Les Nouvelles Esthetiques Spa Magazine #88

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Innovations

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Lifestyle Relaxation & Health Therapies

s k i n v i t a l i t y b o d y b a l a n c e



A Professional take on SPA Business, Health Therapies, Products & Simple Relaxation 2022*ISSUE*88

C O N T E N T S *88

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Doc: LNE France

s k i n v i t a l i t y b o d y b a l a n c e

Q & A with Sue Harmsworth, Spa Industry Visionary, by GWI 2 Anti-Aging Needs a Body That Never Ages 4 Thalgo: Taking eco-commitments more seriously than ever. 6 Tips for Seasonal Skincare Changes 8 Survey Reveals How 2020 Altered the Aesthetic Landscape 10 The Connection Between a Growth Mindset and Neuroplasticity 14 TC Plus Peel - Dermo-Epidermal Bio-revitaliser from KSurgery 12 Can 'Benjamin Button' Effect do the same for Humans? 16 TREND: More Sophisticated Medical-Wellness Destinations 18 DrK cellREVERSE NucleoCollagen For Healthy Skin, Brain & Gut 20 Cellular Health: A Key To Healthy Ageing 24 Luxury Cosmetic Procedures Reach Next Level Prices 26 How to Boost your Productivity with Neurologica 28 A Plan for All Seasons: Modifying Integrated Skincare 30 5 Beauty Treatments for a Big Event!! 32 The Cold Hard Facts About Cryotherapy 34 Introducing NEW Lamelle Dermaheal Re-Firm 36 Is Facial Fitness The New Face Lift? 38 Physical Activity and Fitness Technologies 40 Nordlys - Danish “Northern Lights” 42 Skin that sparkles 44 LPG endermologie - Stimulating Dormant Cellular Activity 46 Mallucci: A state-of-the-art Cosmetic and Aesthetic Clinic 48 Let “No” Work for You 50 6 Medical Clinic Interior Design Ideas For Comfort & Functionality 52 Vagus Nerve Stimulation: 9 Ways to Quickly Calm Body and Soul 56 IV Nutrient Therapy – Drip with Caution 58 The Certified Health & Wellness Coach Is Rising…FINALLY 60 Our Customers Are Always Complaining About Our Prices 62 Why Potential is more Important than Talent 64 5 Unconventional Ways To Show Gratitude To Employees 66 Leaders are Made – BRAND 68

E d i t o r s

W e l c o m e

The Aesthetics Market will be worth $ 27.55 Billion, globally by 2028 at a 10.6% annual growth rate. Development of technologically advanced and user-friendly products, increasing geriatric population, development of invasive and non-invasive aesthetic procedures are some of the factors that will lead the growth of the aesthetic market sector. Aesthetics is a subsidiary of medicine that mainly focuses on procedures and techniques to improve and enhance the skin, face, and body's appearance, texture, and contours. This branch covers the treatment of scars, moles, liver spots, excess fat, wrinkles, skin looseness, unwanted hair, cellulite and skin discoloration. The growing awareness of the products and growing demand for costeffective aesthetics medicine, non-surgical procedures and cosmetic surgery are the main factors for an individual to predict the market growth. Additionally an increase in consumer spending on aesthetic enhancing supplements worldwide and the growing demand for procedures mainly by working population, due to required improved self presentation, results in a increased demand for aesthetic innovations, and in turn the increase in the numbers of doctors and therapist who provide safe and effective treatments for the clients by using new technological innovations. Dates to Diarise: Les Nou velles Esthetiques Spa Conference and Spa Awards 2022 are taking place on the 24 & 25th July 2022, at The Houghton Hotel. Register today on www.lesnouvelleblog.co.za Enjoy the read !

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques International Publisher I 7, avenue Stephane Mallarme 75017 PARIS Tel: 01 43 80 06 47 Fax: 01 43 80 83 63 www.nouvelles-esthetiques.com I Fondateur : H. Pierantoni I Directeur de la Publications: Jeannine Cannac-Pierantoni I Redactrice en chef: Michéle de Lattre-Pierantoni I International Editions • Argentina • Baltic • Benelux • Brazil • Bulgaria • Canada • China • France • Greece • Hong Kong • Hungary • Israel • Italy • Japan • Mexico • Poland • Portugal • Romania • Singapore • South Africa • Spain • Taiwan • Turkey • Ukraine • USA • Yugoslavia Les Nouvelles Esthétiques South African Edition I Max Cafe P. O. Box 81204, Parkhurst Johannesburg, South Africa 2120 I Tel: +27 83 267 2773 e-mail: info@lesnouvelles.co.za www.lesnouvelles.co.za I Publisher/Creative Director : Anthony de Freitas e-mail: tony@maxcafe.co.za I Managing Editor : Dr. Nadine de Freitas e-mail: nadine@maxcafe .co.za I Editor ial Assistant: Sarene Kloren editor ial @lesnouvelles.co.za I Adver tising Enquir ies: Dr Nadine de Freitas e-mail: info@lesnouvelles.co.za I Subscription Enquiries: Tel: +27 83 267 2773 e-mail: info@lesnouvelles.co.za or visit: www.lesnouvelles.co.za


spa trends

Q & A with Sue Harmsworth, Spa Industry Visionary, by GWI By Global Wellness Institute

and cognitive health will be huge coming out of the pandemic, with depression and anxiety having risen exponentially since COVID. One reason the functional medicine and diagnostics piece is so key is that with all the wonderful destinations focusing on Asian traditions (the Indian, Thai or Balinese approaches), people weren’t given concrete results. When you’ve gone to medicalwellness clinics in Germany or Austria, they do advanced testing (whether hormones or vitamin deficiencies) on intake, and when you leave, you do them again. You can see the results. It seems crazy, but you really can significantly impact your blood pressure or cholesterol in one week. What I want to do—and it’s the future—is to be able to program individuals on a personalized plan with a very full set of stats so that they can see their results over time. McGroarty: Operators and investors have struggled to get even the ROI of a spa in a hotel project. What needs to change to pull off these far more ambitious integrative wellness destinations? Harmsworth: First, it’s going to take an entirely new operating model and type of operator. There’s lots of great operators on the clinic side?; I could run through some of the big names from Lanserhof to SHA, but they’re not as integrated as I think the future will be, and I don’t think there’s an operator out there right now with this forward-thinking, bringit-all-together approach.

Sue Harmsworth needs little introduction: She has spent five decades shaping the global spa, global wellness and beauty industries (responsible for designing 500+ spas in 65 countries), and her services were honored by Queen Elizabeth the Second. She founded the global brand ESPA in 1993, which she sold in 2017; is founder of Sue Harmsworth Ltd, which advises owners and private equity firms on creating wellness destinations; and she sits on various boards, from Forbes to the Global Wellness Institute (GWI). In this edition, Harmsworth discusses: • Why the term “wellness” has reached near meaninglessness — and how we need new distinctions. • How integrative wellness resorts—which marry “serious” and “light” wellness—are the future but will require a whole new kind of operator. •How the pandemic experience is fueling consumer desire for wellness real estate. • Why the spa practitioners of the future must be trained better and deeper. • What investment bet she would place in wellness. Beth McGroarty, GWI VP of Research and Forecasting: In your recent master class with us, you discussed how the term “wellness” has become so oversaturated and overstretched it’s reaching the point of meaninglessness. And that the time is now to make new distinctions. Talk more about this problem, what new distinctions need to be made. Harmsworth: I’m starting to hate the word wellness (laughing) because it’s become so generic it’s utterly

2

confusing the consumer. Everything is labeled “wellness”: You go to the supermarket, and you’re overwhelmed. We need new terms and definitions— and as an industry, we don’t challenge ourselves enough to be clear with consumers. It’s becoming a real issue with social media moving so fast and so much copying going on. The history of wellness and spa—and the regional differences—add to the confusion. What we think of as “wellness”—all the ancient medical traditions from TCM to Ayurveda; amazing, centuries-old “kurs” at European health farms; the hydrothermal piece; advanced massage techniques—these existed forever before modern “wellness” was born in the spa industry in the 90s. As the spa industry took off, the word and concept became confusing, and it has to do with what the US means by it versus the rest of the world. In the US, every beauty salon, or every two treatment rooms by a pool, suddenly became a “spa”—not what I, as a European, would call one. When the spa movement became powerful in the 90s, stress was the overwhelming focus. The world was changing: Women were going back into the workforce, flying constantly became the norm, and technology was taking over the world. Stress was the huge issue, and most spas were built for relaxation—from massages to meditation. What I would call “light wellness”—with no negative connotations. But now, we have a much more complex set of modalities and advanced practitioners at wellness destinations. We have fitness/sports, a much more

serious nutrition and microbiome piece, spa, complementary medicine, and beauty—but aesthetics as in both medicine/machines and more non-invasive approaches. And we have more medical or “serious” wellness. But there can be confusion around “medical wellness” for consumers: They may think it means traditional allopathic medicine and ask, why would I go to an expensive resort when I can do the same things with a specialist? The future of medicine at destinations is functional medicine and preventative, advanced testing and diagnostics: whether hormone analysis, 3D scanning analyzing bone density, muscle mass and visceral fat, or microbiome and nutrition testing. All to create a personalized health plan. So, you have “light wellness,” which spas and hospitality destinations have excelled at. You have medical or “serious” wellness, but it’s different this time around: It’s preventative, functional medicine and diagnostics. That’s why I’m so keen on new definitions and distinctions: “Wellness” is too imprecise to mean anything. People have got to focus on what their consumers want and get clear about what they’re delivering. McGroarty: I know you’re working on some big integrative wellness destinations—and you believe that’s the future. Why? Harmsworth: It’s absolutely the future, with all the lifestyle diseases hitting us so hard, and I’m working on properties now that bring everything together: functional medicine and diagnostics, an aesthetics clinic, and all the traditional wellness, from complementary medicine to fitness to serious meditation (with Buddhist monks or TCM). Mental

We need to remember that, historically, spas—outside the US—haven’t been particularly profitable. That’s because the hotel model is to view every department as a completely standalone profit center, so they isolate a spa’s costs and revenues, so it often doesn’t show a good ROI—and also, unless you have a hotelier or developer who really gets it, they haven’t been spending the capital on spas that would let them actually see the ROI. In the US, developers who’ve been building shopping malls and condos typically don’t understand spas at all: they think narrowly in terms of square-foot return on investment. But this will change: The hospitality industry is recognizing the importance of health and wellness to the consumer, and that means everything: nutrition/menus, lighting, air and water quality, sleep quality, a great spa/wellness center. What operators need to learn is that you’ve got to turn the model on its head. It’s much easier to make an integrative wellness resort profitable because the medical diagnostics and medical-aesthetics areas (while the practitioners are much more expensive) can be hugely profitable, far more so than any spa. Integrative wellness resorts will have a whole different profit and loss model than the departmental formulas of hotels: You will look at the bottom-line profit across all departments, where all is wellness (rooms, F&B, spa, medical services, aesthetics, etc.) It’s one pot; they will be very profitable, even if there is a loss leader. Second, we need to build destinations broad enough so the consumer can do different things at different times. Most people that want a vacation want wellness: to eat right; to have stimulating, healthy

things for kids (cooking classes, foraging, sailing— not some boring Kids Club)—but they want to relax, have a few drinks, have fun. On the other extreme, some people need much more: You’ve had cancer or put on 20 pounds, etc. You want the strictness and deeper functional medicine of a medical-wellness environment to do something more intensive, often alone. And then desires fall everywhere in-between. More healthy people now want to assess their life once or twice a year for preventative reasons: to be the best at every stage of their life, to pick up the little things before the big things happen. Like me, they start seeking prevention in their 20s and 30s. This is all much broader than what’s come before. And if you can bring it all together without confusion, it’s going to make money. For sure. This is a design issue and one I’m right in the middle of with my projects. Most medical spas have been quite small (say, 50 bedrooms). To achieve this new integrative model, the resorts are going to have to be bigger, and the whole nature piece will be enormous: the great outdoors, a warm enough climate, and the quality of the air. It’s about creating a place that can have paths that run from fun and families to the more serious, preventative stuff. Third, it will be much easier to make an integrative wellness resort stack up financially with the residential component. I’m working on the Amaala project on Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea, spearheaded by their ruler, Prince Mohammad bin Salman bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud, a wellness resort and community at the ultra-high-networth end. It’s set on 435 miles of coastline and will integrate everything from advanced medicine to comprehensive wellness approaches—and many of the main wellness brands will be there. It’s an interesting example of designing for different needs and guests, with both an integrative wellness resort for adults and another for families. McGroarty: There’s no greater expert—give me a prediction for the future of spas. The really good spas where the therapists and treatments are good, the hardware and thermal areas are good, the design and flow are good, the air quality and infection control are good—they will start to take on even more approaches from the “light wellness” side. However, in the future, spa therapists and practitioners are going to have to be much better trained with deeper skills. They need a much broader knowledge set to be able to deal with all the things increasingly coming their way. They’re bombarded by clients with more serious issues (diabetes, cancer, heart disease, depression and grief): The majority that walk in now have some kind of contraindication. This is why I’m so strong on what we’re doing in the UK with the training ruling bodies, putting modules together so that well-qualified therapists (we call them level 3 or 4 here) can keep adding modules (whether cancer or nutrition training) so they can deliver more “wellness” than just massages or facials, be empowered to deal with the day-to-day realities they see, and be set on a career path of constant skill-upgrading. The spas that will take it to the next level will focus on training in a much more intense way.

McGroarty: The pandemic seems to have given wellness real estate and communities new momentum. COVID has obviously woken all of us up to working from home, and this ongoing reality will drive real growth in wellness real estate and communities—and in more affordable projects. . It’s completely changed my thinking: I love being in one beautiful place, and I’ll never fly the way I did before. All those businesspeople flying week after week; that’s all going to slow way down and have to be justified. Since the pandemic, people are spending a lot—or all of—their time in their homes. More people will choose a wellness community as the primary residence, and maybe they’ll have a pied-à-terre in the city and go in one or two days. This will drive more affordable wellness communities. I’m working on a wellness real estate project now (still at the concept stage) where you go from the most expensive villa at $1 million to artisan homes down to $300,000—that’s relatively affordable. It will be an interesting community: They will grow everything themselves and have their own Waldorf school for the kids. Another multisite project I’m working on is also affordable because the cost of the real estate makes the difference (and this is purely real estate, with no hotel). I can’t give much away, but it has the obvious things you would expect—yes, yoga, yes, a spa—but it’s really much more about an entire lifestyle of wellbeing. We will see more of that. I’ve always said, don’t put me in some place with a bunch of old people—and the way forward is multigenerational wellness communities. It’s all so interesting how desires are shifting: Even people with lots of money, while they want to buy in a better, more naturally beautiful location, don’t necessarily want to buy bigger. I’m working with a very wealthy New York developer (third-generation real estate company) on a Costa Rican wellness community. He doesn’t want a bigger villa; he wants a truly sustainable villa for his kids—a whole different, healthier way of living. He’ll have to go to New York sometimes but not often. McGroarty: You’re an investor in wellness. Name a segment you would place a future bet on. Harmsworth: I’ve talked about the future for integrative wellness destinations, with more serious, preventative functional medicine and diagnostics. People go to “serious” wellness resorts, do a battery of tests/scans, come out pumped up to change their lives, and—it’s human nature—in a few months, they’ve fallen off the wagon. I think a crucial future of the tech piece is both advanced diagnostics and anchoring people to the site for ongoing monitoring and follow-up—using AI and “tele” models. I’d invest there. I also think you have a huge singles market coming up (people divorced, widowed, that don’t want to get married or remarried), so hospitality models that combine comprehensive wellness with fun and the social piece will rise.


spa trends

Q & A with Sue Harmsworth, Spa Industry Visionary, by GWI By Global Wellness Institute

and cognitive health will be huge coming out of the pandemic, with depression and anxiety having risen exponentially since COVID. One reason the functional medicine and diagnostics piece is so key is that with all the wonderful destinations focusing on Asian traditions (the Indian, Thai or Balinese approaches), people weren’t given concrete results. When you’ve gone to medicalwellness clinics in Germany or Austria, they do advanced testing (whether hormones or vitamin deficiencies) on intake, and when you leave, you do them again. You can see the results. It seems crazy, but you really can significantly impact your blood pressure or cholesterol in one week. What I want to do—and it’s the future—is to be able to program individuals on a personalized plan with a very full set of stats so that they can see their results over time. McGroarty: Operators and investors have struggled to get even the ROI of a spa in a hotel project. What needs to change to pull off these far more ambitious integrative wellness destinations? Harmsworth: First, it’s going to take an entirely new operating model and type of operator. There’s lots of great operators on the clinic side?; I could run through some of the big names from Lanserhof to SHA, but they’re not as integrated as I think the future will be, and I don’t think there’s an operator out there right now with this forward-thinking, bringit-all-together approach.

Sue Harmsworth needs little introduction: She has spent five decades shaping the global spa, global wellness and beauty industries (responsible for designing 500+ spas in 65 countries), and her services were honored by Queen Elizabeth the Second. She founded the global brand ESPA in 1993, which she sold in 2017; is founder of Sue Harmsworth Ltd, which advises owners and private equity firms on creating wellness destinations; and she sits on various boards, from Forbes to the Global Wellness Institute (GWI). In this edition, Harmsworth discusses: • Why the term “wellness” has reached near meaninglessness — and how we need new distinctions. • How integrative wellness resorts—which marry “serious” and “light” wellness—are the future but will require a whole new kind of operator. •How the pandemic experience is fueling consumer desire for wellness real estate. • Why the spa practitioners of the future must be trained better and deeper. • What investment bet she would place in wellness. Beth McGroarty, GWI VP of Research and Forecasting: In your recent master class with us, you discussed how the term “wellness” has become so oversaturated and overstretched it’s reaching the point of meaninglessness. And that the time is now to make new distinctions. Talk more about this problem, what new distinctions need to be made. Harmsworth: I’m starting to hate the word wellness (laughing) because it’s become so generic it’s utterly

2

confusing the consumer. Everything is labeled “wellness”: You go to the supermarket, and you’re overwhelmed. We need new terms and definitions— and as an industry, we don’t challenge ourselves enough to be clear with consumers. It’s becoming a real issue with social media moving so fast and so much copying going on. The history of wellness and spa—and the regional differences—add to the confusion. What we think of as “wellness”—all the ancient medical traditions from TCM to Ayurveda; amazing, centuries-old “kurs” at European health farms; the hydrothermal piece; advanced massage techniques—these existed forever before modern “wellness” was born in the spa industry in the 90s. As the spa industry took off, the word and concept became confusing, and it has to do with what the US means by it versus the rest of the world. In the US, every beauty salon, or every two treatment rooms by a pool, suddenly became a “spa”—not what I, as a European, would call one. When the spa movement became powerful in the 90s, stress was the overwhelming focus. The world was changing: Women were going back into the workforce, flying constantly became the norm, and technology was taking over the world. Stress was the huge issue, and most spas were built for relaxation—from massages to meditation. What I would call “light wellness”—with no negative connotations. But now, we have a much more complex set of modalities and advanced practitioners at wellness destinations. We have fitness/sports, a much more

serious nutrition and microbiome piece, spa, complementary medicine, and beauty—but aesthetics as in both medicine/machines and more non-invasive approaches. And we have more medical or “serious” wellness. But there can be confusion around “medical wellness” for consumers: They may think it means traditional allopathic medicine and ask, why would I go to an expensive resort when I can do the same things with a specialist? The future of medicine at destinations is functional medicine and preventative, advanced testing and diagnostics: whether hormone analysis, 3D scanning analyzing bone density, muscle mass and visceral fat, or microbiome and nutrition testing. All to create a personalized health plan. So, you have “light wellness,” which spas and hospitality destinations have excelled at. You have medical or “serious” wellness, but it’s different this time around: It’s preventative, functional medicine and diagnostics. That’s why I’m so keen on new definitions and distinctions: “Wellness” is too imprecise to mean anything. People have got to focus on what their consumers want and get clear about what they’re delivering. McGroarty: I know you’re working on some big integrative wellness destinations—and you believe that’s the future. Why? Harmsworth: It’s absolutely the future, with all the lifestyle diseases hitting us so hard, and I’m working on properties now that bring everything together: functional medicine and diagnostics, an aesthetics clinic, and all the traditional wellness, from complementary medicine to fitness to serious meditation (with Buddhist monks or TCM). Mental

We need to remember that, historically, spas—outside the US—haven’t been particularly profitable. That’s because the hotel model is to view every department as a completely standalone profit center, so they isolate a spa’s costs and revenues, so it often doesn’t show a good ROI—and also, unless you have a hotelier or developer who really gets it, they haven’t been spending the capital on spas that would let them actually see the ROI. In the US, developers who’ve been building shopping malls and condos typically don’t understand spas at all: they think narrowly in terms of square-foot return on investment. But this will change: The hospitality industry is recognizing the importance of health and wellness to the consumer, and that means everything: nutrition/menus, lighting, air and water quality, sleep quality, a great spa/wellness center. What operators need to learn is that you’ve got to turn the model on its head. It’s much easier to make an integrative wellness resort profitable because the medical diagnostics and medical-aesthetics areas (while the practitioners are much more expensive) can be hugely profitable, far more so than any spa. Integrative wellness resorts will have a whole different profit and loss model than the departmental formulas of hotels: You will look at the bottom-line profit across all departments, where all is wellness (rooms, F&B, spa, medical services, aesthetics, etc.) It’s one pot; they will be very profitable, even if there is a loss leader. Second, we need to build destinations broad enough so the consumer can do different things at different times. Most people that want a vacation want wellness: to eat right; to have stimulating, healthy

things for kids (cooking classes, foraging, sailing— not some boring Kids Club)—but they want to relax, have a few drinks, have fun. On the other extreme, some people need much more: You’ve had cancer or put on 20 pounds, etc. You want the strictness and deeper functional medicine of a medical-wellness environment to do something more intensive, often alone. And then desires fall everywhere in-between. More healthy people now want to assess their life once or twice a year for preventative reasons: to be the best at every stage of their life, to pick up the little things before the big things happen. Like me, they start seeking prevention in their 20s and 30s. This is all much broader than what’s come before. And if you can bring it all together without confusion, it’s going to make money. For sure. This is a design issue and one I’m right in the middle of with my projects. Most medical spas have been quite small (say, 50 bedrooms). To achieve this new integrative model, the resorts are going to have to be bigger, and the whole nature piece will be enormous: the great outdoors, a warm enough climate, and the quality of the air. It’s about creating a place that can have paths that run from fun and families to the more serious, preventative stuff. Third, it will be much easier to make an integrative wellness resort stack up financially with the residential component. I’m working on the Amaala project on Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea, spearheaded by their ruler, Prince Mohammad bin Salman bin Abdulaziz Al-Saud, a wellness resort and community at the ultra-high-networth end. It’s set on 435 miles of coastline and will integrate everything from advanced medicine to comprehensive wellness approaches—and many of the main wellness brands will be there. It’s an interesting example of designing for different needs and guests, with both an integrative wellness resort for adults and another for families. McGroarty: There’s no greater expert—give me a prediction for the future of spas. The really good spas where the therapists and treatments are good, the hardware and thermal areas are good, the design and flow are good, the air quality and infection control are good—they will start to take on even more approaches from the “light wellness” side. However, in the future, spa therapists and practitioners are going to have to be much better trained with deeper skills. They need a much broader knowledge set to be able to deal with all the things increasingly coming their way. They’re bombarded by clients with more serious issues (diabetes, cancer, heart disease, depression and grief): The majority that walk in now have some kind of contraindication. This is why I’m so strong on what we’re doing in the UK with the training ruling bodies, putting modules together so that well-qualified therapists (we call them level 3 or 4 here) can keep adding modules (whether cancer or nutrition training) so they can deliver more “wellness” than just massages or facials, be empowered to deal with the day-to-day realities they see, and be set on a career path of constant skill-upgrading. The spas that will take it to the next level will focus on training in a much more intense way.

McGroarty: The pandemic seems to have given wellness real estate and communities new momentum. COVID has obviously woken all of us up to working from home, and this ongoing reality will drive real growth in wellness real estate and communities—and in more affordable projects. . It’s completely changed my thinking: I love being in one beautiful place, and I’ll never fly the way I did before. All those businesspeople flying week after week; that’s all going to slow way down and have to be justified. Since the pandemic, people are spending a lot—or all of—their time in their homes. More people will choose a wellness community as the primary residence, and maybe they’ll have a pied-à-terre in the city and go in one or two days. This will drive more affordable wellness communities. I’m working on a wellness real estate project now (still at the concept stage) where you go from the most expensive villa at $1 million to artisan homes down to $300,000—that’s relatively affordable. It will be an interesting community: They will grow everything themselves and have their own Waldorf school for the kids. Another multisite project I’m working on is also affordable because the cost of the real estate makes the difference (and this is purely real estate, with no hotel). I can’t give much away, but it has the obvious things you would expect—yes, yoga, yes, a spa—but it’s really much more about an entire lifestyle of wellbeing. We will see more of that. I’ve always said, don’t put me in some place with a bunch of old people—and the way forward is multigenerational wellness communities. It’s all so interesting how desires are shifting: Even people with lots of money, while they want to buy in a better, more naturally beautiful location, don’t necessarily want to buy bigger. I’m working with a very wealthy New York developer (third-generation real estate company) on a Costa Rican wellness community. He doesn’t want a bigger villa; he wants a truly sustainable villa for his kids—a whole different, healthier way of living. He’ll have to go to New York sometimes but not often. McGroarty: You’re an investor in wellness. Name a segment you would place a future bet on. Harmsworth: I’ve talked about the future for integrative wellness destinations, with more serious, preventative functional medicine and diagnostics. People go to “serious” wellness resorts, do a battery of tests/scans, come out pumped up to change their lives, and—it’s human nature—in a few months, they’ve fallen off the wagon. I think a crucial future of the tech piece is both advanced diagnostics and anchoring people to the site for ongoing monitoring and follow-up—using AI and “tele” models. I’d invest there. I also think you have a huge singles market coming up (people divorced, widowed, that don’t want to get married or remarried), so hospitality models that combine comprehensive wellness with fun and the social piece will rise.


spa lifestyle

Anti-Aging Needs a Body That Never Ages We live in a time when breakthroughs are sought to prevent or reverse aging. For the longest time aging itself, although a universal process, was a deep mystery. There is no gene for aging, and nothing is completely predictable, because no two people age alike, not even identical twins. Aging involves the lifespan of cells, which once seemed to be the answer. Calculate how long a cell is programmed to live before it dies, and calculating when the whole body will die becomes possible. But this possibility more or less vanished when it was discovered that stem cells, the precursor to fully formed cells, exist everywhere, meaning that replenishment of aging cells is always possible. Now the search is on for finer genetic clues in the epigenome, the sheath surrounding every strand of DNA that does two vital things: It triggers the rate of genetic activity the way a rheostat controls the level of a light bulb, and it registers with chemical markers the important experiences that happen to a person during a lifetime. Now the betting is on that information registering at this subtle level is the key to reversing aging. Information has a valuable trait: it never dies. Therefore, anti-aging might be a matter of making sure that the body’s nearly infinite store of information (just the amount stored in a single cell runs to billions of digital bits) doesn’t get lost, tangled, or degraded. Where the body was once viewed by medical science as a machine, now it tends to be viewed as an information memory bank. If this makes it seem that aging has met its match, there is one enormous glitch. Information is the mark left behind by experience, and no one knows why the same experience means zero to one person and becomes a trauma for another. For example, speaking in public is considered one of the greatest fears people normally have, but politicians and actors thrive on it. Falling off a step in the dark can be frightening, but skydivers love the thrill of falling from an airplane. There is no standard measurement for experience, and even the greatest risk that should shorten someone’s life, such as chain smoking and drinking to excess, has its cases where the person lives to a normal lifespan and even survives someone who has avoided ever y risk imaginable. Experience, then, is the missing key. What is experience? When you get down to it, experiences— physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual—occur in consciousness. You are processing your life right this minutes, and every minute since you were born, by

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metabolizing every experience. But the physical side is the last link in a chain that begins in a different body than the one you see in a mirror. In the Vedic tradition of India, the physical body is where karma leaves its mark, karma being any activity the registers in consciousness. The important thing to know is that your karmic body is the end of the line. Experience has to undergo your personal perception and interpretation. If you love jazz, hearing it will be perceived and processed as a joyful experience, and this will register in your karmic body as chemical responses that might, or might not, leave a permanent epigenetic marker. On the other hand, if you hate jazz and are subjected to it, the same experience will be toxic, and a distinctly different marker will be registered on your body. The way you process your experiences is unique, and since aging is also unique, the story of aging is interwoven with the story of your life. That’s a key insight, but at first glance it doesn’t seem to help in a practical sense. Uniqueness makes it even harder to calculate how an experience will turn into information to be stored in your epigenetic makeup. It was always inaccurate to think of the body as a machine, because machines wear out with repeated stress, while the human body doesn’t. Repeated exercise makes your muscles strong, not weaker; repeated practice at the piano doesn’t wear out your fingers—they become more skilled and precise. Likewise, seeing the body as a storehouse of information constantly bombarding the epigene is also a limiting concept, as we just saw, because information alone, tells you nothing about how you as an individual are affected by life’s experiences. This is where we need a broader concept of the human body. What if you have a body that never ages? If this is true, then aging might be a bad link, a disconnect, or some other glitch that keeps your ageless body from shaping your physical/karmic body. Decades ago I thought of the ageless body as quantum mechanical, because in Nature, the quanta or subatomic particles are immune to time (except in spans of millions of billions of years). It is obvious that the human body is a structure built from ripples in the quantum field, because the whole cosmos is. But quanta, like information, have no meaning and indeed no experiences, while your life has both. So, is there an ageless body that also has meaning and experiences? The Vedic tradition says yes,

By Deepak Chopra MD

pointing to two ageless bodies, in fact. The first is the subtle body, which is where consciousness creates, governs, interprets, ad controls all experiences, along with how you interpret them. It is well-established in modern biology that cells, tissues, organs, and the body as a whole are independent but intimately linked systems. These systems communicate constantly via what are known as signal molecules such as hormones and neurotransmitters. The terms don’t matter, because no one knows how all these systems operate with such exquisite precision and intelligence. The answer is the subtle body, which is the source of the intelligence that flows through every cell, tissue, and organ, modifying itself to meet the specific requirements of the body’s 200 different types of cells. In essence, your body speaks 200 different languages at the cellular level, and there has to be a source that understands them all—the subtle body. The subtle body is operational. It is all about processing life’s experiences so that they can be metabolized as karma, the meaningful activities that are coded as the karmic body. The subtle body is neither physical nor mental but unites both. You encounter it all the time as the reason you have your own thoughts, feelings, sensations, and other experiences instead of someone else’s, or everybody sharing the same pattern, the way all amoebas, mice, and oak trees are essentially the same as every other. However, a second ageless body is still needed, because all these operations happening in the subtle body are transformations of consciousness that flow into the bodymind as experiences coded into information so that the body can manifest. Yet where does consciousness itself come from? Its source is the so-called causal body. “Causal” refers to how pure awareness is the source or cause of all thoughts and actions. Awareness starts to move, express creativity, exhibit intelligence, and so on. You can mold gold into uncountable shapes, but without a source for gold, nothing can happen. What I’ve sketched in is a process that makes life possible as a source (causal body), from which morphs the subtle body, where all experience is given meaning, direction, and interpretation, ending with the end product, the bodymind. If this is the process of life itself, the same process is where aging occurs— or doesn’t. We need to explain the difference between time and immortality, ageless and that which is subject to age.



spa therapies

Thalgo La Beaute Marine: Taking eco-commitments more seriously than ever. Thalgo is a skincare brand committed to clean beauty, and a more beautiful sea. We have 5 major eco commitments: 1. Clean Beauty 2. Green packaging 3. Clean Oceans 4. Eco-gestures and a 5. Green Factor y. Read about all the ecocommitments starting from our SeaCleaners partnership to our Clean Beauty and formulas. The Sea Cleaners: Manta Project As a partner of The SeaCleaners since 2021, Thalgo has made many active efforts to help protect and clean-up our oceans. The SeaCleaners are a non-profit environmentalist organization founded by Yvan Bourghon – an internationally renowned French sailor who solo-sailed around the world. In the last 15 years he has borne witness to the extent of marine pollution and it’s devastating and irreversible consequences. He aims to collect as much plastic as possible with his boat, christened “Mantra”. This revolutionary ship will clean up plastic from the oceans AND collect data. The goal is to collect waste in the oceans 300 days a year, 3 tons and hour, which amounts to 10 000 tons a year. This ship is planned to set sail in 2024, but test boats are already being sent out as we speak.

