oro Valley was nearly paved over.  The story of Steam Pump Ranch begins in 1847, when George Pusch was born in Frankfurt, Germany. He immigrated to the United States and began working in New York, then moved West like many others in search of opportunity. After settling in California, he drove

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a mule team to Tucson, Arizona, and that’s where he found it. He called on an old friend, John Zellweger from Switzerland, to join him, and they pooled their funds to buy part of the old Canada del Oro ranch, located off Camp Grant Road, now Oracle Road. The location was key since the road, formerly an important juncture of Indian travel, was also the route that the wagon trains, Wells Fargo, and other travelers used to go West. They registered their own brand, “PZ,” and began construction of the ranch headquarters. The main part of their plan was the purchase of one of two steam pumps that would end up in the Arizona territory. The pump would draw up water from underneath the dry, desert floor to water cattle on their way to market in Tucson. Cattle ranchers got paid by the pound there, and they were more than happy to spend the $0.15 a head needed to weigh down their herds with water at Steam Pump. The PZ brand also had


around 15,000 cattle of their own to water and keep, in addition to a downtown butcher shop and Ice Company along the railroad. Pusch may have indeed had one of the first vertical business models in the territory. Eventually, Pusch got involved in politics and the move toward statehood. He sold the ranch to John Proctor, a hotelier from Pasadena, California, who moved to Tucson to manage the Pioneer Hotel. He loved farming and raised cattle, and wanted to use the ranch to supply his hotel with local eggs, meat and vegetables. His main contribution to the architecture of Steam Pump Ranch was building a luxurious home on the property, including the guest home containing a more than 10-foot barbeque grill.  Proctor’s daughter married a popular (New York Giants) baseball player in the 50s, Hank Leiber, and as the spring training industry sprung up to take advantage of the mild weather in the Southwest, Steam Pump Ranch became the place to be, its guesthouses having hosted everyone from famous baseball players to movie stars who came to Tucson to escape the limelight and take in the views.  The once lush, green ranch, still owned by the Proctor-Leiber family, fell into ruin and sat for a few decades until it caught the eye of a few developers in 2003. Developer Michael Naifeh and the brothers who own Brake Masters purchased 6 of the 15 available acres for $500,000. Their development plans started off with a strip mall, but then they scrapped that idea and came up with another concept before returning to the idea of a strip center. 

becoming retail property, and was instrumental in getting the property on the National Registry of Historic Places to further preserve it. “The ranch has always been a part of history,” explains Lazar. “In the Pusch era, the ranch was a landmark for Ranchers in the Territory to bring their cattle herds were watered before they were shipped to market by rail stock cars. During Pusch and Proctor era the ranch was very lush and green. Around 2000, much of the vegetation started vanishing. Over the last year or so, ranch it has gone through a change and the ecosystem is being revitalized. "  Since the preservation bond was passed, more historic discoveries have been made at the site, including native coal from Tucson Ice and Cold Storage Company established by George Pusch Sr. and John C. Zellweger.  Progress on the building renovations has already been made, including completing a ghost structure that preserves the current pump house/blacksmith shop and shows what it would have looked like in its prime when it gave the ranch property its inimitable name.  “What made Steam Pump Ranch was the pump house that housed the steam-powered water pump,” says Lazar.  Henrietta, Maybelle, Gertrude and Wilemina

“The ranch has always been a part of history,” explains Lazar.

Their project drew the attention of the town council when, in April 2004, they submitted a demolition application for the parcel. The plans included paving over the original 1890s ranch house, an adobe house built in the early 1900s, and the remains of the pump house. “About 2003, a prominent group of concerned citizens recognized the historical values of Steam Pump Ranch and other area sites. Their commitment to the preservation of these historical sites soon became known to the Town and openly received,” says Oro Valley Historical Society President Warren Lazar. Oro Valley founder James Kriegh fought to save the ranch from CONTINUED >

October 2015 | Pusch Ridge Lifestyle

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you dream it. we build it.