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oceans and participating in many events such as: World Ocean’s Day, World Clean Up Day, and Blue Friday annually. Not only do we actively try to reduce marine pollution upstream, we also aim to raise awareness and include/educate the communities around us.

packaging. If the product are sold in it however (for example Eveil a la Mer Marine Cleansing Bar and Source Marine pebble jar refills), it’s made from sustainably managed forests and printed with plant inks. At the Heart of the Formulas:

Clean Beauty Charter & Green Packaging To truly contribute to waste reduction and keep our sea clean – Thalgo is committed to and eco-design approach, with both our formulas and packaging. The Heart of the Packaging: The launch of the refillable pebble jars with the new Source Marine range, Thalgo has introduced an endlessly refillable option which stands for an ecological and economical approach. Primary packaging chosen for their recyclability: Although Thalgo’s packaging has always been recyclable, now with the launch of the new Eveil a la Mer and Source Marine ranges, our packaging is both recyclable AND made with recycled materials.

World Oceans Day & Blue Friday

Green Boxes:

Thalgo is actively involved in cleaning our

Most of Thalgo products are without secondary

As part of the “Clean Beauty” charter, Thalgo products contain skin-friendly ingredients. Along with our re-launched ranges, the following is a Thalgo eco-promise: Animal ingredient free. Thalgo skincare products are vegan-friendly and completely cruelty free. The new ranges are free from irritant agents and endocrine disruptors. As a massive added bonus, between 92% 98% of the new Eveil a la Mer ingredients are of natural origin in each of the formulas. Thalgo aims to exceed your skincare expectations while simultaneously doing everything in our power to protect our one and only home: Planet Earth. The Thalgo eco-mantra: Let ’s protect the sea. For more informtion or to become a Thalgo stockist contact Thalgo on Te: 011 880 3850 email: sales@marinespadistributors.co.za or visit: www.thalgo.co.za



skincare

Tips for Seasonal Skincare Changes Skin reacts innately to its environment. In winter, it frequently reacts with dryness, tightness, inflammation, and irritation. So, while we can’t control those temperature drops, there are steps we can take to prevent severe changes to our facial skin.

How can we combat this dryness and irritation?

What about the winter causes these changes?

The one product you don’t want to cut out of your fall regime? Yes, you guessed it! SPF!

Our skin changes in the winter, because with the weather shifts, we lose humidity in the air. It begins drawing moisture from our skin as a result. The chilly wind is also rough on the skin barrier. We then exacerbate the dryness with habits like spending more time indoors with the heat turned up and longer hot showers. Not to mention, are you guilty of licking dry lips? All the fun and frequently unhealthy winter food can also have an impact on the skin. You may also see an increase in breakouts in the winter as the skin can end up overproducing oil to make up for the dehydration and dryness caused by the elements. If you see a breakout coming on, cleanse your skin and dab it with a spot treatment.

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Moisturizing will be the key to maintaining healthy and glowing and skin. Try adding a few drops of hyaluronic acid serum to your moisturizer.

The number-one mistake people make when adjusting their skincare routine? Not giving it enough time. Transforming the skin is like most things in life, it takes time and consistency. It takes 28 days for skin cells to turn over, so you need to give a product at least a month to see a difference. Though you should notice a difference in hydration much quicker. Another mistake I see is overusing a product or overexfoliating. Maintaining the skin barrier is key, and I recommend exfoliating one to two times per week, especially with how rough winter weather is on the epidermis.

By Lizette Ludwig - Well Defined An overlooked piece of the skincare routine no matter the season One thing that should stay consistent year-round is how cleanse your skin. A good cleansing practice is vital and the foundation of any good skincare routine. Removing buildup like oil, sweat, sunscreen, and environmental pollution twice a day is key to clear and healthy skin. Clean skin allows products and treatments to seep past the facial barrier and work properly. It helps maintain the proper pore size and prevents excess oil production. Finding the right cleanser and routine is so important, as different types of skin can build up more oil than others. It can take a bit of trial and error, but remember to give a product time to work—at least a month—and only add in or remove one product at a time so you can see what’s working and what’s not. However, if a product causes an immediate reaction like a rash, discontinue immediately. Any burning for more than a minute or two can signify a negative reaction.



spa trends

New Survey Reveals How 2020 Altered the Aesthetic Landscape Forever By Julie Keller Callaghan - Well Defined AEDIT, a technology-driven platform that simplifies and safeguards the search for aesthetic solutions and qualified providers, has announced the results of its inaugural consumer trends survey of 1,000 men and women, ages 18 and older.

Despite spending significantly more time at home in 2020, demand for treatments remained high with 23 percent of respondents stating that they are more interested in aesthetic treatments now that they can recover at home during the pandemic.

Findings indicate that Millennials and Gen Z now account for the largest age group interested in aesthetic procedures. The pandemic has not slowed down this demographic's interest in pursuing selfconfidence and self-expression through beauty. The rise of video conferencing for work and widespread communication as well as rapid advances in beauty technology have helped to strengthen demand for aesthetic treatments and procedures over the past year.

The Dawn of A Digital Age of Aesthetics AEDIT founder, CEO and facial plastic surgeon William A. Kennedy III, M.D., says he believes technology is revolutionizing the beauty industry. “It places more emphasis on personalized experiences, giving consumers the opportunity to be more in control of their beauty decisions, whether that be virtually trying on lipstick before purchasing, or in our case, trying on a cosmetic procedure before booking a consultation,” he says.

Video Conferencing Never before have men and women been so bombarded with footage of themselves on video. With the advent of daily Zoom meetings, Google Hangouts, and FaceTimes, people who are not used to viewing themselves on screen were suddenly thrust into their very own spotlight. This led to nitpicking their appearances. AEDIT's survey found that those interested in non-surgical and surgical treatments participate in video conferencing meetings significantly more often than those who do not. In fact, 39 percent of respondents who use video conferencing weekly reported interest in non-surgical aesthetic treatments while 37 percent reported interest in surgical treatments. A full 29 percent of Millennials agree that using video conferencing makes them more interested in getting aesthetic treatments. The biggest areas of concern for those who engage in regular video conferences are their teeth (39 percent), weight (33 percent), stomach/midsection (28 percent), under eye bags/pouches (23 percent), and hair thinning/loss (16 percent).

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women age 35 and up and are more likely to already have seen a doctor or had a surgical treatment than their Gen X and Boomer peers. Millennials, and now Gen Z, largely embrace aesthetic edits with open arms and zero apologies, with 40 percent stating that they do not feel ashamed or embarrassed about getting aesthetic treatments. The survey supports this, showing that more than 40 percent of respondents still want to feel confident in their looks during the pandemic. This population is specifically interested in aesthetic treatments to look naturally more attractive. It follows that the survey also uncovered a jump in participants using facial skincare products during the pandemic, despite a decrease in using cosmetics in 2020. Looking Ahead

Much like our social and work lives, many of those consultations are now virtual. AEDIT's survey reveals that the pandemic has decreased interest in visiting doctors' offices and has increased interest in telemedicine by more than 20 percent. Moreover, 44 percent of survey respondents wish there was a way to see exactly how surgery would affect their face before taking the leap. This desire is even greater for younger women, with 50 percent of Millennials and Gen Z and 51 percent of women showing keen interest in the ability to predict the outcome of aesthetic procedures. Owning It is In. So, is Good Skin. Millennials have long been influencing beauty trends as the first generation who came of age during the digital revolution. However, Baby Boomers tend to eclipse them when it comes to seeking out a tweak, lift, or poke in the search to remain naturally ageless. A shift is happening. The AEDIT survey showed that Millennials and Gen Z have significantly more interest in non-surgical and surgical treatments than men and

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

AEDIT board member and Beverly Hills facial plastic surgeon Andrew Frankel, M.D., predicts, “There might be a lull in elective surgery once the pandemic is cleared and life returns to normal, because people will likely not want to be home recuperating at that point. They will long to be out enjoying themselves. As such, promoting injectables and non-surgical procedures will be fruitful right as the world opens up again and people wish to look their best upon re-entry.” About The Author: Julie Keller Callaghan Julie is the co-founder of Well Defined and a longtime influencer and advocate in the wellness world. Along with her work at Well Defined, she is an executive recruiter and marketing specialist for Hutchinson Consulting. She is also a consultant and content strategist for numerous wellness brands. She is the former editor-in-chief and publisher of American Spa and was named a 2019 Folio Top Woman in Media in the Industry Trailblazers category and a 2018 winner of ISPA's Innovate Award. She is also a seasoned journalist, specializing in spa, travel, health, fitness, wellness, sustainability, and beauty.



innovation

TC Plus Peel An innovative Dermo-Epidermal Bio-revitaliser from KSurgery Dermo-Epidermal bio-revitalisation is a broad term generally referring to aesthetic techniques such as mesotherapy, hyaluronic acid injecting and chemical peels, with the purpose of revitalising and rejuvenating the skin. The innovative TC Plus chemical peel from KSurgery falls squarely into this aesthetic treatment category. What is TC Plus? TC Plus is a chemical peel developed by the Italian based KSurgery Laboratories, which contains the cornerstone ingredient of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) which has been enhanced by the addition of two alphahydroxy acids namely, Mandelic acid and Kojic acid. The innovative gel formula stabilises TCA thanks to the combination of strong and weak acids mixed in such a way as to make the peel treatment Safe, Stable and Effective. TC Plus exhibits the following key functions: • Chemical peeling - treatment to visibly improve skin structure mostly by cell exfoliation • Regeneration - the peel can reach the dermis and stimulate the organised regeneration of tissue matrix • By so doing, becomes more of a bio-revitalisation and not just a surface peel • Reactivates certain cell chemical pathways which promote overall skin physiological conditions leading to improved skin tone, firmness, pore size and fine lines. In particular TC Plus is indicated to treat: •Photoaging (Glogau type II to type III) •Melasma •Shallow acne scars •Zones of deeper hyperpigmentation What do the key ingredients in TC Plus do? As mentioned earlier, Trichloroacetic acid is the cornerstone ingredient and forms the basis of the formulation. TCA is a carboxylic acid which has the primary function of peeling the skin through the action of chemical exfolition. During the exfolition process, the Skin Stress Response System (SSRS) is activated and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) is produced by

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keratinocytes. POMC is then split by an enzymatic reaction at an acid pH. The reaction produces a range of peptide hormones, including beta-endorphins. The beta-endorphins act as skin stimulators for the fibroblasts, and keratinocytes and thereby increase cell turnover. TCA also assists skin growth and repair by promoting growth factors which are fundamental to proper epidermis cell functioning. The following growth factors are directly affected by the presence of TCA: • Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) • Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), which plays a key role in the functioning of keratinocytes • Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) which is vital for cell proliferation •and Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Kojic Acid is the second key ingredient and is best known for its ability to inhibit melanin formation. The mechanism is as follows: Kojic acid limits formation of tyrosine, an amino acid required for melanin production, by binding the copper in the active part of the tyrosinase (an enzyme which helps to produce tyrosine), thereby inhibiting the enzyme's action. Kojic acid is routinely used in the treatment of: • Melasmas and chloasmas • Senile lentigo and solar lentigo • Dark circles under the eye • Lightening of visible sun damage, age spots, or scars • Skin-lightening / brightening effect • Antimicrobial properties: reduces acne caused by bacteria in the skin. The final key ingredient in TC Plus is Mandelic Acid. Mandelic acid is the largest of the alpha-hydroxy molecules and, because of its size, penetrates the skin slowly thus ensuring slow and safe absorption of TCA and other molecules. It also reduces proliferation of Propionibacterium acnes and is thus a great antibacterial and anti-inflammatory agent. The final important function it serves is to stimulate skin regeneration by reducing corneocyte adhesion.

What is the overall mechanism of TC Plus? 1. TCA causes the coagulation of proteins which leads to the destruction of the living cells of the epidermis and possibly dermis (dependant on duration and concentration of treatment). The depth of the skin necrosis is directly proportional to the concentration of TCA. 2. Abnormal keratinocytes are replaced by deep surviving islets of keratinocytes, pilosebaceous units and sweat glands. 3. As the skin re-epithelialises, new collagen is formed which leads to a stimulated healing cascade. Dermal collagen starts forming within 2-3 weeks. Increased papillary dermal collagen and elastin fibre production continues for up to 6 months. 4. Remodelling of elastic fibres takes place over time, resulting in a stronger dermis. 5. Most importantly, a good TCA peel not only causes cell destruction, but stimulation as well resulting in a double aesthetic end point. In general, it is better to do less harsh peels but more often, as this eliminates complications of deeper TCA peels. One of the advantages of TC Plus is that one can easily manage the depth of peel. TC Plus is available in two concentrations of TCA depending on the needs and end goals required for the patient: TC Plus Soft - 12% TCA and TC Plus Strong - 20% TCA. Whereas TC Plus Soft is a milder peel focussed on the corneal and granular layer of the epidermis, TC Plus Strong targets the entire thickness of the epidermis. TC Plus Strong provides a much deeper exfoliation and can be used to treat medium-superficial scars, papules, pustules, nodules, cysts, deep acneic lesions and skin blemishes. It is ideally more suitable for middle aged patients, whilst Soft is recommended for younger patients and darker skin phototypes. Should you wish to know more about TC Plus or would like to arrange for a demonstration, contact Amo (0628481749) or Grant (0828098954) or visit the Regensys website: www.regensys.co.za


“Regain and Retain your Natural Beauty” At Regensys, we live and breathe the phrase “Regain and Retain your Natural Beauty”. Regensys is the sole importer and distributor of Dermica Laboratoires and KSurgery Laboratories in South Africa. Regensys strives to supply the highest quality European aesthetic products and devices as well as training and support to aesthetic doctors, skin therapists, skin clinics and spas. We are driven by a passion for the underlying chemistry and physics underpinning aesthetics processes and products. The Regensys team are constantly striving to find innovative, safe, and medically sound beauty enhancement products to support doctors and skincare therapists. “We understand that each person is unique, an idea that medical practitioners will agree with, which is why we have chosen two globally recognised companies to partner and grow the business with. The aesthetics products and devices that we offer allow each and every treatment plan to be individualised to meet each patient or client’s personal aesthetic goals.” KSurgery Laboratories from Italy supplies classic peels, specialist peels, aesthetic cosmetics, both for professional use and retail to public. KSurgery also carry an extensive range of Professional and Retail skin products for the Body, which are particularly suitable for Spas. Dermica Laboratoires from Spain supplies a range of mesotherapy serums, aesthetic serums and specialised creams, Medical devices (GoldPen – microneedling, a handheld injecting device – DermaJet and a DermaPlax machine). They also carry their own in-house developed dermal fillers and threads. Dermica is targeted towards doctors and carries more specialised aesthetic products, but some, like the mesotherapy solutions can also be used during in-salon micro-needling. We also sell the Regensys branded Collagen powder (3 flavours and Natural) as well as glutathione capsules, available for retail in spas.


innovation

Understanding the Connection Between a Growth Mindset and Neuroplasticity The phrase “growth mindset” refers to the idea that you can always change and grow. The word “neuroplasticity” refers to your brain’s ability to change and grow over time when exposed to learning new things. You can connect the concepts by saying that a growth mindset encourages you to try new things to help your brain function better. Engaging in practices related to a growth mindset can benefit your brain’s neuroplasticity. This makes these concepts popular in many fields like medicine, education, and business. What does it mean to develop a growth mindset? Having a growth mindset means that you nurture your intellect through lifelong learning. You believe that your skills, abilities, and outlook can change over time as you expose yourself to new experiences and information and practice new skills.

To develop a growth mindset, you can: •Believe you can learn new information and take action to do so • Engage in incremental steps to improve yourself • Focus on trying new things without fixating on the outcome. • Put a large amount of time into learning new things. • Keep trying, even when you have challenges. • Learn throughout your life. • Develop new methods for learning. A “growth mindset” is a term that came about in the early 2000s by researcher Carol Dweck. It is a term that is the opposite of a fixed mindset. With this outlook, you are open to learning new things and often more forgiving of failure. On the other hand, a fixed mindset is can be more limiting. With an outlook like this, you may not be willing to tackle new challenges because you don’t believe you can change. Because of the brain’s natural plasticity, you can develop a growth mindset if you want to. You can learn to identify moments when you may find yourself retreating to a fixed mindset so that you can reframe your thinking. What are examples of a growth mindset? While this may sound like a lofty idea, having a growth mindset is something that can affect even your day-to-day activities. Here are a few examples

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of a growth mindset: • Continuing to learn new things or refining skills that you already know. • Being happy for someone’s accomplishment and using it as inspiration to improve yourself. • Acknowledging when you fail and not letting it stop you. • Listening to criticism and taking the feedback as an opportunity to grow. • Adapting to a changing environment or new technology at work. • Practicing skills to give you the confidence to try something that makes you uncomfortable. What is Neuroplasticity, and how does it work? The term “neuroplasticity” refers to the concept that your brain can change over time. For a long time, people thought the brain stopped developing at a certain age. Now, research indicates that the brain can grow and change no matter your age. These changes come in stages. 1. You may first experience chemical changes in the brain when trying something new. 2. Your brain may then continue into physical changes the longer you engage in learning and skill-building. Over time, neurons can create new connections and change the structure of your brain. 3. Your brain becomes stronger and more active the longer you engage in t hese behaviors. Keep in mind that changes to the brain can be both positive and negative. The brain’s abilities can lessen if you do not engage it with stimulation. There is a lot of current research about neuroplasticity. Scientists want to find out how it can help people who experience health challenges like strokes, trauma, or mental health conditions. Some researchers want to measure what types of experiences lead to positive changes in the brain. One 2020 research review examined studies about neuroplasticity in children and adolescents. It showed that participants’ neuroplasticity benefited from “experienced-based interventions” but that the area needs more research. How can you encourage a growth mindset and neuroplasticity. You can adopt a growth mindset at any point in your

life. Taking in new experiences and adopting new abilities for a growth mindset can usually increase neuroplasticity.Trying new activities and expanding your worldview can promote changes in your mindset and brain. These types of activities may include: •Trying a new hobby •Learning a foreign language •Reading a book about a new topic. •Traveling somewhere new. Note that brain and mindset changes develop slowly over time. You can’t engage in one of the above activities for a short period and expect to experience any kind of long lasting change. Repetition are also important factors in strengthening neural pathways. Commit to trying new things and opening yourself up to new experiences regularly. Remind yourself that the goal of trying something new is not to be the best at it. Rather, it is about challenging yourself to learn new things throughout your life. This can have many benefits for your brain and well-being. Adapting to Life’s Challenges Increased neuroplasticity isn’t just useful for learning new skills. You can approach many common challenges in life with a growth mindset. 1. Learning to get along with people you know in new types of relationships. 2. Getting along with a difficult co-worker or family member without getting your feelings hurt. Or rebuilding the relationship after an argument. 3.Learning how to thrive despite a chronic health condition that might require something like physical therapy, dietary restrictions, etc. Takeaway The link between having a growth mindset and increased neuroplasticity is that personal growth and progress are possible. This is because the brain’s neuroplasticity allows a person who approaches challenges with a growth mindset to develop new skills. A growth mindset dispels the idea that you have a finite amount of ability or intelligence. Neuroplasticity is a similar concept, but relates to your brain’s ability to change as you grow. The more you experience and learn, the better your brain can function.



spa trends Yuancheng Lu chose three of the four factors and genetically added them to a harmless virus. The virus was designed to deliver the rejuvenating Yamanaka factors to damaged retinal ganglion cells at the back of an aged mouse's eye. After injecting the virus into the eye, the pluripotent genes were then switched on by feeding the mouse an antibiotic. "The antibiotic is just a tool. It could be any chemical really, just a way to be sure the three genes are switched on," Sinclair said. "Normally they are only on in very young developing embryos and then turn off as we age." Amazingly, damaged neurons in the eyes of mice injected with the three cells rejuvenated, even growing new axons, or projections from the eye into the brain. Since that original study, Sinclair said his lab has reversed aging in the muscles and brains of mice and is now working on rejuvenating a mouse's entire body. "Somehow the cells know the body can reset itself, and they still know which genes should be on when they were young," Sinclair said. "We think we're tapping into an ancient regeneration system that some animals use -- when you cut the limb off a salamander, it regrows the limb. The tail of a fish will grow back; a finger of a mouse will grow back."

The 'Benjamin Button' Effect: The Goal is to do the same for Humans By Sandee LaMotte, CNN In molecular biologist David Sinclair's lab at Harvard Medical School, old mice are growing young again. Using proteins that can turn an adult cell into a stem cell, Sinclair and his team have reset aging cells in mice to earlier versions of themselves. In his team's first breakthrough, published in late 2020, old mice with poor eyesight and damaged retinas could suddenly see again, with vision that at times rivaled their offspring's. David Sinclair has reversed aging in mice and believes the same can be done for people. David Sinclair has reversed aging in mice and believes the same can be done for people. When those mice died some six months later, they still had good eyesight, Sinclair told an audience at Life Itself, a health and wellness event presented in partnership with CNN. "It's a permanent reset, as far as we can tell, and we think it may be a universal process that could be applied across the body to reset our age," said Sinclair, who has spent the last 20 years studying ways to reverse the ravages of time. "If we reverse aging, these diseases should not happen. We have the technology today to be able to go into your hundreds without worrying about getting cancer in your 70s, heart disease in your 80s and Alzheimer's in your 90s. This is the world that is coming. It's literally a question of when and

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for most of us, it's going to happen in our lifetimes," Sinclair told the audience with CNN. "His research shows you can change aging to make lives younger for longer. Now he wants to change the world and make aging a disease," said Whitney Casey, who is partnering with Sinclair to create a do-it-yourself biological age test. While modern medicine addresses sickness, it doesn't address the underlying cause, "which for most diseases, is aging itself," Sinclair said. "We know that when we reverse the age of an organ like the brain in a mouse, the diseases of aging then go away. Memory comes back; there is no more dementia. "I believe that in the future, delaying and reversing aging will be the best way to treat the diseases that plague most of us."

A Reset Button In Sinclair's lab, two mice sit side by side. One is the picture of youth, the other gray and feeble. Yet they are brother and sister, born from the same litter -- only one has been genetically altered to age faster. If that could be done, Sinclair asked his team, could the reverse be accomplished as well? Japanese

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

biomedical researcher Dr. Shinya Yamanaka had already reprogrammed human adult skin cells to behave like embryonic or pluripotent stem cells, capable of developing into any cell in the body. The 2007 discovery won the scientist a Nobel Prize, and his "induced pluripotent stem cells," soon became known as "Yamanaka factors." However, adult cells fully switched back to stem cells via Yamanaka factors lose their identity. They forget they are blood, heart and skin cells, making them perfect for rebirth as "cell du jour," but lousy at rejuvenation. You don't want Brad Pitt in "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" to become a baby all at once; you want him to age backward while still remembering who he is. Labs around the world jumped on the problem. A study published in 2016 by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, showed signs of aging could be expunged in genetically aged mice, exposed for a short time to four main Yamanaka factors, without erasing the cells' identity. But there was a downside in all this research: In certain situations, the altered mice developed cancerous tumors. Looking for a safer alternative, Sinclair lab geneticist

That discovery indicates there is a "backup copy" of youthfulness information stored in the body, he added. "I call it the information theory of aging," he said. "It's a loss of information that drives aging cells to forget how to function, to forget what type of cell they are. And now we can tap into a reset switch that restores the cell's ability to read the genome correctly again, as if it was young." While the changes have lasted for months in mice, renewed cells don't freeze in time and never age (like, say, vampires or superheroes), Sinclair said. "It's as permanent as aging is. It's a reset, and then we see the mice age out again, so then we just repeat the process. "We believe we have found the master control switch, a way to rewind the clock," he added. "The body will then wake up, remember how to behave, remember how to regenerate and will be young again, even if you're already old and have an illness."

Science Already Knows How To Slow Human Aging Studies on whether the genetic intervention that revitalized mice will do the same for people are in early stages, Sinclair said. It will be years before human trials are finished, analyzed and, if safe and successful, scaled to the mass needed for a federal stamp of approval. While we wait for science to determine if we too can reset our genes, there are many other ways to slow the aging process and reset our biological clocks, Sinclair said. "The top tips are simply: Focus on plants for food, eat less often, get sufficient sleep, lose your breath for 10 minutes three times a week by exercising to maintain your muscle mass, don't sweat the small stuff and have a good social group," Sinclair said.

All these behaviors affect our epigenome, proteins and chemicals that sit like freckles on each gene, waiting to tell the gene "what to do, where to do it, and when to do it," according to the National Human Genome Research Institute. The epigenome literally turns genes on and off. What controls the epigenome? Human behavior and one's environment play a key role. Let's say you were born with a genetic predisposition for heart disease and diabetes. But because you exercised, ate a plant-focused diet, slept well and managed your stress during most of your life, it's possible those genes would never be activated. That, experts say, is how we can take some of our genetic fate into our own hands.

a sauna and a dip in an ice-cold pool. "I've got my 20-year-old body back," he said with a smile. Speaking of cold, science has long thought lower temperatures increased longevity in many species, but whether it is true or not may come down to one's genome, according to a 2018 study. Regardless, it appears cold can increase brown fat in humans, which is the type of fat bears use to stay warm during hibernation. Brown fat has been shown to improve metabolism and combat obesity.

The positive impact on our health from eating a plantbased diet, having close, loving relationships and getting adequate exercise and sleep are well documented. Calorie restriction, however, is a more controversial way of adding years to life, experts say.

One supplement he takes after discovering its benefits is 1 gram of resveratrol, the antioxidant-like substance found in the skin of grapes, blueberries, raspberries, mulberries and peanuts.

Cutting back on food -- without inducing malnutrition -- has been a scientifically known way to lengthen life for nearly a century. Studies on worms, crabs, snails, fruit flies and rodents have found restricting calories "delay the onset of age-related disorders" such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes, according to the National Institute on Aging. Some studies have also found extensions in life span: In a 1986 study, mice fed only a third of a typical day's calories lived to 53 months -- a mouse kept as a pet may live to about 24 months. Studies in people, however, have been less enlightening, partly because many have focused on weight loss instead of longevity. For Sinclair, however, cutting back on meals was a significant factor in resetting his personal clock: Recent tests show he has a biological age of 42 in a body born 53 years ago. "I've been doing a biological test for 10 years now, and I've been getting steadily younger for the last decade," Sinclair said. "The biggest change in my biological clock occurred when I ate less often -- I only eat one meal a day now. That made the biggest difference to my biochemistry."

Additional Ways To Turn Back The Clock Sinclair incorporates other tools into his life, based on research from his lab and others. In his book "Lifespan: Why We Age and Why We Don't Have To," he writes that little of what he does has undergone the sort of "rigorous long-term clinical testing" needed to have a "complete understanding of the wide range of potential outcomes." In fact, he added, "I have no idea if this is even the right thing for me to be doing." With that caveat, Sinclair is willing to share his tips: He keeps his starches and sugars to a minimum and gave up desserts at age 40 (although he does admit to stealing a taste on occasion). He eats a good amount of plants, avoids eating other mammals and keeps his body weight at the low end of optimal. He exercises by taking a lot of steps each day, walks upstairs instead of taking an elevator and visits the gym with his son to lift weights and jog before taking

Sinclair takes vitamins D and K2 and baby aspirin daily, along with supplements that have shown promise in extending longevity in yeast, mice and human cells in test tubes.

He also takes 1 gram of metformin, a staple in the arsenal of drugs used to lower blood sugars in people with diabetes. He added it after studies showed it might reduce inflammation, oxidative damage and cellular senescence, in which cells are damaged but refuse to die, remaining in the body as a type of malfunctioning "zombie cell." However, some scientists quibble about the use of metformin, pointing to rare cases of lactic acid buildup and a lack of knowledge on how it functions in the body. Sinclair also takes 1 gram of NMN, or nicotinamide mononucleotide, which in the body turns into NAD+, or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. A coenzyme that exists in all living cells, NAD+ plays a central role in the body's biological processes, such as regulating cellular energy, increasing insulin sensitivity and reversing mitochondrial dysfunction. When the body ages, NAD+ levels significantly decrease, dropping by middle age to about half the levels of youth, contributing to age-related metabolic diseases and neurodegenerative disorders. Numerous studies have shown restoring NAD+ levels safely improves overall health and increases life span in yeast, mice and dogs. Clinical trials testing the molecule in humans have been underway for three years, Sinclair said. "These supplements, and the lifestyle that I am doing, is designed to turn on our defenses against aging," he said. "Now, if you do that, you don't necessarily turn back the clock. These are just things that slow down epigenetic damage and these other horrible hallmarks of aging. "But the real advance, in my view, was the ability to just tell the body, 'Forget all that. Just be young again,' by just flipping a switch. Now I'm not saying that we're going to all be 20 years old again," Sinclair said. "But I'm optimistic that we can duplicate this very fundamental process that exists in everything from a bat to a sheep to a whale to a human. We've done it in a mouse. There's no reason I can think of why it shouldn't work in a person, too."


spa trends Yuancheng Lu chose three of the four factors and genetically added them to a harmless virus. The virus was designed to deliver the rejuvenating Yamanaka factors to damaged retinal ganglion cells at the back of an aged mouse's eye. After injecting the virus into the eye, the pluripotent genes were then switched on by feeding the mouse an antibiotic. "The antibiotic is just a tool. It could be any chemical really, just a way to be sure the three genes are switched on," Sinclair said. "Normally they are only on in very young developing embryos and then turn off as we age." Amazingly, damaged neurons in the eyes of mice injected with the three cells rejuvenated, even growing new axons, or projections from the eye into the brain. Since that original study, Sinclair said his lab has reversed aging in the muscles and brains of mice and is now working on rejuvenating a mouse's entire body. "Somehow the cells know the body can reset itself, and they still know which genes should be on when they were young," Sinclair said. "We think we're tapping into an ancient regeneration system that some animals use -- when you cut the limb off a salamander, it regrows the limb. The tail of a fish will grow back; a finger of a mouse will grow back."

The 'Benjamin Button' Effect: The Goal is to do the same for Humans By Sandee LaMotte, CNN In molecular biologist David Sinclair's lab at Harvard Medical School, old mice are growing young again. Using proteins that can turn an adult cell into a stem cell, Sinclair and his team have reset aging cells in mice to earlier versions of themselves. In his team's first breakthrough, published in late 2020, old mice with poor eyesight and damaged retinas could suddenly see again, with vision that at times rivaled their offspring's. David Sinclair has reversed aging in mice and believes the same can be done for people. David Sinclair has reversed aging in mice and believes the same can be done for people. When those mice died some six months later, they still had good eyesight, Sinclair told an audience at Life Itself, a health and wellness event presented in partnership with CNN. "It's a permanent reset, as far as we can tell, and we think it may be a universal process that could be applied across the body to reset our age," said Sinclair, who has spent the last 20 years studying ways to reverse the ravages of time. "If we reverse aging, these diseases should not happen. We have the technology today to be able to go into your hundreds without worrying about getting cancer in your 70s, heart disease in your 80s and Alzheimer's in your 90s. This is the world that is coming. It's literally a question of when and

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for most of us, it's going to happen in our lifetimes," Sinclair told the audience with CNN. "His research shows you can change aging to make lives younger for longer. Now he wants to change the world and make aging a disease," said Whitney Casey, who is partnering with Sinclair to create a do-it-yourself biological age test. While modern medicine addresses sickness, it doesn't address the underlying cause, "which for most diseases, is aging itself," Sinclair said. "We know that when we reverse the age of an organ like the brain in a mouse, the diseases of aging then go away. Memory comes back; there is no more dementia. "I believe that in the future, delaying and reversing aging will be the best way to treat the diseases that plague most of us."

A Reset Button In Sinclair's lab, two mice sit side by side. One is the picture of youth, the other gray and feeble. Yet they are brother and sister, born from the same litter -- only one has been genetically altered to age faster. If that could be done, Sinclair asked his team, could the reverse be accomplished as well? Japanese

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

biomedical researcher Dr. Shinya Yamanaka had already reprogrammed human adult skin cells to behave like embryonic or pluripotent stem cells, capable of developing into any cell in the body. The 2007 discovery won the scientist a Nobel Prize, and his "induced pluripotent stem cells," soon became known as "Yamanaka factors." However, adult cells fully switched back to stem cells via Yamanaka factors lose their identity. They forget they are blood, heart and skin cells, making them perfect for rebirth as "cell du jour," but lousy at rejuvenation. You don't want Brad Pitt in "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" to become a baby all at once; you want him to age backward while still remembering who he is. Labs around the world jumped on the problem. A study published in 2016 by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, showed signs of aging could be expunged in genetically aged mice, exposed for a short time to four main Yamanaka factors, without erasing the cells' identity. But there was a downside in all this research: In certain situations, the altered mice developed cancerous tumors. Looking for a safer alternative, Sinclair lab geneticist

That discovery indicates there is a "backup copy" of youthfulness information stored in the body, he added. "I call it the information theory of aging," he said. "It's a loss of information that drives aging cells to forget how to function, to forget what type of cell they are. And now we can tap into a reset switch that restores the cell's ability to read the genome correctly again, as if it was young." While the changes have lasted for months in mice, renewed cells don't freeze in time and never age (like, say, vampires or superheroes), Sinclair said. "It's as permanent as aging is. It's a reset, and then we see the mice age out again, so then we just repeat the process. "We believe we have found the master control switch, a way to rewind the clock," he added. "The body will then wake up, remember how to behave, remember how to regenerate and will be young again, even if you're already old and have an illness."

Science Already Knows How To Slow Human Aging Studies on whether the genetic intervention that revitalized mice will do the same for people are in early stages, Sinclair said. It will be years before human trials are finished, analyzed and, if safe and successful, scaled to the mass needed for a federal stamp of approval. While we wait for science to determine if we too can reset our genes, there are many other ways to slow the aging process and reset our biological clocks, Sinclair said. "The top tips are simply: Focus on plants for food, eat less often, get sufficient sleep, lose your breath for 10 minutes three times a week by exercising to maintain your muscle mass, don't sweat the small stuff and have a good social group," Sinclair said.

All these behaviors affect our epigenome, proteins and chemicals that sit like freckles on each gene, waiting to tell the gene "what to do, where to do it, and when to do it," according to the National Human Genome Research Institute. The epigenome literally turns genes on and off. What controls the epigenome? Human behavior and one's environment play a key role. Let's say you were born with a genetic predisposition for heart disease and diabetes. But because you exercised, ate a plant-focused diet, slept well and managed your stress during most of your life, it's possible those genes would never be activated. That, experts say, is how we can take some of our genetic fate into our own hands.

a sauna and a dip in an ice-cold pool. "I've got my 20-year-old body back," he said with a smile. Speaking of cold, science has long thought lower temperatures increased longevity in many species, but whether it is true or not may come down to one's genome, according to a 2018 study. Regardless, it appears cold can increase brown fat in humans, which is the type of fat bears use to stay warm during hibernation. Brown fat has been shown to improve metabolism and combat obesity.

The positive impact on our health from eating a plantbased diet, having close, loving relationships and getting adequate exercise and sleep are well documented. Calorie restriction, however, is a more controversial way of adding years to life, experts say.

One supplement he takes after discovering its benefits is 1 gram of resveratrol, the antioxidant-like substance found in the skin of grapes, blueberries, raspberries, mulberries and peanuts.

Cutting back on food -- without inducing malnutrition -- has been a scientifically known way to lengthen life for nearly a century. Studies on worms, crabs, snails, fruit flies and rodents have found restricting calories "delay the onset of age-related disorders" such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes, according to the National Institute on Aging. Some studies have also found extensions in life span: In a 1986 study, mice fed only a third of a typical day's calories lived to 53 months -- a mouse kept as a pet may live to about 24 months. Studies in people, however, have been less enlightening, partly because many have focused on weight loss instead of longevity. For Sinclair, however, cutting back on meals was a significant factor in resetting his personal clock: Recent tests show he has a biological age of 42 in a body born 53 years ago. "I've been doing a biological test for 10 years now, and I've been getting steadily younger for the last decade," Sinclair said. "The biggest change in my biological clock occurred when I ate less often -- I only eat one meal a day now. That made the biggest difference to my biochemistry."

Additional Ways To Turn Back The Clock Sinclair incorporates other tools into his life, based on research from his lab and others. In his book "Lifespan: Why We Age and Why We Don't Have To," he writes that little of what he does has undergone the sort of "rigorous long-term clinical testing" needed to have a "complete understanding of the wide range of potential outcomes." In fact, he added, "I have no idea if this is even the right thing for me to be doing." With that caveat, Sinclair is willing to share his tips: He keeps his starches and sugars to a minimum and gave up desserts at age 40 (although he does admit to stealing a taste on occasion). He eats a good amount of plants, avoids eating other mammals and keeps his body weight at the low end of optimal. He exercises by taking a lot of steps each day, walks upstairs instead of taking an elevator and visits the gym with his son to lift weights and jog before taking

Sinclair takes vitamins D and K2 and baby aspirin daily, along with supplements that have shown promise in extending longevity in yeast, mice and human cells in test tubes.

He also takes 1 gram of metformin, a staple in the arsenal of drugs used to lower blood sugars in people with diabetes. He added it after studies showed it might reduce inflammation, oxidative damage and cellular senescence, in which cells are damaged but refuse to die, remaining in the body as a type of malfunctioning "zombie cell." However, some scientists quibble about the use of metformin, pointing to rare cases of lactic acid buildup and a lack of knowledge on how it functions in the body. Sinclair also takes 1 gram of NMN, or nicotinamide mononucleotide, which in the body turns into NAD+, or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. A coenzyme that exists in all living cells, NAD+ plays a central role in the body's biological processes, such as regulating cellular energy, increasing insulin sensitivity and reversing mitochondrial dysfunction. When the body ages, NAD+ levels significantly decrease, dropping by middle age to about half the levels of youth, contributing to age-related metabolic diseases and neurodegenerative disorders. Numerous studies have shown restoring NAD+ levels safely improves overall health and increases life span in yeast, mice and dogs. Clinical trials testing the molecule in humans have been underway for three years, Sinclair said. "These supplements, and the lifestyle that I am doing, is designed to turn on our defenses against aging," he said. "Now, if you do that, you don't necessarily turn back the clock. These are just things that slow down epigenetic damage and these other horrible hallmarks of aging. "But the real advance, in my view, was the ability to just tell the body, 'Forget all that. Just be young again,' by just flipping a switch. Now I'm not saying that we're going to all be 20 years old again," Sinclair said. "But I'm optimistic that we can duplicate this very fundamental process that exists in everything from a bat to a sheep to a whale to a human. We've done it in a mouse. There's no reason I can think of why it shouldn't work in a person, too."


innovation

TREND: Bigger, More Sophisticated Medical-Wellness Destinations By Cecelia Girr & Skyler Hubler From 1400–1700, the Medical Renaissance marked a historic breakthrough in our approach to healthcare. Science began to dominate superstition. Anatomical discoveries paved the way for modern medicine. And yes, vaccines were in development. Over three hundred years later, we’re undergoing a new kind of medical renaissance, one where two complementary yet often competing entities— healthcare and wellness—will converge. As with any great renaissance, this new era will bring enlightenment, prolific thinkers, and a focus on art and design. Rather than looking backward to move forward, however, this renaissance will be born from healthcare and wellness looking side- toside to learn from one another.

personalized guides to optimal health. Years from now, we might just look back and realize that this was the Golden Age. How We Got There The road where healthcare and wellness meet was not built overnight. Historians point to several factors that led to the Medical Renaissance following the Middle Ages—increased interaction between cultures, the rediscovery of ancient texts, innovation, and the impacts of conflict and death. The causes for our modern renaissance look eerily similar. Interaction Between Cultures

Dr. Kenneth R. Pelletier, clinical professor of medicine and best-selling author, points to the fierce turf wars between conventional medicine and wellness— which has often been considered complementary or alternative medicine — as a major roadblock. “There’s an inherent tension between the money and the patients that are going to occupy this space.” But all signs — signs uncharacteristically optimistic for our current COVID-era—point to things being different this time around. The pandemic has forced health up the agenda for governments, businesses and individuals alike. And in tandem, we’re becoming acutely aware that it’s better to stay well than to wait for illness to strike. In terms of the two systems working together, Dr. Pelletier is confident that it’s coming. “If you look three to five years down the road, it’s inevitable that there will be a much more seamless exchange between healthcare and wellness, where there’s mutual respect and wider acceptance based on evidence rather than bias.” In this new era, healthcare and wellness will learn to get along. Hospitals will take inspiration from five-star resorts, yoga studios might measure improved telomere length, and prescriptions may be coupled with hyper-

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This time around, the clash of cultures is happening between conventional healthcare and less conventional wellness. After all, it was the antiquated healthcare industry that opened the door for wellness to become the cool kid on the block. When healthcare gave us lab coats and sterile waiting rooms, wellness offered spiritual healers and therapeutic retreats. Up until now, the two had danced in each other’s worlds, sometimes crossing but never successfully syncing up. Conflict And Death The pandemic has proven that science, medicine, and PhDs are essential, accelerating a mutual awakening of both camps. Wellness enthusiasts have been brutally reminded that yoga and essential oils won’t cure COVID-19, while those who solely relied on healthcare to cure their ailments have been forced to get real about the importance of preventative care (or “selfcare” as it’s been affectionately renamed in some circles). We’re waking up to the fact that healthcare and wellness need each other, and consumer demands are forcing them to coexist peacefully. Wellness is learning to lean

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

into science, establish standards, and hold itself accountable. At the same time, healthcare is beginning to borrow from the wellness playbook—transforming a once sterile industry into a more holistic, lifestyleoriented, and even pleasurable one. A New Duality As we look to a future where healthcare and wellness converge, there’s no better visual representation than Octave’s Sangha Retreat in Suzhou, China. Frederick Chavalit Tsao built the expansive resort with the vision of creating a utopia “where ancient healing modalities and modern medicine come together in the name of human optimization.” On the property, there’s a corridor that runs from one side to the other. One end is home to conventional medicine, and the other hosts wellness practices ranging from acupuncture to more “out-there” devices that measure the age of your soul. Visitors are free to flow between the two sides based on their needs. The corridor at the Sangha Retreat presents a perfect image of what we believe is next for healthcare and wellness. A kind of yin yang approach where two seemingly opposing forces finally discover that they can—and must—work together. As Dr. Pelletier puts it, “Medicine is realizing that its roots have come from wellness traditions, and the wellness community is recognizing that not all doctors are evil.” The truth is, hospitals, prescriptions and doctors aren’t going away any time soon. But by emphasizing selfcare, we can all decrease our dependence on the parts of healthcare. It starts by taking deliberate actions to care for our mental and physical health. And while it’s ultimately up to us, healthcare and wellness both have a vital role to play in unlocking access, empowering us to make smarter choices, and maybe even making it feel good along the way.



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DrK cellREVERSE NucleoCollagen For Young & Healthy Skin, Brain & Gut. What does the DrK cellREVERSE NucleoCollagen Contain? • Nucleotides - a scientifically balanced and unique form of Nucleotides. The key ingredient in this product is a nutrient called Nucleotides, which are responsible for the efficient replication of every cell in our bodies as they are the building blocks of our genetic material (DNA/RNA). •Collagen - It is a natural, high-purity, bioactive ingredient with a protein content of over 97% (on a dry weight basis). It is quite widely known that Collagen has numerous beneficial effects when taken internally, especially for Skin, joint, and cartilage health as well as vitality. • Trans-Resveratrol - Is a natural compound found in several plants which has been shown to have powerful antioxidant properties. Antioxidants neutralize free radicals, which are believed to be associated with aging, cardiovascular disease, and other inflammatory medical conditions. Daily supplementation with DrK cellREVERSE NucleoCollagen improves skin hydration and barrier function, contributing to a healthy skin, brain and gut function.Daily supplementation of 10g of DrK cellREVERSE NucleoCollagen delivers the optimum dose of Nucleotides and Collagen peptides for DNA, gut and skin repair. DrK cellREVERSE NucleoCollagenis in a convenient powder format that makes it an easy addition to water, juice, morning smoothies and yoghurt.

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Normal signs of aging skin include dryness and break down of the collagen network that leads to fine lines. Your skin loses the ability to make collagen and heal itself. The skin becomes thinner, loses elasticity, begins sagging and develops wrinkles. A thinner skin also becomes more sensitive to sun damage and air pollutants. The DrK cellREVERSE NucleoCollagen delivers clinically proven ingredients which act as the building blocks needed to support a healthier and younger looking skin. The DrK cellREVERSE NucleoCollgen contains a unique balance of key nutrients to boost tissue repair and new skin cell growth. Giving your skin the nourishment, it needs for a youthful glow you desire. Nucleotides: Our body has a relentless demand for new cells and new cells need nucleotides to be formed • Diet alone is no longer sufficient to supply our daily nucleotide needs •Nucleotide supplementation has become essential •Nucleotides (NMN and NADH+) play a role in anti-aging •Nucleotides are critical for optimal functioning of the immune system and the repair of the gut lining and length of the villi in the small intestines Trans - Resveratrol: Resveratrol (a.k.a. trans-resveratrol or 3, 4', 5-

trihydroxystilbene) is a natural phytoalexin compound, found in red grape skin, Japanese knotweed, peanuts, blueberries, and some other berries. It is a powerful antioxidant produced by some plants in response to stress, injury, infection or ultraviolet (UV)-irradiation. In the mid-1990s, resveratrol was brought into the spotlight as the main polyphenol in red wine, in the context of the French paradox (i.e., the apparent contradiction between the French having a low rate of cardiovascular diseases despite having a diet rich in saturated fats, including the consumption of large amounts of alcohol, and cigarette smoking). It was hypothesized that the benefits for the French were due to their consumption of moderate amounts of red wine that contained 1 to 2 mg of resveratrol per 8 ounces. Since then, scientific interest for this polyphenol has increased exponentially. By 1996, there were 46 scientific papers on resveratrol, increasing to over 1,300 by 2006 and to more than 9,800 by August 2017.3 Now, resveratrol is recognized for its beneficial effects on, among others, cardiovascular health, blood glucose control, skin health, bone health and memory. Resveratrol is therefore widely used as a key ingredient to promote healthy aging. Collagen: Collagen is the most abundant protein in your body. It's the main component of connective tissues that make up several body parts, including tendons, ligaments, skin, and muscles.Collagen has many important functions, including providing your skin with structure and strengt hening your bones.





spa trends

Cellular Health: A Key To Healthy Ageing By Dawn Brighid | Health & Wellness, Healthy Aging Many people are aware that the human body is made up of microscopic cells. However, not everyone is aware that you can take steps to maintain your health on a cellular level. Cellular health is a modern approach to wellness that involves supporting your body’s health by keeping your cells abundant and thriving.

Every cell relies on DNA to direct it, so any interruptions or mistakes within the DNA can cause serious issues within the body. Errors or “typos” within the genetic code can cause cellular dysfunction, leading to imbalance and disease in the body. Keeping DNA mutations to a minimum is an effective way to combat aging and maintain an optimal level of health.

What is Cellular Health? NAD+ and Cellular Health The concept of cellular health involves taking steps to support the functioning of your cells in an effort to boost your overall health. The cells are the most basic level of biological organization. Cellular health aims to support the cells, mitochondria, DNA, and any other components that come into play. Components of the Cells To understand the concept of cellular health, it helps to first review the different components that make up each cell. Mitochondria The mitochondria are also known as the powerhouse of the cell. This important structure is responsible for converting glucose to ATP, supplying the cells with usable energy. Without well-functioning mitochondria, cells cannot produce the energy needed to function and may even die off. Although powerful, the mitochondria are not immune to aging. This component of our cells can have reduced efficiency as we age. Some methods for maintaining mitochondrial health include: decreasing toxin exposure, consuming a nutrient-rich diet, and increasing muscle mass. DNA The DNA provides a genetic code to the cells–an instruction manual that tells the cells how to function.

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Certain chemicals in the body impact cellular health, such as NAD+. NAD+ is a molecule found in every single cell of the human body. This important molecule helps with different chemical reactions at a cellular level. Having abundant levels of NAD+ helps to keep your cells functioning properly. As we age, our NAD+ levels naturally decrease. Why is Cellular Health Important? Because your cells make up all of the tissues and organs that keep your body functioning properly, having cells that function well supports your body’s overall health. Focusing on cellular health offers the opportunity to get to the root of any health issues by supporting the most basic level of life. Our cells make up our tissues and organs, meaning that keeping the cells healthy can help maintain the larger systems of your body and your body as a whole. As your body ages, your cells age. So taking steps to keep your cells healthy can help slow down the aging process and even reverse it in some instances. Using NMN & NAD+ to Support Cellular Health Maintaining high levels of NAD+ in the body is essential to maintaining cellular health, so many people supplement NAD+. Although the benefits of NAD+ are well-known, not everyone realizes that another important molecule comes into play that has an equally beneficial effect.

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

NMN is a form of vitamin B3 found in all living things and is a key player in the production of NAD+. Supplementation of NMN has been found to directly impact NAD+ levels, as it is a key player in the production of NAD+. Because NAD+ levels naturally decrease with age, supplementing NAD+ and/or NMN can help maintain these levels and combat some of the negative effects of aging. Some potential benefits of maintaining optimal NAD+ levels include: • Improved energy levels • Faster metabolism • Reduced brain fog • Improved heart health • Reduced inflammation • Healthy immune system • Improved sleep • DNA and muscle repair How to Incorporate NMN Into Your Daily Routine Some common foods, such as broccoli and avocado, offer a natural source of NMN. However, NMN is only found in these foods in small quantities, so to consume an adequate amount, you’d have to eat 66 pounds. Using an NMN supplement (we use Elevant NMN) is one of the easiest ways to ensure that you are getting adequate amounts to give your cellular health a major boost. The importance of supporting your body through the aging process has never been clearer. By taking steps to maintain your health at a cellular level, you’ll not only feel your best, but you may even be adding years to your life. Maintaining NAD+ levels is one of the easiest ways to support your body through the aging process and even reverse some of the negative effects of aging that you’re already experiencing.



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By Tatiana Boncompagni

Luxury Cosmetic Procedures Reach Next Level Prices, the $200,000 Face-lift As the famous F. Scott Fitzgerald line goes, the rich are different from you and me — and apparently so, too, are their face-lifts. Just ask Hilda Back, 63, who traveled from her home in Woodlands, Texas, to New York and shelled out $230,000 for a nip and tuck at the hands of Dr. Andrew Jacono, a plastic surgeon who is perhaps best known for doing the designer, Marc Jacobs’s recent face-lift. Ms. Back said the cost for her surgery, which included a brow-lift, upper and lower eyes, face-lift, lip-lift, neck-lift, earlobe reconstruction and rhinoplasty, was “a little higher than what I expected,” but she is happy with her results. “I have a Rolls-Royce, I have three homes, I have everything I could possibly want, but I was still depressed,” Ms. Back said. “The way I look at this is: This is my face, and it’s going everywhere I go.” So, then, why not the $200,000 face-lift? Just as the prices of luxury real estate, art, cars and other collectibles have skyrocketed in recent years, so has the cost of a nip and tuck at the hands of an elite group of savvily marketed plastic surgeons, most of whom specialize in face-lifts and have months long waiting lists, despite their fees. “It’s a little like the label on clothes, or if the price of the wine is more, it’s better,” said Dr. Jonathan Sykes, a plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills and Sacramento and a past president of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. “Is facial surgery worth the super-high tariff? Only the consumer can decide that.” While inflationary pressures, including the cost of medical supplies and support-staff salaries, and a jump in demand — what the industry has christened the “Zoom Boom” — have led many doctors to raise their rates, the average cost of a face-lift in the United States has increased only marginally to $10 000 in 2021, up 3 percent since 2020, according to the Aesthetic Society, an association of board-certified plastic surgeons. The doctors touting their “designer” face-lifts insist

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that their advanced technique, elevated aesthetic sensibilities and experience allow them to charge these rates. Dr. Lara Devgan, a plastic surgeon in Manhattan, likened what she does to “commissioning an artist to make a very beautiful painting for you.” Dr. Devgan charges up to $200,000 for a face-lift. “At first blush, it may seem like a big number, but I think of this as a question of value, not of cost,” Dr. Devgan said. “Your face is your job, it’s your love life, it’s your identity.” Dr. Julius Few, a plastic surgeon in Chicago and Los Angeles, charges $50,000 for a “basic face-lift,” he said, and “well into the six figures” for more extensive procedures. In an interview, he spoke about his love of painting and photography and 22 years of focusing on faces. “For the affluent patient I treat, this is really more like purchasing artwork than purchasing a technical procedure,” said Dr. Jacono, who helped pioneer a technique that’s referred to as an “extended deep plane” face-lift, which he has taught to other doctors around the world.

Dr. White said that the procedure should be at a premium because it does require a lot of skill but that, morally and ethically, a wider range of patients should have access to such work. For the very well-heeled — and such sentiments notwithstanding — the idea of dropping the large amounts on elective surgery barely raises an eyebrow. So, assuming it’s in the budget, what exactly does $200,000 buy? Surgery is priced depending on several factors, including how complicated it is and how many areas of the face are treated. A face-lift can include a brow lift, lower and upper eyelid surgery, rhinoplasty, lip lifts, mid-face lifts, neck lifts and a host of other addons — fat grafting, facial implants, buccal fat par removal and skin lasers — all of which add thousands to the final bill.

The key difference between a deep plane face-lift and the SMAS (which stands for superficial musculoaponeurotic system and refers to the layer of tissue and fascia between the skin and the muscles of the face) is that the deep-plane lift allows the skin and SMAS to stay attached, preserving capillaries and blood flow to the skin, while the SMAS technique separates them. The deep-plane lift works by repositioning the facial ligaments that stretch with age and gravity, allowing for movement of the face so that it doesn’t look pulled, as was often the result of face-lifts historically.