. . . garages to kitchens


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. . . driveways to outdoor retreats

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www.malyandassociates.com ROC: 140799


STEAM PUMP RANCH

(CONTINUED)

More projects have been approved, including renovations of the once lavish main ranch house, renovation of the guest houses, and the pump house/blacksmith shop renovation, which will have its ribbon-cutting in late September. “The garage will become the historical society’s museum. The old Proctor-Leiber house will be renovated and turned into a home that can be toured," says Lazar. “The Pusch house is now a walk-through museum for public education about the Pusch family and what they contributed to Southern Arizona. Other guest houses will also be refurbished and rebuilt to a walk-in museum.”  In addition to the renovations on the property, the site is home to the Oro Valley Farmer’s market and Second Saturdays--an event that includes historic tours, walk-throughs, live music, antique vendors and activities for children. Plans for a November 7th Harvest Day Festival, to celebrate the historic time of Pusch House on the harvest in the area, are Steam Pump Ranch also in the works.  20

Pusch Ridge Lifestyle | October 2015

“We need the community behind us to preserve the history, and that means involving everyone," says Lazar. "Transplants, snowbirds, life-long residents. Steam Pump Ranch made this area, so spread the word about this historical resource.” Experience the history of Steam Pump Ranch. The site is open The House Today

for special occasions such as Settler’s Day, open houses and holiday events. These include tours of the Pusch family ranch house, guest speakers, food, entertainment and historical demonstrations. For information and dates on activities at Steam Pump Ranch, check Oro Valley’s Parks and Recreation calendar of events at: OroValleyAZ.gov.


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ARTICLE LISA ALLEN

Leave a Book, Take a Book

Promoting literacy, community and the environmental spirit one Little Free Library at a time.

O

ne movie that all three of my kids can agree on is Ferris Beuller’s Day Off. They even recite lines now and then, including the ubiquitous “Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.” That quote has now become our standard when we’re driving in a new part of town, though it goes more like this: ‘Little free libraries might be here, Mom! If you don’t stop driving so fast, we might miss them.’ Thousands of Little Free Libraries can be found throughout the United States as well as in places across the globe like Lithuania and Lebanon, Rome and Winnipeg and Sao Paulo and Dublin. As of this writing, there are more than 15,000 Little Free Libraries scattered across the world. The original Little Free Library was built to resemble a one room schoolhouse. Todd Bol built it as a tribute to his mother, a former school teacher with a passion for reading. He adorned it with a sign that said ‘free books,’ mounted it on a post in his Hudson, Wisconsin, yard, and filled it with books. He built more and gave them away, and then joined forces with Rick Brooks of Madison, Wisconsin Together, they saw the potential to effect good through the giving and receiving of books. The non-profit organization Little Free Library’s goals are twofold: to promote literacy and the love of reading for both children and adults through free book exchanges worldwide and to promote a sense of community.

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What started in 2009 as a tribute to one mother has grown into an international movement that not only promotes the love of reading, but is also beginning to evolve into walking and biking tours and is, in some places, is influencing school curriculum as well as service and social media projects. The Little Free Library concept is not unlike that of a traditional library, though the differences are significant. There is no need for a card, and there are no due dates or fines, and the selection of books is ever changing. Everyone is encouraged to leave a book or to take a book, and can return it or not, at his or her discretion. Even more fun is that each Little Free Library can reflect its owner through its design. Many look like exaggerated birdhouses, but others vary in shape, size and decoration. Official Little Free Libraries are chartered with the non-profit Little Free Library and are included on a comprehensive online map. While there is a fee to obtain a charter, the planning and construction of each unit is left up to the discretion of the owner. Kits are available for purchase, but many opt to use recycled or repurposed items to build a distinctive container that mirrors their reasons behind joining the movement, and several are part of landscape vignettes that include gardens and benches. The Tucson area is home to 20 officially-registered Little Free Libraries. Who will be the next to build one here? Come on, Pusch Ridge! Let’s build some Little Free Libraries.  To learn more and to browse the official Little Free Library map,

There is no need for a library card, and there are no due dates or fines, and the selection of books is ever changing. Everyone is encouraged to leave a book or to take a book, and can return it or not, at his or her discretion.

visit LittleFreeLibrary.org.