Then there is the postoperative care, which can include 24/7 direct access to your surgeon and athome nurses. Dr. Chia Chi Kao, a plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills who is known for his scar-free endoscopic “ponytail face-lift,” meaning that incisions are made behind the hairline, runs an outpatient surgery and aftercare center with suites where patients can recover with the help of a hyperbaric oxygen chamber. “It’s like a luxury hotel,” said Lily Bell, 48, a beauty industry executive in Beverly Hills, who stayed five days and four nights in Dr. Kao’s center and spent $212,000 on her face- and neck-lift and recovery. Diane Pizzoli, 68, a fashion designer in Roseland, N.J., had several face-lift consultations with doctors, some of whom presented her with estimates that were close to six figures.

Many surgeons perform deep-plane face-lifts and don’t ask their patients to drop close to a quartermillion dollars on the surgery. “I understand it is a luxury item, and it does have tremendous value, but it shouldn’t be just for the 1 percent,” said Dr. Matthew White, a plastic surgeon in Manhattan who does extended deep-plane face-lifts.

“Some of these other doctors were really selfpromoting and bragging about celebrities they’ve done,” said Ms. Pizzoli, who ultimately spent $50,000 on her face-lift and neck-lift and eyelid surgery and recovery. “I still look like myself, just much younger,” she said. “A higher fee is not always co-measured with a successful result.”



innovation

How to Boost your Productivity with Neurologica Nootropics are gaining recognition worldwide, and with good reason: these brain boosting substances harness the power of natural ingredients to enhance mental focus and flow, while helping you to stay on top of your game as you tackle productivity at work. They've become an increasingly popular way to enhance concentration, improve mental performance, treat anxiety, and even help you get a good night's sleep. Certain nootropics are also adaptogenic, which means that they calm the nervous system and help your body manage stress. Nootropics can be taken as and when needed, but since they work best cumulatively it's likely that you'll get the most out of them when used consistently on a daily basis. If you're battling to focus and would like to better manage your stress - or even if you'd simply like to get a better workout in - you might want to consider adding nootropics to your daily routine, as you get brain health to support your concentration and performance requirements.

Behind the Brand Neurologica specialises in bringing innovative nootropic combinations and functional brain health supplements directly to the consumer. Our aim is to empower consumers and enhance their overall performance by giving them the freedom to choose high-quality alternatives, purposefully designed by professionals, as opposed to average mainstream alternatives. Founded by registered professionals (pharmacologists and scientists), Neurologica's range of fit-for-purpose nootropic products are artisanally crafted and designed to give consumers the cutting edge when they need to master themselves- both physically and mentally. Brainpower isn't just about enhancing the ability to focus or on getting things done; imagination and creativity are the ultimate wins. When we refer to mastering your mind, we're referring to the ability to think inside AND out of the box, applying both logic and creativity in harmony. SCIENCE - Build a Better Brain Nootropics are natural and synthetic compounds that can boost cognitive function and improve many aspects of your life, especially when it comes to enhancing performance and decreasing stress.

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Nootropic substances can be used individually or in a combination for optimal results. Neurologica has merged thorough research and pharmacology practises to combine optimal ingredients and ensure the ideal dosages for each - but crafting a nootropic formulation can be likened to the development of an iconic building. Build a Foundation Some ingredients are standard in all our formulations. This is because you can't build an iconic building without a solid foundation. Certain minerals and vitamins, such as B vitamins, iodine, selenium, and CoEnzyme Q10, provide a strong foundation for optimal health. Design Plan The brain is wonderfully complex, in that there are many different parts with equally varying functions. It's vital that the right ingredients are used to enhance the cognitive function of each part, and Neurologica has done the work to map out the blueprint of ingredients required to achieve your personal goal.

that it can quickly become overwhelming. This is why we rely on trained pharmacists to help navigate this choice. Some ingredients have been used for thousands of years, while others are cutting-edge discoveries. Neuroscientists are still in the process of studying them and finding new applications regularly. We have eliminated ingredients that do not meet the criteria of a true nootropic. Synergy We have chosen ingredients that work in synergy with each other. This keeps the formulation both clean and potent at the same time. This is referred to as “Systems Theory”, which means that no ingredient is evaluated on its own; rather it's studied as part of a whole. Neurologica has also ensured, where applicable, that all of the precursors of effective ingredients are present so that there is not a single ingredient that will not be effective. Quality is never an accident. It is always the result of intelligent effort. - John Ruskin Why should I choose Neurologica?

Manufacturing Neurologica has partnered with some of the best pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities that South Africa has to offer. They are staffed with registered professionals such as pharmacists and scientists that take their responsibilities seriously. It was a key decision for us to manufacture locally; not only because we have such a high regard for the quality of the South African pharmaceutical industry, but also because it enables us to maintain a strong relationship with our partners ensuring that outputs match Neuroloigca's quality ethos. High Quality Materials You wouldn't develop an iconic building using subpar materials, so why should it be any different when it comes to improving the function of your most precious asset - the brain? All pharmaceutical ingredients have to be standardized to ensure that there is no variation from one batch to another. This is why it's vital that all plant materials are processed in a manufacturing facility, ensuring that any differences are eliminated and that the ingredients are safe and effective. However, not all ingredient manufacturing facilities are created equal. Neurologica is committed to using reliable and reputable sources to ensure that our products are safe and sourced with care. Types of Building Materials There are so many nootropic ingredients out there,

We're all familiar with the overwhelm that comes along with standing in front of pharmacy shelves full of brain health and energy products. Although individual prices seem affordable, the fact that you're required to take a combination of compounds for best effect means that you end up committing a number of capsules on a daily basis. This is where Neurologica comes in. Neurologica has merged thorough research and pharmacology practises to combine optimal ingredients and ensure the ideal dosages for each to support your specific needs, whether you want to increase clarity of thinking, improve your sleep, or enhance creativity. We take the guesswork out of choosing the right nootropics, so that all of the research on which ingredients to take, how often, and when has already been done for you. When you choose Neurologica, you can rest easy knowing that you're benefiting from the highest quality, pharmaceutically-designed product. True to our robust design philosophy, we've even gone as far as adding daily vitamins, essential minerals, and co-enzymes into the mix, for your convenience! For more information contact: Tel: +27 79 348 1754 email address: info@neurologica.co.za or visit: www.neurologica.co.za



innovation As days grow shorter and much of the country welcomes cooler weather, everyone find themselves shifting their habits - from what they wear and eat to when and how they exercise and more. Though it's frequently overlooked, skincare should also shift with the seasons. As the air grows drier and indoor heaters kick on, the skin becomes less hydrated, and clients /patients face a different set of environmental insults. It's worth emphasizing that, while there may be fewer hours of sunlight, UV exposure remains a concern through the winter months. Clients may need to tweak their daily skincare regimens in the weeks and months ahead to support their skin health in the face of changing exposures. When it comes to integrated skincare, seasonal adjustments can be essential to optimizing outcomes. Clients should use products formulated to protect and moisturize the skin before, during, and after procedures. At SkinCeuticals, we formulate products with clients' changing needs in mind. So when it comes to moisturizers and SPF, you and your clients can find the right balance of ingredients in the ideal formulation base to optimize the user experience. Of course, there are some constants, like the antioxidants that are essential to skin health every day, all year long. We are proud of our leadership in the antioxidant space, with recognized formulations like CE Ferulic, Phloretin CF, and more recently, Silymarin CF. As noted by Dr. Jenifer Henderson, these formulations deliver the proven efficacy of our stable L-ascorbic acid in combination with other potent antioxidants to help protect the skin from environmental insults and optimize recovery in the wake of procedures.

A Plan for All Seasons: Modifying Integrated Skincare By Jenifer L. Henderson, MD, FACS

Clients make a significant monetary investment when they choose aesthetic procedures - from injectables to surgery. Proper skin care is a simple, accessible, and affordable way to protect and maximize that investment for the long-term. SkinCeuticals is honored to partner with you and your clients in optimizing skin health. - Alison A. Murakami, PhD_VP, Medical Affairs

Jenifer Henderson, MD: Antioxidants are important in skincare because they help to minimize oxidative stress on the skin caused by environmental insults. Antioxidants are important in integrated skincare, because it's important to get the skin in good condition prior to any procedure or surgery. When patients are in a routine of using antioxidants before surgery, they're going to continue their use during the recovery period and afterwards. They start to see improvements in the skin-minimizing fine lines, improving firmness and elasticity of the skin-before the procedure.

In our practice, we have patients use antioxidants

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

we'll add additional hydration with Hydrating B5 Gel; they use that first and put the daily moisturizer on top of it.

Ultimately, patients want to maintain results for as long as they can, and topical antioxidants help there, too.

In winter months and in aged skin, we tend to like Emollience. They can also use Triple Lipid Restore 2:4:2, which helps improve barrier function. It's got ceramides, cholesterol, and fatty acids, and it's good for all skin types. That tends to be a really good product for winter time.

Every time we do a surgery, we include a skincare surgery kit in the cost of the procedure. For example, for a face lift, we provide a gentle cream cleanser, CE Ferulic, Epidermal Repair, sunscreen-usually Light Moisture UV Defense SPF 50. We also include Antioxidant Lip Repair, because lips become very dry after surgery. We give the kit to the patient at their pre-operative appointment, which is usually two weeks before the surgery, so they can start using the products. Which antioxidants ingredients do you prefer for integrated skincare? Dr. Henderson: I use CE Ferulic for most everything ablative or non-ablative, because CE Ferulic is 15% L-ascorbic acid, and I prefer that patient use the highest percentage of vitamin C topically that they can tolerate. If patients can't tolerate CE Ferulic after fully ablative, we'll switch to Phloretin CF, with a slightly lower percentage of L-ascorbic acid. CE Ferulic also has the benefit of vitamin E, which is also an antioxidant that works together with vitamin C to support recovery. For men especially, we like Phloretin CF gel. It tends to work well post shaving. As opposed to a serum, many men seem to prefer the gel formulation. I also prefer the Phloretin CF for oily skin and for patients that have hyperpigmentation. For acne-prone skin, I like new Silymarin CF, which helps prevent lipid peroxidation in the sebum, which is a factor in acne production. It's also very good for oily skin.

What is the role of topical hyaluronic acid in integrative skincare? Dr. Henderson: I love topical hyaluronic acid yearround. It's a great plumper of the skin and lips, and it promotes elasticity and firmness of the skin. We use it following most of the procedures that we do. I like it especially for patients who have had injectables; it adds plumpness and hydration to the skin. It's a good surface hydrator. What about UV protection? Why is it important even in the fall and winter when patients may perceive that it's not as necessar y? Dr. Henderson: UV protection is so important. Post procedure, you want to prevent re-pigmentation of skin that you've just treated. We use it right after any procedure that we do in the office, for the most part. It also is important to protect scars from the sun, since scar remodeling and reformation after an injury can be affected by sun exposure. You want to maintain results after any procedures. UV protection is important to maintain the results after we've achieved a good outcome from whatever procedure we're doing. We recommend patients use SPF every day. Patients that tend to have oily skin or don't want to do a lot of additional skincare or use a lot of additional skincare products can use their sunscreen as a daily moisturizer.

Is it important to moisturize? Why are antioxidant products beneficial in skincare, especially in integrated skincare?

Antioxidants help optimize results and support recovery. They neutralize free radicals and therefore may help decrease inflammation. Also, it is well known by aesthetic physicians that L-ascorbic acid is involved in all phases of the wound healing.

30

right away after surgery. And in fact, we put the first application on after ablative laser procedures while they're still under anesthesia.

Dr. Henderson: We know that skin heals better in a moist environment, so we like to have the skin hydrated post any procedure. Certainly, getting the skin in optimum quality before we create an injury or an insult to the skin improves the post healing outcome. Especially for ablative laser procedures, which I do quite a few of, I like Hydra Balm. It creates a really good occlusive barrier and helps the patient with some itching and discomfort. It's great for patients with severe dry or compromised skin. I use Hydra Balm until the patient re-epithelializes, and then we usually switch to a product that helps reinforce the skin barrier. This is also a good option for any patient with very dry skin. We may modify our recommendations seasonally. In summertime, when it's hot and patients sweat a bit, most people prefer a lighter formulation. Daily Moisture is a lighter formulation that is good for all skin types. If that's not enough for the patient, typically

And even in the winter when we don't have a lot of sun, SPF is important because UV is still present. About: Jenifer L. Henderson, MD, FACS Facial plastic surgeon, Cavalon Aesthetics, Silverdale, WA_Associate Clinical Professor, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences


innovation As days grow shorter and much of the country welcomes cooler weather, everyone find themselves shifting their habits - from what they wear and eat to when and how they exercise and more. Though it's frequently overlooked, skincare should also shift with the seasons. As the air grows drier and indoor heaters kick on, the skin becomes less hydrated, and clients /patients face a different set of environmental insults. It's worth emphasizing that, while there may be fewer hours of sunlight, UV exposure remains a concern through the winter months. Clients may need to tweak their daily skincare regimens in the weeks and months ahead to support their skin health in the face of changing exposures. When it comes to integrated skincare, seasonal adjustments can be essential to optimizing outcomes. Clients should use products formulated to protect and moisturize the skin before, during, and after procedures. At SkinCeuticals, we formulate products with clients' changing needs in mind. So when it comes to moisturizers and SPF, you and your clients can find the right balance of ingredients in the ideal formulation base to optimize the user experience. Of course, there are some constants, like the antioxidants that are essential to skin health every day, all year long. We are proud of our leadership in the antioxidant space, with recognized formulations like CE Ferulic, Phloretin CF, and more recently, Silymarin CF. As noted by Dr. Jenifer Henderson, these formulations deliver the proven efficacy of our stable L-ascorbic acid in combination with other potent antioxidants to help protect the skin from environmental insults and optimize recovery in the wake of procedures.

A Plan for All Seasons: Modifying Integrated Skincare By Jenifer L. Henderson, MD, FACS

Clients make a significant monetary investment when they choose aesthetic procedures - from injectables to surgery. Proper skin care is a simple, accessible, and affordable way to protect and maximize that investment for the long-term. SkinCeuticals is honored to partner with you and your clients in optimizing skin health. - Alison A. Murakami, PhD_VP, Medical Affairs

Jenifer Henderson, MD: Antioxidants are important in skincare because they help to minimize oxidative stress on the skin caused by environmental insults. Antioxidants are important in integrated skincare, because it's important to get the skin in good condition prior to any procedure or surgery. When patients are in a routine of using antioxidants before surgery, they're going to continue their use during the recovery period and afterwards. They start to see improvements in the skin-minimizing fine lines, improving firmness and elasticity of the skin-before the procedure.

In our practice, we have patients use antioxidants

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

we'll add additional hydration with Hydrating B5 Gel; they use that first and put the daily moisturizer on top of it.

Ultimately, patients want to maintain results for as long as they can, and topical antioxidants help there, too.

In winter months and in aged skin, we tend to like Emollience. They can also use Triple Lipid Restore 2:4:2, which helps improve barrier function. It's got ceramides, cholesterol, and fatty acids, and it's good for all skin types. That tends to be a really good product for winter time.

Every time we do a surgery, we include a skincare surgery kit in the cost of the procedure. For example, for a face lift, we provide a gentle cream cleanser, CE Ferulic, Epidermal Repair, sunscreen-usually Light Moisture UV Defense SPF 50. We also include Antioxidant Lip Repair, because lips become very dry after surgery. We give the kit to the patient at their pre-operative appointment, which is usually two weeks before the surgery, so they can start using the products. Which antioxidants ingredients do you prefer for integrated skincare? Dr. Henderson: I use CE Ferulic for most everything ablative or non-ablative, because CE Ferulic is 15% L-ascorbic acid, and I prefer that patient use the highest percentage of vitamin C topically that they can tolerate. If patients can't tolerate CE Ferulic after fully ablative, we'll switch to Phloretin CF, with a slightly lower percentage of L-ascorbic acid. CE Ferulic also has the benefit of vitamin E, which is also an antioxidant that works together with vitamin C to support recovery. For men especially, we like Phloretin CF gel. It tends to work well post shaving. As opposed to a serum, many men seem to prefer the gel formulation. I also prefer the Phloretin CF for oily skin and for patients that have hyperpigmentation. For acne-prone skin, I like new Silymarin CF, which helps prevent lipid peroxidation in the sebum, which is a factor in acne production. It's also very good for oily skin.

What is the role of topical hyaluronic acid in integrative skincare? Dr. Henderson: I love topical hyaluronic acid yearround. It's a great plumper of the skin and lips, and it promotes elasticity and firmness of the skin. We use it following most of the procedures that we do. I like it especially for patients who have had injectables; it adds plumpness and hydration to the skin. It's a good surface hydrator. What about UV protection? Why is it important even in the fall and winter when patients may perceive that it's not as necessar y? Dr. Henderson: UV protection is so important. Post procedure, you want to prevent re-pigmentation of skin that you've just treated. We use it right after any procedure that we do in the office, for the most part. It also is important to protect scars from the sun, since scar remodeling and reformation after an injury can be affected by sun exposure. You want to maintain results after any procedures. UV protection is important to maintain the results after we've achieved a good outcome from whatever procedure we're doing. We recommend patients use SPF every day. Patients that tend to have oily skin or don't want to do a lot of additional skincare or use a lot of additional skincare products can use their sunscreen as a daily moisturizer.

Is it important to moisturize? Why are antioxidant products beneficial in skincare, especially in integrated skincare?

Antioxidants help optimize results and support recovery. They neutralize free radicals and therefore may help decrease inflammation. Also, it is well known by aesthetic physicians that L-ascorbic acid is involved in all phases of the wound healing.

30

right away after surgery. And in fact, we put the first application on after ablative laser procedures while they're still under anesthesia.

Dr. Henderson: We know that skin heals better in a moist environment, so we like to have the skin hydrated post any procedure. Certainly, getting the skin in optimum quality before we create an injury or an insult to the skin improves the post healing outcome. Especially for ablative laser procedures, which I do quite a few of, I like Hydra Balm. It creates a really good occlusive barrier and helps the patient with some itching and discomfort. It's great for patients with severe dry or compromised skin. I use Hydra Balm until the patient re-epithelializes, and then we usually switch to a product that helps reinforce the skin barrier. This is also a good option for any patient with very dry skin. We may modify our recommendations seasonally. In summertime, when it's hot and patients sweat a bit, most people prefer a lighter formulation. Daily Moisture is a lighter formulation that is good for all skin types. If that's not enough for the patient, typically

And even in the winter when we don't have a lot of sun, SPF is important because UV is still present. About: Jenifer L. Henderson, MD, FACS Facial plastic surgeon, Cavalon Aesthetics, Silverdale, WA_Associate Clinical Professor, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences


innovation

5 Beauty Treatments for a Big Event!! By Mallucci London Whether you're dialling up the glam for a wedding, a party or an upcoming date night, you'll know that beauty prep is all part of the fun. It's official: getting ready is the new going out. You can keep it simple with your favourite makeup look, or go all-out with at-home and in-clinic treatments. And, personally? We prefer the latter, ever y. single. time. There's no better base for party makeup than freshlyscrubbed, hydrated, glowing skin. The kind so positively radiant, you hardly need a highlighter. Here, we're breaking down the best night out beauty treatments to unlock that level of luminosity. From instant skin boosters to long-lasting pore plumpers, we've got your perfect prep covered… Six Weeks Before a Big Event: Profhilo and LED You're probably not prepping six weeks in advance for a party or date night, but for bigger events (think, weddings) - or just for long-lasting luminosity - Profhilo is your perfect pick. Known as 'the injectable moisturiser' it floods parched skin and fine lines with wrinkle-filling hyaluronic acid, which lends an instant glow that looks better as the weeks go by. By week six, you'll have that 'spent a month at a yoga retreat' radiance. Plus, it's ultra natural-looking; no one will know you've plumped for an injectable.

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If you're intrigued by LED light therapy for skin, now is the time to give it a go. Book in for red light LED to encourage the production of collagen, which keeps skin looking fresh and taut. You can start six weeks out, and team your facial with a Visia Skin Analysis, which allows your Mallucci London practitioner to assess the starting condition of your skin. Come back for two more treatments before the event - each spaced two weeks apart - and your final Visia Skin Analysis will show just how far your skin has progressed. (The glow will give it away, too.) 12-24 Hours Pre-Party: Aquagold and Oxygen Loved by the A-list; AquaGold is the very same treatment Kim Kardashian turned to when getting prepped for the 2019 Met Gala. It uses 24 carat gold-plated micro-needles - finer than a human hair - to push a Mesotherapy cocktail of hyaluronic acid and growth factors into your skin. Equipped with plumping power, this cocktail lends an instantly healthy look, while the delicate needles ensure there's no bruising or swelling. Ideal for a last-minute pick-me-up. If you want radiance that's needle-free, try an Oxygen Facial, which sees a concentrated stream of O2 targeted at tired-looking skin. A session can take up

to an hour, but it's one of the most relaxing night-out beauty treatments around, lulling you into a sense of calm as your pores are immersed in nourishing molecules. Plus, the collagen boost it triggers is second to none. Try it on the day before or morning of a big event, and your makeup will glide on like a dream. (Although you might not need it.) On the Day Of An Event: Hydrating Sheet Masks No matter what in-clinic treatment you've booked in for - a facial, an injectable or LED - you'd be remiss not to enhance the effects at home with a serumsoaked sheet mask. Choose one that's pillowy, plush and glow-enhancing, and apply it any time; morning, night or just before you apply makeup. You can even use it while you're soaking in the bath, as the steam will open up your pores, so the nourishing ingredients are better absorbed. Once you've removed the sheet, pat the remaining serum down and leave it on your skin. Then, when it comes time to do your makeup, apply a thin layer of the ZO Hydrating Crème over the top. Your skin will be positively gleaming, no matter the occasion.



innovation patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were recruited and received localized and whole-body cryotherapy treatments and conventional physiotherapy. Pain decreased in all treatment groups, but most markedly in the whole-body cryotherapy group, where patients had two to three daily cryotherapy sessions at -110 degrees C for one week. In addition to treating inflammation and pain, cryotherapy may play a positive role in treating patients with depression and anxiety disorders. A 2008 study in Poland found that the decrease of anxiety and depressive symptoms were significantly higher in a group of patients who were exposed to daily cryotherapy. The study group was treated using a series of 15 daily visits to a cryogenic chamber (-110 to -160 degrees C), which lasted two to three minutes each, in addition to standard outpatient psychopharmacotherapy. A control group w i t h s i m i l a r s y m p t o m s a l s o re c e i ve d psychopharmacotherapy, without cryotherapy treatments. These findings suggest a possible role for whole-body cryotherapy as a short-term adjuvant therapy for depressive and anxious patients.

Frozen Future

The Cold Hard Facts About Cryotherapy

By Kristin Vukovic

People are paying top dollar to expose their bodies to temperatures not found on Earth for one to three bone-chilling minutes while stripped down to their swimwear or birthday suits and sporting gloves, socks, and sometimes other protective accoutrements. In Antarctica, the coldest temperature ever recorded was measured by a satellite at -135.8 degrees F, while liquidnitrogen - cooled cryochambers range between 150 to 300 degrees below zero. When exposed to such frigid temperdtures, we’re thrust into survivdl mode: the brain sends the majority of the body’s blood to its core in an attempt to keep it warm, and receptors prompt the nervous system to release endorphins—those feel-good chemicals that help diminish pain while triggering positive feelings. After exiting the chamber, the ensuing rush of blood ostensibly rids the body of toxins and rejuvenates it at the cellular level. Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC), which has not been approved for medical use by the U.S. Food

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and Drug Administration (FDA), claims to reduce inflammation, cellulite, anxiety, headaches, and even depression. Early adopters include professional athletes, who traded ice baths for cryotherapy to help ease their aches and pains. Now, celebrities are hopping on the bandwagon: A single cryotherapy session is reputed to burn up to 800 calories and help with anti-aging and weight loss. Cryotherapy is also popping up in spas across the country, from cryotherapy facials to whole-body cryotherapy treatments.

cryotherapy has become a well-established treatment for a wide variety of benign and malignant skin lesions. Today’s whole-body cryotherapy, developed in 1978 in Japan to treat rheumatoid arthritis, involves entering a chamber of liquid nitrogen, which tricks the body into hypothermia. Scientists in Germany and Poland further developed cryo (cold) procedures, and in 1989, the third cryochamber in the world was created in Poland. The treatment quickly became commercialized and popularized among athletes in Europe.

Despite its recent popularity, cryotherapy is far from new. According to “History of Cryotherapy” in Dermatology Online Journal (2005) by Anatoli Freiman, M.D., and Nathaniel Bouganim, M.D., of the McGill University Health Centre Division of Dermatology (Montreal), the Egyptians used cold to treat injuries and inflammation as early as 2500 BCE. Following World War II, liquid nitrogen became commercially available, and over the years,

Cold Hard Facts

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

There is a dearth of cryotherapy studies in the U.S., because the majority of research has been done in Europe and Japan, with studies focusing on the benefits for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic inflammatory and destructive joint disease. The first randomized controlled trial of whole-body cryotherapy was conducted in Finland in 2006: 60

While cryotherapy was slow to come to the U.S., body-conscious consumers have quickly adopted it. KryoLife (New York City), which opened in 2012, offers whole-body cryotherapy sessions. The sessions use protocols that have been developed over 25 years of using the modality in Europe and include a treatment in a cryosauna or cryochamber, as well as a 10-15-minute warmup on cardio equipment. While every session is beneficial and provides immediate results, CEO Joanna Fryben recommends a minimum of 10 sessions to see cumulative benefits. “My friends—athletes—were using the therapy back in my native country of Poland,” says Fryben. “I became more familiar with it when my mom had a knee-replacement surgery and used the therapy for pain relief and as a part of her physical therapy. She absolutely loved the results. I did a lot of research and interviewed many doctors and people who used the therapy in Europe before I decided to introduce the modality on the USA.” KryoLife is a distributor of Juka Cryosaunas and an exclusive distributor of KrioSystem Life. “The reason we use and sell their equipment is because unlike other devices available, they have European medical and quality certifications,” she says. Athletes swear by cryotherapy because of its healing benefits and lack of recovery time. Fryben explains that unlike an ice bath, which does not affect the nervous and endocrine systems, cryotherapy positively impacts our nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. “Whole-body cryotherapy is much more potent, of much shorter duration, and much more comfortable for the user,” she says. “After an ice bath, an athlete should take a rest for the remainder of the day, but after whole-body cryotherapy, one is encouraged to exercise. The therapy increases neuromuscular connection, so the movement is more efficient. After an ice bath, muscle loses its capacity for some time.” Plus, with cryotherapy, guests don’t get wet. Golfers are getting in the game, too. In April 2015, The Spa at Sea Island (GA) started using Impact Cryotherapy equipment. “We were exposed to the

Impact unit because one of our members is a cofounder of the company,” says spa director Ella Stimpson. “We did a test with the professional golf community in our area, and it was a big hit. So when crafting a program that was primarily focused on golfers and other athletes, it made perfect sense to include a groundbreaking new technology to tackle pain, flexibility, and inflammation.” Stimpson explains that obtaining a full understanding of the guest’s medical history is important, because there are a few conditions that are contraindicated and some that require less extreme temperatures and time. “We want to understand their full training and therapeutic concerns so we can craft not only a great cryotherapy session for them but also build a recurring program around their lifestyle that will impact their game and quality of life,”she says. Spas and wellness clinics across the globe are striving to provide guests with the most effective programs, and incorporating cryotherapy as a part of the treatment plan is becoming increasingly popular. Thermes Marins Monte-Carlo (Monaco), a wellness and preventative health center, started offering cryotherapy to its guests in November 2014. “Cryotherapy is truly an amazing treatment with so many benefits,”says general manager Christine Zoliec. She explains that the cryotherapy treatment triggers a series of reactions in the body. “At the end of the session the body will take 20 to 30 minutes to recover the skin temperature, then the guest will start to feel effects. Within three minutes, a session helps to treat muscle and inflammatory diseases but can also help recovery from jetlag, help fight against sleep disorders, and has an anti-stress and anti-aging effect,” says Zoliec. SHA Wellness Clinic (Alicante, Spain) has also offered cryotherapy since 2014. “We are constantly trying to innovate and offer both conventional and alternative therapies,” says head of internal medicine and anti-aging Vicente Mera, M.D. “Whichever ancient or novel therapy might improve our patients’ wellbeing, if it is safe, then we try to implement into our general or more specific therapeutic program.”