October 2015 | Pusch Ridge Lifestyle

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Financial Fitness Of course, no one can predict exactly how long they'll live. But by taking into account your current health, diet, exercise level, access to quality medical care, and family health history, you might be able to make a reasonable assumption DO YOU PLAN ON WORKING AFTER AGE 62?

Social Security WHAT SHOULD YOU DO AT AGE 62? ARTICLE THOMAS CURTIS

I

s 62 your lucky number? If you're eligible, that's the earliest age you can start receiving Social Security retirement benefits. If you decide to start collecting benefits before your full retirement age, you'll have company. According to the Social Security Administration (SSA), approximately 73 percent of Americans elect to receive their Social Security benefits early. (Source: SSA Annual Statistical Supplement, 2013)  Although collecting early retirement benefits makes sense for some people, there's a major drawback to consider: if you start collecting benefits early, your monthly retirement benefit will be permanently reduced. So before you put down the tools of your trade and pick up your first Social Security check, there are some factors you'll need to weigh before deciding whether to start collecting benefits early. HAVE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT YOUR LONGEVITY?

Another key factor in your decision is whether or not you plan to continue working after you start collecting Social Security benefits at age 62. That's because income you earn before full retirement age may reduce your Social Security retirement benefit. Specifically, if you are under full retirement age for the entire year, $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $2 you earn over the annual earnings limit ($15,720 in 2015). Example: You start collecting Social Security benefits at age 62. You continue working, and your job pays $30,000 in 2015. Your annual benefit would be reduced by $7,140 ($30,000 minus $15,720, divided by 2). Note: If your monthly benefit is reduced in the short term due to your earnings, you'll receive a higher monthly benefit later. That's because the SSA recalculates your benefit when you reach full retirement age, and omits the months in which your benefit was reduced. WILL YOUR SPOUSE BE AFFECTED?

When to begin receiving Social Security is more complicated when you're married. The age at which you begin receiving benefits may significantly affect the amount of lifetime income you and your spouse receive, as well as the benefit the surviving spouse will be entitled to, so you'll need to consider how your decision will affect your joint retirement plan. OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

In addition to the factors discussed here, other financial considerations may influence whether you start collecting Social Security benefits at age 62. How do other sources of retirement income factor in? Have you considered how your income taxes will be affected? What about personal considerations? Do you plan on traveling, volunteering, going back to school, starting your own business, pursuing hobbies, or moving to a new location? Do you have grandchildren or elderly parents whom you want to help take care of? Every person's situation is different. Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC, an independent broker/dealer, and are not insured by FDIC, NCUA or any other government agency, are not deposits or obligations of the financial institution, are not guaranteed by the financial institution, and are subject to risks, including the possible loss of principal.

Is it better to take reduced benefits at age 62 or full benefits later? The answer depends, in part, on how long you live. If you live longer than your "break-even age," the overall value of your retirement benefits taken at full retirement age will begin to outweigh the value of reduced benefits taken at age 62. You'll generally reach your break-even age about 12 years from your full retirement age. FOR MORE INFORMATION For example, if your full retirement age is 66, Social Security rules can be complex. For more inyou should reach your break-even age at 78. formation about Social Security benefits, visit the If you live past this age, you'll end up with SSA website at SocialSecurity.gov. Or contact: higher total lifetime benefits by waiting until Thomas Curtis CFP®, AIF® full retirement age to start collecting. HowevManaging Partner er, unless you're able to invest your benefits Wealth Management Partners rather than use them for living expenses, your - An Independent Firm break-even age is probably not the most im1980 E River Road #120 portant part of the equation. For many peoTucson, AZ. 85718 ple, what really counts is how much they'll 520.297.7999 receive each month, rather than how much WMPAZ.com they'll accumulate over many years. 26

Pusch Ridge Lifestyle | October 2015

Content Prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions. Financial Advisors of RJFS are not qualified to render advice on tax or legal matters. You should discuss tax or legal matters with the appropriate professional. This material is being provided for information purposes only and is not a complete description, nor is it a recommendation. The information has been obtained from sources considered to be reliable, but Raymond James does not guarantee that the foregoing material is accurate or complete.


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Driver’s Notebook

Porsche’s 918 Spyder is Automotive Haute Couture

ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHY TOM STRONGMAN

T

o Porsche enthusiasts, seeing a 918 Spyder is like catching a glimpse of the Holy Grail or the Hope Diamond because only 918 of them will be built, worldwide. The limited-production Spyder, with a base price of $845,000, is the sort of automotive haute couture created by Porsche once every 10 or 12 years. Contemporaries include the 950-horsepower hybrid LaFerrari, priced at $1,350,000; McLaren P1 at $1,150,000; and the Bugatti Veyron at $1,914,000. All are capable of pavement-wrinkling acceleration and have top track speeds of at least 200 mph. The Spyder showcases the kind of technology that it takes to create a genuine super car these days. It is a four-wheel-drive, plug-in hybrid. A 608-horsepower V-8 and an electric motor power the rear wheels and a single electric motor powers the fronts. The car shown here was equipped with the Weissach package that includes carbon fiber trim and lighter wheels. Its starting price is $929,000. The last mega-Porsche was the 605-horsepower, V-10 Carrera GT from 2004-2007. It was $440,000. For manufacturers, cars such as the Spyder are mostly demonstrations of their capabilities. Porsche materials say the Spyder “embodies the essence of the Porsche idea: it combines motor racing technology with everyday utility, maximum performance and minimum consumption.” It is built in very limited numbers, has an astronomical price and is bought by the wealthiest of buyers. Let’s look closely at what makes the Spyder tick.

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Pusch Ridge Lifestyle | October 2015

The Porsche 918 Spyder is a hybrid supercar capable of accelerating to 60 mph in 2.5 seconds and hitting 214 mph on a track.

It has a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) structure with, says Porsche, “aluminum crash elements at the front and rear to absorb and reduce the energy of a collision.” The 918’s hybrid drive system profits from experience Porsche learned by racing the 911 GT3 R hybrid and the 919 sports-racing prototype that competed at the 24 Hours of Le Mans last June. The 919 had a turbocharged V-4 engine and a 250-horsepower electric motor driving the front axle. There are four driving modes. Solely on electric power, the 918 can cover up to 19 miles, accelerate to 60 miles per hour in 6.2 seconds and reach 93 mph. In hybrid mode, the two electric motors and the V-8 work together. In sport mode, the combustion engine operates continuously and the electric motors take on a support role. Race hybrid mode delivers maximum performance. Maximum acceleration to 60 mph is 2.5 seconds and top track speed is 214 mph. Calculating the fuel economy rating for a hybrid is tricky. The EPA rates the 918’s fuel economy at 20 mpg in the city and 24 on the highway using the gasoline engine. The hybrid rating is 67 miles per gallon equivalent. The liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery sits low behind the driver. It can be fully charged in seven hours from a 110-volt outlet or 2.5 hours with a 220- volt or 240-volt outlet. The V-8 is designed with cylinder heads that breathe in through the outside ports and exhale through exhaust pipes that coming


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CHARITIES & FUNDRAISERS Boys & Girls Club of Tucson (520) 573-3533 The exhaust exits out of the engine cover to help cool the engine compartment.

Children’s Opportunity Foundation (520) 219-2521

ENTERTAINMENT & RECREATION Hon-Dah Resort & Casino (928) 369-7574 hon-dah.com

FASHION & ACCESSORIES J Bridal Boutique (520) 577-5528 jbridalboutique.com The small cabin has deeply reclining seats. Various vehicle functions and the audio system can be operated intuitively by the multi-touch black panel on the center console.