Face Freeze As more technology is developed to localize cryotherapy treatments for the face and neck, spas are expanding their cryotherapy offerings. Additionally, with smaller, less expensive devices, more spas can afford to offer the therapy to spagoers. At Skintology Skin and Laser Center (New York City), guests can experience the CryoCure Facial. “A controlled beam of vaporized liquid nitrogen is used to freeze the skin of the face, scalp, and neck area,” says owner Yevgenya Freylikhman. “The cold nitrogen produces an instantaneous tightness in the skin, filling in fine lines and wrinkles. Collagen is activated to produce more cells, causing skin to become more elastic over repeated use.” The treatment flushes away built-up toxins, soothes inf lammation and eliminates puf f iness. Cryohealthcare was among the first companies to bring cryotherapy to the U.S. in 2009 after discovering it in Germany, and they have sold approximately 200 cryotherapy units nationwide. Medical director Jonas Kuehne, M.D., developed the Cryofacial, a treatment where gaseous nitrogen is applied to the skin with different levels of pressure.

“Cryofacials have been done in the past by soaking gauze in liquid nitrogen and placing it directly onto the skin of the face,” says managing director, Emilia Kuehne. “However, this treatment brings with it the risk of overexposure and possible burns, as it is difficult to apply the soaked gauze evenly to the skin. Our method allows very even cold exposure to the face in a controlled manner.” In addition to full-body cryotherapy and local cryotherapy, Chicago CryoSpa offers the Cryofacial. “When we had the opportunity to be the first destination outside of Los Angeles to offer the Cryofacial, we jumped on it right away,” says founder Jim Karas. Chicago CryoSpa was conceptualized by Karas and opened in July 2013 after a personal experience. “More than three years ago, I woke up with a partially torn Achilles,” he says. “I tried every conceivable treatment but with no luck. I was giving a speech and taping numerous television segments in Los Angeles, and a friend recommended cryo. After five days of the cryosauna, followed by five days of the local treatment directly on the injured area, I could run across the street. This was after eight months of limping. I came home, rented the space, and bought the equipment. It was the fastest business decision I have ever made.”

Primary Precautions Cryotherapy should always be administered by trained professionals who screen for current and past medical conditions, including heart attack or stroke, high-blood pressure, pregnancy, seizures, blood-clotting issues, infections or fever, a pacemaker or other implanted medical devices, and Raynaud’s disease, which causes some areas of the body to feel numb and cold in response to cold temperatures or stress. Even with proper screening and precautions, more high-quality research is needed. Safety is a priority for cryotherapy companies. KryoLife selects and trains technicians to the medicalgrade safety standards.“There have not been reported cases of any negative impact of wholebody cryotherapy,” says Fryben. “It is much safer than a hot sauna. However, the protocols, some precautions, and common sense should always be applied, and we are very strict about them at KryoLife. The treatment should always be supervised.” At Cryohealthcare, clients wear socks, gloves, shoes, underwear, and face mask in order to prevent irritation or injury to areas of compromised blood circulation during cold exposure. “We adhere to all European standards and added some of our own,” says Kuehne. “A first-time treatment may not exceed two minutes, and maximum treatment time for whole-body cryotherapy is three minutes.”

It is imperative to have trained therapists who never operate machines alone and nitrogen monitors that ensure levels are within safe parameters — breathing too much nitrogen can deplete the oxygen supply in the blood, which can be fatal. Facilities should also have a defibrillator and emergency kit onsite and provide CPR training to employees. Even with precautions, side effects can occur: moisture on the skin or clothing could freeze and cause frostbite, and cold intolerance and temporary nausea are possible reactions to the treatment. However, the many benefits of cryotherapy provide yet another reason for spa-goers to chill out.


innovation patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were recruited and received localized and whole-body cryotherapy treatments and conventional physiotherapy. Pain decreased in all treatment groups, but most markedly in the whole-body cryotherapy group, where patients had two to three daily cryotherapy sessions at -110 degrees C for one week. In addition to treating inflammation and pain, cryotherapy may play a positive role in treating patients with depression and anxiety disorders. A 2008 study in Poland found that the decrease of anxiety and depressive symptoms were significantly higher in a group of patients who were exposed to daily cryotherapy. The study group was treated using a series of 15 daily visits to a cryogenic chamber (-110 to -160 degrees C), which lasted two to three minutes each, in addition to standard outpatient psychopharmacotherapy. A control group w i t h s i m i l a r s y m p t o m s a l s o re c e i ve d psychopharmacotherapy, without cryotherapy treatments. These findings suggest a possible role for whole-body cryotherapy as a short-term adjuvant therapy for depressive and anxious patients.

Frozen Future

The Cold Hard Facts About Cryotherapy

By Kristin Vukovic

People are paying top dollar to expose their bodies to temperatures not found on Earth for one to three bone-chilling minutes while stripped down to their swimwear or birthday suits and sporting gloves, socks, and sometimes other protective accoutrements. In Antarctica, the coldest temperature ever recorded was measured by a satellite at -135.8 degrees F, while liquidnitrogen - cooled cryochambers range between 150 to 300 degrees below zero. When exposed to such frigid temperdtures, we’re thrust into survivdl mode: the brain sends the majority of the body’s blood to its core in an attempt to keep it warm, and receptors prompt the nervous system to release endorphins—those feel-good chemicals that help diminish pain while triggering positive feelings. After exiting the chamber, the ensuing rush of blood ostensibly rids the body of toxins and rejuvenates it at the cellular level. Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC), which has not been approved for medical use by the U.S. Food

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and Drug Administration (FDA), claims to reduce inflammation, cellulite, anxiety, headaches, and even depression. Early adopters include professional athletes, who traded ice baths for cryotherapy to help ease their aches and pains. Now, celebrities are hopping on the bandwagon: A single cryotherapy session is reputed to burn up to 800 calories and help with anti-aging and weight loss. Cryotherapy is also popping up in spas across the country, from cryotherapy facials to whole-body cryotherapy treatments.

cryotherapy has become a well-established treatment for a wide variety of benign and malignant skin lesions. Today’s whole-body cryotherapy, developed in 1978 in Japan to treat rheumatoid arthritis, involves entering a chamber of liquid nitrogen, which tricks the body into hypothermia. Scientists in Germany and Poland further developed cryo (cold) procedures, and in 1989, the third cryochamber in the world was created in Poland. The treatment quickly became commercialized and popularized among athletes in Europe.

Despite its recent popularity, cryotherapy is far from new. According to “History of Cryotherapy” in Dermatology Online Journal (2005) by Anatoli Freiman, M.D., and Nathaniel Bouganim, M.D., of the McGill University Health Centre Division of Dermatology (Montreal), the Egyptians used cold to treat injuries and inflammation as early as 2500 BCE. Following World War II, liquid nitrogen became commercially available, and over the years,

Cold Hard Facts

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

There is a dearth of cryotherapy studies in the U.S., because the majority of research has been done in Europe and Japan, with studies focusing on the benefits for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic inflammatory and destructive joint disease. The first randomized controlled trial of whole-body cryotherapy was conducted in Finland in 2006: 60

While cryotherapy was slow to come to the U.S., body-conscious consumers have quickly adopted it. KryoLife (New York City), which opened in 2012, offers whole-body cryotherapy sessions. The sessions use protocols that have been developed over 25 years of using the modality in Europe and include a treatment in a cryosauna or cryochamber, as well as a 10-15-minute warmup on cardio equipment. While every session is beneficial and provides immediate results, CEO Joanna Fryben recommends a minimum of 10 sessions to see cumulative benefits. “My friends—athletes—were using the therapy back in my native country of Poland,” says Fryben. “I became more familiar with it when my mom had a knee-replacement surgery and used the therapy for pain relief and as a part of her physical therapy. She absolutely loved the results. I did a lot of research and interviewed many doctors and people who used the therapy in Europe before I decided to introduce the modality on the USA.” KryoLife is a distributor of Juka Cryosaunas and an exclusive distributor of KrioSystem Life. “The reason we use and sell their equipment is because unlike other devices available, they have European medical and quality certifications,” she says. Athletes swear by cryotherapy because of its healing benefits and lack of recovery time. Fryben explains that unlike an ice bath, which does not affect the nervous and endocrine systems, cryotherapy positively impacts our nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. “Whole-body cryotherapy is much more potent, of much shorter duration, and much more comfortable for the user,” she says. “After an ice bath, an athlete should take a rest for the remainder of the day, but after whole-body cryotherapy, one is encouraged to exercise. The therapy increases neuromuscular connection, so the movement is more efficient. After an ice bath, muscle loses its capacity for some time.” Plus, with cryotherapy, guests don’t get wet. Golfers are getting in the game, too. In April 2015, The Spa at Sea Island (GA) started using Impact Cryotherapy equipment. “We were exposed to the

Impact unit because one of our members is a cofounder of the company,” says spa director Ella Stimpson. “We did a test with the professional golf community in our area, and it was a big hit. So when crafting a program that was primarily focused on golfers and other athletes, it made perfect sense to include a groundbreaking new technology to tackle pain, flexibility, and inflammation.” Stimpson explains that obtaining a full understanding of the guest’s medical history is important, because there are a few conditions that are contraindicated and some that require less extreme temperatures and time. “We want to understand their full training and therapeutic concerns so we can craft not only a great cryotherapy session for them but also build a recurring program around their lifestyle that will impact their game and quality of life,”she says. Spas and wellness clinics across the globe are striving to provide guests with the most effective programs, and incorporating cryotherapy as a part of the treatment plan is becoming increasingly popular. Thermes Marins Monte-Carlo (Monaco), a wellness and preventative health center, started offering cryotherapy to its guests in November 2014. “Cryotherapy is truly an amazing treatment with so many benefits,”says general manager Christine Zoliec. She explains that the cryotherapy treatment triggers a series of reactions in the body. “At the end of the session the body will take 20 to 30 minutes to recover the skin temperature, then the guest will start to feel effects. Within three minutes, a session helps to treat muscle and inflammatory diseases but can also help recovery from jetlag, help fight against sleep disorders, and has an anti-stress and anti-aging effect,” says Zoliec. SHA Wellness Clinic (Alicante, Spain) has also offered cryotherapy since 2014. “We are constantly trying to innovate and offer both conventional and alternative therapies,” says head of internal medicine and anti-aging Vicente Mera, M.D. “Whichever ancient or novel therapy might improve our patients’ wellbeing, if it is safe, then we try to implement into our general or more specific therapeutic program.”

Face Freeze As more technology is developed to localize cryotherapy treatments for the face and neck, spas are expanding their cryotherapy offerings. Additionally, with smaller, less expensive devices, more spas can afford to offer the therapy to spagoers. At Skintology Skin and Laser Center (New York City), guests can experience the CryoCure Facial. “A controlled beam of vaporized liquid nitrogen is used to freeze the skin of the face, scalp, and neck area,” says owner Yevgenya Freylikhman. “The cold nitrogen produces an instantaneous tightness in the skin, filling in fine lines and wrinkles. Collagen is activated to produce more cells, causing skin to become more elastic over repeated use.” The treatment flushes away built-up toxins, soothes inf lammation and eliminates puf f iness. Cryohealthcare was among the first companies to bring cryotherapy to the U.S. in 2009 after discovering it in Germany, and they have sold approximately 200 cryotherapy units nationwide. Medical director Jonas Kuehne, M.D., developed the Cryofacial, a treatment where gaseous nitrogen is applied to the skin with different levels of pressure.

“Cryofacials have been done in the past by soaking gauze in liquid nitrogen and placing it directly onto the skin of the face,” says managing director, Emilia Kuehne. “However, this treatment brings with it the risk of overexposure and possible burns, as it is difficult to apply the soaked gauze evenly to the skin. Our method allows very even cold exposure to the face in a controlled manner.” In addition to full-body cryotherapy and local cryotherapy, Chicago CryoSpa offers the Cryofacial. “When we had the opportunity to be the first destination outside of Los Angeles to offer the Cryofacial, we jumped on it right away,” says founder Jim Karas. Chicago CryoSpa was conceptualized by Karas and opened in July 2013 after a personal experience. “More than three years ago, I woke up with a partially torn Achilles,” he says. “I tried every conceivable treatment but with no luck. I was giving a speech and taping numerous television segments in Los Angeles, and a friend recommended cryo. After five days of the cryosauna, followed by five days of the local treatment directly on the injured area, I could run across the street. This was after eight months of limping. I came home, rented the space, and bought the equipment. It was the fastest business decision I have ever made.”

Primary Precautions Cryotherapy should always be administered by trained professionals who screen for current and past medical conditions, including heart attack or stroke, high-blood pressure, pregnancy, seizures, blood-clotting issues, infections or fever, a pacemaker or other implanted medical devices, and Raynaud’s disease, which causes some areas of the body to feel numb and cold in response to cold temperatures or stress. Even with proper screening and precautions, more high-quality research is needed. Safety is a priority for cryotherapy companies. KryoLife selects and trains technicians to the medicalgrade safety standards.“There have not been reported cases of any negative impact of wholebody cryotherapy,” says Fryben. “It is much safer than a hot sauna. However, the protocols, some precautions, and common sense should always be applied, and we are very strict about them at KryoLife. The treatment should always be supervised.” At Cryohealthcare, clients wear socks, gloves, shoes, underwear, and face mask in order to prevent irritation or injury to areas of compromised blood circulation during cold exposure. “We adhere to all European standards and added some of our own,” says Kuehne. “A first-time treatment may not exceed two minutes, and maximum treatment time for whole-body cryotherapy is three minutes.”

It is imperative to have trained therapists who never operate machines alone and nitrogen monitors that ensure levels are within safe parameters — breathing too much nitrogen can deplete the oxygen supply in the blood, which can be fatal. Facilities should also have a defibrillator and emergency kit onsite and provide CPR training to employees. Even with precautions, side effects can occur: moisture on the skin or clothing could freeze and cause frostbite, and cold intolerance and temporary nausea are possible reactions to the treatment. However, the many benefits of cryotherapy provide yet another reason for spa-goers to chill out.


innovation

Introducing NEW Lamelle Dermaheal Re-Firm Rare. Precious. An innovation like no other. NEW Lamelle Dermaheal Re-Firm is our most advanced anti-ageing solution to date. It harnesses the astounding anti-ageing potential of cutting-edge regenerative medicine using a precious elixir born of biotechnology. The Genesis of a Marvel Let's start at the beginning. Only recently has medical science begun to unravel the incredible potential of stem cells. These living cells are found in many tissues throughout your body and have the power to transform themselves into almost any other type of cell. They're especially useful for rejuvenation as they can migrate to an area of injury and evolve into whatever your body requires. Building block action aside, they can also secrete “factors”, a biochemical message that essentially controls the cells around them. Knowing that stem cells are the key that can unlock a cascade of anti-ageing benefits, Lamelle has been working with biotechnology companies invested in using stem cells to treat degenerative diseases. Naturally, this research has generated stem cell-derived blends with phenomenal applications in biocosmetics. Being at the forefront of innovation, we're now proud to unveil our most pioneering skin rejuvenator yet - Dermaheal Re-Firm. A Blend like No Other Lamelle Dermaheal Re-Firm isn't just a next-generation anti-ageing product. It's a marvel. The first product of its kind to harness the power of stem cell conditioning media (SCCM). Put simply, “conditioning media” is a stem cell's “liquid essence” - a precious elixir containing a treasure trove of cell-communicating secreted factors. To create this powerful rejuvenating cocktail, we start by extracting the stem cells from adipose tissue (fat cells) - proven to deliver the best results over other types of stem cells when it comes to skin rejuvenation - and incubate them in a liquid gel. Once the stem cells have secreted their powerful factors, we separate them from their essence and use the latter to create Dermaheal Re-Firm. The results? Astounding. As Re-Firm's SCCM elixir contains highly active growth factors, anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as collagen and elastin-encouraging peptides, it can transform your skin within just 28 days. As your cells receives the message that inspires them to perform their functions optimally you can expect to see a dramatic improvement in firmness; reduced wrinkling and brighter, more luminous-looking complexion. Potent and Precious The production of stem cell conditioning media is an exacting science controlled by the hands of the few highly-skilled biotechnologists that have mastered it. The supply is extremely limited making Dermaheal Re-Firm one of the world's most exclusive products. We're working hard to make it more accessible to everyone, but for now, it exists as something rare, potent and precious that has to be pre-ordered. We regret that not everyone will be able to experience its extraordinary effects. However, the other products in our Dermaheal range - while they don't include the elixir - also offer the benefits of growth factors. About Lamelle Research Laboratories Lamelle Research Laboratories is a proudly South African biotechnology research company. Trusted by thousands of South Africans, Lamelle is known for pioneering products and has produced many exciting firsts. For example, the brand's Helase 50+ sunscreen is the only product that can protect you from the full radiation spectrum as well as repair the damage it can cause to your DNA. What's great about Lamelle is that they've got something for every face. No matter what your age, skin type or concern - be it acne, pigmentation and premature ageing - their skincare range offers multiple solutions promising healthy skin and amazing results. They've also always been right at the forefront of innovation when it comes to treating dry and sensitive skin and even have their own one-of-a-kind ceramide that helps restore your skin's barrier function.

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For more information visit: www.lamelle.co.za



innovation Image supplied by Celluvac www.celluvac.co.za

Is Facial Fitness The New Face Lift? By Hannah Thompson In a world where injectables seem to be available on every corner, Hannah Thompson asks: are face workouts the no-needles answer we’ve been waiting for? Is it your pores, your jawline or your ever-so-slightly wonky nose? Whatever it is that bothers you specifically, we’ve all fallen deep into over-analysing our faces, and understandably so. Just when the omnipresence of social media left us sure that we couldn’t be any more exposed to our own image, along came a pandemic which hurried us further into the house of mirrors. The more we Zoomed, Facetimed and Instagrammed in an attempt to keep ourselves connected with the outside world, the more we picked, poked and prodded at our own reflections. According to my work calendar, I spent over 150 hours on video calls in the last three months of 2021 alone; no wonder I'm now hyper-aware of my own facial asymmetries - from my dominant raised eyebrow to the way one side of my mouth slightly pulls down when I talk. Ironically, the same screens that had us reckoning with our faces day in day out also provided us with a connection to a new skincare movement that was beginning to emerge. Almost overnight, leagues of fresh-faced ‘skinfluencers’ appeared, not just cleansing and masking, but expertly scraping, rolling and pulling their faces in front of the camera. But they hadn’t mixed up the recipe for a sourdough starter and an at-home face mask: they were extolling the benefits of facial fitness. The details of face training will differ depending on who you speak to, but comparisons are frequently drawn to the way we exercise our bodies. 'According to data from Pinterest, searches for "Face yoga exercises" and "How to get naturally glowing skin" quadrupled during 2020,' says Olivia Houghton, senior creative foresight analyst at trend forecaster The Future Laboratory. On social media platforms, where bite-sized video reels and infographics answered our pandemic-born

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desire for filling time and adopting easy-to-master hobbies, the face fitness trend largely grew around the use of facial massage and tools. The centuriesold East Asian gua sha quickly became one of the most popular techniques, with the Tiktok hashtag reaching 840.1M views (and counting). But can face training really live up to the promises made by its glowing and sculpted fans? As a beauty journalist, I’ve become immune to the clickbait nature of quick fix promises and social media trends. And, to be honest, lazily accepting of the idea that if you want to see profound change in your face it's probably going to come at the tip of a needle. Facial fitness, however, wasn’t only taking off at a rate I’d never seen before, but was also a movement accessible to people of all skin types and ages. Intrigued, I picked up a gua sha tool and started using it for 5-10 minutes a day- and I noticed an immediate change in my reflection. My skin looked healthier and more alive than it had in months, and I was suddenly aware of just how much tension I was carrying in my face. Both suspicious and in awe of them, I started to speak to experts in these techniques to find out what, if anything, was happening below the surface. Facial massage, a long-standing technique for releasing tension is something that Abigail James, expert facialist and author of The Glow Plan, has been practising with her clients for over 15 years. After training in sports and Ayurveda lymphatic massage, she realised the applications were transferable to our faces. ‘In our face, not all of the muscles are connected bone to bone, some of them are actually attached to each other so that we can express. We still get tension in those muscles – you can look at someone's face and immediately see if they're stressed, happy or upset,’ she explains. ‘Where you've got tight muscles, you're going to have fluid that won't be able to pass through as easily because there's tension. With massage, you can work along stretching out those muscles to release that tension.’ In both the facials she performs in her clinic

and the techniques she shares with followers on Instagram and Youtube, James favours the physical and emotional benefits of touch rather than that of tools. The point of these techniques is to get beneath the surface, working with the muscles in a way that ultimately benefits the skin. ‘Facial massage is about helping to boost blood circulation, and as we do that we bring fresh blood and nutrients up to the skin surface,’ says world-leading face yoga expert Danielle Collins, whose multifaceted approach combines the benefits of stretching muscles and massage. ‘It also works on lymphatic drainage, helping to remove the toxins from our skin and ease any tension.’ The results? A radiant, plump, and sculpted complexion. Facialist and Chinese medicine practitioner Ada Ooi - the hands responsible for many a red carpet glow - has clients from around the world returning for her signature blend of gua sha, traditional Chinese acupuncture and reflexology. Her all-encompassing facials are designed to stimulate the body's meridian lines, an aspect of traditional Chinese medicine which conceives of channels of interconnected pathways that transport energy across the body. While on a surface level, Ooi’s facials leave clients with radiance and defined features, there’s an element of training for the muscles too. ‘The long term benefits of gua sha and massage is that the more you do it, the more you signal to the area that you’re massaging and train it on how it should behave,’ she says. The more you do it, the more you signal to the area and train it on how it should behave. As FaceGym founder Inge Theron explains, where facial massage focuses on muscle manipulation, face exercise (also known as face yoga) is ‘resistance training’. ‘When you're actually pulling and pushing your muscles, you get an exhaustion, and the muscle is strengthening because it's working out,' she says. 'Where the muscle is the scaffolding that your skin sits on, if your muscles are toned and tight, the skin is toned and tight.’



innovation Technology is arguably the biggest force driving change in the physical activity economy, bringing new business models and methods of participation, new ways to reach customers, and new kinds of devices and equipment. Technology is transforming how consumers engage with all types of fitness and physical activity, enabling us to track our own metrics, monitor performance and progress, access programs and services on demand, and connect with likeminded “tribes” and communities. GWI estimates that technologies related to recreational physical activity represented a $26.3 billion global market in 2018. Asia-P%cific is the largest regional market, at $10.8 billion, because it is the world’s largest consumer market for fitness wearables and trackers. North America ranks second in size for technology, at $8.6 billion, and it is the largest region for technology services that support physical activity (e.g., streaming services, apps, intermediaries, software, and other platforms). The United States and China are the dominant countries in the physical activity technology sector, accounting for over half the market in 2018. The GWI report, Move to be Well: The Global Economy of Physical Activity, further breaks out the market sizes for this segment across the world’s regions and the top 20 countries. The physical activity technology landscape encompasses a diverse range of devices/equipment and software/services (as elaborated in the table above) that support people’s participation in fitness, sports, active recreation, and mindful movement in many different ways. With promises of making exercise more convenient, fun, affordable, personalized, portable, social, gamified, trackable, efficient, and results-oriented, these technologies are seeing a rapid uptake by consumers all over the world, even in countries that have not previously had well-developed fitness and gym offerings.

Physical Activity and Fitness Technologies A Fast-Growing $26 Billion Global Market By Katherine Johnston and Ophelia Yeung, GWI Senior Research Fellows

On the other hand, all of these technologies are so new that there is not yet conclusive scientific evidence on what is effective at changing behavior and increasing physical activity and what is just a gimmick. The rise of fitness and health tracking, monitoring, and connectivity is also giving rise to a host of concerns related to personal security and privacy, stress and anxiety, the impacts of digital versus face to-face connections, and other issues. While trackers, apps, social media platforms, streaming services, etc., may be adding a level of convenience, motivation, and fun to exercise, it is also important to keep in mind that these technologies are not essential for people to be physically active. Hundreds of thousands of people around the world get enough movement each day with nothing more than a pair of shoes, a simple bicycle, or a ball and an empty field. In many ways, technologies are attempting to fill gaps in our built environments and lifestyles that prevent us from getting enough movement. As long as our environment continues to favor a sedentary lifestyle over movement and our busy lives keep us from exercising, we will be looking to technology to help reduce those barriers.

The Diverse Landscape of Physical Activity Technologies Streaming and on-demand services: While athome and on-demand fitness first emerged in the 1980s (the early years of video technology, the

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Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

fitness boom, and Jane Fonda VHS tapes), today’s technology-driven streaming and on-demand exercise options have become a major disruptor in the industry. GWI estimates that online and app-based streaming / on-demand exercise classes and workouts were a $6.1 billion market globally in 2018 (this represents about 4.4% of glob%l consumer spending on doing fitness and mindful movement activities). The range of options span every category of exercise imaginable (spin, running, boxing, dance cardio, yoga, barre, ballet, and so on). They include: subscription, pay-as-you-go, and free options; livestre amed and on-demand/recorded classes; equipment linked services (e.g., Peloton, Mirror); gym/studio spin-offs (e.g., Exhale On Demand); celebrity/ influencer-based workouts (e.g., AKT On Demand, TA Online Studio); online only services (e.g., Daily Burn, Keep); and virtual personal training (e.g., Aaptiv Coach). Most streaming/ on-demand services are currently U.S.-based, although China and the United Kingdom are also rapidly-growing hubs. Apps: The first fitness apps were launched in 2008, soon after the introduction of the iPhone and the Apple App Store. There are now an estimated 250,000-300,000+ fitness and health apps available for download, generating an estimated $2.4 billion in user revenues in 2018 (from downloads, upgrades, and in-app purchases). Most fitness apps focus on tracking, measuring, and analyzing various fitness and health metrics (e.g., tracking workouts, counting steps, monitoring fitness goals, counting calories consumed and burned, etc.). Some of the most popular apps in this category are free for users (e.g., My Fitness Pal, Samsung Health, Pacer), although many are paid or offer a premium/paid upgrade option. Apps are increasingly adding a social and community dimension (e.g., Runtastic, Joyrun), or an element of gamification, competition, and rewards (e.g., Fitocracy, Yodo Run, Nexercise). Some include informational/educational tutorials, while some provide personalized music and playlists for workouts (e.g., RockMyRun, Fit Radio). Some popular apps are connected with wearable devices (e.g., Fitbit, Codoon), and some are connected with major fitness brands (e.g., Nike Run Club, UA Record). (Note that GWI has separated apps that focus primarily on providing streaming/ondemand workouts and classes into a separate category, above.) Software and platforms: Estimated at $1.4 billion globally in 2018, a wide variety of software and online services and platforms are streamlining management, booking, and customer- facing functions across all types of physical activity-related businesses. The emergence of class finder and booking intermediaries has been a major disruptor for gyms and fitness studios in the last five years – ClassPass is the largest player, although there are many other competitors across different regions, such as Singapore-based GuavaPass (recently acquired by ClassPass), UK-based PayAsUGym, Gympass (focused on the corporate market), Indiabased FitPass, FitReserve, and others. The other major segment in this sector is booking, scheduling, billing, and back-office management software and systems. Mindbody is the most recognized player in this segment, but there are dozens of other services focusing on different types of businesses, such as gyms (e.g., Virtuagym), sports and active recreation

providers and nonprofits (e.g., ACTIVE Network, PerfectMind), yoga studios (e.g., TULA), dance studios (e.g., The Studio Director), martial arts (e.g., Kicksite), personal trainers (e.g., My PT Hub), and so on. The United States is home to the largest number of exercise- related software services and platforms, although other countries that have sizable tech and software industries also have many companies and start-ups (United Kingdom, Canada, India, China). Wearables and trackers: At $14.7 billion in 2018, wearables represent over half the technology market. This category includes fitness bands (e.g., Fitbit, Garmin, Polar, Huawei Band, Xiaomi Mi Band) and other types of activity trackers that range from simple pedometers to high-tech clip-ons. Other types of sensor-embedded trackers and fitness wearables have emerged in recent years including smart jewelry (e.g., Bellabeat Leaf, Misfit Shine); smart clothing (e.g., Hexoskin, Sensoria fitness socks, Nadi X yoga pants, SUPA Powered sports bra); smart footwear (e.g., UA HOVR shoes, Altra IQ shoes, Digitsoles, Lechal smart insoles); and smart eyewear (e.g., Recon Jet, Vue, Level, Solos AR smart glasses). Smart and networked equipment: Estimated at $1.7 billion in 2018, exercise/ fitness/gym equipment and sporting goods embedded with sensors and networking capabilities are a small but rapidly growing portion of the fitness/ sports equipment and supplies market. This category includes sophisticated fitness and gym equipment with connectivity, tracking, streaming, artificial reality, and other high-tech functions (e.g., treadmills, ellipticals, stationary bikes, other cardio/strength training equipment). All types of sporting goods and equipment –balls, bats, tennis racquets, golf clubs, etc. – are also being transformed by sensors and smart functions that track metrics, analyze performance, provide virtual coaching, and more. Exergaming: The video gaming industry made its first foray into fitness in the 1980s with early versions of vir tual reality exercise systems (e.g., HighCyclevirtual exercise bike and Atari Puffer game-connected bike) and fitness mats connected with gaming systems (e.g., Nintendo Power Pad). While none of these early products were successful, the “exergaming” or “exertainment” industry started to take off with the launch of the D.nce D.nce Revolution g%me in 1998, the Wii Fit system in 2007, and the advanced Kinect motion detection in 2010 (allowing a person’s body to become the game controller). The proliferation of mobile devices and gaming apps in the last decade has brought wildly popular augmented reality exergaming apps like Zombies, Run!; Pokémon GO; %nd Superhero Workout. Today, every major gaming system offers a wide array of fitness-focused games and connected controllers/equipment, such as Wii Sports, EA Sports Active 2, Nike+ Kinect Training, Just Dance, etc. GWI has not estimated the market size for exergaming because no recent data are available, and it is not possible to separate fitness-focused games and gaming equipment (hardware/ controllers) from the overall video gaming, eSports, and related markets. A ten-year-old study by the U.S.-based Games for Health Project found that worldwide sales of health-focused games (e.g., Wii Fit, EA Sports Active, Dance Dance Revolution) totaled $2 billion over an 18-month period in 2009.


innovation Technology is arguably the biggest force driving change in the physical activity economy, bringing new business models and methods of participation, new ways to reach customers, and new kinds of devices and equipment. Technology is transforming how consumers engage with all types of fitness and physical activity, enabling us to track our own metrics, monitor performance and progress, access programs and services on demand, and connect with likeminded “tribes” and communities. GWI estimates that technologies related to recreational physical activity represented a $26.3 billion global market in 2018. Asia-P%cific is the largest regional market, at $10.8 billion, because it is the world’s largest consumer market for fitness wearables and trackers. North America ranks second in size for technology, at $8.6 billion, and it is the largest region for technology services that support physical activity (e.g., streaming services, apps, intermediaries, software, and other platforms). The United States and China are the dominant countries in the physical activity technology sector, accounting for over half the market in 2018. The GWI report, Move to be Well: The Global Economy of Physical Activity, further breaks out the market sizes for this segment across the world’s regions and the top 20 countries. The physical activity technology landscape encompasses a diverse range of devices/equipment and software/services (as elaborated in the table above) that support people’s participation in fitness, sports, active recreation, and mindful movement in many different ways. With promises of making exercise more convenient, fun, affordable, personalized, portable, social, gamified, trackable, efficient, and results-oriented, these technologies are seeing a rapid uptake by consumers all over the world, even in countries that have not previously had well-developed fitness and gym offerings.