out the center V of the engine. That explains why the exhaust pipes are visible in the upper part of the rear engine cover. There is a tiny rear window. Routing the exhaust out the top makes the engine compartment cooler plus it looks amazing. The transmission is a seven-speed, dual-clutch Porsche PDK unit. Intriguing details: According to Car and Driver, the mesh engine cover is stamped from a solid sheet of stainless steel and then has 7,335 holes cut into it by a laser. The magazine also reports that the tire sidewalls are laser etched to create a texture like that of suede. A front-axle lift system, a $10,500 option, increases ground clearance to keep the nose from scraping on speed bumps or inclines. As Pete Stout wrote as editor of Panorama, the national magazine of the Porsche Club of America: “Is the 918 an overwrought marketing message or a supercar to lust after?” I have not driven one, but seeing it in person makes me think it is a supercar to lust after. 2015 PORSCHE 918 SPYDER ENGINE: 4.6-liter, 608-horsepower V-8 ELECTRIC MOTORS: 156-horsepower, 129-horsepower WHEELBASE: 107.5 inches CURB WEIGHT: 3,692 pounds BASE PRICE: $845,000

With Weissach package, $929,000 MPG RATING: 20 in the city, 24 on the highway (gas only) 67 mpg equivalent combined

HOME BUILDERS & REMODELERS Maly & Associates (520) 299-0856

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Burris-Hennessy Commercial Properties (520) 882-4343 The Billings Team/Long Realty (520) 730-7603 thebillingstucson.com

SENIOR LIVING & SERVICES The Villas (520) 531-0086

October 2015 | Pusch Ridge Lifestyle

29


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October Lifestyle Calendar

THROUGH OCTOBER 11 27TH ANNUAL PATAGONIA FALL FESTIVAL TOWN PARK, PATAGONIA AZ 85624

A celebration of music and art! Patagonia's annual small-town fair offers gifts and goodies from 125-plus vendors, non-stop entreat booths, and a children's carnival. Visit website for event times.

OCTOBER 10 28TH COCHISE COUNTY CYCLING CLASSIC COCHISE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, DOUGLAS

Called the jewel of Perimeter Bicycling Association's events as it offers the most scenic route around southeastern Arizona where the Dragoon Mountains and the West are still wild. Cyclists may choose to ride 165, 95, 47 or 27 miles, starting/finishing at the fairgrounds. CochiseCountyCyclingClassic.com or 520.745.2033

THROUGH OCTOBER 31

OCTOBER 15 - 18 DISNEY ON ICE PRESENTS FROZEN

NIGHTFALL AT OLD TUCSON

TUCSON CONVENTION CENTER

OLD TUCSON

Captivating young and old alike, the stage production for the Academy Award winning movie, Frozen, shares the magical land of Arendelle, along with Elsa, Anna and Olaf, live on stage. Ticketmaster 800.745.3000   

Does your average haunted house leave you wanting? Come to the only One real haunted town … Nightfall! Bury yourself in a totally terrifying town with outrageous live shows, disturbing haunts, and a collection of hideous live characters … including the GARGOYLES! Tickets are available at the nightfall gate or online.

THROUGH OCTOBER 25 6HT LOFT FILM FEST 2015 THE LOFT CINEMA, TUCSON

Dedicated to showcasing the best independent, foreign and classic films, as well as celebrating the work of established and emerging directors, writers, producers and actors. Through eclectic and diverse programming, the Fest challenges, inspires and entertains, and honors the artists whose talent and passion bring that cinema to life.

OCTOBER 8 - 11

THROUGH NOVEMBER 8 "PREMIUM BLEND" - UA DANCE

THE 2015 UNITED STATES TENNIS CONGRESS

UA STEVIE ELLER DANCE THEATRE

HILTON TUCSON EL CONQUISTADOR GOLF & TENNIS RESORT

The UA School of Dance presents eight non-consecutive performances with classic and new choreography performing José Limón's stunning piece, "The Unsung," paying homage to the American Indian, at UA Stevie Eller Dance Theatre. Features new ballet by James Clouser and fresh choreography by the award-winning faculty. Centerpiece: Ben Stevenson’s masterwork, Four Last Songs, set to Richard Strauss’s poignant, haunting songs of farewell. 520.621.3341 

Created by serious tennis players for serious players, the mission of The Tennis Congress is to give passionate adults  access to world-class training usually reserved only for top juniors and professionals.  The 2015 United States Tennis Congress has reached capacity due to overwhelming response. TennisCongress.com to be added to waiting list.  32

Pusch Ridge Lifestyle | October 2015


GREAT FUTURES START HERE.