Physical Activity and Fitness Technologies A Fast-Growing $26 Billion Global Market By Katherine Johnston and Ophelia Yeung, GWI Senior Research Fellows

On the other hand, all of these technologies are so new that there is not yet conclusive scientific evidence on what is effective at changing behavior and increasing physical activity and what is just a gimmick. The rise of fitness and health tracking, monitoring, and connectivity is also giving rise to a host of concerns related to personal security and privacy, stress and anxiety, the impacts of digital versus face to-face connections, and other issues. While trackers, apps, social media platforms, streaming services, etc., may be adding a level of convenience, motivation, and fun to exercise, it is also important to keep in mind that these technologies are not essential for people to be physically active. Hundreds of thousands of people around the world get enough movement each day with nothing more than a pair of shoes, a simple bicycle, or a ball and an empty field. In many ways, technologies are attempting to fill gaps in our built environments and lifestyles that prevent us from getting enough movement. As long as our environment continues to favor a sedentary lifestyle over movement and our busy lives keep us from exercising, we will be looking to technology to help reduce those barriers.

The Diverse Landscape of Physical Activity Technologies Streaming and on-demand services: While athome and on-demand fitness first emerged in the 1980s (the early years of video technology, the

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Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

fitness boom, and Jane Fonda VHS tapes), today’s technology-driven streaming and on-demand exercise options have become a major disruptor in the industry. GWI estimates that online and app-based streaming / on-demand exercise classes and workouts were a $6.1 billion market globally in 2018 (this represents about 4.4% of glob%l consumer spending on doing fitness and mindful movement activities). The range of options span every category of exercise imaginable (spin, running, boxing, dance cardio, yoga, barre, ballet, and so on). They include: subscription, pay-as-you-go, and free options; livestre amed and on-demand/recorded classes; equipment linked services (e.g., Peloton, Mirror); gym/studio spin-offs (e.g., Exhale On Demand); celebrity/ influencer-based workouts (e.g., AKT On Demand, TA Online Studio); online only services (e.g., Daily Burn, Keep); and virtual personal training (e.g., Aaptiv Coach). Most streaming/ on-demand services are currently U.S.-based, although China and the United Kingdom are also rapidly-growing hubs. Apps: The first fitness apps were launched in 2008, soon after the introduction of the iPhone and the Apple App Store. There are now an estimated 250,000-300,000+ fitness and health apps available for download, generating an estimated $2.4 billion in user revenues in 2018 (from downloads, upgrades, and in-app purchases). Most fitness apps focus on tracking, measuring, and analyzing various fitness and health metrics (e.g., tracking workouts, counting steps, monitoring fitness goals, counting calories consumed and burned, etc.). Some of the most popular apps in this category are free for users (e.g., My Fitness Pal, Samsung Health, Pacer), although many are paid or offer a premium/paid upgrade option. Apps are increasingly adding a social and community dimension (e.g., Runtastic, Joyrun), or an element of gamification, competition, and rewards (e.g., Fitocracy, Yodo Run, Nexercise). Some include informational/educational tutorials, while some provide personalized music and playlists for workouts (e.g., RockMyRun, Fit Radio). Some popular apps are connected with wearable devices (e.g., Fitbit, Codoon), and some are connected with major fitness brands (e.g., Nike Run Club, UA Record). (Note that GWI has separated apps that focus primarily on providing streaming/ondemand workouts and classes into a separate category, above.) Software and platforms: Estimated at $1.4 billion globally in 2018, a wide variety of software and online services and platforms are streamlining management, booking, and customer- facing functions across all types of physical activity-related businesses. The emergence of class finder and booking intermediaries has been a major disruptor for gyms and fitness studios in the last five years – ClassPass is the largest player, although there are many other competitors across different regions, such as Singapore-based GuavaPass (recently acquired by ClassPass), UK-based PayAsUGym, Gympass (focused on the corporate market), Indiabased FitPass, FitReserve, and others. The other major segment in this sector is booking, scheduling, billing, and back-office management software and systems. Mindbody is the most recognized player in this segment, but there are dozens of other services focusing on different types of businesses, such as gyms (e.g., Virtuagym), sports and active recreation

providers and nonprofits (e.g., ACTIVE Network, PerfectMind), yoga studios (e.g., TULA), dance studios (e.g., The Studio Director), martial arts (e.g., Kicksite), personal trainers (e.g., My PT Hub), and so on. The United States is home to the largest number of exercise- related software services and platforms, although other countries that have sizable tech and software industries also have many companies and start-ups (United Kingdom, Canada, India, China). Wearables and trackers: At $14.7 billion in 2018, wearables represent over half the technology market. This category includes fitness bands (e.g., Fitbit, Garmin, Polar, Huawei Band, Xiaomi Mi Band) and other types of activity trackers that range from simple pedometers to high-tech clip-ons. Other types of sensor-embedded trackers and fitness wearables have emerged in recent years including smart jewelry (e.g., Bellabeat Leaf, Misfit Shine); smart clothing (e.g., Hexoskin, Sensoria fitness socks, Nadi X yoga pants, SUPA Powered sports bra); smart footwear (e.g., UA HOVR shoes, Altra IQ shoes, Digitsoles, Lechal smart insoles); and smart eyewear (e.g., Recon Jet, Vue, Level, Solos AR smart glasses). Smart and networked equipment: Estimated at $1.7 billion in 2018, exercise/ fitness/gym equipment and sporting goods embedded with sensors and networking capabilities are a small but rapidly growing portion of the fitness/ sports equipment and supplies market. This category includes sophisticated fitness and gym equipment with connectivity, tracking, streaming, artificial reality, and other high-tech functions (e.g., treadmills, ellipticals, stationary bikes, other cardio/strength training equipment). All types of sporting goods and equipment –balls, bats, tennis racquets, golf clubs, etc. – are also being transformed by sensors and smart functions that track metrics, analyze performance, provide virtual coaching, and more. Exergaming: The video gaming industry made its first foray into fitness in the 1980s with early versions of vir tual reality exercise systems (e.g., HighCyclevirtual exercise bike and Atari Puffer game-connected bike) and fitness mats connected with gaming systems (e.g., Nintendo Power Pad). While none of these early products were successful, the “exergaming” or “exertainment” industry started to take off with the launch of the D.nce D.nce Revolution g%me in 1998, the Wii Fit system in 2007, and the advanced Kinect motion detection in 2010 (allowing a person’s body to become the game controller). The proliferation of mobile devices and gaming apps in the last decade has brought wildly popular augmented reality exergaming apps like Zombies, Run!; Pokémon GO; %nd Superhero Workout. Today, every major gaming system offers a wide array of fitness-focused games and connected controllers/equipment, such as Wii Sports, EA Sports Active 2, Nike+ Kinect Training, Just Dance, etc. GWI has not estimated the market size for exergaming because no recent data are available, and it is not possible to separate fitness-focused games and gaming equipment (hardware/ controllers) from the overall video gaming, eSports, and related markets. A ten-year-old study by the U.S.-based Games for Health Project found that worldwide sales of health-focused games (e.g., Wii Fit, EA Sports Active, Dance Dance Revolution) totaled $2 billion over an 18-month period in 2009.


innovation

Nordlys - Danish “Northern Lights” By Radiant Healthcare SA Nordlys is the Danish name for the spectacular phenomenon “Northern Lights” - also commonly known as ”Aurora Borealis” in Latin, which means ”dawn of the north” and named after the Roman goddess of the dawn. It is caused by electrically charged particles from the sun entering the earth's atmosphere and can be seen in the Northern hemisphere, displaying a magnificent curtain of light in various colours. Nordlys is the name of the light and laser medical system from Candela which provides treatments for many of the most in-demand aesthetic treatments: (Ellipse technology that the Nordlys have built in was founded in Denmark) offers photo rejuvenation and hair removal treatments, drawing on a dual method that combines Ellipse's patented selective waveband technology (SWT) with the non-ablative Frax 1550, 1940 and Nd:YAG 1064 lasers. 3 advanced technologies to help you look and feel your best. Everyone's skin is unique and not all skin conditions can be treated the same way. That's why the Nordlys system offers three different state-of-theart technologies: Candela SWT‚ (short for Intense Pulsed Light) uses exclusive technology to target problem areas with narrow wavelengths of light. Result: less heat in your skin. And fewer treatments compared to other IPLs. Frax 1550‚ and Frax 1940‚ applicators deliver very small, controlled bursts of energy to resurface skin cause amazing bulk tissue heating at the same time. Thanks to the laser's unique technology, treatments can be customized to your specific needs. Treatments take just a short time, and healing and recovery are quick. With the Frax 1550 and Frax 1940 treatments, you can: •Smooth textural irregularities

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•Rejuvenate sun-damaged skin •Improve skin texture. The treatment is clinically proven to improve the appearance of skin with short downtime and minimal side effects Nd:YAG 1064 laser is designed to treat 21 skin and vascular conditions - from leg veins to port wine stains. Its built-in SoftCool technology delivers a stream of cool air for greater comfort during and after treatment. How does the Treatment Work? An intense pulsed light is applied in a series of gentle pulses over the treatment area. Without damaging the skin, the light penetrates through the skin and is absorbed by the haemoglobin of the abnormally dilated capillaries or the melanin of the pigmented lesion. The heat causes the lesion to fragment and the dilated capillaries to close, the body then begins its natural healing process. The Nordlys Ellipse IPL stimulates fibroblast activity encouraging the formation of new collagen and elastin thereby improving the appearance of the fine lines and an overall skin texture. How long is each treatment? Treatment varies from 15 to 45 minutes depending on the size of the area to be treated. How many Treatments are Needed? The number of sessions recommended depends on the specific condition and the size of the area being treated. Your doctor or laser therapist will discuss this with you before treatments commence. For optimal results multiple treatments are sometimes recommended depending on your individual skin condition. Followup treatments may be recommended to maintain results. You will have great results after 1 treatment. Is it painful? Pain is minimal and most patients describe the sensation

as being similar to the snap of an elastic band with some sensation of heat. Your doctor or laser therapist will always make sure of your comfort levels as the treatment is being administered. Are there possible side effects or risks involved? The side-effects and risks are minimal if the treatment is performed by trained professionals who are experienced in this type of treatment. Immediately after the treatment the skin may appear flushed rather like a sunburn, brown pigmented spots may appear darker and capillaries may be visible. Swelling is usually minimal but it depends on the individual being treated. What Results can I Expect? It helps to even out skin tone, improves the texture and gives the skin radiance. It helps to reverse the results of UV damage e.g. solar lentigines (brown marks) and telangiectasia (red veins). It provides skin rejuvenation on the treated areas and helps to soften the appearances of wrinkles. It enhances elasticity, it helps to firm the skin and reduce enlarged pores Which areas can be treated? This treatment can be used for effectively treating and improving the appearance of the face, neck, decollete and hands - however the neck and decollete would require more treatments than the face. You can treat top to toe. Your Dermatologist or Therapist can provide you with more information on whether the Nordlys Ellipse IPL is the right treatment for you. If you suffer from chronic pigmentation or chronic redness you will need to consult your Dermatologist before commencing with this treatment. Radiant Healthcare are proud to be sole distributors of the Candela Medical Range, especially of our Nordlys multiplatform. Contact us for more information: Tel: 011 794 8253 or visit: www.radianthealth.co.za



innovation

Skin that sparkles Are precious metals your skins new best friend? You’ve probably seen or heard of diamond and gold facials, and perhaps assumed it was just pampering taken to a new and decadent extreme. However, passing fad it is not. Precious elements have been used in luxury skincare throughout history, and not for entirely spurious reasons. The Chinese Chou dynasty used gold on their skin, a habit taken up by geishas for 300 years, while the last Empress of China used pearl powder and was famed for her youthful appearance. Cleopatra is said to have worn a mask of gold every night to preserve her beauty. Skincare companies today claim that gold has powerful anti-ageing properties. Twenty four carat gold in modern face creams is said to increase collagen production, boost elasticity and reduce the appearance of fine lines and age spots. Some product houses say gold flakes merely look pretty, but do nothing unless broken down small enough to actually penetrate the skin. So if you are going for gold, make sure it’s colloidal (a solution which contains tiny particles of the element in question). The scientific evidence to back up any of this is rarer than gold itself. But that doesn’t stop folk in Beverly Hills parting with just under two thousand dollars for a Black Pearl Gold Cleopatra Mask, or London’s rich paying for a gold flake mask at “Oro Gold Beauty Clinic” on the King’s Road. True, the properties of gold are not to be entirely scoffed at – in medicine it is given to people with arthritis, and currently being researched as a possible treatment for cancer. However, this does not mean it is automatically good for our skin. Some dermatologists consider gold a serious skin irritant, so those with sensitive skins might want to give the 24 carat face masks a wide berth. Stick with the reputable creams that contain other ingredients – such as Temple Spa’s Skin Truffle which contains black truffles, grapeseed, champagne, gold

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and silk elements, and diamond powder. Silver was used by the ancients to heal wounds and treat ulcers. Today, its antimicrobial and antibacterial elements make it a prime candidate to treat skin ailments, from acne to fine lines and wrinkles. Again more evidence is needed, but you could try Kerstin Florian Mineral Wellness Soak, which contains minerals and salts, as well as hand harvested crystals and colloidal silver. Colloidal platinum is said to be an antioxidant, and researchers in Japan found that platinum nanoparticles prolonged the life of worms amake of that what you will). It is also used in cancer treatments as it has the ability, in certain chemical forms, to inhibit the division of living cells. According to the blurb on La Prairie’s Platinum Rare, platinum “helps maintain the skin’s electrical balance”, which apparently “protects the skin’s DNA, and replenishes moisture continuously for a look of soft splendour”. Generally, it’s used in such tiny (nano) amounts in beauty products, it’s unlikely to have any visible effects. Copper peptides, while less luxurious sounding, have more positive research results to support their collagen promoting and antioxidant properties – thus Kiehl’s Powerful Wrinkle Reducing Cream may not actually be overstating its point. Back on earth, albeit in higher echelons, some lauded skincare lines are using diamonds to achieve visible results; most notably The Natura Bisse Diamond Collection, available in Harrods and Liberty, with treatments at Agua Spas inLondon, Stanley House and Sequoia Spa at The Grove. So, what do diamonds do for us? Some experts agree that diamonds may have light reflective properties that make skin look younger, while

diamond infused products might also work as exfoliants. The idea that diamonds have anti-ageing properties or can actually penetrate the skin barriers, however, does not go down so well in most dermatological circles. Dr Adam Friedman, consultant dermatologist at the Harley Street Dermatology Clinic says, “It sounds like a good way of spending money for nothing. The reality is that gold and diamonds are completely unreactive.” Many cosmetic chemists point out that diamonds, gold and platinum have been used as a delivery system for certain cancer drugs as a way of shielding the drug from the body’s defence system. However, it seems a rather big leap from that to the idea that anti-ageing ingredients will penetrate deeper if sprinkled with crushed engagement rings. Yet it is one that Yannis Alexandrides, plastic surgeon and founder of 111Skin, is happy to take. “We use black diamond microspheres to transport active ingredients including vit+min C, hyaluronic acid, collagen, and arbutin to the deepest layers of the skin, where they target cells for regeneration,” he says. Melissa Vitalis, the Beverly Wilshire spa director has a more realistic view of the kind of client their Natura Bisse diamond infused facials attract. “They’ve had a busy year and want a little well deserved pampering and so book the best facial that we have on our menu.” Ultimately it seems, until the evidence is in, that precious elements (re the rather glamorous icing on the more active, nuts-and-bolts ingredients of products and treatments: something to add a little expensive sparkle to the festive party season, and hopefully to our skin too.



innovation

LPG endermologie Stimulating Dormant Cellular Activity Made in France, LPG endermologie technology gently stimulates the skin to reactivate dormant cellular activity. In contrast to a lot of the techniques available on the market, LPG® endermologie offers a 100% natural alternative: stimulating dormant cellular activity within our skin to fight all unaesthetic manifestations (wrinkles, sagging skin, localized resistant fat, cellulite appearance, and more). The mechanical stimulation of cells, called endermologie®, thus reactivates their awakening naturally and painlessly. The Fight For Natural Beauty: The Ultimate LPG Commitment LPG is FOR: Beauty that looks like you. NATURAL. HEALTHY. SUSTAINABLE. An intelligent strategy in a NO RISK, NO SIDE EFFECT battle to slow the unaesthetic effects of passing time. LPG is AGAINST: Excessively aggressive, unnatural techniques with unpredictable results and potential complications, an artificial, stereotypical beauty, in an irrational fight against passing time. Our patented technologies are the result of continuous research conducted by our engineers, our researchers who are part of a SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH COMMITTEE, and our thousands of practitioners throughout the world. Our technology is always designed to naturally improve health and beauty while perfectly respecting the skin's ecology and the human body's physiology. LPG endermologie for the Face: Acting like a real skin workout, the motorized flaps awaken the natural synthesis of essential rejuvenating substances. This cell stimulation then helps fibroblasts (rejuvenating cells) to boost their production of collagen (firmness), elastin (suppleness), and hyaluronic acid (volume and hydration), naturally present in our skin.

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LPG endermologie for the Body: Acting simultaneously on the release of stubborn localized fat and on skin quality (firmness, cellulite aspect), the new Patent (Roller and motorized flap combined with sequential suction) allows the body technology to act directly on the adipocytes present in our hypodermis (slimming cells) and on the fibroblasts present in our dermis (rejuvenating cells). A 360 treatment that puts an end to the dilemma: slimming or firming? The results: The new CELLU M6® Alliance innovation provides overall effectiveness and visible results in just 3 sessions. The results speak for themselves, according to the Dermscan Endermologie study in 2016:67% of cellulite is smoothed in body treatments and 71% women reported more skin firmness. After 12 sessions, women reported an amazing 5.2cm fat reduction. The results speak for themselves, according to the Dermscan Endermologie study in 2016. The Natural Beauty and Anti-ageing Ritual For over 30 years, LPG® has made its state-of-theart devices available to beauty-conscious men and women who are demanding when it comes to their health. In complete harmony with this healthy way of life, it is advised that endermologie® treatments be taken on for the same reasons as you would a balanced diet or regular athletic activities. The stimuli sent to the cells act as a “helping hand” to maximize their potential. Making endermologie® a part of your lifestyle means choosing an intelligent, responsible, healthy lifestyle aimed at preserving your body and your face from the ravages of time. About the rebrand, as told by Lydie HayekRocque, LPG Group Marketing and Digital VP. LPG: INNER POWER.BETTER LIFE A secret power lies deep inside each of us: The strength to reactivate health, beauty and well-being. The brand is committed to providing health, beauty

and well-being benefits to feel better in your body and skin. The new LPG group signature: “INNER POWER. BETTER LIFE” embodies all this strength. INNER POWER: is the cellular reactivation power to act from within. BETTER LIFE: is the effectiveness that helps to regain self-confidence for a better life. The new signature reaffirms all the core values of the brand and will help us to accelerate the groups international development for the next 35 years. Your cells have a secret power. Reactivate them. For more information on LPG endermologie, contact Marine Spa Distributors at (+27) 11 880 3851 or send an email to sales@marinespadistributors.co.za



innovation

Mallucci London A state-of-the-art Cosmetic and Aesthetic Clinic

Welcome to Mallucci London. A state-of-the-art Cosmetic and Aesthetic Clinic, founded by award-winning surgeon and plastic and cosmetic surgeon Mr Patrick Mallucci FRCS. The Mallucci London Clinic is a Centre of Excellence aimed at offering the most advanced and innovative techniques, and product lines in plastic surgery, aesthetics, hair transplants and gynaecology, at the modern clinic and operating theatre in Central London. Mallucci London is home not only to Mr Patrick Mallucci FRCS, but to his friendly and highly experienced medical team of respected doctors, surgeons and nurses, who are all at hand to offer the highest standard of patient care 48

Mr Patrick Mallucci: MBChB, MD, FRCS (Plast) Medical Director

(BAPRAS) and the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS).

Mr Mallucci graduated in 1989 from medical school to embark upon his surgical training. In 1993 he became a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. Having completed his general surgery, he undertook his training in Plastic Surgery both in the UK and abroad - London, Oxford, Stoke Mandeville, Australia and Paris. In 1996 he was awarded the higher post graduate degree of Doctorate in Medicine (MD) having spent two years at University College London developing the concept of scarless wound healing. He was awarded the Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons in Plastic Surgery, FRCS(Plast) in 1998.

Mr Mallucci has published extensively within the Plastic Surgery Literature throughout his career and is frequently invited to present worldwide at Plastic Surgery Conferences and education forums. He is most renowned for his innovative research into “The Perfect Breast” a defining series of papers that have been published globally setting new standards in aesthetic breast surgery. Mr Mallucci is actively involved in teaching both at undergraduate and postgraduate level, including leading international masterclasses in aesthetic breast surger y.

Mr Mallucci is a full member of the British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons

Mr Mallucci has also been highly represented in the media throughout his career having partaken in numerous television documentaries and news items, as well as the written press where his opinion on current matters in Plastic Surgery is often sought.



innovation

Let “No” Work for You “Doctor, just one more vial! Please can you make my lips a little bit bigger? I think they will look even better, don't you agree?” Another patient who has been overserved and is overdone wants larger lips, more cheek fillers, or another nose job. They praise, flatter, and fluff you. They are more than willing to pay full price. But you know they don't need it. It will make them appear more unnatural and divert from their ultimate goal. But can you resist? Can you say, “No”? The power and benefits of saying no are much greater than it initially seems. When passionately pressed with an ambiguous, poorly defined, or imprudent request from someone whom we care about, saying “Yes” seemingly is the easy option. It complies, pleases, and avoids hurting another's feelings. We believe it puts us in good graces, garners us favors. And, “Yes” may satisfy an itch wanting to be scratched. But the reality is saying yes too easily often does the opposite of what we want. It sets unrealistic expectations, breeds failure, and leads to even more heartache. Eventually it ends in ill will. And, at extremes, saying yes can land us in risky and/or dangerous situations, whether physically, legally, or financially. On the appropriate occasions when we say no, we mark a comforting and reliable boundary. It declares

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By Steve Dayan, MD

what we are willing to do or accept. Saying no means respect, honesty, and care for the other person. But equally as importantly, saying no establishes a space of respect for ourselves.

an expert in.”), when you tell someone the why behind your no, it helps them to understand your reasoning. And it allows you a better and more honest relationship afterward.

The word “No” is functional and beneficial professionally, and paradoxically it often leads to gaining more patients, as a reputation for honesty ensues. Patients want to know and see the doctor who is going to put their best interests first.

Also, the why behind your no sets the table for compromise. If the other person knows why you said no, then they can offer an alternative that meets or satisfies your why. This may lead to a middle path forward. Meaningful compromise is always front and center, leading to the most impactful advancements in diplomacy as well as the skill we most often revere in our leaders.

Additionally, while saying no can lead to professional growth, it is equally if not more valuable in our personal, familial, and romantic lives. By saying no, we tell the other person we love them-whether it is a child disciplined with a midnight curfew, a best friend who asks you to compromise your ideals. However, there is one key component that is often overlooked and is essential to unlocking all the benefits of the word “No.” It is critical to reveal the reason behind your “No,” or in other words the why to your “No.” Whether it is a patient (“No, I think that more fillers won't enhance your attractiveness and in fact may make you look unnatural.”) or your child (“No, I don't want you out after midnight, when a higher proportion of drunk drivers are on the road and I care about your safety.”) or a friend (“No, my strategy is to only put money into projects that I am

When I have had to say, “No” on occasion, I have been surprised at how my relationships-whether with patients, staff, friends, colleagues, or romanticallyare strengthened. It is the relationships in which I have quickly offered a “Yes,” trying so hard to please and subsequently failing, that I most regret. While gaining comfort uttering the word, “No” may not be inherent or easy for most, with time and judicious use, something curious starts to happenyou begin to receive a lot more of what you want. Consider it and let me know how “No” works for you.



innovation become tedious spaces with pretty standard interiors, functional furniture and monotoned waiting rooms. However, now a shift in this attitude is taking place on a big scale. Medical practice owners now realise that how their space looks and feels has a significant impact on the patients' psyche and overall wellbeing. How Can You Create A Welcoming Medical Centre Design? More and more medical centres are trying to explore how can they make their facilities more welcoming, vibrant, and visually appealing. In order to do that, you can play around with a number of themes, design palettes and innovative medical clinic interior design ideas, such as • You can explore themes like minimalism, or you can experiment with the Scandinavian designs. • Make sure your clinic doesn't feel congested in any way. Lack of space because of a poor layout could make your patients feel anxious and nervous. The best way to ensure that this doesn't happen is to go for a biophilic design that has a lot of open-spaces with ample sunlight. Also, make sure your clinic is well-ventilated. Another option is to use indoor plants. Not only do plants help create a beautiful space, but they also offer multiple health benefits. • Going for a layout with glass curtain walls, skylights, and floor to ceiling windows is also a great idea. • Use colours and artwork that have a calming effect on your patients' psyche. A Zen kind of atmosphere with wooden furniture, use of earthy colours, and water features is very effective for this purpose. • Try to add places of convenience to your design as well. If your facility has features like an eatery, flower shop, or a gift shop, your patients would immediately feel more at ease. There are numerous other medical clinic interior design ideas that could help make your facility look and feel more welcoming. Just go with what you think appeals to your specific set of requirements. TIP #3: Use of Infection Controlling Raw Materials

6 Medical Clinic Interior Design Ideas For Comfort, Beauty & Functionality The healthcare industry is one of the most rapidly growing industries in the world. With every passing year, medical facilities are expanding and becoming more and more advanced be it in terms of technological developments, new and better diagnostic equipment or hospital infrastructures. The healthcare industry is leaving no stone unturned to provide us with the best of the medical sector solutions. As a result, every medical centre or clinic in today's time wants to make sure that their infrastructure is absolutely on point. Size and location are not the only factors which will determine the success of your medical practice. What you need is a bouquet of effective medical clinic interior design ideas to make sure every aspect of your facility looks professional and at the same time exudes a sense of comfort and ease. Nowadays, there's a lot of focus on design ideas that have a positive effect on how your patients feel as soon as they step inside your medical clinic. If you manage to provide an atmosphere of comfort,

52

security, and tranquillity, your patients immediately feel a sense of calmness that helps build trust and reliability.

clinic interior design ideas are particularly helpful if your facility is a sizeable one with multiple departments, wings, and buildings.