Every kid deserves a Great Future! Give the Gift of Membership! Through the generous support of our donors, the Boys & Girls Clubs of Tucson is able to provide affordable after-school programming to 5,000 Club Members each year through its six Clubhouses in Tucson. Using proven programs and resources, BGCT equips youth with pathways to success and as a result Club Members have the resilience and support to face challenges and seek results. Club Membership is only $10 per school year per child, yet the true cost per member is $600. For more than 50 years, the Boys & Girls Clubs of Tucson (BGCT) has helped kids, especially those who need us most, build Great Futures! BGCT IS A TRUSTED PARTNER IN EMPOWERING CHILDREN AND IS A LEADING TUCSON CHARITY.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT! TO LEARN MORE OR MAKE A DONATION, VISIT

WWW.BGCTUCSON.ORG • (520)573-3533


WORDS KENDRA MATHEWSON

Birds on a Wire

Parting Thoughts

O

ne of my dear friends is a painter who sees the world through her amazing artist eyes. When she was the newbie in our neighborhood, her heart was sensitive to how to integrate her family into the community. Driving one day she noticed how birds perched on a telephone wire seemed to choose when to gather, and who to pause with. As she watched the birds sit, and then come and go, those birds spoke to her of how we create community, who we keep counsel with, and even the dynamic nature of the process. She had moved in down the street, and it was my love of her work that initially drew us together. We shared a moment of connection on my front porch steps, and lingered like birds chatting on the telephone wire, before we flew off back to our hectic lives. Over the years, through working on house projects, painting together, building a club, learning new skills together, cooking meals together, playing cards as couples, we’d pause from the “flights” our lives demanded (me flying around in my minivan and she in her Mini Cooper) to sit like those birds on a wire and talk over tea. This is how we became friends. That is community. That is how community begins and how it grows. These one-on-one connections expand and extend and become a beautiful web of interconnectedness. Through

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Pusch Ridge Lifestyle | October 2015

“I Think I’ve Got This” by Lisa Lala | Birds on a Wire Series

words, stories, shared experiences and common interests, we find inspiration to create our communities. My friend’s keen observations became the main theme of a series that has become her signature. The beauty of her Birds on a Wire series, and her reflections on community, have inspired me to embrace and celebrate more the important place it has in our lives. We live in such an individualistic society that our personal empowerment sometimes overshadows the significance of our need for each other. Like the ingredients of an exceptional recipe, or the materials used to construct a quality home, a community is only as good as the people who comprise it. Because the people are who ignite an idea, imagine a future, share an event, take the bull by the horns, see a need and fill it, spread the word about a new business, open their home to new families, bring a meal when there’s an illness, invest in a neighbor or believe in a student, give witness to struggles and celebrate successes. Our magazine is your “wire.” Let us pause to read the stories that have been inspired by our community, to drink in the beautiful photographs that paint the story of us. Email your editor and publisher, or better yet reach out and enjoy a cup of coffee together. Let us stop here in the pages of our publication each month and celebrate like birds on a wire, before we fly off back to our busy lives. You inspire us.


Come Join Us...

SUNDAY, OCT OBER 11 • 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Fall Wine Tasting B E N E F I T I N G

• Enjoy Live Entertainment • Buy-It-Now & Silent Auction • Revel in Culinary Delights • Sip & Savor the Extensive Assortment of Wines • Sponsorships are Available (FOR MORE INFORMATION: 520-293-1136)

IN

THE

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Southwest Corner of Campbell and Skyline across from La Encantada

Tickets $65 PER PERSON VisitYOTO.ORG or Call 520-293-1136 Purchase tickets online starting September 1st


Maybe You Didn’t Hear. You have new neighbors around your town! Introducing Beltone’s New Owners, Joe and Katie Kopp.

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Pusch Ridge October 2015  

October 2015 Issue of Pusch Ridge Lifestyle

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