6 Medical Clinic Interior Design Ideas

You can use your flooring design to fulfil this objective, or you can employ other strategies such as the use of colours or patterns on the walls or ceilings of your medical clinic. Since it is a medical facility, whatever strategy you adopt, should be easy to clean and longlasting enough to withstand all the spills and muddles that a clinic sees on a daily basis. It would be ideal if your wayfinding medical clinic interior design ideas are aesthetically pleasing as well.

So, here is our list of 6 most impactful medical clinic interior design ideas that you can work with while finalising an interior design for your facility TIP #1: Help Your Patients Navigate Through If your patients find it difficult to navigate their way through your facility, they might start feeling stressed out, ruining their visiting experience completely. So, putting up proper wayfinding information throughout the various sections of your clinic should be an important aspect of your interior design. Wayfinding has become a welcome feature that hospitality, retail, and healthcare facilities are open to exploring with a lot of interest and curiosity. An example is a well thought out flooring plan that could serve as a map, guiding people through various sections of their clinics. Wayfinding medical

You can also integrate technology into your interior design for wayfinding purposes by putting up navigation apps or self-help kiosks. Such technological inputs could really help cut down all the confusion.

According to The Australian Safety and Quality Goals for Health Care, approximately 180,000 patients suffer healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in Australia every year. These are infections that patients get while they are getting treated in a medical facility. Such staggering numbers clearly indicate that there's a need for more stringent and precise implementation of infection preventive rules and guidelines to be followed by both - the medical workforce as well as the medical infrastructures they work for. How Can Infection Controlling Raw Materials Restrict The Spread Of Infections? Expert commercial interior designers pay special attention to ensure their medical clinic designs are visually pleasing and also restrict the spread of infections. One way to achieve this is by using infection controlling raw materials at the level of interior designing. You can employ a number of the medical clinic interior design ideas in order to achieve this, including • Using antimicrobial coatings as finishing touches on hard surfaces. On plastic and similar surfaces, microbes can survive for more than 11 days. So, the use of such materials should be restricted. • Material like copper has natural antimicrobial qualities. It can kill microbes like E. coli, MRSA, adenovirus, the influenza A virus and several other infective agents. Coating hard surfaces with copper could reduce the spread of infections pretty efficiently. • Another way you can reduce the spread of infections is by coating glass, steel, and ceramic surfaces with photoactive pigments. • Indigo LED lighting is another alternative. This kind of lighting is known to have antibacterial qualities. Many hospitals use this technique in their operating rooms and treatment rooms, to restrict the spread of infections. TIP #4: Adaptable or Multi-Purpose Spaces

TIP #2: Create a Welcoming Ambiance

Installing spaces that can be used for multiple purposes is one of the most productive medical clinic interior design ideas to look into while planning the interiors of your clinic.

In the last many years, hospitals and clinics have

Waiting areas, in particular, should have this feature so that your patients and


innovation become tedious spaces with pretty standard interiors, functional furniture and monotoned waiting rooms. However, now a shift in this attitude is taking place on a big scale. Medical practice owners now realise that how their space looks and feels has a significant impact on the patients' psyche and overall wellbeing. How Can You Create A Welcoming Medical Centre Design? More and more medical centres are trying to explore how can they make their facilities more welcoming, vibrant, and visually appealing. In order to do that, you can play around with a number of themes, design palettes and innovative medical clinic interior design ideas, such as • You can explore themes like minimalism, or you can experiment with the Scandinavian designs. • Make sure your clinic doesn't feel congested in any way. Lack of space because of a poor layout could make your patients feel anxious and nervous. The best way to ensure that this doesn't happen is to go for a biophilic design that has a lot of open-spaces with ample sunlight. Also, make sure your clinic is well-ventilated. Another option is to use indoor plants. Not only do plants help create a beautiful space, but they also offer multiple health benefits. • Going for a layout with glass curtain walls, skylights, and floor to ceiling windows is also a great idea. • Use colours and artwork that have a calming effect on your patients' psyche. A Zen kind of atmosphere with wooden furniture, use of earthy colours, and water features is very effective for this purpose. • Try to add places of convenience to your design as well. If your facility has features like an eatery, flower shop, or a gift shop, your patients would immediately feel more at ease. There are numerous other medical clinic interior design ideas that could help make your facility look and feel more welcoming. Just go with what you think appeals to your specific set of requirements. TIP #3: Use of Infection Controlling Raw Materials

6 Medical Clinic Interior Design Ideas For Comfort, Beauty & Functionality The healthcare industry is one of the most rapidly growing industries in the world. With every passing year, medical facilities are expanding and becoming more and more advanced be it in terms of technological developments, new and better diagnostic equipment or hospital infrastructures. The healthcare industry is leaving no stone unturned to provide us with the best of the medical sector solutions. As a result, every medical centre or clinic in today's time wants to make sure that their infrastructure is absolutely on point. Size and location are not the only factors which will determine the success of your medical practice. What you need is a bouquet of effective medical clinic interior design ideas to make sure every aspect of your facility looks professional and at the same time exudes a sense of comfort and ease. Nowadays, there's a lot of focus on design ideas that have a positive effect on how your patients feel as soon as they step inside your medical clinic. If you manage to provide an atmosphere of comfort,

52

security, and tranquillity, your patients immediately feel a sense of calmness that helps build trust and reliability.

clinic interior design ideas are particularly helpful if your facility is a sizeable one with multiple departments, wings, and buildings.

6 Medical Clinic Interior Design Ideas

You can use your flooring design to fulfil this objective, or you can employ other strategies such as the use of colours or patterns on the walls or ceilings of your medical clinic. Since it is a medical facility, whatever strategy you adopt, should be easy to clean and longlasting enough to withstand all the spills and muddles that a clinic sees on a daily basis. It would be ideal if your wayfinding medical clinic interior design ideas are aesthetically pleasing as well.

So, here is our list of 6 most impactful medical clinic interior design ideas that you can work with while finalising an interior design for your facility TIP #1: Help Your Patients Navigate Through If your patients find it difficult to navigate their way through your facility, they might start feeling stressed out, ruining their visiting experience completely. So, putting up proper wayfinding information throughout the various sections of your clinic should be an important aspect of your interior design. Wayfinding has become a welcome feature that hospitality, retail, and healthcare facilities are open to exploring with a lot of interest and curiosity. An example is a well thought out flooring plan that could serve as a map, guiding people through various sections of their clinics. Wayfinding medical

You can also integrate technology into your interior design for wayfinding purposes by putting up navigation apps or self-help kiosks. Such technological inputs could really help cut down all the confusion.

According to The Australian Safety and Quality Goals for Health Care, approximately 180,000 patients suffer healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in Australia every year. These are infections that patients get while they are getting treated in a medical facility. Such staggering numbers clearly indicate that there's a need for more stringent and precise implementation of infection preventive rules and guidelines to be followed by both - the medical workforce as well as the medical infrastructures they work for. How Can Infection Controlling Raw Materials Restrict The Spread Of Infections? Expert commercial interior designers pay special attention to ensure their medical clinic designs are visually pleasing and also restrict the spread of infections. One way to achieve this is by using infection controlling raw materials at the level of interior designing. You can employ a number of the medical clinic interior design ideas in order to achieve this, including • Using antimicrobial coatings as finishing touches on hard surfaces. On plastic and similar surfaces, microbes can survive for more than 11 days. So, the use of such materials should be restricted. • Material like copper has natural antimicrobial qualities. It can kill microbes like E. coli, MRSA, adenovirus, the influenza A virus and several other infective agents. Coating hard surfaces with copper could reduce the spread of infections pretty efficiently. • Another way you can reduce the spread of infections is by coating glass, steel, and ceramic surfaces with photoactive pigments. • Indigo LED lighting is another alternative. This kind of lighting is known to have antibacterial qualities. Many hospitals use this technique in their operating rooms and treatment rooms, to restrict the spread of infections. TIP #4: Adaptable or Multi-Purpose Spaces

TIP #2: Create a Welcoming Ambiance

Installing spaces that can be used for multiple purposes is one of the most productive medical clinic interior design ideas to look into while planning the interiors of your clinic.

In the last many years, hospitals and clinics have

Waiting areas, in particular, should have this feature so that your patients and


innovation

their visitors could feel more comfortable spending time in your facility. For instance, if someone is waiting alone, he/she could rearrange the furniture to get some privacy. And if a family is waiting, they could rearrange the space to make it more homely and snug for themselves. This can also be done for treatment spaces. You can expand or divide the rooms to suit your current requirements. Using shell spaces for this purpose is a great option. Shell spaces are the spaces which are seldomly used and can be easily reorganized for other activities. A conference room can be converted into a private waiting area by rearranging a few pieces of furniture. Or a large examination room can be divided into smaller consultation room by using prefabricated walls. How Can You Create A More Personalised Medical Clinic Interior Design? These elements can be used for developing more personalised customisable medical clinic interior design ideas • Wheeled or prefabricated partition walls • Light-weight, functional furniture • Centralized workstations for nurses • Easy to install and easy to remove storage units • Portable lamps or other sources of lights TIP #5: Smart Integration of Technology Advancement in technology has made our healthcare facilities rise like never before. Although, can we use technology not only to provide better medical services but also, to make our hospitals and clinics look and feel more comfortable? Yes, we definitely can! How Can You Integrate Technology Into Medical Clinic Interior Design? These days, many modern clinics and medical facilities are exploring how to integrate technology into their medical clinic interior design ideas. Here's what we suggest -

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• Use of Virtual Reality at the Designing Stage Start by using this mind-boggling technology to design your interiors itself. Virtual Reality (VR) allows you to create a digitalized 3D model of your medical clinic including all its subsections like the reception area, waiting rooms, operation theatre, examination rooms, etc. It gives you a clear idea of how your facility is going to look once the construction and designing part gets completed. This gives you a lot of control at the planning stage of the process itself. You can make as many changes as you want or try different approaches in the 3D model before making a final call. • Infrastructure for Telemedicine Services - Providing telemedicine services like medic-to-patient or medicto-medic video consultations, remote monitoring of patient's health, wireless pill bottles to remind them to take their medications on time, needs the support of infrastructure at the designing stage of the process. You need to design your conference rooms and examination halls in such a way that large video screens, projectors, camera setups, and computers can be easily installed, at your convenience. • Charging Points and Wheeled Workstations Installing charging points throughout the clinic will allow your patients, staff members and visitors to keep their phones or other devices fully charged. And wheeled workstations would make the job of your nurses and technicians a lot easier and quicker. You can also explore technologies like digital checkin kiosks and survey stations while deciding what kind of tech-savvy medical clinic interior design ideas would work for your facility. TIP #6: Take Into Account the Needs of Your Employees While most of the medical clinic interior design ideas we've mentioned above are aimed at making your patients feel more comfortable, please remember that you can't ignore the comfort of your employees either. Studies show that patients have a more positive experience, leading to greater recovery when their caregivers are satisfied and happy. So, the physical

and mental wellbeing of your staff members should be one of your highest priorities. How Can Your Medical Interior Design Provide Comfort For Staff? • Spaces with Natural Light - Plan your interiors in a way so that not only your corridors, examination rooms, and waiting areas receive ample natural light but the backstage areas of your clinic as well. • Private Spaces for Your Staff Members - Make sure your clinic's layout has private spaces for your healthcare providers, especially those who work with critical patients. These members of your staff work in highly stressful conditions and providing them with private spaces would help them regain their composure in a quick and effective manner. • Lounge Spaces - You can also add multiple common spaces and lounge areas for your doctors, nurses, technicians, and other employees with customisable furniture and storage compartments. You can also consider adding shared office spaces to your layout for your physicians or any other employees. This could help you save up on the upfront costs of putting up proper offices right from the beginning. In-house daycare facilities and a cafeteria would also help boost the morale of your employees.

Conclusion When it comes to medical clinic interior design ideas, you need to take into consideration the requirements and expectations of your patients, visitors, physicians, nurses, technicians, and all the other employees. Make use of modern technology, aesthetics, and interior designing sensibilities to plan a truly functional, contemporary, and friendly medical healthcare facility. Keeping in mind your specific requirements and budget constraints, follow our guidelines to the best of your abilities and remember to always leave some scope for future expansion or renovations.



innovation

Vagus Nerve Stimulation: 9 Ways to Quickly Calm Body and Soul By Dr. Frank Lipman This difficult time has shown us just how fragile physical and mental health can be, and how important it is to protect and preserve them both. One silver lining: most of us are more aware of what sends our stress levels into the stratosphere, with the tricky part being how to bring them back down to earth. The good news is that inside every one of us in an actual nerve whose job it is to do exactly that — the vagus nerve (VN). To tap into its calming powers on-demand, I recommend practicing ‘vagus nerve stimulation’ (VNS). Here’s a topline on this powerful tool, and how to use it to help your body and mind thrive through stressful times: Introducing the Vagus Nerve Before we get into VNS, let’s meet your vagus nerve, which actually consists of two nerves that ‘wander’ through the body. The VN starts in the brain stem, emerging through the skull and heads south, passing down though the carotid sheath, and branching out across the torso, influencing the function of different organs throughout the body. The VN is an essential part of your parasympathetic nervous system, responsible for calming and balancing your nervous system, as well as regulating critical body functions, among them, heart rate, blood pressure, digestion, perspiration and even speaking. It also calms down your organs, including your digestive tract, after your system has been ratcheted up by the sympathetic nervous system in response to a perceived threat, the so-called “fight-or-flight” response. The vagus nerve controls much of your internal show. If you’re wondering what exactly the VN are up to, the answer is quite a bit. The VN communicates and sends signals back and forth between the brain and the internal organs, including heart, lungs, kidneys, spleen, intestines, and liver, to name a few. You could think of the brain as the boss, and the VN as the superstar assistant working to issue orders, communicate with the staff and keep the trains running on time. The VN also plays an essential role managing what goes on in the muscles and the nerves that control them, for instance, those involved in speaking, swallowing, eye movements and facial expressions. What’s more, the VN helps manage heart rhythm as well as the involuntary muscles, helping to stimulate peristalsis, the muscle contractions in your digestive tract which moves food through it. And, wouldn’t you know it, it’s tied in to your immune system as well. The VN is so intimately involved in so much of your basic day-to-day bodily functions, life without it would be vir tually impossible. Your gut and brain communicate with help from the Vagus Nerve. When all is going well and mind and body aren’t

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stressed, the VN sends out the ‘rest-and-digest’ messages, via the parasympathetic nervous system. It lets the brain know it’s OK to slow heart and breathing rates, while digestion can move along at a faster clip. All good. However, when stress kicks in, the VN becomes more inhibited, and the fight-orflight response of the sympathetic nervous system cranks up. Digestion slows, heart and breathing rates speed up – and you get that slightly panicky feeling most of us are all too familiar with. Soothe yourself by stimulating the vagus nerve. Knowing that the vagus nerve is so plugged into soothing your stress response, the question becomes, how to tap into it whenever stress, depression or anxiety levels start to rise? The answer: vagal nerve stimulation (VNS.) Though surgical VNS options exist for more severe or chronic conditions, a non-invasive approach fits the bill for most of us and the way to go to keep vagal ‘tone’ in good condition. One way to get a handle on that tone is to track your heart rate variability (HRV), with a fitness tracker. If your HRV is on the higher side, that’s an indication that your vagal ‘tone’ likely in a positive place as well. If your tone is on the lower side, the good news is that you can train yourself to flip the metaphorical VN switch and nudge your tone up. How to do that? Try any number of the following mind/body practices – which also happen to be known for their calming, balancing effects – to stimulate the vagus nerve and let the good feelings flow: 1. Get ‘tapping.’ Also known as ‘tapping,’ the Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is an acupressure-based set of moves you can do almost anywhere. You stimulate the vagus nerve by tapping on specific meridian points, helping to bust stress and relieve anxiety. 2. Tune into Meditation. While I urge everyone to get into a daily practice to cultivate positive emotions, reduce stress and encourage relaxation, if you need a dose of serenity right now, a quick guided meditation will take the edge off and stimulate the vagus nerve. Just grab a chair, close your eyes and take a 3-minute time-out. 3. Expose yourself to the Cold. Brief doses of cold temperatures have been shown to increase vagus nerve activity and curb the fightor-flight response. Try stepping outside, minimally dressed, for a few minutes in winter or finish your morning shower with an ice-cold blast, eventually working your way up to all-cold showers. It’s a great anti-aging strategy as well. Or you can start small by dousing your face in ice cold water or placing a Ziplock bag full of ice cubes on your face for a few minutes, helping to stimulate relaxation and blood flow to the brain. 4. Go deep into Slow Belly Breathing. Another excellent technique for taming anxiety and activating the vagus ner ve is deep, slow

breathing. Here’s a simple Abdominal Breathing exercise you can do anywhere – at your work-fromhome desk, in your car or wherever you may find yourself getting stressed. Here’s how: •Get into a relaxed position, sitting upright in a chair, or if space permits, lying down. •Put your hands on your abdomen. •Close your mouth gently and touch your tongue to your upper palate and breath through your nose. • Inhale deeply and very slowly, being aware of your diaphragm moving downward and your abdomen expanding. Your hands on your abdomen will feel the expansion, like a balloon filling. • At the end of the inhalation, don’t hold the breath – let your abdomen fall automatically as you exhale. • Try to get all the breath out of your lungs on the expiration. The expiration should normally be about twice as long as the inhalation when you are relaxed. • Keep repeating this, keeping your focus on your hands rising on the abdomen on the inhale and falling on the exhale. 5. Make a joyful Noise. Believe it or not, your vagus nerve is connected to your vocal cords and throat muscles, so when you sing, you’re stimulating your vagus nerve as well as making a joyful noise. Not a singer? Then try humming, gargling or chanting, all of which will have a similar, positive effect on vagal tone. 6. Make your exercise your vagus nerve stimulating medicine. Simply put, exercise makes you healthier, and also helps stimulate your vagus nerve – so there’s a lot to like about moving more and often. When you’re healthier, you’re more resilient, you heal quicker, you can handle stress better, keeping your blood pressure out of the danger zone. While virtually all forms of exercise confer benefits, when it comes to vagus nerve stimulation, the slow and flowing movements and slow deep breathing involved in practices like yoga and tai chi are great ways to activate the benefits of the parasympathetic nervous system. 7. Doctor’s orders – hit the massage table. Who doesn’t love a massage? Be it full-body, back and shoulders only, or foot massage, it all helps stimulate the vagus nerve and boost vagal tone. 8. Hang out with People you Enjoy. Though it’s not been easy to connect with others as often as we may have liked to recently, spending time with your tribe – perhaps outdoors is best for now – is good for overall stress relief. But take it a step further with some hearty belly laughs or getting a case of the giggles and you will also help stimulate the vagus nerve – so don’t hold back! 9. Ingest some vagus nerve stimulators. A few more super simple ways to tone up and tune up the vagal action? Through your mouth – with a daily high-quality probiotic, a few weekly servings of omega 3 fatty acids, chia seeds, flax seeds and walnuts.



innovation

IV Nutrient Therapy – Drip with Caution The AAMSSA Report: By Rochelle Friedman

Hooking up to an intravenous nutrient drip for various health and wellness treatments has become a huge trending procedure in the anti-ageing industry. Yet is must be noted that while there is scientific literature to support the benefits of these treatments, it does come with its own set of risks, contraindications and interactions. Dr Cobus van Niekerk, Past President of AAMSSA (Aesthetic and Anti-aging Medicine Society of South Africa) advises on how to administer IV nutrient therapy responsibly and safely. While intravenous nutrient therapy is by no means a new anti-ageing treatment, its popularity shows no signs of abating. Quite the opposite actually: over the years, IV drips has become a firm favourite amongst a variety of health conscious individuals – such as those who are looking to treat anything from certain cancers, ischaemic heart disease and high cholesterol – to boosting their energy levels or improving their appearance. In a nutshell, IV therapy offers a range of treatment solutions in the health, aesthetics and anti-ageing market. The question is though: do they work?

IV Therapy – Worth the hype? Or is it all in ‘vein?’ The fact is, those who are undergoing IV therapy – or considering getting such a treatment, should not be discouraged to do so as there is scientific literature to support these treatments. That said however, it’s imperative that IV treatments are done in a responsible way by well-trained practitioners.

Risky Business It is worrying that people trust non-medically trained IV Bars (business entities), where the patient chooses the latest trend on a menu, with no doctor supervision, no examination and no preliminary blood tests to asses a patient’s general health before undergoing a treatment like this. This is despite the procedure carrying several contraindications, interactions and consequences. In fact, there have been at least two cases of documented deaths related to IV treatments in South Africa. It is therefore so important to do your own research, research the doctor or clinic where you will receive the treatment, and use this article for things to watch out for before embarking on this journey.

Ethically and Safely Every IV should be done ethically correct, by a medical doctor trained in IV therapies with a full history, examination (including observations) and documentation of any allergies. The doctor should sign off special investigations (pretesting), and informed consent needs be obtained from patients. Moreover, any complications, side effects and contra-indications should be discussed and considered with patients. A follow up must then be scheduled.

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On the day of the IV treament, all patients are required to have their observations checked, urine

test performed, and patients asked to document their last meals. In addition, all IV treatment patients must be monitored at all times for symptoms like dizziness, nausea, confusion, cramps, pain at the drips site, sweating etc. If there is no doctor on site to deal with emergencies, don’t have the treatment done. In fact, not only should / doctor be present, but / resuscitation trolley should be available in the treatment room. Medical practitioners and nurses must ideally have a Basic Life Support Certification, with at least one practitioner being Advanced Life support Certified. Notably, certain treatments should be administered over at least three hours, as doing it faster may cause severe side-effects, and even lead to the death.

The Potential use of IV therapies includes, but is not limited, to: Malabsorption syndromes, Chemotherapy/cancer therapies, Chronic fatigue syndrome, Detoxification, Gastric bypas patients, Peri-operatively, Macular degeneration, Chelation therapies, Anti-ageing PMS relief, or Hair treatments

IV Nutrients consists of: Vitamins, Anti-oxidants, Minerals, Anti-microbials, Membrane stabilisers, Chelating agents, Trace minerals, Phosphatidylcholine or Specialised Treatments, as recommended by a doctor. The most common vitamins include vitamin A, BComplex, folic acid, vitamin C and vitamin E. Antioxidants for IV use include alph/ lipoic acid, glutathione, superoxide dismutae etc. When it comes to IV chelating agents, these should only be used by trained doctors with experience.

Trending Treatments: Be Informed The most popular treatments listed below only scratches the surface with regards to IV nutrient therapies, and it’s purely listed here so that patients nd potential patients may be informed about what they may receive in their treatment. The B-Complex Vitamins • In combination it helps to provide optimal health. • Are important in glucose metabolism and stabilization of brain chemistry • Relieves leg cramps, is important for thyroid function, treating insomnia and improves irritability • Vitamin B supplementation should be used in patients with hormone replacement therapy and contraceptives as it may deplete Vitamin B Vitamin C • Vitamin C is an anti-oxidant and benefits the immune system (increases white blood cells and interferon) • It decreases the rate of certain cancers, improves gum disease • It reduces bruising, helps regenerate vitamin E, glutathione and uric acid, and is involved in serotonin production (treatment of depression and anxiety)

• Vitamin C increases HDL (good cholesterol), lowers triglycerides and prevents free radical damage of LDL (bad cholesterol) • Vitamin C prevents the incidence of lung disease, increases fertility, lowers the incidence of cataracts and aids in wound healing • The above is the reason that ‘high dose vitamin C’ is such a buzz-word in integrative and functional medicine Glutathione • Please note that glutathione, though improving complexion, may lead to other complications like a higher incidence of skin c/ancer – and is not in itself promoted as a skin lightening treatment • It does, however, have an important role in immune metabolism and transport of amino acids across cell membranes, improves macrophage function and is important in red blood cell integrity • It is also a powerful intracellular antioxidant and is useful in neurological diseases, radiation exposure, overdoses, brain injuries, arsenic poisoning, parkinson’s disease, chronic kidney failure and emotional disorders Meyer’s Cocktail • Developed by Dr John Myers, MD, this cocktail has been used by thousands of physicians • Slow IV push made up of vitamin B-complex, B5, B6, B12, vitamin C, magnesium and calcium (contraindicated in patients on digoxin) • This is an all-round good IV drip • Increased energy levels an adrenal gland support. • Stress reliever (magnesium, B-vitamins & vitamin C) • Low magnesium may cause dysrhythmias, palpitations, tremors, asthma, hypertension, IBS or psychological symptoms of anxiety and insomnia.

Contra-indications to IV Therapy. Absolute:Dialysis Relative: Chronic renal failure, Congestive heart failure, Allergies / sensitivities to ingredients, G6PD deficiency – Absolute contra-indication for vitamin C deficiency, Poorly controlled hypertension, Seizure disorders (epilepsy), Cardiac arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythms), Nephrolithiasis (kidney stones) Incompatibilities: Folate + other vitamins, minerals may cause precipitation, Alpha lipoic and phosphatidylcholine should be given alone Do not push thiamine rapidly as it may cause an aphylaxis, EDTA should only be given with Ca and Mg, (No other minerals), Vitamin C and B12 may cause oxalate kidney stones. Fat soluble vitamins and nutrients should be given through central IV lines or PIC lines only. Glutathione may cause allergic reactions and should be started at half doses. New IV bags by Baxter are free of xeno-estrogens

Take Home Message Please be cognisant that IV treatments are not as clear-cut and simple as some IV Bars and other professionals may make it out to be. Be careful of who you trust and do your research on the treatments, as well as the treating medical physician who will be administering your IV. It is, after all, your body, and someone with enough knowledge may just be empowered enough to make the right decision for themselves at the right time…


innovation

IV Nutrient Therapy – Drip with Caution The AAMSSA Report: By Rochelle Friedman

Hooking up to an intravenous nutrient drip for various health and wellness treatments has become a huge trending procedure in the anti-ageing industry. Yet is must be noted that while there is scientific literature to support the benefits of these treatments, it does come with its own set of risks, contraindications and interactions. Dr Cobus van Niekerk, Past President of AAMSSA (Aesthetic and Anti-aging Medicine Society of South Africa) advises on how to administer IV nutrient therapy responsibly and safely. While intravenous nutrient therapy is by no means a new anti-ageing treatment, its popularity shows no signs of abating. Quite the opposite actually: over the years, IV drips has become a firm favourite amongst a variety of health conscious individuals – such as those who are looking to treat anything from certain cancers, ischaemic heart disease and high cholesterol – to boosting their energy levels or improving their appearance. In a nutshell, IV therapy offers a range of treatment solutions in the health, aesthetics and anti-ageing market. The question is though: do they work?

IV Therapy – Worth the hype? Or is it all in ‘vein?’ The fact is, those who are undergoing IV therapy – or considering getting such a treatment, should not be discouraged to do so as there is scientific literature to support these treatments. That said however, it’s imperative that IV treatments are done in a responsible way by well-trained practitioners.

Risky Business It is worrying that people trust non-medically trained IV Bars (business entities), where the patient chooses the latest trend on a menu, with no doctor supervision, no examination and no preliminary blood tests to asses a patient’s general health before undergoing a treatment like this. This is despite the procedure carrying several contraindications, interactions and consequences. In fact, there have been at least two cases of documented deaths related to IV treatments in South Africa. It is therefore so important to do your own research, research the doctor or clinic where you will receive the treatment, and use this article for things to watch out for before embarking on this journey.

Ethically and Safely Every IV should be done ethically correct, by a medical doctor trained in IV therapies with a full history, examination (including observations) and documentation of any allergies. The doctor should sign off special investigations (pretesting), and informed consent needs be obtained from patients. Moreover, any complications, side effects and contra-indications should be discussed and considered with patients. A follow up must then be scheduled.

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On the day of the IV treament, all patients are required to have their observations checked, urine

test performed, and patients asked to document their last meals. In addition, all IV treatment patients must be monitored at all times for symptoms like dizziness, nausea, confusion, cramps, pain at the drips site, sweating etc. If there is no doctor on site to deal with emergencies, don’t have the treatment done. In fact, not only should / doctor be present, but / resuscitation trolley should be available in the treatment room. Medical practitioners and nurses must ideally have a Basic Life Support Certification, with at least one practitioner being Advanced Life support Certified. Notably, certain treatments should be administered over at least three hours, as doing it faster may cause severe side-effects, and even lead to the death.

The Potential use of IV therapies includes, but is not limited, to: Malabsorption syndromes, Chemotherapy/cancer therapies, Chronic fatigue syndrome, Detoxification, Gastric bypas patients, Peri-operatively, Macular degeneration, Chelation therapies, Anti-ageing PMS relief, or Hair treatments

IV Nutrients consists of: Vitamins, Anti-oxidants, Minerals, Anti-microbials, Membrane stabilisers, Chelating agents, Trace minerals, Phosphatidylcholine or Specialised Treatments, as recommended by a doctor. The most common vitamins include vitamin A, BComplex, folic acid, vitamin C and vitamin E. Antioxidants for IV use include alph/ lipoic acid, glutathione, superoxide dismutae etc. When it comes to IV chelating agents, these should only be used by trained doctors with experience.

Trending Treatments: Be Informed The most popular treatments listed below only scratches the surface with regards to IV nutrient therapies, and it’s purely listed here so that patients nd potential patients may be informed about what they may receive in their treatment. The B-Complex Vitamins • In combination it helps to provide optimal health. • Are important in glucose metabolism and stabilization of brain chemistry • Relieves leg cramps, is important for thyroid function, treating insomnia and improves irritability • Vitamin B supplementation should be used in patients with hormone replacement therapy and contraceptives as it may deplete Vitamin B Vitamin C • Vitamin C is an anti-oxidant and benefits the immune system (increases white blood cells and interferon) • It decreases the rate of certain cancers, improves gum disease • It reduces bruising, helps regenerate vitamin E, glutathione and uric acid, and is involved in serotonin production (treatment of depression and anxiety)

• Vitamin C increases HDL (good cholesterol), lowers triglycerides and prevents free radical damage of LDL (bad cholesterol) • Vitamin C prevents the incidence of lung disease, increases fertility, lowers the incidence of cataracts and aids in wound healing • The above is the reason that ‘high dose vitamin C’ is such a buzz-word in integrative and functional medicine Glutathione • Please note that glutathione, though improving complexion, may lead to other complications like a higher incidence of skin c/ancer – and is not in itself promoted as a skin lightening treatment • It does, however, have an important role in immune metabolism and transport of amino acids across cell membranes, improves macrophage function and is important in red blood cell integrity • It is also a powerful intracellular antioxidant and is useful in neurological diseases, radiation exposure, overdoses, brain injuries, arsenic poisoning, parkinson’s disease, chronic kidney failure and emotional disorders Meyer’s Cocktail • Developed by Dr John Myers, MD, this cocktail has been used by thousands of physicians • Slow IV push made up of vitamin B-complex, B5, B6, B12, vitamin C, magnesium and calcium (contraindicated in patients on digoxin) • This is an all-round good IV drip • Increased energy levels an adrenal gland support. • Stress reliever (magnesium, B-vitamins & vitamin C) • Low magnesium may cause dysrhythmias, palpitations, tremors, asthma, hypertension, IBS or psychological symptoms of anxiety and insomnia.

Contra-indications to IV Therapy. Absolute:Dialysis Relative: Chronic renal failure, Congestive heart failure, Allergies / sensitivities to ingredients, G6PD deficiency – Absolute contra-indication for vitamin C deficiency, Poorly controlled hypertension, Seizure disorders (epilepsy), Cardiac arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythms), Nephrolithiasis (kidney stones) Incompatibilities: Folate + other vitamins, minerals may cause precipitation, Alpha lipoic and phosphatidylcholine should be given alone Do not push thiamine rapidly as it may cause an aphylaxis, EDTA should only be given with Ca and Mg, (No other minerals), Vitamin C and B12 may cause oxalate kidney stones. Fat soluble vitamins and nutrients should be given through central IV lines or PIC lines only. Glutathione may cause allergic reactions and should be started at half doses. New IV bags by Baxter are free of xeno-estrogens

Take Home Message Please be cognisant that IV treatments are not as clear-cut and simple as some IV Bars and other professionals may make it out to be. Be careful of who you trust and do your research on the treatments, as well as the treating medical physician who will be administering your IV. It is, after all, your body, and someone with enough knowledge may just be empowered enough to make the right decision for themselves at the right time…


innovation Coaches trained in the art and science of motivating healthy changes have been the missing link in both healthcare and wellness. The future? They’ll work with more doctors, insurers, employers, physical therapists, fitness trainers, wellness resorts and people independently The world spends $8.3 trillion a year on healthcare, and $4.4 trillion on wellness, and we still can’t stem the tide of chronic diseases. Behavior change is the toughest. That’s why the most puzzling thing in both healthcare and wellness is that coaches trained specifically in helping people make healthy behavior changes haven’t been at the center of everything. They’re a no-brainer, they’ve been absent, but the certified health and wellness coach (HWC) is finally here. And their rise is a key trend in our The Future of Wellness 2022 report. It's a Wild West of wellness coaching: fitness, lifestyle and career coaches are long-established—and now there are even spiritual and “burnout” coaches. “Wellness coach” may be the most over-used noun on earth, especially now that any TikTok influencer can boldly hang up a digital shingle without any credentials. This trend predicts that the future will offer new coaching distinctions, because what a certified health and wellness coach does is something utterly unique; nobody has their skillset. What do they do? This coach is a healthcare professional trained in evidence-based communication techniques such as motivational interviewing. The coaching experience is a nuanced conversational process that gets people developing the intrinsic motivation and confidence to hit realistic weekly wellbeing goals. And unlike the 15 minutes a doctor gives you, they spend real time with you: around 50 minutes a week for at least 3 months. The science shows that’s when new habits start to stick. This coaching approach is radically different from the “prescriptive” model that rules both medicine and wellness. Doctors say exercise; wellness gurus say follow me on this exact path to weight loss or enlightenment. These coaches check all advice-dispensing and the guru mentality at the door because the evidence is overwhelming that prescriptive models have failed spectacularly. And the wellness world does need to interrogate its impact on long-term behavior change: Why are wellness devotees always chasing the next diet or influencer? Health and wellness coaching is grounded in this evidencebased principle: Behavior change gets switched on–and stays on–when it’s motivated from within. And the evidence for this coaching’s impact is growing: one metareview found that it reduces risk factors for heart disease and diabetes and boosts exercise and healthy eating–and that the body of evidence “provides substantial evidence for a coaching clinical intervention.”

The Certified Health & Wellness Coach Is Rising…FINALLY 60



spa business On a recent podcast, one of our listeners contacted us with a Business Pickle with which he wanted our help. Peter Harvey is in a Business-to-Business (B2B) organization. Their offering does not have the lowest price, and they have no plans to lower it. However, their customers keep complaining. Peter wanted to know what we thought he should do. Since price is something that can seldom be low enough, I figured some of you face the same issues, and I would share our advice here with you. Too many organizations don't have a pricing strategy. However, having one is essential for your experience. There is an intersection between psychology and pricing, and there are a couple of different approaches you can take in this area. In another podcast, we discussed Fernando's problem regarding distinguishing a commodity from the others in the field. The main point of that podcast was that a critical part of customer strategy and competitive differentiation is to determine how you are different from the pack and communicate that to your customers. These same principles often apply to pricing strategy. There is a difference between creating value and communicating value. So, my first advice to Peter is to ensure that the organization provides enough value to its customers to justify the higher price. Also, customers should recognize that value. Nothing is valuable until somebody is willing to pay for it. From a marketing standpoint, perceived value is the only value that matters ever. Therefore, Peter's company should then communicate those value points so that customers understand what their pricing gets them beyond whatever offer they compare. In other words, if you are pricing your product as a superior product, it ought to be superior in quality, customer service, or performance. The question then becomes, how much should they pay for that superior performance? For example, Apple has a higher-priced product than its competitors in the phone space. It is a great product that does many things very well, and it has a perceived value tied up in its brand. However, the iPhone hasn't always beat the competition in every category. For example, over the years, Samsung's comparable model has been objectively better in some categories, like memory availability or camera clarity, etc. So in a side-by-side comparison, Apple does not come out on top.

Our Customers Are Always Complaining About Our Prices. What Do We Do? By Colin Shaw - Why Customers Buy 62

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

in Peter's position since he is in the B2B space. However, the negotiation metaphor works for a retail situation; the "offer" is the retail price, and the negotiation is whether the customer takes one off the shelf at that price and buys it.

In Peter's case, his company could communicate the benefits of the attribute you are superior on over the competition so that customers perceive the value of your product as well as you do. Then, they might be willing to pay more.

A strategy you could take with this pricing negotiation is an Economic Value Analysis. This term refers to translating all of your benefits into dollars and cents. So, if that is the way a customer is deciding, then ensure that they know what all your offer is worth.

Consider this Volvo ad about precision steering: Besides being fantastic fun to watch, these ads show vital attributes of the trucks that their customers should understand: precision, quality, and toughness. They might not be the cheapest, but they have these attributes for which their customers pay a premium. If these attributes are not worth it, then shop for another truck.

Another option is to communicate how you don't nickel and dime customers. Instead, you talk about all the services and other perks of your offer. The goal here is to change the conversation away from price and toward the total cost of ownership. It is essential to communicate what a customer should compare to competitive offers. Often, organizations don't realize how much customers don't know about their product category, which can lead to some interesting deciding factors. For example, I bought an uninterruptible power supply a few months ago. As I was comparing the different versions, I had a list of all the things it would do. The only thing I understood on the list was the amount of time it would give me uninterrupted. So, that's how I made the decision. This idea is related to pricing in that I went into the decision process with a vague sense of priorities about what I wanted. I could have just chosen the cheapest one, which would have indicated I was focused on price. However, I didn't buy the cheapest one (though I am not unfocused on price, either). Instead, I wanted one that would help me the longest in times of emergency. As an inexperienced buyer of uninterruptible power supply products, I chose this one because it was the most straightforward to evaluate. For the uninterruptible power supply manufacturer with the best of everything in that long list that I didn't understand but has a higher price and a lower run time than the one I chose, that stinks. But, again, it all comes back to perceived value. The other product was better for me and provided the most value for the price, but I didn't understand that. It could be the same for Peter's customers. That's why communication about what attributes should be part of the decision process might be an essential step for companies in Peter's predicament.

However, what Samsung doesn't have is the picture of an apple on the back. Instead, people see the brand's value from design, shared community, or another less quantifiable attribute. Sometimes, superior performance is not a necessity for a premium, or at least it isn't in every product category—but only if you have a brand like Apple. Many customers, not all, mind you, perceive the iPhone as a better phone no matter what the facts tell them, and they are willing to pay for it.

So, are you communicating what matters to customers? If not, you should first determine what customers use to decide what to buy and then ensure you are the best on those things. For example, the amount of time an uninterruptible power supply allows one to be uninterrupted seems like an excellent place to start. So, if that's what people use, ensuring yours lasts longer than the others to justify your premium price is a good pricing strategy.

Getting back to Peter's Business Pickle, it could be that your customers don't realize all the value you offer them. Perceptions are inspired by communication. Also, prices could be considered, at least in some sense, a negotiation between the buyer and seller. It might be an actual negotiation

Another strategy could be educating customers on what should matter to them. So, if the amperage rating is more important in an emergency because it runs more devices, then tell customers that. Give them an understanding of the long list of features they are ignoring.

The Curse of Knowledge and What to Do About It It's a little bit funny how often firms forget to take the perspective of their customers. It's a psychological bias called the curse of knowledge. The idea is that once you know something, it's hard to remember what it was like not to know it. So, the uninterruptible power supply engineers designed the product well and are proud of the extra amps they squeezed out of the mechanism. However, the company forgot that most people don't remember why amps are essential and, perhaps most importantly, don't care about them. So, to summarize, Peter should communicate value or figure out what attributes are essential to customers and maximize those. Alternatively, suppose Peter is superior in other characteristics. Then, they should ensure they can communicate that, so people understand what it means and why it matters to compare appropriately. Finally, Peter should ensure that he knows his customers. We did a podcast a few weeks ago about firing your customers. I'm not suggesting that Peter needs to fire his customers, nor was the point of the podcast that you should fire customers at the first complaint they throw your way. However, it could be that the customers that are complaining about Peter's company's high price are not the correct type of customers for their offer. If price is their primary driver of decisions and Peter's product or service isn't the cheapest, and there are no plans to change that, these customers are not a good match in the first place. These price-conscious consumers are not the target of the firm's customer strategy. If Peter spends too much time trying to convince them to stay, his team could be missing out on the potential customers that are a good fit for the offer. Many B2B companies are focused on price, and some of them even hire pricing consultants to do the negotiations for them. It can be cutthroat, too. However, not every B2B transaction is like that. It is best to communicate about the price if that's the language of that customer's decision. However, not every transaction is about price. Finding those customers and communicating your value proposition to them can be a winning pricing and customer strategy if you aren't the cheapest.


spa business On a recent podcast, one of our listeners contacted us with a Business Pickle with which he wanted our help. Peter Harvey is in a Business-to-Business (B2B) organization. Their offering does not have the lowest price, and they have no plans to lower it. However, their customers keep complaining. Peter wanted to know what we thought he should do. Since price is something that can seldom be low enough, I figured some of you face the same issues, and I would share our advice here with you. Too many organizations don't have a pricing strategy. However, having one is essential for your experience. There is an intersection between psychology and pricing, and there are a couple of different approaches you can take in this area. In another podcast, we discussed Fernando's problem regarding distinguishing a commodity from the others in the field. The main point of that podcast was that a critical part of customer strategy and competitive differentiation is to determine how you are different from the pack and communicate that to your customers. These same principles often apply to pricing strategy. There is a difference between creating value and communicating value. So, my first advice to Peter is to ensure that the organization provides enough value to its customers to justify the higher price. Also, customers should recognize that value. Nothing is valuable until somebody is willing to pay for it. From a marketing standpoint, perceived value is the only value that matters ever. Therefore, Peter's company should then communicate those value points so that customers understand what their pricing gets them beyond whatever offer they compare. In other words, if you are pricing your product as a superior product, it ought to be superior in quality, customer service, or performance. The question then becomes, how much should they pay for that superior performance? For example, Apple has a higher-priced product than its competitors in the phone space. It is a great product that does many things very well, and it has a perceived value tied up in its brand. However, the iPhone hasn't always beat the competition in every category. For example, over the years, Samsung's comparable model has been objectively better in some categories, like memory availability or camera clarity, etc. So in a side-by-side comparison, Apple does not come out on top.

Our Customers Are Always Complaining About Our Prices. What Do We Do? By Colin Shaw - Why Customers Buy 62

Les Nouvelles Esthetiques no’88

in Peter's position since he is in the B2B space. However, the negotiation metaphor works for a retail situation; the "offer" is the retail price, and the negotiation is whether the customer takes one off the shelf at that price and buys it.

In Peter's case, his company could communicate the benefits of the attribute you are superior on over the competition so that customers perceive the value of your product as well as you do. Then, they might be willing to pay more.

A strategy you could take with this pricing negotiation is an Economic Value Analysis. This term refers to translating all of your benefits into dollars and cents. So, if that is the way a customer is deciding, then ensure that they know what all your offer is worth.

Consider this Volvo ad about precision steering: Besides being fantastic fun to watch, these ads show vital attributes of the trucks that their customers should understand: precision, quality, and toughness. They might not be the cheapest, but they have these attributes for which their customers pay a premium. If these attributes are not worth it, then shop for another truck.

Another option is to communicate how you don't nickel and dime customers. Instead, you talk about all the services and other perks of your offer. The goal here is to change the conversation away from price and toward the total cost of ownership. It is essential to communicate what a customer should compare to competitive offers. Often, organizations don't realize how much customers don't know about their product category, which can lead to some interesting deciding factors. For example, I bought an uninterruptible power supply a few months ago. As I was comparing the different versions, I had a list of all the things it would do. The only thing I understood on the list was the amount of time it would give me uninterrupted. So, that's how I made the decision. This idea is related to pricing in that I went into the decision process with a vague sense of priorities about what I wanted. I could have just chosen the cheapest one, which would have indicated I was focused on price. However, I didn't buy the cheapest one (though I am not unfocused on price, either). Instead, I wanted one that would help me the longest in times of emergency. As an inexperienced buyer of uninterruptible power supply products, I chose this one because it was the most straightforward to evaluate. For the uninterruptible power supply manufacturer with the best of everything in that long list that I didn't understand but has a higher price and a lower run time than the one I chose, that stinks. But, again, it all comes back to perceived value. The other product was better for me and provided the most value for the price, but I didn't understand that. It could be the same for Peter's customers. That's why communication about what attributes should be part of the decision process might be an essential step for companies in Peter's predicament.

However, what Samsung doesn't have is the picture of an apple on the back. Instead, people see the brand's value from design, shared community, or another less quantifiable attribute. Sometimes, superior performance is not a necessity for a premium, or at least it isn't in every product category—but only if you have a brand like Apple. Many customers, not all, mind you, perceive the iPhone as a better phone no matter what the facts tell them, and they are willing to pay for it.

So, are you communicating what matters to customers? If not, you should first determine what customers use to decide what to buy and then ensure you are the best on those things. For example, the amount of time an uninterruptible power supply allows one to be uninterrupted seems like an excellent place to start. So, if that's what people use, ensuring yours lasts longer than the others to justify your premium price is a good pricing strategy.

Getting back to Peter's Business Pickle, it could be that your customers don't realize all the value you offer them. Perceptions are inspired by communication. Also, prices could be considered, at least in some sense, a negotiation between the buyer and seller. It might be an actual negotiation

Another strategy could be educating customers on what should matter to them. So, if the amperage rating is more important in an emergency because it runs more devices, then tell customers that. Give them an understanding of the long list of features they are ignoring.

The Curse of Knowledge and What to Do About It It's a little bit funny how often firms forget to take the perspective of their customers. It's a psychological bias called the curse of knowledge. The idea is that once you know something, it's hard to remember what it was like not to know it. So, the uninterruptible power supply engineers designed the product well and are proud of the extra amps they squeezed out of the mechanism. However, the company forgot that most people don't remember why amps are essential and, perhaps most importantly, don't care about them. So, to summarize, Peter should communicate value or figure out what attributes are essential to customers and maximize those. Alternatively, suppose Peter is superior in other characteristics. Then, they should ensure they can communicate that, so people understand what it means and why it matters to compare appropriately. Finally, Peter should ensure that he knows his customers. We did a podcast a few weeks ago about firing your customers. I'm not suggesting that Peter needs to fire his customers, nor was the point of the podcast that you should fire customers at the first complaint they throw your way. However, it could be that the customers that are complaining about Peter's company's high price are not the correct type of customers for their offer. If price is their primary driver of decisions and Peter's product or service isn't the cheapest, and there are no plans to change that, these customers are not a good match in the first place. These price-conscious consumers are not the target of the firm's customer strategy. If Peter spends too much time trying to convince them to stay, his team could be missing out on the potential customers that are a good fit for the offer. Many B2B companies are focused on price, and some of them even hire pricing consultants to do the negotiations for them. It can be cutthroat, too. However, not every B2B transaction is like that. It is best to communicate about the price if that's the language of that customer's decision. However, not every transaction is about price. Finding those customers and communicating your value proposition to them can be a winning pricing and customer strategy if you aren't the cheapest.


spa business

Why Potential is more Important By Gemma Leigh Roberts - Mindset Matters than Talent According to Jeff Bezos, we shouldn't fall into the trap of taking pride in our natural talents. In an interview discussing his management style and philosophy, the Amazon founder explained that although he believes we should celebrate natural talents, we can't be proud of them because they were given to us; we were born with them. We can and should be proud of our choices, such as studying hard, practicing repeatedly, and working to hone our skills and use them well. Relying on talent to reach our goals is a trap that is easy to fall into, especially if we're naturally good at certain activities. We've all likely come across highly talented people - whether that be athletically, academically, musically, or artistically - but haven't achieved their potential. On the flip side, some people have moderate amounts of talent yet work relentlessly to turn that into achievement. However, as I delve into in my new book, Mindset Matters, those who excel combine talent with hard work and focus. Practice is often a higher predictor of outcome than talent alone - and this is where our potential lies - where we learn what works and what doesn't, figure out how to adjust our approach based on mistakes, and gain knowledge that we need to perform in the long run.

Using a Growth Mindset to Flourish So how do we make sure we don't fall into this trap? I believe the answer lies in nurturing a growth mindset, which is all about believing that you can develop skills and abilities over time - if you're committed to making this happen. This is the opposite of a fixed mindset, where you believe abilities and skills are either present (you have them) or not present (you don't have them), and are shaped entirely by the level of talent you were born with. If you have a fixed mindset, you believe your skills and abilities are unlikely to change significantly, even if you try to make this happen. Nurturing a growth mindset doesn't eliminate the talent factor - there's no doubt that talent is a brilliant launchpad for achievement. If we're lucky enough to have a talent that's also a passion, developing skills associated with that talent is usually easier and can

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foster a great sense of fulfilment. However, a growth mindset does help us understand that no matter what challenges, changes or complexity is thrown our way, we can move forward by focusing on learning and testing new ways of doing things - an approach that will help us thrive in an increasingly complicated and uncertain working world. You can use many strategies to help you nurture a growth mindset. I've chosen three simple coaching exercises from my new book Mindset Matters, which can help you shift how you think about your talents and abilities. Strategy #1: Embrace Continual and Incremental Improvement If we want to succeed in today's workplace, we have no choice but to embrace learning. The world is changing so quickly that we must adapt as we go. Leaders and professionals across all fields can no longer rely on experience alone to forge new paths forward - the skills they've honed may become ineffective or obsolete as the world of work evolves. Those who are performing well and have a fixed mindset can become complacent, assuming their talent will keep them at the top of their game, which is risky. According to Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, a learn-it-all is a more successful and valuable employee than a know-it-all. He encourages Microsoft employees to think of themselves as students rather than experts. To focus on small ways to keep moving forward in your career, you can apply principles based on the 'kaizen' methodology - a Japanese process that refers to continuous improvement across all business functions in the workplace. As I shared in a coaching video on Instagram earlier today, a simple technique you can use to develop a growth mindset and boost your performance is the 'review, refine, repeat' exercise, which I often share with coaching clients. The idea is you review your week -consider what has gone well, and not so well, then refine your approach by making small tweaks to how you do things the following week. Finally, you repeat this process weekly. Strategy #2: Add 'Yet' to your Story This is an incredibly simple technique and is about

understanding that you're on a learning journey, and just because you haven't achieved what you set out to, it doesn't mean you never will. This exercise involves adding the word 'yet' to the end of a sentence when thinking or talking about progress towards your goals. For example, if you think 'I didn't get funding for my project', change it to 'I haven't managed to secure funding yet.' You can do this with any situation that may feel disappointing - I haven't found a solution yet; I haven't secured that promotion yet. When you begin to frame events as works in progress, you can start to view your current situation as the middle of your story - you haven't reached the finale yet, but you're on the journey. Strategy #3: Appreciate all the Failures Growth always entails entry into uncharted territory. As you take on novel challenges, attempt to find new solutions, or focus on broadening your understanding, you won't always be successful in achieving what you set out to do right away. In fact, you may feel like you've failed, which can be uncomfortable. However, learning to fail is critical in today's workplace and the workplace of the future - it's often the big pushes into the unknown that can create tremendous results. If you can shift your perspective to view adverse events as part of the process of reaching an effective and positive solution, mistakes and challenges can be used to your advantage. One way to turn failures into learning experiences is to create a failure wall. Document all your efforts that haven't been fruitful or produced the results you wanted, and display them somewhere. Maybe your interview didn't go as planned, you didn't get that promotion, or you didn't achieve the reaction you wanted after delivering a presentation. These are potentially painful experiences, but looking at the work you've put in will help you appreciate the effort you've made so far and see that many failures pave the road to successful outcomes.

Your Mindset... What are your tips for developing a growth mindset? Are there any exercises or strategies you use to nurture a growth mindset?



spa business

5 Unconventional Ways To Show Gratitude To Employees By Jacob Morgan - The Future of Work Everyone wants to be appreciated, especially employees who put in their best effort every day. But instead of sending the typical thank you email, try taking an unconventional approach. Showing gratitude in unique ways builds connection and shows sincerity in your efforts. Here are five unique ways to show gratitude and appreciation for your employees, no matter the occasion. Thank Their Families For every employee, there’s a family who raised them and supported them. Show appreciation for your staff by thanking their families. Former PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi championed this approach after reflecting on how her success was a result of how her parents raised and supported her. Indra wrote a letter to the parents of each member of her executive team—more than 400 people—thanking them for the gift of their child to the company. The messages were very well received, with some employees saying it was the best thing that ever happened to their parents. Establish Open Lines Of Communication When you appreciate people, you want to talk to them. One way to show gratitude is to make yourself available to employees with open lines of communication.

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Bain employees can reach out to leaders for guidance, advice, and coaching through the “hotline response team.” WD-40 Company CEO Garry Ridge sends regular emails to the entire company to share updates or advice and leave the conversation open for responses. When employees feel they can come to their leaders about anything, from personal questions to career advice or suggestions for the business, they feel valued and seen. Give Unique Awards Most companies give out an employee recognition award, but the typical certificate and handshake can become mundane. A unique prize shows employees you appreciate their efforts, boosts morale, and becomes an engaging part of the corporate culture. Quirky gifts are memorable for employees and show heartfelt gratitude with their creativity and effort. When David Novak was president of KFC, he awarded employees with rubber chickens. When he was president of Pizza Hut, it was giant cheese heads. Along with the fun token, employees got cash and specific feedback about what they did to earn the award. The practice spread throughout the company, with the president of Taco Bell soon handing out hot sauce packets and other leaders handing out boxing gloves for a “knockout performance.”

Become A Mentor One of the most meaningful ways to show gratitude for your employees is to show you care about their futures. When you coach and mentor an employee, you show appreciation for the long term and that you believe in them. Create a mentoring program that connects younger employees with more senior leaders to guide them and act as a sounding board. You can also take employees under your wing to mentor their careers, help guide their decisions, and put them on a path to reach their career goals. Offer Strong Benefits Genuine gratitude for your employees isn’t a onetime thing or an annual event—it’s part of the company’s culture. It might not be flashy, but one of the most effective ways to show gratitude is to give them what they need with quality benefits. Are you meeting employees’ needs and caring for them? Make it a habit to regularly review your benefits package. Providing strong benefits shows appreciation and gratitude year-round. Showing gratitude builds relationships, encourages employees to do their best, and creates a collaborative and supportive culture. Think outside the box to recognize your employees in unique ways.


Award Winning

Innovative Tightening Treatment

The Juliette Armand SKINBOOSTER products mainly focus on a botox-like effect and are definitely a worthy alternative to botox injections. It is a time to hear about the latest MIRACLE of Cosmetology, which “erases” wrinkles of expression without the use of a lancet or a surgical intervention and manages to restore skin firmness with proven effectiveness. With the power of your own cell! Thavma Therapy is based on the EFFECTOX technology that inhibits the mechanism that is responsible for the creation of expression lines and wrinkles. But there’s more: it also offers protection from the main types of ageing (biological ageing & photo-ageing). TM

Beauty Worx Tracey : 083 460 1217 • tracey@beautyworx.co.za

Dandelion Hannah : 061 639 9297 • hannah@dandelion-sa.co.za


spa business

Leaders are Made - BRAND By Brendan P. Keegan - Fearless Leadership Take a moment and think of 5 brands.... What did you think of? First to mind for me are Apple, Nike, Google, TB12, and Amazon. These are brands that either play a key role in my day-to-day life or have a story that is relevant to me. I connect with them personally and I know their reputations, therefore, I am more likely to use their products or recommend them to others. Individual brands are the same, if people connect with you and value you, they will lean into what you have to offer. Now, take another moment and think of 5 people and their brands.....who did you think of? Your BRAND will attract or repel fear. Your brand is who you are. As you go through your life’s journey, there is only one thing you will leave this world with and that is your reputation. Your reputation is your brand. Ever listen to a eulogy closely? You will hear about someone’s life, their accomplishments and if you listen closely, you will hear of their brand or their reputation. Fearless Leaders build a brand that is solid as a rock – because that is the foundation others come to

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depend on. Whatever your brand is today, you can improve it, enhance it and have it become known for being a calming influence amongst a storm. In fact, a truly Fearless Leader makes everyone in the room feel a tad more comfortable simply because they are sitting in the room. As you continue to build your brand, consider the following three ways to make it the best possible: Be Authentic – Make sure your brand represents who you are and who you are striving to be. Embrace your personality, your attributes, your strengths, and channel your energy into developing that brand. Your first step in doing this is increasing your selfawareness of what that authentic brand is. More to come on that in a future newsletter about emotional intelligence. Be Passionate – Build your brand around what you are passionate about. If you love animals, that should be part of your brand; if you are creative and artistic, that should be included; if you love sports and athletics, incorporate aspects of those activities. If your brand includes your passions, you will absolutely

build it faster and with more authenticity. Why? Because it represents who you are and what you like, and as humans we tend to do the things we like to do, and we naturally gravitate toward our passions. Be Tangible – Reputations and brands are built on actions not words. Inevitably, what you do, is who you are. What you don’t do, is who you are not. What you say you are going to do, isn’t good enough. When people think of you, they will think of the tangible things they know about you – you love animals and volunteer at the pet shelter, you are creative and play the piano, you are sporty and coach youth soccer. See the connection between your passion and your tangible action? Bring your authentic self to your passions and use life as one big place to showcase your talent tangibly. Decide to build your brand consciously and start today.